Digital Maine Library – ChiltonLibrary

A few weeks ago, I blogged a bit about Digital Maine Library    here, what we have known for several years as MARVEL!  I think it’s time for another look at this amazing resource.

As previously mentioned, the website seems to be more colorful – each of the databases appear on the homepage, with pictures, and a bit of information about the database.

Scrolling down the homepage I see ChiltonLibrary.  I click on the link – picture and words are each part of the link – and am taken to the ChiltonLibrary web page.

This page gives me several options.  The tabs along the top are Home (it is the shape of a house) ; Select Vehicle ; ASE Test Prep Quizzes ; Help ; Logout and what looks like and Envelope (this is where I can Ask An Expert.  On the left of the page there are several boxes to fill in with information about a vehicle – Vehicle Selector.  More centered on the page I see information about what information I can find – yes, I know, I did use information twice in the same sentence, but it is what it is!

I’m curious about how far back I can go – how old a vehicle this database will be useful for – 1940 seems to be the answer.  My mother had a 1956 Volkswagen Beetle that she absolutely loved – the small rear window was a big deal for her.  I put that information in the boxes and press the select button.

The next page is titled Your Current Vehicle: 1956 Volkswagen Beetle.  Below that there are two bullet points of data that is available for the vehicle – Repair and Bulletins/Recalls.

I click on Repair.  There is quite a list on the next page!  Above the list is Collapse TOC and Search.  No, I’m sorry, I have absolutely NO idea what TOC means, but it does collapse the list to no list, or opens it to the many choices.

I don’t claim to be a car person – yes, I drive a car, and can and do maintain it, but much if not all of this information is waaaaay beyond my knowledge base.  I see how a person who works with and on vehicles might find this very helpful.

Now I’m curious and check the information on a MUCH newer vehicle – a 2016 Volkswagen Beetle.  This time I am given three choices Repair ; Maintenance and Bulletins/Recalls.  As we just learned, the Repair button is not necessarily useful to me, but the Maintenance and Bulletins/Recalls are something I will find useful.

On the Repair page I am given choices – a Vehicle Configuration Filter.  I don’t have a Beetle, so I’ll make it up as I move through the list.  After making my choices, I am shown a list of what should be done at 5000 miles.  There is a Look Ahead button – this takes me to the 15000 mile service, and beyond that.  Looks like a good place for me!

I go back to Bulletins/Recalls.  This page has a fairly long list of issues to be checked.  I did not re-select my vehicle, so perhaps they don’t all pertain to what I chose, but this is another interesting place to poke around when I’m in the search for a “new to me” vehicle.

Back to the homepage I go.

I click on ASE Test Prep Quizzes.  ASE is short for National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence.  So these are a great resource for anyone interested in becoming certified in automotive repair.  Something I will do my best to remember for future use with folks looking for this information.

Help is exactly what it says – an online manual for using the ChiltonLibrary.

From a Library standpoint, this is another amazing database provided by the Maine State Library, and one that will be very helpful to folks looking for how to repair their (insert make, model and year here).

From a consumer standpoint, I think it will be useful when searching for that perfect “new to me” vehicle!

New Items ~ October 2018

FICTION

The boy at the keyhole by Stephen Giles.  A boy is left alone in his family’s English estate with a housekeeper whom he beings to suspect has murdered his mother.

A day like any other by Genie Henderson.  Set during the Great Hamptons Hurricane of 1938, a summer colony and locals are caught in the path of a sudden and devastating hurricane in this prophetic fiction that is a warning of storms to come.

Depth of winter by Craig Johnson.  Sheriff Longmire takes on the head of a drug cartel in a remote area of the northern Mexican desert.

Eagle and Crane by Suzanne Rindell.  Two young daredevil flyers confront ugly truths and family secrets during the U.S. internment of Japanese citizens during WW II.

The fall of Gondolin by J.R.R. Tolkien.  Thousands of years before the events of The Lord Of The Rings, a hero named Tuor visits a secret city.

Flight or fright edited by Stephen King.  An anthology about all the things that can go horribly wrong when you are flying.

In his father’s footsteps by Danielle Steel.  The son of two holocaust survivors struggles to become his own person after his marriage falls apart.

Jane Doe by Victoria Stone.  A double life with a single purpose:  revenge.

The last hours by Minette Walters.  When the Black Death enters England in 1348, no one knows what manner of sickness it is – or how it spreads and kills so quickly.

Lethal white by Robert Galbraith.  Detectives Strike and Ellacott investigate a crime a young man may have witnessed as a child.

Leverage in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas puzzles over a bizarre suicide bombing in a Wall Street office building.

The locksmith’s daughter by Karen Brooks.  An intriguing novel rich in historical detail and drama as it tells the story of Queen Elizabeth’s daring, ruthless spymaster and his female protégée.

The mermaid by Christine Henry.  A beautiful historical fairy tale about a mermaid who leaves the sea to live with her true love on the coast of Maine, only to become the star attraction of history’s greatest showman, P.T. Barnum.

The money shot by Stuart Woods.  Teddy Fay races to stop a scheme of extortion and a hostile takeover.

The other woman by Sandie Jones.  A psychological thriller about a man, his new girlfriend, and the mother who will not let him go.

The other woman by Daniel Silva.  Gabriel Allon, the art restorer and assassin, fights the Russians to decide the fate of postwar global order.

Ohio by Stephen Markley.  This follows 4 former classmates who return to their small town, a region ravaged by the Great Recession, an opioid crisis, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The patchwork bride by Sandra Dallas. This tells 3 different stories with homespun style.  Strong female characters and intriguing storytelling draws the reader into this two-hanky read full of love and loss.

Sign of the cross by Glenn Cooper.  Introducing Harvard professor Cal Donovan in the first of an intriguing new series of religious conspiracy thrillers.

