New Titles for January 2018!

FICTION:

 Alive in shape and color edited by Lawrence Block.  17 paintings by great artists and the stories they inspired.

Artemis by Andy Weir.  A small-time smuggler living in a lunar colony schemes to pay off an old debt by pulling off a challenging heist.

The big book of the Continental Op by Dashiell Hammett.  All 38 stories starring the Continental Op – one of the greatest characters in detective fiction.

The body in the casket by Katherine Hall Page.  A chilling New England who-dun-it, inspired by the best Agatha Christie mysteries and with hints of the timeless board game Clue.

A darker sea by James Haley.  A gripping naval saga featuring Commander Bliven Putnam, chronicling the build up to the biggest military conflict between the U.S. and Britain after the Revolution – The War of 1812.

The demon crown by James Rollins.  To save mankind’s future, the members of Sigma Force must make a devil’s bargain as they join forces with their most hated enemy to stop an ancient threat.

 End game by David Baldacci.  Jessica Reel and Will Robie fight a dangerous adversary in Colorado.

The floating world by C. Morgan Babst.  A dazzling novel about family, home, and grief that takes readers into the heart of Hurricane Katrina with the story of a family whose roots stretch back nearly to the foundation of New Orleans.

Fortitude smashed by Taylor Brooke.  Personalized chips are now implanted beneath the thumbnails of every infant, where glowing numbers count down to the moment they will meet their soul mate.  Fate is now a calculation.

Future home of the living god by Louise Erdrich.  A startling portrait of a young woman fighting for her life and her unborn child against oppressive forces that manifest in the wake of a cataclysmic event.

The girl in the tower by Katherine Arden.  A remarkable young woman blazes her own trail from the backwoods of Russia to the court of Moscow.

The ice house by Laura Lee Smith.  This follows the beleaguered MacKinnons as they weather the possible loss of the family business, a serious medical diagnosis, and the slings and arrows of familial discord.

 In this moment by Karen Kingsbury.  A lawyer defends a public high school principal who starts an after-school Bible study program.

Into the drowning deep by Mira Grant.  A claustrophobic, deep-sea tale that will leave readers glad to be safely on dry land.

The library at the edge of the world by Felicity Hayes-McCoy.  A local librarian must find a way to rebuild her community and her own life in this touching, enchanting novel set on Oreland’s stunning Wet Coast.

The Paris secret by Karen Swan.  A tale of forgotten treasures and long-held secrets, this explores a woman’s journey to discovering the truth behind an abandoned apartment and a family whose mysteries may be better left undiscovered.

Past perfect by Danielle Steel.  The story of two families living 100 years apart who come together in time in a startling moment, opening the door to rare friendship and major events in early 20th century history.

Secrets of Cavendon by Barbara Taylor Bradford.  A saga featuring the aristocratic Ingham family and the Swann family, who have loyally served them for generations.

Seven days of us by Francesca Hornak.  A family can’t escape their secrets when they’re forced to spend the Christmas holiday in quarantine in this sharply funny novel.

Two kinds of truth by Michael Connelly.  While he investigates the murder to two pharmacists, an old case comes back to haunt Harry Bosch.

Weave a circle round by Kari Maaren.  A teen learns about herself – and the fabric of the universe – when she goes traveling in time with an immortal 14 year old.  A charming and extraordinarily relatable book with the potential to become a timeless classic.

The whispering room by Dean Koontz.  Former FBI agent and wanted fugitive Jane Hawk tracks down a group that is brainwashing people into committing suicide.

Year One by Nora Roberts.  It began on New Year’s Eve.  The sickness came on suddenly and spread quickly.  The fear spread even faster…  And as the power of science and technology receded, magic rose up in its place.

You can run by Steve Mosby.  A riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma guaranteed to play havoc with both your brain cells and your heartbeat.

NEW DVDs:

Victoria and Abdul (2017) starring Judi Dench and Ali Fazal

Come along with me (1982) starring Estelle Parsons and Sylvia Sidney

Baby Driver (1917) starring Ansel Elgort, John Hamm, and Jamie Fox

Holocaust (1978) starring Meryl Streep, James Woods, Michael Moriarty

Summer wishes, winter dreams (1973) starring Joanne Woodward and Sylvia Sidney

Law and order: the third year starring Jerry Orbach and Paul Sorvino

Come back to the 5 & Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean (1982) starring Cher and Karen Black

NONFICTION:

Adventures of a ballad hunter by John Lomax.  Vibrant, amusing, often haunting stories of the people the author met and recorded are the gems of this book which also gives lyrics for dozens of songs, this illuminates vital traditions in American popular culture and the labor that has gone into their preservation.

Ageless soul by Thomas Moore.  The lifelong journey toward meaning and joy is explored.

Bunk by Kevin Young.  This follows the rise of hoaxes, humbug, plagiarists, phonies, post-facts, and fake news.

Cover me by Ray Padgett.  The stories behind the greatest cover songs of all time.

The Family Tree cemetery field guide by Joy Neighbors.  How to find, record, and preserve your ancestors’ graves.

The great Halifax explosion by John Bacon.  The astonishing true story of history’s largest man-made explosion before the atomic bomb, and its world-changing aftermath.

Happiness by Christophe Andre.  25 ways to live joyfully through art.

The mindful way to a good night’s sleep by Tzivia Gover.  Discover how to use dreamwork, meditation, and journaling to sleep deeply and wake up well.

The newcomers by Helen Thorpe.  A powerful and moving account of how refugee teenagers at a Denver public high school learn English and become Americans.

Sense of occasion by Harold Prince.  In this fast-moving, candid, conversational, and entertaining memoir, Prince – the most honored director/producer in the history of the American theater – looks back over his 70 year career.

The tattoo dictionary by Trent Aitken-Smith.  Discover the true meanings behind over 200 popular tattoos with this comprehensive book illustrated with over 100 tattoo designs.

