Happy St. Paddy’s!

H       How to catch a leprechaun
A       Anne of Green Gables
P        Patrick, patron saint of Ireland
       (The) Princes of Ireland
Y        You wouldn’t want to sail on an Irish famine ship!

S        Shamrocks, harps, and shillelaghs
T        Tim O’Toole and the wee folk

P        (A) Pot o’ gold
A       (The) Ancient Celts
T        Tommy Makem’s secret Ireland
R        Rick Steves’ Ireland
I        Irish hearts
C        Celtic moon
K        (The) King of Ireland’s son
       (The) St. Patrick’s Day shamrock mystery

D       Discover Ireland
A       As for Ireland
Y        Your green home

Latest Snowfall In Maine

Yes, we are tired of it. Yes, it seems it will never go away.  But, have you ever wondered when was the latest recorded snowfall in Maine?

 This was featured on B98.5 FM Central Maine’s Country Radio Station’s website:

The latest recorded snowfall in Maine goes to Caribou, Maine, on May 25, 1974 they recorded 0.2 inches of snow.

So, if you do see some flakes tomorrow and your furnace kicks on, it’s nothing we can’t handle. We’re Mainers!

And this confirms it from the

National Weather Service

Late Season Snowfall across northern Maine

…2nd latest measurable snowfall on record at Caribou, Maine…

A cold upper low tracked across northern Maine during the early morning hours of May 23, 2015.  The air mass was cold enough that the precipitation that fell across far northern Maine fell mainly as snow. A total of three tenths (0.3″) of an inch of snow was observed at Caribou, Maine on May 23, 2015. This broke the previous record for May 23rd of a trace of snow observed in 1990.  It was the greatest snowfall ever observed so late in the season. It was also the 2nd latest measurable snowfall on record at Caribou. The all-time latest measurable snowfall was May 25, 1974 when two tenths (0.2″) of an inch of snow was observed.

New Titles – March 2018


All the castles burned by Michael Nye.  The story of Owen Webb, a basketball player on scholarship at a private boys’ school, and his relationship with two enigmatic men: his father – whose secrets neither Owen nor this mother suspect – and Carson, an older teen.

Daphne by Will Boast.  This turns the myth of Daphne and Apollo into a modern love story about social anxiety and physical debilitation.  It is at once tragic and enchanting.

Death by chocolate cherry cheesecake by Sarah Graves.  While Jacobia Tiptree has moved on from fixing up houses, she still can’t resist the urge to snoop into the occasional murder in Eastport, Maine.

Eternal life by Dara Horn.  What would it really mean to live forever?  This is both a heady time travel novel and a thoughtful meditation on the meaning of life.

Forty dead men by Donis Casey.  Here is a compassionate look at PTSD after World War I.

The great alone by Kristin Hannah.  Alaska, 1974.  Untamed.  Unpredictable.  And for a family in crisis, the ultimate test of the human spirit.

How to stop time by Matt Haig.  A love story across the ages – and for the ages – about a man lost in time, the woman who could save him, and the lifetime it can take to learn how to live.

Munich by Robert Harris.  Two former friends who attended Oxford accompany Hitler and Neville Chamberlain to a meeting in 1938 and are forced to make a consequential decision.

Murder in an English village by Jessica Ellicott.  As friends, the boisterous and brash American Beryl couldn’t be less alike than the prim and proper British Edwina.  But as sleuths in an England recovering from the Great War, they’re the perfect match.

 Need to know by Karen Cleveland.  In pursuit of a Russian sleeper cell on American soil, a CIA analyst uncovers a dangerous secret that will test her loyalty to the agency – and to her family.

New York fantastic edited by Paula Guran.  Fantasy spreads across the five boroughs in this new anthology series collecting fantastic and extraordinary stories set in a specific urban local.

A natural by Ross Raisin.  A transporting and acutely observed novel about a gay British soccer player, this captures both the world of professional soccer and the stifling pressure on the hero and his lover to hide their relationship.