The spaceship next door by Gene Doucette.  When a spaceship lands in Sorrow Falls, a lovable and fearless small-town girl is the planet’s only hope for survival.  It’s a warm-hearted ode to a time and place in a community so small that everybody knows everybody else’s business.

Stars uncharted by S.K. Dunstall.  In this rip-roaring space opera, a ragtag band of explorers are out to make the biggest score in the galaxy.

The summer wives by Beatriz Williams.  A postwar fable of love, class, power, and redemption set among the inhabitants of an island of the New England coast.

Trust me by Hank Ryan.  There are three sides to every story.  Yours. Mine. And the truth.

Where the crawdads sing by Delia Owens.  In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

With you always by Rena Olsen.  This examines how easy it is to fall into the wrong relationship…and how impossible it can be to leave.

DVDs

Hereditary (2018) starring Toni Collette and Gabriel Byrne

This is us: season 2 (2018) starring Mandy Moore

Deadpool 2  (2018) starring Ryan Reynolds and Josh Brolin

Book Club (2018) starring Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen

The way we get by (2009) directed by Aron Gaudet

NONFICTION

The death of truth by Michiko Kakutani.  Notes on falsehood in the age of Trump.

Dopesick by Beth Macy.  The only book so far to fully chart the opioid crisis in America – an unforgettable portrait of the families and first responders on the front lines.

Fashion climbing by Bill Cunningham.  The glamorous world of 20th century fashion comes alive in this memoir both because of his exuberant appreciation for stylish clothes and his sharp assessment of those who wore them.

Fear: Trump in the White House by Bob Woodward.  The inside story of President Trump as only Woodward can tell it.

A hard rain by Frye Gaillard.  America in the 1960s, our decade of hope, possibility, and innocence lost.

Leadership in turbulent times by Doris Kearns Goodwin.  Goodwin offers an illuminating exploration into the early development, growth, and exercise of leadership.

No good alternative by William Vollmann.  An eye-opening look at the consequences of coal mining and natural gas production – the second of a two volume work on the ideologies of energy production and the causes of climate change.

On call in the Arctic by Thomas Sims.  An extraordinary memoir recounting the adventures of a young doctor stationed in the Alaskan bush.

The only girl by Robin Green.  A raucous and vividly dishy memoir by the only woman writer on the masthead of Rolling Stone magazine in the early ‘70s.

The power of yes by Amy Newmark.  101 stories about adventure, change and positive thinking from the publishers of Chicken Soup for the Soul.

Proud by Ibtihaj Muhammad.  She is the first female Muslim American to medal at the Olympic Games and was named one of Time’s 100 most influential people.  This is a moving coming of age story from one of the nation’s most influential athletes and illustrates how she rose above all her obstacles.

30 before 30 by Marina Shifrin.  Subtitled: “How I made a mess of my 20s and you can too”, this is a charming and relatable collection of essays documenting a young woman’s attempt to accomplish 30 life goals before turning 30.

The tragedy of Benedict Arnold by Joyce Malcolm.  This sheds new light on the man as well as on the nuanced and complicated time in which he lived.

21 lessons for the 21st century by Yuval Harari.  How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human?  How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news?  Are nations and religions still relevant?  What should we teach our children?

Unhinged by Omarosa Newman.  The former Assistant to the President and Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison in the Trump White House provides her story of corruption and controversy in the current administration.

A year of reading by Elisabeth Ellington.  A month by month guide to classics and crowd-pleasers for you and your book group.

PICTURE BOOKS

 Dam by David Almond

Fruit bowl by Mark Hoffmann

Good Rosie by Kate DiCamillo

Hello, horse by Vivian French

Imagine by Juan Felipe Herrera

Interrupting chicken and the elephant of surprise by David Ezra Stein

Let the children march by Monica Clark-Robinson

Night job by Karen Hesse

No honking allowed! By Stephanie Calmenson

Peppa Pig and the silly sniffles Based on the TV Series

Square by Mac Barnett

Storm by Sam Usher

CHAPTER BOOKS

Bush rescue by Darrel Odgers

Circus lesson by Sally Rippin

Crazy cousins by Sally Rippin

Farm rescue  by Darrel Odgers

Wheelnuts! Craziest race on Earth! Desert dustup by Knife & Packer

Wheelnuts! Craziest race on earth! Spooky smackdown by Knife & Packer

Who is Sonia Sotomayor? by Megan Stine

Winning goal by Sally Rippin

 NON-FICTION

Acadia by Audra Wallace

Blossom to apple by Sarah Ridley

Carlos Santana: sound of the heart, song of the world by Gary Golio

Counting on Katherine: how Katherine Johnson saved Apollo 13 by Helanine Becker

Mae among the stars by Roda Ahmed

Maine by Robin S. Doak

Memphis, Martin, and the mountaintop: the Sanitation Strike of 1968 by Alice Faye Duncan

Seeds to bread by Sarah Ridley

Sisters & champions: the true story of Venus and Serena Williams by Howard Bryant

Turning pages: my life story by Sonia Sotomayor 

Turtle Island: the story of North America’s first people by Eldon Yellowhorn

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Digital Maine Library ~ formerly known as MARVEL!

By now, it may not be a surprise, as the announcement has been made – MARVEL! has changed.  It is now known as Digital Maine Library.  It is still an AMAZING database available to all Maine library card holders.  This database is provided by the Maine State Library.

When I go to the new site, there are several differences.  There is no general search bar visibly available to search the entire site, and there is no alphabet at the top so that I may jump to the database I want.  These are just a couple of the changes I see immediately.

Hmmm . . . At the top of my screen I see the website name, ABOUT, VIDEO TUTORIALS and NEED ASSISTANCE.  Below that, I again see DIGITAL MAINE LIBRARY / GETTING STARTED WITH DIGITAL MAINE LIBRARY / A-Z INDEX / ADVANCED SEARCH.  Below this there is a slide show, with a bit of what we will find here.  Scrolling down the page there are three places I can narrow my search choices – SUBJECT, RESOURCE TYPE and AUDIENCE.