The Third Reich by Thomas Childers.  A riveting study delves deeply into the conditions of the perfect storm that allowed Hitler and his Nazi party to seize and wield unprecedented power.

Total cat mojo by Jackson Galaxy.  The ultimate guide to life with your cat.

William Wegman: being human by William Wegman.  More than 300 photos collected to illustrate the artist’s humanistic and witty approach to his subjects, his beloved Weimaraners.  Divided into 16 themed chapters, this showcases some best known images along with previously unseen gems.

Children’s Books

FICTION

Feather by Ceo Wenxuan

I got the rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison

My lazy cat by Christine Roussey

Papillon goes to the vet by A.N. Kang

Read the book, lemmings! by Ame Dyckman

Seamus’s short story by Heather Hartt-Sussman

Snow scene by Richard Jackson

When the moon comes by Paul Harbridge

When the snow falls by Linda Booth Sweeney

Where, oh where is baby bear? by Ashley Wolff

NON-FICTION

About habitats: seashores by Cathryn Sill

Baby animals playing by Suzi Eszterhas

Beginner’s guide to coding by Marc Scott

Danza!: Amalia Hernandez and el Ballet Folklorico de Mexico by Duncan Tonatiuh

Dazzle ships: World War I and the art of confusion by Chris Barton

Deadliest: 20 dangerous animals by Steve Jenkins

Miguel’s brave knight: young Cervantes and his dream of Don Quixote poems by Margarita Engle

Sergeant Reckless: the true story of the little horse who became a hero by Patricia McCormick

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get Your Holiday Gifts At The Library!

The holidays are coming, MUCH faster than I was expecting!  Time does seem to move faster each year, but the temperature outside was in the 50s only a couple of weeks ago, and now I need my ice scraper in the morning.

 

We all know there are many, MANY holidays in December.  Some of these holidays are simply days – Egg Nog Day, Chester Greenwood Day, Dewey Decimal Day, to name a few.  I’m not sure about you, but these are not “gift” holidays to me.  On the other hand Hanukah, Kwanzaa and Christmas are holidays that are “gift” holidays.

 

So, don’t forget the library in your gift search!  No, I’m not asking you to give us a gift, though it is nice to be remembered.  What I mean is think of us as a source for some of the folks on your shopping list!

 

For the second year in a row, we have calendars.  These calendars contain many wonderful historic pictures of Gardiner and the surrounding communities!  For ten dollars you can share memories about local places with family, or perhaps compare places you know now with what they looked like “back in the day” – whatever day that might have been.

 

Currently we have three titles by local authors available for purchase :  Lou Lou and Pea and the mural mystery by Jill Diamond ; Destination Unknown and Along the Kennebec both by State Representative Gay Grant.  Any of these would make a great gift!

 

Do you have anyone on your list that does not live in our service area?  We would love to sell you a Gardiner Public Library non-resident subscription to use as a gift.  Just think, a gift that truly will last an entire year! And for a whole family as well!

 

Last but by no means least, don’t forget BookIt! the library’s bookstore.  BookIt! is located in Lisa’s Legit Burritos and is well stocked with great titles for you to purchase!  All proceeds from BookIt! go to benefit the library.  Check it out when you are on Water Street in Gardiner!

New Items for December!

FICTION:

After the fire by Henning Mankell.  Here is the story of an aging man whose quiet, solitary life on an isolated island off the coast of Sweden is turned upside down when the house he lives in catches fire.

Christy by Catherine Marshall.  In 1912, a 19 year old girl leaves her comfortable home to teach school on an isolated cove in the great Smokey Mountains.

Deep freeze by John Sandford.  Class reunions: a time for memories – good, bad, and, as Virgil Flowers is about to find out, deadly.

A column of fire by Ken Follett.  A pair of lovers find themselves on opposite sides of a conflict while Queen Elizabeth fights to maintain her throne.

Every breath you take by Mary Higgins Clark.  Laurie Moran investigates the murder of a wealthy widow who was pushed from the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In the midst of winter by Isabel Allende.  Three very different people are bought together in a story that journeys from present-day Brooklyn to Guatemala in the recent past to 1970s Brazil.

It devours! by Joseph Fink.  A female scientist investigates an unusual rumbling in an American Southwest desert and comes across a religious congregation planning a dangerous ritual.

Midnight line by Lee Child.  Jack Reacher, in a small Wisconsin town, sees a class ring in a pawn shop from West Point 2005.  He wonders what circumstances made the owner give it up and decides to find out and return it.  Why not?

Near Haven by Matthew Sirois.  A boat builder in rural Maine decides to hunker down in place when the world finds out that a comet that is streaking toward Earth is said to be both unavoidable and fatal for humanity.

The Noel diary by Richard Paul Evans.  A romance writer delves into a stranger’s past when his estranged mother leaves her extremely stuffed house to him.

Paris in the present tense by Mark Helprin.  A modern-day story of live, music, and death, with echoes of the Nazi retreat in World War II France.

The Paris Spy by Susan MacNeal.  American-born spy Maggie Hope searches for her half-sister in Nazi-occupied France during World War II.

Pieces of happiness by Anne Ostby.  A novel of 5 lifelong friends who, in their 60s, decide to live together on a cocoa farm in Fiji, where they not only start a chocolate business but strengthen their friendships and rediscover themselves.

The power by Naomi Alderman.  Suddenly all over the world, teenage girls develop the ability to send an electric charge from the tips of their fingers.

Quick and dirty by Stuart Woods.  The New York lawyer Stone Barrington is hired to recover a stolen Van Gogh painting.

The Rooster Bar by John Grisham.  Three students at a sleazy for profit law school hope to expose the student loan baker who runs it.

The secret, book, and scone society by Ellery Adams.  This is set within a quirky small-town club where the key to happiness, friendship – or solving a murder – can all be found within the pages of the right book.

The stolen marriage by Diane Chamberlain.  This conveys a strong sense of daily life in the American South during World War II, and the concurrent devastation of the polio epidemic in a crime-tinged tale of a marriage of convenience.

