Latest Snowfall In Maine

Yes, we are tired of it. Yes, it seems it will never go away.  But, have you ever wondered when was the latest recorded snowfall in Maine?

 This was featured on B98.5 FM Central Maine’s Country Radio Station’s website:

The latest recorded snowfall in Maine goes to Caribou, Maine, on May 25, 1974 they recorded 0.2 inches of snow.

So, if you do see some flakes tomorrow and your furnace kicks on, it’s nothing we can’t handle. We’re Mainers!

And this confirms it from the

National Weather Service

Late Season Snowfall across northern Maine

…2nd latest measurable snowfall on record at Caribou, Maine…

A cold upper low tracked across northern Maine during the early morning hours of May 23, 2015.  The air mass was cold enough that the precipitation that fell across far northern Maine fell mainly as snow. A total of three tenths (0.3″) of an inch of snow was observed at Caribou, Maine on May 23, 2015. This broke the previous record for May 23rd of a trace of snow observed in 1990.  It was the greatest snowfall ever observed so late in the season. It was also the 2nd latest measurable snowfall on record at Caribou. The all-time latest measurable snowfall was May 25, 1974 when two tenths (0.2″) of an inch of snow was observed.

Kill A Watt Energy Detectors

Do you remember…..

Did you even know…..

that the Gardiner Public Library has Kill A Watt Energy Detectors which were distributed to the public libraries of Maine several years ago?  These were a gift from Efficiency Maine which was a program of the Maine Public Utilities Commission.  Plug in the Kill A Watt Energy Detector at your home or office and find out exactly how much electricity each device is using.  Some of the biggest “energy hogs” in a typical home are the refrigerator, toaster, computer, coffee maker, space heater, lamps, TV, microwave oven, and air conditioner.  Now you can catch the culprits behind your high electric bills and discover how much they are costing you.


Check one of these devices out from the library …. and discover where your electrical charges are coming from!



What’s Your Favorite Holiday Movie?

One of my favorite holiday movies is Christmas in Connecticut starring Barbara Stanwyck.  The story is about a famous food writer who lies in her column about living on a farm, raising her children and being a good cook.  In reality she is an unmarried New Yorker who can’t boil an egg.  When her editor insists she will spend Christmas entertaining him and a heroic sailor as a good publicity stunt, her job is on the line.


She quickly rounds up a cottage, husband, baby and cook before the guests arrive, but real trouble begins when ‘married’ Stanwyck begins to fall in love with the engaged navy man.


Check this fun film out from the Gardiner Library sometime.


What’s one of your favorite holiday movies?



Small Business Saturday

Hate the mad rush of going to the big box stores as you holiday shop during the weekend after Thanksgiving?  Remember the days of going “downtown” to do that shopping by visiting a row of different stores with different types of items on a smaller and more personal level?  Perhaps that trip in the past might have included coffee/tea/snack and a lunch at that local downtown.  It was fun, wasn’t it, and something you still remember.  Small Business Saturday on November 25th endeavors to bring back those days and emotions.  The blurb below tells about Gardiner Maine Street’s promo of Small Business Saturday here in Gardiner.  Check out their website.  Shop, eat, and socialize with your friends in downtown Gardiner that day and avoid the mad rush of the malls that put us under so much pressure….and in such a foul mood.

 Join us on Saturday November 25th to celebrate Small Business Saturday

Small Business Saturday (locally known as Shop Local Saturday) is a national movement started by American Express in 2010 with a goal of encouraging shoppers to visit their local, small businesses on the Saturday after Thanksgiving.  We are planning to offer several shopping-centric activities to get you up and about visiting and supporting local businesses.

Grab some swag and free shopping bags at the Welcome Station during 10am to 2pm located inside Gardiner Food Co-op & Cafe, 269 Water Street.  Returning this year will be the Passport where each validated purchase from participating businesses earns you an entry for a prize raffle drawing.

Take advantage of Free Gift-Wrapping with several fun and classic holiday prints to choose from.  This is a fun event for shoppers and business owners alike, but also for the community. Stay up to date with Special Business Promotions by visiting our Facebook page and



Marsden Hartley

Do you know who Marsden Hartley was?  If you are interested in what Maine has contributed to the culture of the world, then you should know who he is even if you do not know yet.  Hartley was born in Lewiston, Maine in 1877 and died in Ellsworth in 1943.  His contribution to world culture?  Wikipedia calls him an American Modernist painter and says “he wanted to become ‘the painter of Maine’ and depict American life at a local level.  This aligned Hartley with the Regionalism movement, a group of artists active from the early- to mid-20th century that attempted to represent a distinctly ‘American art.’  He continued to paint in Maine, primarily scenes around Lovell and the Corea coast, until his death in Ellsworth in 1943.  His ashes were scattered on the Androscoggin River.

Colby College Museum of Art in Waterville is currently featuring an exhibition titled Marsden Hartley’s Maine which will run through November 12, 2017.  The museum’s web site at reports that, “This exhibition will explore Marsden Hartley’s complex, sometimes contradictory, and visually arresting relationship with his native state—from the lush Post-Impressionist inland landscapes with which he launched his career, to the later roughly rendered paintings of Maine’s rugged coastal terrain, its hardy inhabitants, and the magisterial Mount Katahdin.