Next there is the content of the site.  At a guess, I would say that there are close to 100 different databases that can be accessed here – WOW!

Okay, I click on the word ABOUT and am taken to a page that gives me some history of MARVEL! and the DIGITAL MAINE LIBRARY.  Very interesting information.

Now I’m interested to see what VIDEO TUTORIALS is all about, so I click there.  A page of a variety of lessons appears – from some of the databases, to Facebook, G mail and Instagram.  I will have to take some time to check these out.

The NEED ASSISTANCE button takes me to a place with information about who to contact with questions about this site.

In the next line of links, I click on Getting Started with Digital Maine Library.  This page gives me answers to some of the most commonly asked questions regarding the new site.

A-Z Index is just that, an alphabetical list of all the resources available here pops up on the left side of the page.

The last link on this line is Advanced Search.  This takes me to a page that discusses a couple of the ways that the website sorts, searches and then presents the information to us.  I have discovered a Search Bar that is not on the home page.  This Search Bar is the one that will search the entire Digital Maine Library website and not only the databases that I choose to look at.  Personally, I hope that this will be moved to the home page for the convenience of all of us.

Back to the home page.

Below the slideshow there are three boxes – Subject ;  Resource Type and  Audience.  Each of these has up and down arrows in the box.  Clicking on the arrows gives me many ways to narrow my search – perhaps define or refine are a better words.  Each set of arrows has many, MANY choices and ways to pinpoint which database(s) will be most appropriate for my search.

Enough for now, I look forward to exploring more on this site, but that will have to wait for another day!

 

New Items ~ September 2018

FICTION

All we ever wanted by Emily Giffin.  A scandal sends members of two Nashville families into chaos.

Baby teeth by Zoje Stage.  Here’s a “bad seed” novel about a mom desperate to find help for her mute young daughter whose disturbing behavior grows increasingly dangerous.

Clock dance by Anne Tyler.  This is a window into Willa Drake’s life over 50 years and how she adjusts to some of life’s surprises.

Cottage by the sea by Debbie Macomber.  A lonely woman finds love in a charming seaside town.

The Eastern.  Book Two: Later on by Deborah Gould.  In the second book of a trilogy, five families settle on the Eastern River in Pittston, Maine and build a strong and lasting neighborhood.

In a lonely place by Dorothy Hughes.  A classic California noir with a feminist twist, this prescient 1947 novel exposed misogyny in post-World War II American society making it far ahead of its time.

Kill the farm boy by Delilah Dawson.  This is Tolkien’s Fellowship of the Ring on laughing gas.  It’s a rollicking fantasy adventure that upends numerous genre tropes in audacious style.

The last time I lied by Riley Sager.  A painter is in danger when she returns to the summer camp where some of her childhood friends disappeared.

 The late bloomers’ club by Louise Miller.  A delightful novel about two headstrong sisters, a small town’s efforts to do right by the community, and the power of a lost dog to summon true love.

Lying in wait by Liz Nugent.  Laurence Fitzsimons has a mother who’s determined to control everything and everyone around her – even if she has to kill to do it.

Mary B by Katherine Chen.  The overlooked middle sister in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice casts off her prim exterior and takes center stage in this fresh retelling of the classic novel.

The mere wife by Maria Headley.  A modern retelling of the literary classic Beowulf, set in American suburbia as two mothers – a housewife and a battle-hardened veteran – fight to protect those they love.

The other lady vanishes by Amanda Quick.  This sweeps readers back to 1930s Hollywood and California, where the most dazzling of illusions can’t hide the darkest secrets.

Paradox by Catherine Coulter.  Agents Sherlock and Savich look for an escaped psychopath.

A people’s history of the vampire uprising by Raymond Villareal.  In this wildly original novel – part social-political satire, part international mystery – a new virus turns people into something a bit more than human, upending society as we know it.

The Pharaoh Key by Douglas Preston.  Secrets of a mysterious ancient tablet may point the way to untold treasure – or unspeakable danger.

The prisoner in the castle by Susan MacNeal.   A series of baffling murders among a group of imprisoned agents threatens the outcome of World War II in this new Maggie Hope mystery.

The Romanov Empress by C.W. Gortner.  An historical novel about the beloved Empress Maria, the Danish girl who became the mother of the last Russian tsar.

Star of the north by David John.  A thriller about a woman trying to rescue her twin sister from captivity in North Korea, and the North Korean citizens with whom she forms an unlikely alliance.

Tailspin by Sandra Brown.  A pilot navigates treacherous situations when he attempts to deliver a mysterious black box to a doctor in Georgia.

An unwanted guest by Shari Lapena.  A Catskills lodge loses electricity during a blizzard and its guests start mysteriously dropping dead.

Who is Vera Kelly?  by Rosalie Knecht.  Meet an original, wry and whip-smart female spy for the 21st century.

NONFICTION

Another good dog by Cara Achterberg.  A warm and entertaining memoir about what happens when you foster 50 dogs in less than two years – and how the dogs save you as much as you save them.

The contest by Michael Schumacher.  The 1968 election and the war for America’s soul.  A dramatic, deeply informed account of one of the most consequential elections and periods in American history.

Godspeed by Casey Legler.  This electric coming of age memoir charts Legler’s broken childhood – from swimming in the Olympics at 16 while facing crippling loneliness, to her descent into drug addiction, and a desperate penchant for self-destruction that almost took her life – all while grappling with undiagnosed autism.  It’s a raw story of teenage addiction that is beautifully told.

Indianapolis by Lynn Vincent.  The true story of the worst sea disaster in US Naval history and the 50 year fight to exonerate an innocent man.

Light of the stars by Adam Frank.  An intriguing account of the ongoing search for alien civilizations whose failure to appear may be a warning for humans to get their act together.

My life in the Maine Woods by Annette Jackson.  The author recounts her experiences with her game warden husband during the 1930s.