The story of Arthur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg.  An emotionally powerful novel about 3 people who each lose the one they love most, only to find second chances where they least expect them.

Strange weather by Joe Hill.  A quartet of novellas involving the horrific and the supernatural.

The tea girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See.  This explores the lives of a Chinese mother and her daughter who has been adopted by an American couple.

Unrest by Sandra Heath.  The story of 17 year old Annie, plucked from her comfortable existence in the American Midwest, to trave3l with her mom and siblings to join her lieutenant colonel father in Tehran, Iran in the late 1970s.

The Western Star by Craig Johnson.  A modern Western that pays homage to Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express.

The whole of the moon by Brian Rogers.  These stories span the years from the late 1950s to the present, and the characters are bound by a fact unknown to them: they have each checked out the same public library copy of The Great Gatsby.

NEW MUSIC CDs:

Pacific Daydream by Weezer

Now by Shania Twain

Standards by Seal

The thrill of it all by Sam Smith

Dig your roots by Florida Georgia Line

Reputation by Taylor Swift

NEW DVDs:

Maudie (2017) starring Sally Hawkins and Ethan Hawke

American Gods (2017) starring Ian McShane

Chaplin (1992) starring Robert Downey Jr.

The fugitive (1993) starring Harrison Ford and Tommy Lee Jones

Marvin’s Room (1996) starring Meryl Streep, Diane Keaton, Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert De Niro

Portrait of Jennie (1948) starring Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten.

NONFICTION:

Ali: a life by Jonathan Eig.  The definitive bio of an American icon, from an author with unique access to Ali’s inner circle.

An American family by Khizr Khan.  This inspiring memoir by the Muslim American Gold Star father and captivating DNC speaker is the story of one family’s pursuit of the American dream.

The apparitionists by Peter Manseau.  A story of faith and fraud ink post-Civil War America, told through the lens of a photographer who claimed he could capture images of the dead.

Bobby Kennedy by Chris Matthews.  The New York senator’s journey from his formative years to his tragic run for president.

Endurance by Scott Kelly.  A stunning personal memoir from the astronaut and modern-day hero who spent a record-breaking year aboard the international Space Station. This is a candid account of his remarkable voyage, of the journeys that preceded it, and of his colorful and inspirational formative years.

Fire on the track by Roseanne Montillo.  The inspiring and irresistible true story of Betty Robinson, and other women who broke barriers and finish-line ribbons in pursuit of Olympic Gold.

If you can doodle, you can paint by Diane Culhane.  How to transform simple drawings into works of art.

The letters of Sylvia Plath, Vol. 1 by Sylvia Plath.  A major literary event: the first volume in the definitive, complete collection of the letters of Plath – most never seen before.

Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson.  A bio of the Italian Renaissance polymath which connects his work in various disciplines.

Make yourself at home by Moorea Seal.  A home design book that helps you discover how to style your home for a deeper sense of comfort.

Paperbacks from hell by Grady Hendrix.  An affectionate, nostalgic, and unflinchingly funny celebration of the horror fiction boom of the 1970s and 1980s.

Renoir: an intimate biography by Barbara White.  An in-depth bio of the French impressionist painter – ideal for readers seeking to delve deeply into his personality.

The shattered lens by Jonathan Alpeyrie.  A war photographer’s true story of captivity and survival in Syria.

What to believe when you’re expecting by Jonathan Schaffir.  A new look at old wives’ tales in pregnancy.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

 

 

 

New Titles for November!

FICTION:

 The art of keeping secrets by Rachael Johns.   They started out as “misfit” moms at their sons’ private school.  They shared everything – or so they thought.  Now on a trip to NYC, their tight hold on the secrets they’ve keep for years begins to slip.

Beneath the depths by Bruce Coffin.  A police procedural in which a lawyer who’s already antagonized half the people in Maine winds up dead and, every pine tree in Portland seems chock-full of suspects.

The best kind of people by Zoe Whittail.  A local schoolteacher is arrested, leaving his family to wrestle with the possibility of his guilt, in this novel about loyalty, truth, and happiness.

Fresh complaint by Jeffrey Eugenides.  A collection of stories that the author has been steadily producing through the years.

The girl who takes an eye for an eye by David Lagercrantz.  Lisabeth Salander teams up with an investigative journalist to uncover the secrets of her childhood.

Good me bad me by Ali Land.  Milly’s mother is a serial killer.  Though she loves her mother, the only way to make her stop is to turn her in to the police.  Milly is given a fresh start: a new identity and a home with an affluent foster family.  But Milly has secrets of her own.

Haunted by Richard Patterson. A detective from New York takes his family on a vacation to Maine and is enlisted by local cops to help solve a crime in the woods.

Little fires everywhere by Celeste Ng.  An artist with a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

Merry and bright by Debbie Macomber.  A temp, who works for a strict and stressed boss, is given a social life when family members create an online dating profile for her.

The ninth hour by Alice McDermott.  A powerfully affecting story spanning the 20th century of a widow and her daughter and the nuns who serve their Irish-American community in Brooklyn.

Origin by Dan Brown.  After reconnecting with one of his first students, who is now a billionaire futurist, Professor Robert Langdon must go on a perilous quest with a beautiful museum director.

P.S. from Paris by Marc Levy.  A modern-day love story between a famous actress hiding in Paris and a bestselling writer lying to himself.  They knew their friendship was going to be complicated, but love – and the City of Lights – just might find a way.

Paradox bound by Peter Clines.  An aimless young man escapes his dead-end town when he meets a time-traveling adventuress.  A rousing adventure novel that marries steampunk aesthetics to the seminal concept of protecting American liberty.

Proof of life by J.A. Jance.  When J.P. Beaumont is asked to investigate the death of his nemesis, it leads to an old case once thought solved.

Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor.  This begins with a 13 year old girl’s disappearance from an English village, and then tracks the village through the following years, as teenagers become adults, people grow old and die, and couples get together and separate while what happened to the girl remains a mystery.