Hartley’s renowned abstract German series, New Mexico recollections, and Nova Scotia period have been celebrated in previous exhibitions, but Marsden Hartley’s Maine will illuminate Maine as a critical factor in understanding the artist’s high place in American art history. Maine served as an essential slate upon which he pursued new ideas and theories.  It was a lifelong source of inspiration intertwined with his personal history, cultural milieu, and desire to create a regional expression of American modernism.

The exhibition is organized by the Colby College Museum of Art and The Metropolitan Museum of Art.”

Check out this exhibition for the unique style with which Hartley has been celebrated, for the man’s unique view of Maine and its inhabitants, and for the wonderful Colby College Museum of Art building and collection which have a splendor all their own.



Social Media at Gardiner Public Library

Did you know that if you follow  the Gardiner Public Library on Facebook that on Monday we post “Have You Seen This Movie Monday” which features the description of a movie that can be borrowed from the library?  Did you know that every Wednesday we post “Check It Out” which is a description of a book that can be borrowed from the library?  It’s a great way to have a recommendation delivered right to your electronical device.

Narrow Gauge Cinema

The Kennebec Journal announced on July 7th that the Narrow Gauge Cinema in Farmington was opening a new drive-in theater in the lot behind the cinema.  It brought back all the memories of childhood that involved my parents loading the 4 kids and the dog into the station wagon with bags of popcorn to go to a drive-in theater.  The one we visited had a playground in front of the huge screen that the kids would all play on until dusk arrived and the first movie started.  We always tried to stay awake through intermission to see the second movie since that one was always a little “racier” as smaller children would have fallen asleep by the time it started.  Remember the speaker that was mounted on a pole which you would hang on your car window so you could clearly hear what was happening on the movie screen?  Cars were larger then and a family of 6 with a dog could easily enjoy a double feature at a drive-in without feeling totally cramped and on top of each other.  Below is a web site from the Smithsonian magazine that will help you remember the glory days of the drive-in.  And if you have never had the experience, then it will give you a sense of what you have missed.  Is the experience worth a trip to Farmington to see a double feature under the stars?  It just might be.


Scott Handville, Assistant Library Director

Amish Macaroni Salad

Looking back at my previous blogs, I saw that on July 25, 2015 I had posted one about Marjorie Standish and particularly her Macaroni Salad Recipe.  I recently made a variation called Amish Macaroni Salad that was equally wonderful but different from hers.  It came from; try it out this summer.

Amish Macaroni Salad

  • Prep 15 m
  • Cook 10 m
  • Ready In 1 h 25 m

Recipe By:CONNIE0751

“A colorful and flavorful macaroni salad made with hard cooked eggs, bell pepper and celery in a creamy dressing. Best macaroni salad I have ever had. I always get many requests for recipe. Enjoy!”


  • 2 cups uncooked elbow macaroni
  • 3 hard-cooked eggs, chopped
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 3 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1 small red bell pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons dill pickle relish
  • 2 cups creamy salad dressing (e.g. Miracle Whip)
  • 3 tablespoons prepared yellow mustard
  • 3/4 cup white sugar
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons white vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon celery seed


  1. Bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add macaroni, and cook for 8 to 10 minutes, until tender. Drain, and set aside to cool.
  2. In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, onion, celery, red pepper, and relish. In a small bowl, stir together the salad dressing, mustard, white sugar, vinegar, salt and celery seed. Pour over the vegetables, and stir in macaroni until well blended. Cover and chill for at least 1 hour before serving.

April Fools tradition popularized

On this day in 1700, English pranksters begin popularizing the annual tradition of April Fools’ Day by playing practical jokes on each other.

Although the day, also called All Fools’ Day, has been celebrated for several centuries by different cultures, its exact origins remain a mystery. Some historians speculate that April Fools’ Day dates back to 1582, when France switched from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar, as called for by the Council of Trent in 1563. People who were slow to get the news or failed to recognize that the start of the new year had moved to January 1 and continued to celebrate it during the last week of March through April 1 became the butt of jokes and hoaxes. These included having paper fish placed on their backs and being referred to as “poisson d’avril” (April fish), said to symbolize a young, easily caught fish and a gullible person.
Historians have also linked April Fools’ Day to ancient festivals such as Hilaria, which was celebrated in Rome at the end of March and involved people dressing up in disguises. There’s also speculation that April Fools’ Day was tied to the vernal equinox, or first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, when Mother Nature fooled people with changing, unpredictable weather.
April Fools’ Day spread throughout Britain during the 18th century. In Scotland, the tradition became a two-day event, starting with “hunting the gowk,” in which people were sent on phony errands (gowk is a word for cuckoo bird, a symbol for fool) and followed by Tailie Day, which involved pranks played on people’s derrieres, such as pinning fake tails or “kick me” signs on them.
In modern times, people have gone to great lengths to create elaborate April Fools’ Day hoaxes. Newspapers, radio and TV stations and Web sites have participated in the April 1 tradition of reporting outrageous fictional claims that have fooled their audiences. In 1957, the BBC reported that Swiss farmers were experiencing a record spaghetti crop and showed footage of people harvesting noodles from trees; numerous viewers were fooled. In 1985, Sports Illustrated tricked many of its readers when it ran a made-up article about a rookie pitcher named Sidd Finch who could throw a fastball over 168 miles per hour. In 1996, Taco Bell, the fast-food restaurant chain, duped people when it announced it had agreed to purchase Philadelphia’s Liberty Bell and intended to rename it the Taco Liberty Bell. In 1998, after Burger King advertised a “Left-Handed Whopper,” scores of clueless customers requested the fake sandwich.
Scott Handville, Assistant Library Director