The overneath by Peter Beagle.  Beagle chronicles the lives of unicorns, trolls, and magicians in 13 poignant stories many of which caution readers about magic gone awry and temperamental creatures.

The plea by Steve Cavanagh.  An innocent client.  A wife in jeopardy.  Who will take the plea?  This is perfect for anyone who likes a locked-room mystery wrapped inside a legal thriller on steroids.

Red clocks by Leni Zumas.  Abortion is once again illegal in America, in-vitro fertilization is banned, and the Personhood Amendment grants rights to every embryo.  In a small Oregon fishing town, five very different women navigate these new barriers alongside age-old questions surrounding motherhood, identity, and freedom.

Sadness is a white bird by Moriel Rothman-Zecher.  A young Israeli soldier whose best friends are Palestinian twins is driven to the breaking point by conflicting loyalties.

Self-portrait with boy by Rachel Lyon.  An ambitious young female artist accidentally photographs a boy falling to his death – an image that could jumpstart her career but would also devastate her most intimate friendship.

Semiosis by Sue Burke.  Human survival hinges on a bizarre alliance in this character driven science fiction about first contact.

Seven dead by J. Jefferson Farjeon.  In this classic English mystery, an amateur thief has chosen an isolated house for his first robbery.  But it is no ordinary country home.  While hunting for silverware to steal, he stumbles upon a locked room containing seven dead bodies.

Still me by Jojo Moyes.  Louisa Clark moves to New York and is torn between high society and the life she enjoys at a vintage clothing store.

The storm king by Brendan Duffy.  Haunted by dark secrets and an unsolved mystery, a young doctor returns to his isolated Adirondacks hometown in a tense novel in the vein of Harlan Coben.

Surprise me by Sophie Kinsella.  This delves into the heart of a marriage and shows how those we love and think we know best can sometimes surprise us the most.

The taster by V.S. Alexander.  Amid the turbulence of World War II, a young German woman finds a precarious haven closer to the source of danger than she ever imagined – one that will propel her through the extremes of privilege and terror under Hitler’s dictatorship.

A treacherous curse by Deanna Raybourn.  Members of an Egyptian expedition fall victim to an ancient mummy’s curse.


Get out (2017) starring Daniel Kaluuya and Allison Williams

The Crown (2017) starring Claire Foy and John Lithgow

The two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987) starring Ann-Margret and Claudette Colbert

Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) starring Peter Finch and Glenda Jackson

They shoot horses, don’t they? (1969) starring Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, and Gig Young


NOW that’s what I call music, Vol. 65

Man of the woods – Justin Timberlake

Always ascending – Franz Ferdinand

Mania – Fall Out Boy

We came here to love by Sebastien Izambard


The adventures of the mountain men by Stephen Brennan.  True tales of hunting, trapping, fighting, adventure, and survival in the early to mid-1800s in the Rocky Mountains.

All-American murder by James Patterson.  The story of Aaron Hernandez, the New England Patriots tight end convicted of first degree murder.

Armed in America by Patrick Charles.  A history of gun rights from Colonial militias to concealed carry.

Berlin, 1936 by Oliver Hilmes.  This takes the reader through the 16 days of the Olympiad, describing the events in the German capital through the eyes of a select cast of characters – Nazi leaders and foreign diplomats, sportsmen and journalists, writers and socialites, nightclub owners and jazz musicians.

Bliss more by Light Watkins.  How to succeed at meditation without really trying.

Everything you need to know about social media by Greta Van Susteren.  Step-by-step guide to help readers understand the major social platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Instagram and Snapschat, addressing important moral and behavioral issues.

Fire and fury by Michael Wolff.  With extraordinary access to the Trump White House, Wolff tells the inside story of the most controversial presidency of our time.

A good man with a dog by Roger Guay.  A game warden’s journey from the woods of Maine to the swamps of New Orleans.

I am, I am, I am by Maggie O’Farrell.  An extraordinary memoir told entirely in near-death experiences from one of Britain’s best-selling novelists.

Let’s talk about sleep by Daniel Barone.  A guide to understanding and improving your slumber.