The rules of magic by Alice Hoffman.  Hoffman delights us in this prequel to Practical Magic as three siblings discover both the power and curse of their magic.

The Salt Line by Holly Jones.  In the future, the US border has receded behind a salt line – a ring of scorched earth that protects its citizens from deadly disease-carrying ticks.  Those within the zone live safe, if limited, lives in a society controlled by a common fear.  Only adrenaline junkies who pay a fortune to tour what’s left of nature stray past the salt line.

Sourdough by Robin Sloan.  How many novels can boast an obstreperous sourdough starter as a key character?  This is a delightful and heartfelt read.

Star Wars: from a certain point of view.  An anthology of short stories retells the original “Star Wars” from the point of view of supporting characters.

To be where you are by Jan Karon.  Three generations of Kavanaghs face changes in their lives.

Winter solstice by Elin Hilderbrand.  The Quinns celebrate the holidays when one family member returns from the war in Afghanistan but the gathering turns rocky.

NONFICTION:   

American wolf by Nate Blakeslee.  The enthralling story of the rise and reign of O-Six, the celebrated Yellowstone wolf, and the people who loved or feared her.

The best of us by Joyce Maynard.  In this touching memoir, Maynard chronicles her 2nd marriage.  She beautifully renders the joys of falling in love later in life and the pain of watching her husband die of pancreatic cancer.  Her heartfelt story resonate with those who have loved and lost.

The comfort food diaries by Emily Nunn.  Nunn chronicles her journey to heal old wounds and find comfort in the face of loss through travel, home-cooked food, and the company of friends and family.

The encyclopedia of animal predators by Janet Dohner.  Learn about each predator’s traits and behaviors, identify the tracks and signs of more than 50 predators to protect your livestock, poultry, and pets.

Grant by Ron Chernow.  Ulysses Grant was a complex, mostly admirable figure, and this may become the definitive biography for the foreseeable future.

Hiding in the bathroom by Morra Aarons-Mele.  An introvert’s road map to getting out there in the business world (when you’d rather stay home).

In the shadows of the American century by Alfred McCoy.  Can the US extend the “American century” or will China guide the globe for the next 100 years?  McCoy boldly lays out a series of scenarios that could lead to the end of Washington’s world domination by 2030.

Killing England by Bill O’Reilly.  Major events and battles during the Revolutionary War are told from the perspectives of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and others.

Logical family: a memoir by Armistead Maupin.  The author of the Tales of the City series chronicles his odyssey from the old South to freewheeling San Francisco, and his evolution from curious youth to ground-breaking writer and gay rights pioneer.

Mayhem by Sigrid Rausing.  A searingly powerful memoir about the impact of opioid addiction on a family.

Of mess and moxie by Jen Hatmaker.  Wrangling delight out of this wild and glorious life, Hatmaker presents a round of hilarious tales, shameless honesty, and hope for the woman who has forgotten her moxie.

Vacationland by John Hodgman.  Mild departures from the routine inspire neurotic palpitations in these dourly funny essays that peg the stories to several unnerving locals.

Vinyl Me, Please.  100 albums you need in your collection.

Why we sleep by Matthew Walker.  The first sleep study by a leading scientific expert, this reveals groundbreaking explorations of sleep, explaining how we can harness its transformative power to change our lives for the better.

NEW MUSIC CDs:

Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie

Life changes by Thomas Rhett

Lost and gone forever by Guster

Twin Peaks (music from the limited event series)

Through the eyes of love by Melissa Manchester

Flicker by Niall Horan

 NEW DVDs:

Big little lies (2017) starring Nicole Kidman and Reese Witherspoon

The big sick (2017) starring Kumail Nanjiani, Holly Hunter and Ray Romano

Wonder woman (2017) starring Gal Gadot and Chris Pine

Hero (2017) starring Sam Elliott

This is us: the complete first season (2017) starring Mandy Moore

The beguiled  (2017) starring Colin Farrell, Nicole Kidman, and Kirsten Dunst

12 monkeys (1995) starring Bruce Willis and Brad Pitt

 

 

Literary Reference Center – A MARVEL Database

I think it’s time for me to check out a new-to-me database on the MARVEL! Maine’s Virtual Library page.

Hmmm . . LITERARY REFERENCE CENTER – this looks interesting.  Clicking on the link opens the Literary Reference Center page.  Here I see several options to try.  The top menu bar contains New Search ;  Publications ; Browse Authors ; Browse Most Studied Authors and More.  There’s a place to do a search by Keyword ; Author  or Title.  Down the left side I see BROWSE with several options in the box, REFERENCE SHELF also with several options and CONTENT SPOTLIGHT which appears to be a journal article.  I don’t know how often the article is changed, but this one is about author Peter Matthiessen.

Closer to the center of the page there is BOOK HIGHLIGHT, which contains a sideways scroll.  I see articles with titles such as Critical Insights: The Great Gatsby ; Critical Insights: Mark Twain and Critical Insights: John Steinbeck.  Below this there are two more boxes – FEATURED WORK and FEATURED AUTHOR.  Today the FEATURED WORK is The Left Hand Of Darkness, and the FEATURED AUTHOR is Ursula K. Le Guin.

Where to now?  I check out the options below BROWSE and click on Most Studied Authors.  I am taken to a list of many, Many, MANY authors (in alphabetical order, of course) all that are click-able links!  It looks like I can also check them out by Country ; Culture ; Genre and Movement.  More options than I know what to do with!  After clicking on Movement, I scroll down the page and click on Beat Movement.  Wow, a list of seven authors who were part of the Beat Movement, all as links to more information about each of them.  I click on Jack Kerouac and am taken to a page with information about him, including his full name, birth and death dates.  There are also links to more information about him – Principal Works , Biography, Analysis, Summary, Discussion Topics and Bibliography.  Again, WOW!