On the Ganges by George Black.  Encounters with saints and sinners on India’s mythic river.  Journey along one of the world’s greatest rivers and catch a glimpse into the lives and cultures of the people who live along its banks.

A Senator’s eye by Angus King.  From the formality of the Capitol Rotunda to a glorious sunrise off the coast of Maine, this is a fascinating collection of informal photos taken by King along with his personal insights and captions.

Slow by Brooke McAlary. Here are plans for simple living in a frantic world.  Free yourself from the frantic and embrace the joy of slow.

The stone crusher by Jeremy Dronfield.  The true story of a father and son’s fight for survival in Auschwitz.  A personal and universal account of brutality at its worst and of family devotion at its best.

The strange case of Dr. Couney by Dawn Raffle.  The extraordinary tale of how a mysterious immigrant “doctor” became the revolutionary innovator of saving premature babies by placing them in incubators in World Fair side shows, on Coney Island, and Atlantic City.

The widower’s notebook by Jonathan Santlofer.  Written with humor and great warmth, this is a portrait of a marriage, an account of the complexities of finding oneself single again after losing your spouse, and a story of the enduring power of familial love.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

If You Like . . .

Do you have a favorite author?  One that you are just WAITING for their newest title to be available?  I have several (perhaps more than several, but we won’t go there right now).  So, what do you read when the newest Louise Penny book isn’t due to be released for a few more months, or maybe you’re FINALLY caught up on Sue Grafton’s Alphabet Series, and since she has passed away, you just have no idea what to read next!

Have we got an idea for you!  We have created several lists of suggestions.  “IF you like . . . ___ You might like~” lists or bookmarks are currently on display at the library.

No, we don’t have suggestions for EVERY author out there, but we have many of the most often requested authors and some suggestions of new to you (and me) authors.

An example ~

Louise Penny has a new Armand Gamache book coming out later this year, but I want it NOW!!!!  What or who can I find to read until then??  I’ll check my handy list!  There are 16 authors on the list.  The thought behind the list, is that there is some similarity between Louise Penny and one of these authors.  Perhaps he or she writes a detective series ; or maybe the characters are part of a small town community ; or there is a connection to Canada ; or ; or; or . . .

Whatever the “or”, I now have several new authors to try.  I may find someone I love, I may find a new series, or I might find something that, to me, is a dud.  No matter what I find, I now have an opportunity to select someone new, find a new author and make a new friend.

Enjoy, and Happy Reading!

New Items ~ August 2018

FICTION

The Bar Harbor Retirement Home for Famous Writers by Terri-Lynne DeFino.  A whimsical, moving novel about a retirement home for literary legends who spar, conjure up new stories, and almost magically change the lives of the people around them.

Before and again by Barbara Delinsky.  A young woman loses her daughter in a car accident and struggles to build a new life for herself in the aftermath of tragedy.

By invitation only by Dorothea Benton Frank.  Two families are brought together when the daughter of a Chicago power broker and the son of a Southern peach farmer decide to wed.

The cabin at the end of the world by Paul Tremblay. The apocalypse begins with a home invasion in this tripwire-taut horror thriller.  This unsettling novel invites readers to ask themselves whether, when faced with the unbelievable, they would do the unthinkable to prevent it.

The darkest time of night by Jeremy Finley.  “The lights took him.”  When the 5 year old grandson of a US Senator vanishes in the woods behind his home, the only witness is his older brother who whispers, “The lights took him,” and then never speaks again.  This fast-paced novel is full of suspense and government cover-ups, perfect for thriller and supernatural fans alike.

The forgotten road by Richard Paul Evans.  The second book in the Broken Road series.  After surviving a plane crash, a man decides to walk the length of Route 66.

The great believers by Rebecca Makkai.  A novel of friendship and redemption in the face of tragedy and loss set in 1980s Chicago and contemporary Paris during the beginning of the AIDS epidemic.

How it happened by Michael Koryta.  Kimberly is no good, a notorious jailhouse snitch, teen mother and addict whose petty crimes are well-known to the rural Maine community where she lives.  So when she confesses to her role in a pair of murders, the locals have little reason to believe her story.

King of ashes by Raymond Feist.  A fantasy novel full of simple magic, fighting, political intrigue, and religious strife.  It’s a tale of two young men whose choices will determine a world’s destiny.

Love and ruin by Paul McLain.  McLain returns to the subject of Ernest Hemingway in a story about his passionate, stormy marriage to Martha Gellhorn – a fiercely independent, ambitious woman who would become one of the greatest war correspondents of the 20th century.

No less days by Amanda Stevens.  As far as David Galloway knows, he can’t die.  He wonders where he fits in the world, in God’s plan for the past and the future.  He believes himself to be the only person on the earth who hasn’t aged in over a century.  He’s wrong about that.

Overkill by Ted Bell.  Putting it all on the line to rescue his kidnapped son pits counterspy Alex Hawke against Russian President Vladimir Putin in this thriller.

The perfect couple by Elin Hilderbrand.  A body is found in Nantucket Harbor hours before a picture perfect wedding.

The President is missing by James Patterson and Bill Clinton.  President Jonathan Duncan, a Gulf War veteran and widower, takes on adversaries at home and abroad.

Something in the water by Catherine Steadman.  A documentary filmmaker and an investment banker must decide whether they should protect a secret.

Spymaster by Brad Thor.  As a war looms, a counter-terrorism operative takes on a new role his own way.

Stay hidden by Paul Doiron.  A woman has been shot to death by a deer hunter on an island off the coast of Maine.  To newly promoted Warden Investigator Mike Bowditch, the case seems open and shut.  But as soon as he arrives on remote Maquoit Island, he discovers mysteries piling up one on top of the other.

Us against you by Fredrick Backman.  A novel about people – about strength and tribal loyalty and what we unwittingly do when trying to show our boys how to be men.

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje.  This tells a dramatic story set in the decade after World War II through the lives of a small group of unexpected characters and two teenagers whose lives are indelibly shaped by their unwitting involvement.