Norwich by Karen Crouse.  The story of the small Vermont town that has likely produced more Olympians per capita than any other place in the country – and whose citizens provide a model for achieving excellence while leading well-rounded lives.

Young China by Zak Dychtwald.  How the restless generation born after 1990 will change their country and the world.

FICTION – Picture Books:

Bad mood and the stick by Lemony Snicket

Bear and Chicken by Jannie Ho

Big book of Paw Patrol by Mary Tillworth

Big umbrella by Amy June Bates

Chewie and the Porgs by Kevin Shinick

Dear girl by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Don’t forget Dexter! by Lindsay Ward

If my moon was your sun by Andreas Steinhofel

Kate, who tamed the wind by Liz Garton Scanlon

Little Mouse’s big breakfast by Christine Pym

New LiBEARian by Alison Donald

Pete the Cat: big Easter adventure by James Dean

Runaway baby brother by Katy Hudson

Surprise! by Mike Henson

This is the chick by Wendy Hartmann

Very very very long dog by Julia Patton


Heart and mind of Frances Pauley by April Stevens

Lost rainforest : Mez’s magic by Eliot Schrefer

Love sugar magic: a dash of trouble by Anna Meriano

Wishmakers by Tyler Whitesides


Can I touch your hair? : poems of race, mistakes, and friendship by Irene Latham

Girl who drew butterflies : how Maria Merian’s art changed science by Joyce Sidman

Hidden figures : the true story of four black women and the space race by Margot Lee Shetterly

Impact! asteroids and the science of saving the world by Elizabeth Rusch

Life on Surtsey : Iceland’s upstart island by Loree Griffin Burns

Made for each other : why dogs and people are perfect partners by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent

Muddy boots : outdoor activities for children by Liza Gardner Walsh

My book of rocks and minerals by Devin Dennie

Out of the box by Jemma Westing

Snowy owl invasion! : tracking an unusual migration by Sandra Markle

Spiders! strange and wonderful by Laurence Pringle

Juvenile Graphic Novels

5 worlds : the sand warrior by Mark Siegel

Aphrodite : goddess of love by George O’Connor

Ares : bringer of war by George O’Connor

Brave by Svetlana Chmakova

The Mutts spring diaries by Patrick McDonnell

Poseidon : earth shaker by George O’Connor


Dinosaur train : dinosaurs are different (2015) PBS Kids

The Jetsons & WWE : Robo-Wrestlemania (2017) starring Jeff Bergman and Trevor Devall

The nut job (2014) starring Will Arnett and Katherine Heigl

The stray : a true story (2018) starring Sarah Lancaster and Michael Cassidy

We’re going on a bear hunt (2018) Norton Herrick, film producer and Joanna Harrison, film director.

Wonder (2018) starring Julia Roberts and Jacob Tremblay

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.


Winter Events in the Children’s Room

Children’s Events ~ Winter 2018

Just letting you know some of the upcoming events in the

Children’s Room this winter.

Ms. Jenn the Nutrition Detective will visit us two more times ~

Tuesdays, Mar. 6th and Apr. 3rd.

We will have stories, songs and a craft at

10:00am for preschoolers.

Art @ the Library on

Tuesday, Mar. 27th, from 6:00 to 7:00pm.

Wear your pajamas to the library this evening.

We will have stories and a craft.

Story Time & Crafts every Tuesday at 10:00am.

Babies Love Babies on Fridays at 10:00am.

Adults and children are welcome to attend these events.

Below are some photos from our February events

Miss Jenn & the Nutrition Detectives

Miss Jenn & the Nutrition Detectives

Miss Jenn & the Nutrition Detectives

Art @ the Library – Chinese New Year

Nocturnal Animals presented by the L.C. Bates Museum

Nocturnal Animals presented by the L.C. Bates Museum

Nocturnal Animals presented by the L.C. Bates Museum

Nocturnal Animals presented by the L.C. Bates Museum

Nocturnal Animals presented by the L.C. Bates Museum

Nocturnal Animals presented by the L.C. Bates Museum

Ursula K. Le Guin – A Poem From The Shelves

As many of you may know, well-known fantasy and science fiction author, Ursula K. Le Guin died last month.  The following poem, in homage to her, uses only titles of some of her works.