I click back to the home page and again look at the BROWSE options.  This time I click on Most Studied Works.  I have to tell you, I find it odd that the list of works is in an odd to me order – yes, all of the As are together, but they seem to be in reverse alphabetical order – Awakenings before Atonement before Are You There, God? It’s Me Margaret.  This might not be an issue for many people but is a bit off to me.  Clicking on a title takes me to a beautiful citation of the work, as well as giving me more options to look at.  There is a box on the left that contains Related Information, which includes Interviews, Reviews, Poems, Biographies and several other topics.  The Contents box works well to move me through the current page.

Back on the home page I focus on the REFERENCE SHELF.  Here there are several more choices.  I click on Research Guide.  This takes me to a page that seems to have any and all information I might need to write a research paper – from Plagiarism: How to Avoid Common Pitfalls to Worst Case Scenario: My paper is nearly due and I’ve barely started! to a Research Glossary.  This looks like a great page to keep in mind for “THOSE” questions – “How do I make an outline?” ; “My teacher said I can’t use the internet because it isn’t true.  What makes a true resource on the internet?” or “How do I write a bibliography?”

This is a very interesting database!  There are many pieces that I can see using here at the library, but there are definitely pieces that are a bit  . . . clunky to use.  This is a site that I would have found helpful several centuries (or at least decades) ago when I wrote my first papers for school!

New Books – October 2017

FICTION

Any dream will do by Debbie Macomber.  As Shay Benson begins her life anew by building a relationship with Pastor Drew, her brother’s return threatens to undo it all.

Caroline: Little House revisited by Sarah Miller.  Peeling back the layers of Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie, this reveals another side of Caroline Ingalls, Wilder’s mother.  Not to be missed by Wilder’s grown-up fans or those who enjoy historical fiction.

Crime scene by Jonathan Kellerman.  Clay Edison, a deputy coroner and former star athlete, investigates a possible murder.

The Cuban affair by Nelson DeMille.  Set in 2015 during the early days of the thaw between the US and Cuba – a line from the novel perfectly describes this page-turner:  “Sex, money, and adventure.  Does it get any better than that?”

Don’t let go by Harlan Coben.  Coben explores the big secrets and little lies that can destroy a relationship, a family, and even a town in this powerful thriller.

Enigma by Catherine Coulter.  Agents Savich and Sherlock race against the clock to catch an international criminal and solve the enigma of the man called John Doe.

The followers by Rebecca Wait.  A struggling single mother falls under the spell of a charismatic cult leader, but her rebellious 12 year old daughter isn’t quite so gullible.

 A gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles.  A Russian count undergoes 30 years of house arrest.

Glass Houses by Louise Penny.  Penny shatters the conventions of the crime novel to explore what Gandhi called the court of conscience – a court that supersedes all others.

The golden house by Salman Rushdie.  A modern American epic set against the panorama of contemporary politics and culture – a hurtling, page-turning mystery that is equal parts The Great Gatsby and The Bonfire of the Vanities.

The last Tudor by Phillippa Gregory.  The youngest Grey sister, Mary, is left to face her ruthless cousin, Queen Elizabeth.

A legacy of spies by John LeCarre.  The undisputed master returns with a riveting new book – his first Smiley novel in more than 25 years.

The locals by Jonathan Dee.  Here are the dramas of the 21st century America – rising inequality, working class decline, a new authoritarianism – played out in the classic setting of some of our greatest novels: the small town.

My absolute darling by Gabriel Tallent.  A remarkably self-sufficient 14 year old girl must fight to save herself from her abusive survivalist father.

North Haven by Sarah Moriarty.  A portrait of the family scars and faults passed along the generations, brilliantly capturing life on the Maine coastline, where time seems to stand still even as the water never stops moving.

The punch escrow by Tal Klein.  Fans of hard SF and time travel will enjoy this imaginative debut.

The right time by Danielle Steel.  The author Alexandra Winslow, writing under the pseudonym Alexander Green, creates a double life that isolates her.

Robert B. Parker’s The hangman’s sonnet by Reed Coleman.  This Jessie Stone novel involves a reclusive folk singer.

Secrets in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas must separate rumors from reality when a woman who traffics in other people’s secrets is silenced.

Seeing red by Sandra Brown.  The TV journalist Kerra Bailey and former federal agent John Trapper join forces to expose a web of conspiracy behind a hotel bombing in Dallas.

Sleeping beauties by Stephen King and Owen King.  The authors tell the highest of high-stakes stories: what might happen if women disappeared from the world of men?

The store by James Patterson.  Two NY writers go undercover to expose the secrets of a powerful retailer.

Strange practice by Vivian Shaw.  Fans who enjoy gaslamp fantasies will appreciate how Shaw brings her Victorian monsters into the modern age.

We shall not all sleep by Estep Nagy.  Set on a small Maine island, this is a richly told story of American class, family, and manipulation – a compelling portrait of a unique and privileged WASP stronghold on the brink of dissolution.

Y is for yesterday by Sue Grafton.  Yesterday was for youthful indiscretions.  Today is for consequences.

NONFICTION

After the eclipse by Sarah Perry.   A mother’s murder, a daughter’s search.  In a fierce memoir of a mother’s murder outside of her daughter’s bedroom in rural Maine, a daughter’s coming-of-age in the wake of immense loss, and her mission to know the woman who gave her life.

Dying: a memoir by Cory Taylor.  This slender volume brings a fresh point of view to end of life care, the concept of having a sense of control over the unknown, and the role of chance in life.  This deep meditation is beautifully written and destined to be an important piece of conversation surrounding death.

The far away brothers by Lauren Markham.  The deeply reported story of identical twin brothers who escape El Salvador’s violence to build new lives in California – fighting to survive, to stay, and to belong.

A farewell to ice by Peter Wadhams.  Based on five decades of research and observation, this is a haunting and unsparing look at the melting ice caps and what their disappearance will mean.

Feeling Jewish by Devorah Baum.  A young critic offers an original, passionate, and erudite account of what it means to feel Jewish – even when you are not.