The woman in the woods by John Connolly.  In the woods of Maine, private detective Charles Parker faces a pair of otherworldly foes in a crime novel packed with colorful characters.

NEW DVDs

Love, Simon (2018) starring Nick Robinson and Jennifer Garner

Black Panther (2018) starring Chadwick Boseman

A quiet place (2018) starring Emily Blunt

Isle of dogs (2018) directed by Wes Anderson

The morning after (1986) starring Jane Fonda and Jeff Bridges

NEW MUSIC CDs

Come Tomorrow by Dave Matthews Band

Bigger by Sugarland

Pray for the wicked by Panic! At the Disco

Part of the light by Ray LaMontagne

Deer Tick Volume 1 by Deer Tick

Everybody knows by Stephen Stills and Judy Collins

NONFICTION

Barracoon: the story of the last “black cargo” by Zora Hurston.  This illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade – abducted from Africa on the last “Black Cargo” ship to arrive in the U.S.

Call me American by Abdi Nor Iftin.  The inspirational tale of a boy in war-torn Africa who fell in love with America through movies and escaped his country’s turmoil to move to Portland, Maine – a story of remarkable courage, determination, and triumph.

Cooking Maine style by Marjorie Standish and Sandra Oliver.  Tried and true recipes from DownEast and Marjorie Standish.

The electric woman by Tessa Fontaine.  A story for anyone who has ever imagined running away with the circus, wanted to be someone else, or wanted a loved one to live forever.  This is ultimately about death-defying acts of all kinds, especially that ever constant good old-fashioned unconditional love.

Figures in a landscape by Paul Theroux.  A delectable collection of his recent writing on great places, people, and prose.  Travel essays take us to Ecuador and Hawaii.  We take a helicopter ride with Elizabeth Taylor, eavesdrop on the day-to-day life of a Manhattan dominatrix, and explore New York with Robin Williams.

From broken glass by Steve Ross.  From the survivor of 10 Nazi concentrations camps who went on to create the New England Holocaust Memorial, an inspiring memoir about finding strength in the face of despair.

The guide to humane critter control by Theresa Rooney.  Natural, nontoxic pest solutions to protect your yard and garden.

Hype by Nina Shapiro.  A doctor’s guide to medical myths, exaggerated claims, and bad advice along with how to tell what’s real and what’s not.

Moving forward in mid-career by John Weiss.  Losing a job is one of the most devastating events one can experience.  This is a guide for workers who have been fired or laid off and are in the process of rebuilding not only their careers but also their personal identities independent of a job title.

Northland by Porter Fox.  A quest to rediscover America’s other border – the fascinating but little known northern one.  It’s the world’s largest international boundary, yet it remains obscure even to Amercians.

Pops: fatherhood in pieces by Michael Chabon.  Six essays on fatherhood, showcased around an essay he wrote for GQ about his youngest son, a fashionista since kindergarten.

There are no grown-ups by Pamela Druckerman.  A midlife coming-of-age story where the author investigates life in her 40s and wonders whether her mind will ever catch up with her face.

Upon further review by Mike Pesca.  The greatest sports minds today imagine how the world would change if a play, trade, injury, or referee’s call had just gone the other way.  It’s the greatest what-ifs in sports history.

PICTURE BOOKS

Amanda Panda and the bigger, better birthday by Candice Ransom

Greedy goat by Petr Horacek

Name for baby by Lizi Boyd

Cycle City by Alison Farrell

I really want to see you, Grandma by Tara Gomi

Don’t eat that by Drew Sheneman

Forever or a day by Sarah Jacoby

Frightful ride of Michael McMichael by Bonny Becker

Dog with nice ears by Lauren Child

Busy creature’s day eating! by Mo Willems

Square by Mac Barnett

CHAPTER BOOKS

Breakout by Kate Messner

Whatshisface by Gordon Korman

Front desk by Kelly Yang

Enemy: Detroit, 1954 by Sara Holbrook

Two dogs in a trench coat go to school  by Julie Falatko

Baby Monkey, private eye by Brian Selznick

 NON-FICTION

Forest fairy crafts: enchanting fairies & felt friends from simple supplies by Lenka Vodicka-Paredes

Guide to genealogy by T.J. Resler

Star Wars maker lab by Liz Lee Heinecke

Solo a Star Wars story: the official guide by Pablo Hidalgo

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Positively izzy by Terri Libenson

Be prepared by Vera Brosgol

Star Scouts by Mike Lawrence

Wings of fire: the graphic novel by Tui Sutherland

NEW DVDs

Sight words: level 1 & level 2 & level 3 (2015) starring Brad Caudle and Luci Christian.

Pinkalicious & Peterrific: Pinkamagine it! (2018) animated.

Justice League action: season 1 and part 2 (2018) starring Kevin Conroy.

PJ Masks: save the summer (2018) animated.

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Items ~ July 2018

FICTION

All the ever afters by Danielle Teller.  The untold story of Cinderella’s stepmother, this gives life to the brace and resourceful Agnes, better known as one of fairy tales’ most reviled villains.

The atrocities by Jeremy Shipp.  Any fans of haunted houses or strange families will thoroughly enjoy this read.

Beautiful music by Michael Zadoorian.  Set in early 1970s Detroit, a racially divided city still reeling from its violent riot of 1967, this novel is the story of a high school boy’s transformation through music.

The captives by Debra Jo Immergut.  A riveting story of a woman convicted of a brutal crime, the prison psychologist who recognizes her as his high school crush – and the charged reunion that sets off an astonishing chain of events with dangerous consequences for both.

The cast by Danielle Steel.  A magazine columnist meets an array of Hollywood professionals when a producer turns a story about his grandmother into a TV series.

The death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware.  A tarot card reader mistakenly receives an inheritance letter and attends the funeral of the deceased to collect it.