Very far away from anywhere else

Changing planes

City of illusions

Planet of exile

The unreal and the real

The dispossessed

Always coming home


Cat dreams

A ride on the red mare’s back


The twins, the dream

Catwings return

A visit from Dr. Katz

Wild angels


Incredible good fortune




Nine lives

The birthday of the world

The beginning place


A fisherman of the inland sea

The wind’s twelve quarters

The farthest shore

The other wind


The eye of the heron

Fish soup

New Titles – February 2018


City of endless night by Douglas Preston.  One of the best in the Pendergast series – tense and tightly wound, with death relentlessly circling, stalking, lurking behind every shadow.  A New York City detective and an F.B.I. special agent track down a killer who decapitates numerous victims.

Cry your way home by Damien Walters.  This collection of subversive short horror pieces focuses on the ways girls and women, particularly mothers and daughters, intentionally or inadvertently harm one another.

Death below stairs by Jennifer Ashley.  Victorian class lines are crossed when cook Kat Holloway is drawn into a murder that reaches all the way to the throne.

Elmet by Fiona Mozley.  A not-always-gentle giant and his two children live peacefully in the woods, but the push and pull of old forces will eventually find them, and the results will be explosive.

Fools and mortals by Bernard Cornwell.  In this delightful departure from his popular military historicals, Cornwell conducts a boisterous behind-the-scenes romp through the often sordid world of the Elizabethan stage.

Forest dark by Nicole Krauss.  This follows the strange journeys of two American Jews in Israel who experience mysterious transformations while wandering in the desert.

The girls in the picture by Melanie Benjamin.  A fascinating novel of the friendship and creative partnership between two of Hollywood’s earliest female legends – screenwriter Frances Marion and superstar Mary Pickford.

Glory days by Melissa Fraterrigo.  Here is a stark portrait of the painful transitions of 21 century small-town America.

Green by Sam Graham-Felsen.  A novel race and privilege in America that you haven’t seen before:  a coming-of-age story about a life-changing friendship, propelled by an exuberant, unforgettable voice.

Halsey Street by Naima Coster.  A family saga set against the landscape of gentrifying Brooklyn.

Heart Spring Mountain by Robin MacArthur.  A young woman returns to her rural Vermont hometown in the wake of a devastating storm to search for her missing mother and to unravel a powerful family secret.

The immortalists by Chloe Benjamin.  This is a family saga that investigates the question:  If you knew the date of your death, how would you live your life?

The music shop by Rachel Joyce.  This deceptively simple love story is a magical winner that explores the idea that the perfect song can transform one’s life.

The night market by Jonathan Moore.  A sharp and scary near-future thriller that delivers a dark message about society’s love affair with technology.

Now that you mention it by Kristan Higgins.  When a fateful moment requires Nora to return home to Maine after having made a life for herself in Boston, she must decide whether staying is worth sticking around to hear some hard truths.

Operator Down by Brad Taylor.  Pike Logan’s search for a Mossad agent and ally puts him on a collision course with a ruthless military coup in Africa – and tests his loyalties to the Task Force.

Peculiar ground by Lucy Hughes-Hallett.  This is a great English country house novel, spanning three centuries, that explores surprisingly timely themes of immigration and exclusion.

Red sky at noon by Simon Sebag Montefiore.  This novel is set during the epic cavalry ride across the hot grasslands outside Stalingrad during the darkest times of World War II.

Robicheaux by James Lee Burke.  A bereaved detective confronts his past and works to clear his name when he becomes a suspect during the investigation into the murder of a man who killed his wife.

Say my name by Allegra Huston.  A middle aged woman has an extramarital affair with a much younger man.

Sing, unburied, sing by Jesmyn Ward.  A 13 year old boy comes of age in Mississippi while his black mother takes him and his toddler sister to pick up their white father, who is getting released from the state penitentiary.