The four tendencies by Gretchen Rubin.  The indispensable personality profiles that reveal how to make your life better (and other peoples lives better too).

Install your own solar panels by Joe Burdick.  Designing and installing a photovoltaic system to power your home.

Madness by Sam Sax.  An astounding debut collection of poems – Winner of the 2016 National Poetry Series Competition.  In this collection, Sax explodes the linkage between desire, addiction, and the history of mental health.

Nomadland by Jessica Bruder.  A book about low-income Americans (mostly seniors) eking out a living while driving from locale to locale for seasonal employment.

The plant paradox by Steven Gundry.  Most of us have heard of gluten – a protein found in wheat that can cause widespread inflammation in the body.  Americans spend billions on gluten-free diets in an effort to protect their health.  But what if we’ve been missing the root of the problem?

Quakeland by Kathryn Miles.  A journey around the US in search of the truth about the threat of earthquakes leads to spine-tingling discoveries, unnerving experts and ultimately the kind of preparation that will actually help guide us through disasters.

The republic for which it stands by Richard White.  This offers a fresh and integrated interpretation of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age as the seedbed of modern America.

This blessed earth by Ted Genoways.  Both a concise exploration of the history of the American small farm and a vivid, nuanced portrait of one family’s fight to preserve their legacy and the life they love.

What happened by Hillary Clinton.  The former secretary of state relates her experience as the first woman candidate nominated for president by a majority party and reveals what she was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history.

What I found in a thousand towns by Dar Williams.  A beloved folk singer presents an impassioned account of the fall and rise of the small American towns she cherishes.

Why Buddhism is true by Robert Wright.  Neuroscience and psychology findings are used to support Buddhist practice and meditation and show how it holds the key to moral clarity and enduring happiness.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

An Alphabet of Maine Titles

A friend and I were talking the other day, and we wondered if it would be possible to create an alphabetical list of books containing Maine places.

My list isn’t quite alphabetical, though the Maine places ARE in alphabetical order.  As you will notice, I did use poetic license with two letters – X and Z.  Please leave a comment if you have ideas for these two special letters!

Summers at Castle AUBURN

The BLUE HILL meadows

CHELSEA Chelsea bang bang

DALLAS Buyers Club

EMBDEN town of yore

FRIENDSHIP makes the heart grow fonder

The GRAY man

HOPE and tears

History of ISLESBOROUGH, Maine

Thomas JEFFERSON builds a library

KENNEBEC gumbo

LIBERTY or death

MOUNT VERNON love story

NORTH HAVEN

The OLD TOWN Canoe Company

Mr. Goodhue remembers PORTLAND

The daring Miss QUIMBY

RANDOLPH Caldecott

SAINT GEORGE and the dragon

TURNER & Hooch

The UNION quilters

Hollywood comes to VINALHAVEN

The three Weissmanns of WESTPORT

Elijah of BuXton

New YORK to Dallas

History of Cape EliZabeth, Maine

New Items In The Library!

FICTION:

The Amber Shadows by Lucy Ribchester.  This re-creates World War II life and the enclosed world of code-breaking and plays out the suspense in a Hitchcock homage almost worthy of the master.

Before we were yours by Lisa Wingate.  A South Carolina lawyer, researching her grandmother’s past, learns about a Tennessee orphanage that kidnapped children and placed them for adoption with wealthy people.

The blinds by Adam Sternbergh.  A tense, broiling, 21st century Western with a crafty premise and a high body count.

Brave deeds by David Abrams.  Spanning 8 hours, this follows a squad of 6 AWOL soldiers as they attempt to cross war-torn Baghdad on foot to attend the funeral of their leader.

The Captain’s Daughter by Meg Moore.  A gripping novel about a woman who returns to her hometown in coastal Maine and finds herself pondering the age old question of what could have been.

The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor.  A woman inherits a bookstore and discovers her family’s connection to a famous set of photographs.

Deadfall by Linda Fairstein.  The Manhattan prosecutor Alexandra Cooper becomes a suspect.

Down a dark road by Linda Castillo.  Kate Burkholder, an Amish-born (but excommunicated) chief of police, believes that an old friend accused of his wife’s murder may be innocent.

The duchess by Danielle Steel.  A 19th century British duke’s daughter, disinherited by her half-brothers, flees to Paris to make a new life.

Exposed by Lisa Scottoline.  Rosato & DiNunzio, Philadelphia’s most drama-ridden law firm, faces perhaps its most dramatic episode ever when it’s threatened both inside and out.

The followers by Rebecca Wait.  A struggling single mother falls under the spell of a charismatic cult leader, but her rebellious 12 year old daughter isn’t quite so gullible.

A game of ghosts by John Connolly.  The games begin anew as retired police detective Charlie Parker, along with sidekicks Angel and Louis, bring their special brand of cynicism and expertise to this paranormal thriller.

Gather the daughters by Jennie Melamed.  A haunting novel about a cult on an isolated island where nothing is as it seems.

Grace by Paul Lynch.  A sweeping, Dickensian story of a young girl on a life-changing journey across 19th century Ireland on the eve of the Great Famine.

The grip of it by Jac Jemc.  A chilling literary horror novel about a young couple haunted by their newly purchased home.

The half-drowned king by Linnea Hartsuyker.  Steeped in legend and myth, this is a swashbuckling epic of family, love, and betrayal that reimagines the Norse sagas.

House of spies by Daniel Silva.  Gabriel Allon, the Israeli art restorer and spy and now head of Israel’s secret intelligence service, pursues an ISIS mastermind.

I know a secret by Tess Gerritsen.  Jane Rizzoli and Maura Isles pursue a shadowy psychopath keeping secrets and taking lives.

A kind of freedom by Margaret Sexton.  An urgent novel that explores the legacy of racial disparity in the South through a poignant and redemptive family history.

The last laugh by Lynn Freed.  A hilarious novel about the riotous, passion-filled adventures of three women who THOUGHT they were past their prime.