Denver Moon: the mind of Mars by Warren Hammond.  Once considered humanity’s future home, Mars hasn’t worked out like anybody hoped.  Plagued by crime and a terraforming project that’s centuries from completion, Mars is a red hell.

The favorite sister by Jessica Knoll.  This is a blistering paced thriller starring two sisters who join the cast of a reality TV series.  One won’t make it out alive.  So…who did it?

Florida by Lauren Groff.  A literary tour de force of precariousness set in a blistering place, a state shaped like a gun.

The girl who never read Noam Chomsky by Jana Casale.  The interior life of a millennial Everywoman as she matures over the decades.  So much fun, so smart, and ultimately profound and beautiful.

The lonely witness by William Boyle.  When a young woman with a sordid past witnesses a murder, she finds herself fascinated by the killer and decides to track him down herself.

Motherhood by Sheila Heti.  A novel about whether to have children that will spark conversations about womanhood, parenthood, and about how – and for whom – to live.

The optimistic decade by Heather Abel.  You say you want a revolution?  This energetic and entertaining novel about a utopian summer camp and its charismatic leader asks smart questions about good intentions gone terribly wrong.

The outsider by Stephen King.  An unspeakable crime.  A confounding investigation.  Terry Maitland seems like a nice guy, but is he wearing another face?

Shelter in place by Nora Roberts.  Survivors of a mass shooting outside a mall near Portland, Maine develop different coping mechanisms and face a new menace years later.

Social creature by Tara Burton.  Louise has nothing.  Lavinia has everything.  After a chance encounter, the two spiral into an intimate, intense, and possibly toxic friendship.  A Talented Mr. Ripley for the digital age, this takes a classic tale of obsession and makes it irresistibly new.

Sorority by Genevieve Crane.  An addictive, compulsively readable exploration of female friendship and coming of age that will appeal to anyone who has ever been curious about what goes on in a sorority house.

That kind of mother by Rumaan Alam.  Can motherhood ever look beyond race?  Can we learn to recognize the terrible blindness of our respective cultural perspective?

There there by Tommy Orange.  A look at Native American life in Oakland, CA, through the experiences and perspectives of 12 characters.  The author articulates the challenges and complexities not only of Native Americans but also of America itself.

Timberline by Matthew Mayo.  Based in the northern Rocky Mountains at the beginning of the winter months, this is a tale of adventure, survival, determination, and surprise.  Western fans will enjoy.

Time was by Ian McDonald.  Brought together by a secret project designed to hide British targets from German radar, Tom and Ben have found a love that could not be revealed. When the project went wrong, they vanished into nothingness, presumed dead.  Now they are lost in time, hunting each other across decades, leaving clues in books of poetry and trying to make their desperate timelines overlap.

NONFICTION

Beneath a ruthless sun by Gilbert King.  A spellbinding true story of racism, privilege, and official corruption.  By turns sobering, frightening, and thrilling, this meticulous account of the power and tenacity of officially sanctioned racism recalls a dark era that America is still struggling to leave behind.

Birds of a feather by Lorin Lindner.  Parrots and military veterans bond and heal each other in this powerful story of dedicated service to abandoned birds and veterans and how bringing them together helped save them all.

Calypso by David Sedaris.  This is beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk and love a good tumor joke.  It is simultaneously Sedaris’ darkest and warmest book yet – and it just might be his very best.

Fight like a girl by Kate Germano.  One woman’s professional battle against systemic gender bias in the Marines and the lessons it hold for all of us.

First in line by Kate Brower.  An intimate, news-making look at the men who are next in line to the most powerful office in the world – the vice-presidents of the modern era, from Richard Nixon to Joe Biden to Mike Pence.

I’m Keith Hernandez by Keith Hernandez.  The legendary first baseman tells all in this gripping memoir.  His mission was not to write a “boring” baseball book.  Mission accomplished.

The last lobster by Christopher White.  Although Maine has been experiencing a lobster “boom” in the past few years, White says a climate-affected fluctuation in lobster populations may be endangering the industry and the Maine culture it supports.

The lives of the Surrealists by Desmond Morris.  Life histories of the Surrealists, known and unknown by one of the last surviving members of the movement.

One day you’ll thank me by David McGlynn.  A pleasing blend of humor and humility that shows what it means to be a father in America today.  Timeless, funny, and honest stories of raising boys.

Paul Simon: the life by Robert Hilburn.  An intimate, candid, and definitive bio written with Simon’s participation – but without editorial control – by an acclaimed music writer.

Reporter: a memoir by Seymour Hersh.  A revealing memoir of a decades-long career breaking some of the most impactful stories of the last half-century, from Washington to Vietnam to the Middle East.

The restless wave by John McCain.  A memoir by the Republican senator from Arizona, an American hero who reflects on his life – and what matters most.

The rise and fall of the dinosaurs by Steve Brusatte.  Every week a new species of dinosaur is being discovered somewhere in in the world.  EVERY WEEK.  We are in a new golden age of dinosaur science, and this provides an insider’s view of that history.

Ruthless tide by Al Roker.  A gripping narrative history of the 1889 Johnstown Flood – the deadliest flood in US history.

The soul of America by Jon Meacham.  The Pulitzer Prize winning biographer contextualizes the present political climate through the lens of difficult moments in American history.

Tip of the iceberg by Mark Adams.  A fascinating and funny journey into Alaska, America’s last frontier, retracing the historic 1899 Harriman Expedition.  Tourists will certainly enjoy reading about both the past and the present, and the breezy, self-deprecating tone makes for an obvious vacation diversion.

World War II at sea by Craig Symonds.  Many have argued that WW II was dominated by naval operations; few have shown and explained how and why this was the case.  This combines story-telling verve, expertly illuminating not only the mechanics of large scale warfare on (and below) the sea but offering wisdom into the nature of the war itself.