The wanted by Robert Crais.  A single mother hires Elvis Cole to investigate her teenage son who is on the run after a deadly crime spree.

The woman in the window by A.J. Finn.  A twisty, powerful Hitchcockian thriller about an agoraphobic woman who believes she witnessed a crime in a neighboring house.


2018 Grammy Nominees

Songs of Experience by U2

Lust For Life by Lana Del Rey

The Rest of Our Life by Tim McGraw & Faith Hill


It   (2017) starring Bill Skarsgard

A Late Quartet   (2012) starring Christopher Walken, Catherine Keener, and Philip Seymour Hoffman

Dunkirk   (2017) directed by Christopher Nolan

Strictly Ballroom   (1993) directed by Baz Luhrmann

Weeds: Season one and two starring Mary-Louise Parker

Nurse Jackie: Season 1 starring Edie Falco

Scavenger Hunt    (1979) starring Richard Benjamin, James Coco, and Ruth Gordon


The boy who really, really wanted to have sex by John McNally.  Subtitled “The memoir of a fat kid”, this gives readers an honest and often mischievous look at the author’s working-class childhood in Midwestern America.

The Dogist puppies by Elias Friedman.  An endearing look at puppies.

50 things to do in Maine before you die by Nancy Griffin.  The ultimate to-do list for Mainers and visitors alike.

How Maine changed the world by Nancy Griffin.  This reflects upon the contributions Maine has made that have had significant cultural and historical impacts on both the US and the world.

The joy of acrylic painting by Annie Gonzales.  Expressive painting techniques for beginners.

Maine: life in a day by Susan Conley.  Gathering the work of 50 photographers, this captures the day to day lives of ordinary Mainers.

Remodelista by Julie Carlson.  Simple, stylish storage ideas for all over the organized home.

So you want to talk about race by Ijeoma Oluo. The author explores the complex reality of today’s racial landscape – from white privilege and police brutality to systemic discrimination and the Black Lives Matter movement – offering clarity that readers need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide.

Stop here, this is the place by Susan Conley.  Through Susan’s recollections of moments from her childhood and the ongoing lives of her children, we’re reminded of our own childhoods, and of the necessity to stop and pay attention, to hold on.

Tell me more by Kelly Corrigan.  Stories about the 12 hardest things we have to learn to say such as “I was wrong,” “I know,” and “I love you”.

Treating people well by Lea Berman.  The extraordinary power of civility at work and in life.

The truth matters by Bruce Bartlett. A citizen’s guide to separating facts from lies and stopping fake news in its tracks.

The ultimate instant pot pressure cooker cookbook by Ella Sanders.  200 easy foolproof recipes.

Women and power by Mary Beard.  A look at the roots of misogyny and its manifestations today.

You need a budget by Jesse Mecham.  A proven system for breaking the paycheck to paycheck cycle, getting out of debt, and living the life you want.

New Children’s Books for February 2018


Click, clack, moo! I love you by Doreen Cronin

Come home already! by Jory John

Dreadful tale of Prosper Redding by Alexandra Bracken

How to find and elephant by Kate Banks

Journey under the sea by R.A. Montgomery

Library book by Tom Chapin

Love by Matt de la Pena

Magic for sale by Carrie Clickard

Real McCoys by Matthew Swanson

Secret of the ninja by Jay Leibold

Space and beyond by R.A. Montgomery

Surf monkeys by Jay Leibold

Survivor diaries: avalanche! by Terry Lynn Johnson

Valensteins by Ethan Long


Lindsey Vonn by Eric Braun

Many: the diversity of life on earth by Nicola Davies

Michael Phelps by Grace Hansen

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: the case of R.B.G. vs. Inequality by Jonah Winter

Simone Biles by Grace Hansen

Strongest man in the world: the legend of Louis Cyr by Lucie Papineau

Super Bowl: chasing football immortality by Matt Doeden

You wouldn’t want to live without bacteria by Roger Canavan

You wouldn’t want to live without boogers by Alex Woolf

You wouldn’t want to live without clocks and calendars! by Fiona Macdonald

You wouldn’t want to live without dentists! by Fiona Macdonald

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.