The late show by Michael Connelly.  This introduces Rene Ballard, a fierce young detective fighting to prove herself on the LAPD’s toughest beat.

Less by Andrew Greer.  You are a failed novelist and about to turn 50.  A wedding invitation arrives: your boyfriend of the past 9 years is engaged to someone else.  You can’t say yes – it would be too awkward – and you can’t say no – it would look like defeat.  On your desk are a series of invitations to half-baked literary events around the world.  How do you arrange to skip town?  You accept them all.

The lightkeeper’s daughters by Jean Pendziwol.  A decades-old mystery is revisited as an elderly woman shares the story of her childhood with a troubled teen.  A haunting tale of nostalgia and lost chances that is full of last-minute surprises.

The locals by Jonathan Dee.  Here are the dramas of the 21st century America – rising inequality, working class decline, a new authoritarianism – played out in the classic setting of some of our greatest novels – the small town.

The lying game by Ruth Ware.  This introduces 4 women who have been carrying a terrible secret since their boarding school days, a secret that is about to be literally unearthed.

The mapmaker’s daughter by Katherine Hughes.  A fascinating evocation of the major players of the Ottoman renaissance. A captured Venetian encounters a strange blend of civilization and barbarism as she attains the highest rank possible for a woman in the Ottoman Empire.

Mrs. Fletcher by Tom Perrotta.  A mother and son experience existential tizzies following his departure for college.

Secrets of the tulip sisters by Susan Mallery.  Sisters reconnect when one returns to their tulip-centered hometown.

See what I have done by Sarah Schmidt.  This recasts one of the most fascinating murder cases of all time (Lizzie Borden) into an intimate story of a volatile household and a family devoid of love.

Seven stones to stand or fall by Diana Gabaldon.  A collection of short fiction – including two never-before-published novellas – featuring Jamie Fraser, Lord John Grey, Mastery Raymond, and others, all extending the story of Outlander in thrilling new directions.

Sun at midnight by Rosie Thomas.  Love and adventure in this epic story set against the stunning backdrop of Antarctica.

Tom Clancy Point of Contact by Mike Maden.  With typhoons, deadly Chinese and North Korean operatives wielding bats, knives, and guns, and a weaponized thumb drive – the action reaches Clancy level early and stays there.

Use of force by Brad Thor.  The counterterrorism operative Scot Harvath is called in when a missing terrorism suspect drowns off the Italian coast.

We shall not all sleep by Estep Nagy.  Set on a small Maine island, this is a richly told story of American class, family, and manipulation – a compelling portrait of a unique and privileged WASP stronghold on the brink of dissolution.

NEW MUSIC CDs:

Evolve by Imagine Dragons

Come From Away (original Broadway cast recording)

Melodrama by Lorde

Fake Sugar by Beth Ditto

Dear Evan Hansen (original Broadway cast recording)

Divide by Ed Sheeran

NEW DVDs:

The Lost City of Z (2017) starring Charlie Hunnam

Only angels have wings (1939) starring Cary Grant and Jean Arthur

Broadcast News (1987)  starring Holly Hunter and William Hurt

Westworld (1973) starring Yul Brynner and Richard Benjamin

NONFICTION:

The Cooperstown casebook by Jay Jaffe.  Who’s in the baseball hall of fame, who should be in, and who should pack their plaques and go away.

Deaf daughter by Carol Lee Adams.  This memoir reveals what it’s like to be born able to hear, only to be deaf by age 19.

Drawing calm by Susan Evenson.  Relax, refresh, refocus with drawing, painting and collage workshops.

The history of top 40 singles: 1970-1989 by Frank Deangelis.  Once you learn the histories of these hits, you’ll never hear them the same way again.

Hue 1968 by Mark Bowden.  A stirring history of the 1968 battle that definitively turned the Vietnam War into an American defeat.

Magnetic City by Justin Davidson.  From “New York” magazine’s architecture critic, a walking and reading guide to New York City.

Modern ethics in 77 arguments by Peter Catapano.  Guns, race, and human rights are among the varied ethical issues tackled in this wide-ranging collection.

Notes on a foreign country by Suzy Hansen.  Blending memoir, journalism, and history, this is a moving reflection on America’s place in the world today.  It is a powerful journey of self-discovery and revelation – a profound reckoning with what it means to be American in a moment of grave national and global turmoil.

Scotland: the best 100 places by Peter Irvine.  Extraordinary places to walk, eat, and sleep divided by the themes of reflective, magnificent, and human – all backed up by wonderful photos.

Sons and soldiers by Bruce Henderson.  The untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the US Army to fight Hitler.

Step Parenting by Randall Hicks.  50 one-minute dos and don’ts for stepdads and stepmoms.

The totally unscientific study of the search for human happiness by Paula Poundstone.  This chronicles her amusing and surprisingly personal search for the key to happiness.  A deeply revealing memoir in which the pathos doesn’t kill the humor and one that delivers more than it promises.

Wild things by Bruce Handy.  It’s a profound, eye-opening experience to re-encounter books that you once treasured after decades apart.  A clear-eyed love letter to the greatest children’s books and authors.

Would everybody please stop?  by Jenny Allen.  An Erma Bombeck for the new age with reflections on life and other bad ideas.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

 

What Should I Read Next?

What do you do when you have discovered a new (or new-to-you) author, and you want another book that is just like the one you finished?

You’ve read EVERYTHING you can get your hands on by ______ (fill in the blank) and want to read something JUST like (s)he writes.

Fascination with puppy dog tales – yes, I noticed the pun as well – has you craving more animal stories.

What do you do?  Yes, your local librarian is a wonderful help, but when you finish the book at midnight, and really, ReAlLy, REALLY need a new author SOON, please don’t call us! At least, not a midnight!

A fantastic website for you to find that new author, or subject area, or whatever piece of the title you just finished that sends you searching is part of the MARVEL database.  As I have mentioned in previous blog posts, this amazing resource is provided to all libraries in Maine, and with your current library card you will discover some great new authors and books.