PICTURE BOOKS

Aquarium by Cynthia Alonso

Dude by Aaron Reynolds

Fall in Line, Holden! by Daniel W Vandever

Geraldine by Elizabeth Lilly

King of Bees by Lester L. Laminack

No Kimchi for Me by Aram Kim

People Don’t Bite People by Lisa Wheeler

Roar: A Dinosaur Tour by Michael Paul

Teddy’s Favorite Toy by Christian Trimmer

Two Problems for Sophia by Jim Averbeck

Vernon is on His Way: Small Stories by Philip C. Stead

CHAPTER BOOKS

Boy Called Bat by Elana Arnold

I Love You, Michael Collins by Lauren Baratz-Logsted

Lulu Is Getting a Sister by Judith Viorst

Spirit Hunters by Ellen Oh

Train I Ride by Paul Mosier

Unicorn in the Barn by Jacqueline K. Ogburn

 

NON-FICTION

Lemonade Stand Cookbook by Kathy Starahs

Rodent Rascals by Roxie Munro

Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist by Jess Keating

What’s on Your Plate? Exploring the World of Food by Whitney Stewart

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Bolivar by Sean Rubin

Time Museum by Matthew Loux

Do You Know Komodo Dragons? By Alain M. Bergeron

NEW DVDs

Early Man (2018) starring Eddie Redmayne and Tom Hiddleston.

G-Force (2009) starring Nicolas Cage and Penelope Cruz.

Gnomeo & Juliet (2011) starring Michael Caine and Emily Blunt.

Strange Magic (2015) starring Evan Rachel Wood and Kristen Chenoweth.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Independence Day Poem From The Shelves

I ~ If you lived at the time of the American Revolution

N ~ Notable American women

D ~ Digging to America

E ~ Eight American poets

P ~ Patriotic crafts

E ~ Ethnic America

N ~ New discoveries in American quilts

D ~ Discovering great American artists

E ~ Exploring North America

N ~ National Parks

C ~ Celebrate America

E ~ Escaping to America

D ~ Don’t know much about American history

A ~ Absolutely American

Y ~ You wouldn’t want to be an American colonist!

New Items ~ June 2018

FICTION

Adjustment Day by Chuck Palahniuk.  Young men take on geriatric politicians who are pushing the country toward a third world war.

American by day by Derek Miller.  A gripping and timely novel that follows Sigrid, a dry-witted Norwegian detective, from Oslo to the U.S. on a quest to find her missing brother.

Big guns by Steve Israel.  From the congressman-turned-novelist comes a comic tale about the mighty firearm industry, a small Long Island town, and Washington politics.

Circe by Madeline Miller.  This tells about Circe’s evolution from insignificant nymph to formidable witch best known for turning Odysseus’ sailors into swine.

Date with malice by Julia Chapman.  Mystery readers who love to escape to Louise Penny’s village of Three Pines will enjoy becoming acquainted with the town of Bruncliffe and its quirky residents.

Dead girl running by Christina Dodd.  Two emotionally damaged characters find hope, self-forgiveness, and love in this modern version of Gaslight that hooks readers and keeps them mesmerized until the end.

The fallen by David Baldacci.  Amos Decker, known as the Memory Man, puts his talents toward solving a string of murders in a Rust Belt town.

Family and other catastrophes by Alexandra Borowitz.  A wedding weekend tests an eccentric family’s bonds.  Humor and heart mix here and it will resonate with anyone who loves their family despite said family’s best efforts.

The flight attendant by Chris Bohjalian.  A flight attendant wakes up in the wrong hotel, in the wrong bed, with a dead man – and no idea what happened.

Home for unwanted girls by Joanna GoodmanPhilomena meets Orphan Train –  the story of a young unwed mother who is forcibly separated from her daughter at birth and the lengths to which they go to find each other.

 Line of glory by Thomas Clagett.  Although the tale has been told many times, Clagett has done a masterful job of delving into the back stories of the characters involved in the Alamo, both Texan and Mexican.

The listener by Robert McCammon.  Race relations are one subject of this seductive slice of supernatural noir set in 1934 New Orleans.

The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner.  A woman is separated from her son when she begins two consecutive life sentences in a California correctional facility.

The merry spinster by Mallory Ortberg.  A collection of darkly playful stories based on classic fold and fairy tales (but with a feminist spin) that find the sinister in the familiar and the familiar in the alien.

Mile High Murder by Marcia Talley.  This mystery takes the reader on a timely and illuminating trip into the often befuddling world of marijuana legislation.

My dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray.  The tale of Alexander Hamilton’s wife – seen growing up in revolutionary New York, passionately entering into marriage, and striving to assure Hamilton’s legacy.

 Noir by Christopher Moore.  A zany tale set on the mean streets of post-World War II San Francisco, and featuring a diverse cast of characters including a hapless bartender, his Chinese sidekick, a doll with sharp angles and dangerous curves, and a black mamba.

The only story by Julian Barnes.  A love affair between a 48 year old and a 19 year old is hardly unheard of, but this reverses gender expectations.

Our little secret by Roz Nay.  Grilled by police about the missing wife of her former boyfriend, Angela reveals the fateful story of their love triangle.

The perfect mother by Aimee Molloy.  An addictive psychological thriller about a group of women whose lives become unexpectedly connected when one of their newborns goes missing.

River’s child by Mark Seiler.  Fasten your seat belt in this fantasy as our spirited heroes ride icebergs from the frozen north, battle wild men, and fall in love while they race to prevent world war.

Robert B. Parker’s old black magic by Ace Atkins.  Ironic, tough-but-tender Boston PI Spenser delves into the black market art scene to investigate a decades-long crime of dangerous proportions.

The saint of wolves and butchers by Alex Grecian.  A chilling thriller about an enigmatic hunter on the trail of a Nazi who has secretly continued his devilish work here in America.

Scot free by Catriona McPherson.  This character-driven romp is sparked by the larger-than-life quirky residents of the Last Ditch Motel, putting this laugh-out-loud whodunit on a par with the early Janet Evanovich.