Kill A Watt Energy Detectors

Do you remember…..

Did you even know…..

that the Gardiner Public Library has Kill A Watt Energy Detectors which were distributed to the public libraries of Maine several years ago?  These were a gift from Efficiency Maine which was a program of the Maine Public Utilities Commission.  Plug in the Kill A Watt Energy Detector at your home or office and find out exactly how much electricity each device is using.  Some of the biggest “energy hogs” in a typical home are the refrigerator, toaster, computer, coffee maker, space heater, lamps, TV, microwave oven, and air conditioner.  Now you can catch the culprits behind your high electric bills and discover how much they are costing you.


Check one of these devices out from the library …. and discover where your electrical charges are coming from!



Children’s Events ~ Winter 2018

Just letting you know some of the upcoming events in the

Children’s Room this winter.


Ms. Jenn and the Nutrition Detectives will visit us three times ~

Tuesdays, Feb. 6th, Mar. 6th and Apr. 3rd.

We will have stories, songs and a craft at

10:00am for preschoolers.


Nocturnal Animals presented by LC Bates Museum on

Tuesday, Feb. 20th at 10:00am during school vacation week.


We will show a Movie on Thursday, Feb. 22nd at 10:00am.

Stay tuned, we will announce the movie as the time gets close.


Upstream will join us for Art @ the Library on

Tuesday, Feb. 27th, from 6:00 to 7:00pm.

Create your own 9×12 original unframed fish art.

Art materials and paper provided.


Story Time & Crafts every Tuesday at 10:00am.


Babies Love Babies on Fridays at 10:00am.


Adults and children are welcome to attend these events.


New Titles for January 2018!


 Alive in shape and color edited by Lawrence Block.  17 paintings by great artists and the stories they inspired.

Artemis by Andy Weir.  A small-time smuggler living in a lunar colony schemes to pay off an old debt by pulling off a challenging heist.

The big book of the Continental Op by Dashiell Hammett.  All 38 stories starring the Continental Op – one of the greatest characters in detective fiction.

The body in the casket by Katherine Hall Page.  A chilling New England who-dun-it, inspired by the best Agatha Christie mysteries and with hints of the timeless board game Clue.

A darker sea by James Haley.  A gripping naval saga featuring Commander Bliven Putnam, chronicling the build up to the biggest military conflict between the U.S. and Britain after the Revolution – The War of 1812.

The demon crown by James Rollins.  To save mankind’s future, the members of Sigma Force must make a devil’s bargain as they join forces with their most hated enemy to stop an ancient threat.

 End game by David Baldacci.  Jessica Reel and Will Robie fight a dangerous adversary in Colorado.

The floating world by C. Morgan Babst.  A dazzling novel about family, home, and grief that takes readers into the heart of Hurricane Katrina with the story of a family whose roots stretch back nearly to the foundation of New Orleans.

Fortitude smashed by Taylor Brooke.  Personalized chips are now implanted beneath the thumbnails of every infant, where glowing numbers count down to the moment they will meet their soul mate.  Fate is now a calculation.

Future home of the living god by Louise Erdrich.  A startling portrait of a young woman fighting for her life and her unborn child against oppressive forces that manifest in the wake of a cataclysmic event.

The girl in the tower by Katherine Arden.  A remarkable young woman blazes her own trail from the backwoods of Russia to the court of Moscow.

The ice house by Laura Lee Smith.  This follows the beleaguered MacKinnons as they weather the possible loss of the family business, a serious medical diagnosis, and the slings and arrows of familial discord.

 In this moment by Karen Kingsbury.  A lawyer defends a public high school principal who starts an after-school Bible study program.

Into the drowning deep by Mira Grant.  A claustrophobic, deep-sea tale that will leave readers glad to be safely on dry land.

The library at the edge of the world by Felicity Hayes-McCoy.  A local librarian must find a way to rebuild her community and her own life in this touching, enchanting novel set on Oreland’s stunning Wet Coast.