Once you or I access the MARVEL database, which can be accessed through the library website, we need to scroll down, and click on the NOVELIST database.  There are two choices for Novelist – NoveList K-8 Plus and NoveList Plus.  As you might assume, one is geared more to the juvenile, but they both work the same way.

Okay, I’m here.  I type James Patterson in the search bar near the top of the page.  I’m doing a “Basic Search” at this point.  My results show me several things.  On the left side of the page there are several ways to “Refine Results”.  The majority of the page seems to be taken up by several tabs.  These tabs include Books ; Audiobooks ; Series ; Authors and Lists & Articles.

Since the Books tab is the first one (and open), I’ll see what it has to say.

My results include 389 citations.  I know Patterson is prolific, but 389???  Anyway, back to NoveList I go.  As I scroll down the first page, I see books by Patterson, books about Patterson, compilations that include Patterson, and books that he co-authored.  Many choices, but since I have read ALL of his stuff and am looking for something new, I click on the next tab.

Audiobooks appears to be exactly that – James Patterson books that have been recorded for our listening pleasure.  I do notice that the narrator of each audiobook is listed, and as a listener, there are some readers that I particularly enjoy listening to, as well as some that I would rather not hear again.  As I scroll down the first page, I realize that some of the titles are listed more than once and see that perhaps there is a choice of Abridged vs. Unabridged.  All in all, an interesting “tab” to look at.

The next tab is Series.  This one shows me the 22 series that Mr. Patterson writes.

The Authors tab lists six authors who in some way have been associated with James Patterson.  A couple of these authors appear to have written about him, or have co-authored works with him, or simply have the same name.

The last tab is Lists & Articles.  This is exactly what it claims – Lists and Articles about James Patterson.  A great resource for anyone interested in who Mr. Patterson is.

As I explored each of these tabs I noticed several things they had in common.  Below each citation there is a bit of information, as well as a few links.  I see a five-star popularity scale, whether the title is written for Adults, Teens or younger and the Read-alikes.  This is the piece I’m interested in right now.

I click on the Title Read-alikes link for one of the titles on this page.  If there were a specific title I LOVED this would be the time to choose it.  I am taken to a page with several new titles.  There is a “Reason” given for each of the titles on this page.

This process works the same way when I click on Author Read-alikes.  I am taken to a page with several – nine seem to be the maximum number – new authors that might be of interest.

Back to the original “James Patterson” search page I go.  This time I click on the book title itself, and am taken to a page with a description of the book, the genre and tone.  Also on this page, the far right column shows me Read-alikes.  I see the book covers, author and a link to this new title.  I know, I know, “Don’t judge a book by its’ cover”, but … .

I can also search for those “puppy tales” I’m interested in.  The search bar is near the top of each of the NoveList pages, so I type in puppy tales.

Yup, this works as well!  I’m taken to pages that include more than 600 “puppy tales”.

Now, I’ve jumped around this great resource, my clock tells me it’s 2:00a.m., I didn’t disturb my local librarian, I’ve found some new reading ideas, and requested them to be picked up at the library.  This looks like several ticks in the WIN column to me!

Ben’s Guide – A MARVEL Database

I was checking out the MARVEL! database recently and happened across a new-to-me database.

Ben’s Guide to US Government for Kids

I click on the database and discover a fun picture of Ben Franklin with several links to follow.  Along the very top there are GPO ; ABOUT THIS SITE ; LEGAL ; FEEDBACK ; a Search spot, and two little icons.  These links take me to the US Government Publishing Office ; Information about the site and where it originates ; a reminder that this is a private site that does not collect personal data ; and a form to send feedback about the website.  The person-like icon takes me to Learning Adventures and the United States shaped icon takes me to Citizenship.

The next set of “tabs” – I’ll use that term as that’s what we have become used to on a website – include Home ; About Ben and GPO ; Libraries ; Learning Adventures ; Glossary and Games.  There are three more “clickable” links – Ages 4 – 8 Apprentice ; Ages 9 – 13 Journeyperson and Ages 14+ Master.

Where to begin!?!?!

The About Ben and GPO link gives me several extra links, with quite a bit of information about Benjamin Franklin.  One of the links shows me a timeline of his life, and, I admit it, I LOVE timelines!  This man did many things, and if a bit of this information intrigues me enough, I can and will do more research.

The Glossary link is just exactly that – a glossary of terms in a governmental aspect.  The words may have other meanings, but this glossary is how the terms relate to the U.S. Government.

Learning Adventures and the links in the center of the page for various age level lead to the same place, a varied array of information about our government.  A few of the topics include Branches of Government : Symbols, Songs and Structures ; Historical Documents and  Election Process.  Each of these links are in the box in the center of my screen.  To the right of this box, the icons for each of the learning levels appear.  Clicking on the icon changes the learning level of the information.

Back along the top of the page there is a Games link.  Let’s see where this takes me!

In the center box I scroll, and have three choices – Place the States ; Printable Activities and Branch-O-Mania.

Hmmm . . . .

Place the States is truly what it says.  I’m taken to a blank silhouette of the United States, with a colorful array of the states at the bottom of the page.  A jigsaw puzzle of the states!

Printable Activities takes me to more choices – either Word Search or Crosswords.  Below each of these are levels.  The levels are the same as previously noted – Apprentice, Journeyperson and Master.  Clicking on a choice takes me to a page that can be printed and the puzzle worked on away from the computer.

Branch-O-Mania opens a new page, with more choices.  This time my choices are the branches of government – Legislative ; Executive and Judicial.  This is a “catching” game.  By that I mean, Ben Franklin must catch the icons that drop from the sky.  Each of the branches of government have icons that pertain to them.

All in all, this is an interesting addition to the MARVEL! database of information.  It’s very user friendly, and a great way for me to refresh my knowledge of our government.

Ann Russell, Technology Librarian