The Sparsholt affair by Alan Hollinghurst.  Explores richly complex relationships between fathers and sons as it spans 7 transformative decades in England, from the 1940s through the present.

Speed the dawn by Philip Donlay.  Hundreds of white-hot meteor fragments plunge toward Earth near Monterey Bay.  Huge fires ignite the tender-dry landscape, the power grid collapse, and the fires grow.  Donovan Nash realizes he is trapped.

The spirit photographer by Jon Varese.  Historical suspense about a charismatic con man haunted – perhaps literally – by a ghost from his past.

Tomb of the unknown racist by Blanche Boyd.  Explores the intricate world of the white supremacy movement and the treacherous ways that racism shatters families and spreads its dark roots across America.

NEW DVDs

The Post (2017) starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) starring Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill

The Greatest Showman (2017) starring Hugh Jackman and Michelle Williams

NONFICTION

Accidental brothers by Nancy Segal.  The riveting story of two sets of identical twins separated at birth and improbably reunited as adults, a dream case for exploring nature and nurture.

Alt-right by Mike Wendling.  A vital guide to understanding the racist, misogynist, far-right movement that rose to prominence during Donald Trump’s election campaign.

The big ones by Lucy Jones.  A riveting history of natural disasters, their impact on our culture, and new ways of thinking about the ones to come.

Cousins Maine Lobster by Jim Tselikis.  From the co-founders of the Cousins Maine Lobster food truck comes a business book revealing to new entrepreneurs how the authors built their brand through integrity and authenticity.

 Crafting a patterned home by Kristin Nicholas.  Create a unique space that’s all your own – bold and colorful handmade projects to fill your home with pattern.

Darwin comes to town by Menno Schilthuizen.  In this delightful account, readers who assume that pigeons, cockroaches, and rats are the only representatives of city biology will learn that it is far more complex.  This is an expert romp through urban natural history.

The death and life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan.  A landmark work of science, history, and reporting on the past, present and imperiled future of the Great Lakes.

Man vs Baby by Matt Coyne.  A fresh take on the bewilderment and joy of having a baby from a rip-roaring new voice, this combination memoir and advice book is sure to charm parents everywhere.

The milk lady of Bangalore by Shoba Narayan.  Sincere and laugh-out-loud funny, Narayan’s rich and evocative writing transports readers to the busy streets of Bangalore and a fully formed picture of modern India.

My patients and other animals by Suzanne Fincham-Gray.  A moving memoir of a life spent in the company of animals – a veterinarian sheds light on the universal experiences of illness, healing, and how we care for loved ones.

Natural causes by Barbara Ehrenreich.  An epidemic of wellness, the certainty of dying, and killing ourselves to live longer…the author explores how we are killing ourselves to live long, but not better.

No immediate danger by William Vollmann.  A timely, eye-opening book about climate change and energy generation that focuses on the consequences of nuclear power production.

Our towns by James Fallows.  A surprising portrait of the civic and economic reinvention taking place in America, town by town and generally out of view of the national media.  A realistically positive and provocative view of the country between its coasts.  Eastport, Maine is one of the towns examined.

Two sisters by Asne Seierstad.  The riveting story of 2 sisters’ journey to the Islamic State and the father who tries to bring them home.  It’s a relentless thriller and a feat of reporting with profound lessons about belief, extremism, and the meaning of devotion.

Waiting for the last bus by Richard Holloway.  Now in his 9th decade, the former Bishop of Edinburgh presents a positive, meditative exploration of the many lessons we can learn from death along with forgiving ourselves and others.

PICTURE BOOKS

Baby Bear’s Book of Tiny Tales by David McPhail

Bear and Wolf by Daniel Salmieri

Funeral by Matt James

Honey by David Ezra Stein

I Am Enough by Grace Byers

Ladybug Girl and the Rescue Dogs by David Soman

Memoirs of a Parrot by Devin Scillian

On the Other Side of the Garden by Jairo Buitrago

Pip & Pup by Eugene Yelchin

This Is the Nest That Robin Built by Denise Fleming

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Car by Kate Dopirak

Wake Up, Baby Bear! by Lynn Plourde

CHAPTER BOOKS

Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World by Ashley Herring Blake

Mystery of the Bear Cub by Tamra Wight

Mystery of the Missing Fox by Tamra Wight

Serpent’s Secret: Kiranmala and the Kingdom Beyond by Sayantani DasGupta

Sky at Our Feet by Nadia Hashimi

Truth as Told by Mason Buttle by Leslie Connor

Who Killed Darius Drake? by Rodman Philbrick

You Go First by Erin Entrada Kelly

NON-FICTION

A Seal Named Patches by Roxanne Beltran

Bluegrass Boy: The Story of Bill Monroe Father of Bluegrass Music by Barb Rosenstock

Song of the Wild: A First Book of Animals by Nicola Davies

When Paul Met Artie: The Story of Simon & Garfunkel by G. Neri

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Crafty Cat and the Great Butterfly Battle by Charise Mericale Harper

NEW DVDs

Mary and the Witch’s Flower (2018) starring Ruby Barnhill and Kate Winslet.

Paw Pals: Summer Rescues  (2017) 8 episodes of Paw Patrol.

PJ Masks: Cracking the Case (2018) Join Catboy, Owlette and Gekko on their night time missions into the night to save the day in this fun-packed superhero adventure.

PJ Masks: Let’s Go PJ Masks! (2017) Another superhero adventure with Catboy, Owlette and Gekko.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

Philip Roth – A Poem From The Shelves

As many of you may know, Pulitzer Prize winning author, Philip Roth died recently. The following poem, in homage to him, uses only titles of some of his works.

Reading myself and others

Our Gang

Everyman

Deception

Indignation

Nemesis

Shop talk

The facts

The plot against America

American pastoral

The great American novel

The humbling

The ghost writer

Letting go

Goodbye, Columbus

Exit ghost