The Paris secret by Karen Swan.  A tale of forgotten treasures and long-held secrets, this explores a woman’s journey to discovering the truth behind an abandoned apartment and a family whose mysteries may be better left undiscovered.

Past perfect by Danielle Steel.  The story of two families living 100 years apart who come together in time in a startling moment, opening the door to rare friendship and major events in early 20th century history.

Secrets of Cavendon by Barbara Taylor Bradford.  A saga featuring the aristocratic Ingham family and the Swann family, who have loyally served them for generations.

Seven days of us by Francesca Hornak.  A family can’t escape their secrets when they’re forced to spend the Christmas holiday in quarantine in this sharply funny novel.

Two kinds of truth by Michael Connelly.  While he investigates the murder to two pharmacists, an old case comes back to haunt Harry Bosch.

Weave a circle round by Kari Maaren.  A teen learns about herself – and the fabric of the universe – when she goes traveling in time with an immortal 14 year old.  A charming and extraordinarily relatable book with the potential to become a timeless classic.

The whispering room by Dean Koontz.  Former FBI agent and wanted fugitive Jane Hawk tracks down a group that is brainwashing people into committing suicide.

Year One by Nora Roberts.  It began on New Year’s Eve.  The sickness came on suddenly and spread quickly.  The fear spread even faster…  And as the power of science and technology receded, magic rose up in its place.

You can run by Steve Mosby.  A riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma guaranteed to play havoc with both your brain cells and your heartbeat.


Victoria and Abdul (2017) starring Judi Dench and Ali Fazal

Come along with me (1982) starring Estelle Parsons and Sylvia Sidney

Baby Driver (1917) starring Ansel Elgort, John Hamm, and Jamie Fox

Holocaust (1978) starring Meryl Streep, James Woods, Michael Moriarty

Summer wishes, winter dreams (1973) starring Joanne Woodward and Sylvia Sidney

Law and order: the third year starring Jerry Orbach and Paul Sorvino

Come back to the 5 & Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean (1982) starring Cher and Karen Black


Adventures of a ballad hunter by John Lomax.  Vibrant, amusing, often haunting stories of the people the author met and recorded are the gems of this book which also gives lyrics for dozens of songs, this illuminates vital traditions in American popular culture and the labor that has gone into their preservation.

Ageless soul by Thomas Moore.  The lifelong journey toward meaning and joy is explored.

Bunk by Kevin Young.  This follows the rise of hoaxes, humbug, plagiarists, phonies, post-facts, and fake news.

Cover me by Ray Padgett.  The stories behind the greatest cover songs of all time.

The Family Tree cemetery field guide by Joy Neighbors.  How to find, record, and preserve your ancestors’ graves.

The great Halifax explosion by John Bacon.  The astonishing true story of history’s largest man-made explosion before the atomic bomb, and its world-changing aftermath.

Happiness by Christophe Andre.  25 ways to live joyfully through art.

The mindful way to a good night’s sleep by Tzivia Gover.  Discover how to use dreamwork, meditation, and journaling to sleep deeply and wake up well.

The newcomers by Helen Thorpe.  A powerful and moving account of how refugee teenagers at a Denver public high school learn English and become Americans.

Sense of occasion by Harold Prince.  In this fast-moving, candid, conversational, and entertaining memoir, Prince – the most honored director/producer in the history of the American theater – looks back over his 70 year career.

The tattoo dictionary by Trent Aitken-Smith.  Discover the true meanings behind over 200 popular tattoos with this comprehensive book illustrated with over 100 tattoo designs.

The Third Reich by Thomas Childers.  A riveting study delves deeply into the conditions of the perfect storm that allowed Hitler and his Nazi party to seize and wield unprecedented power.

Total cat mojo by Jackson Galaxy.  The ultimate guide to life with your cat.

William Wegman: being human by William Wegman.  More than 300 photos collected to illustrate the artist’s humanistic and witty approach to his subjects, his beloved Weimaraners.  Divided into 16 themed chapters, this showcases some best known images along with previously unseen gems.

Children’s Books


Feather by Ceo Wenxuan

I got the rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison

My lazy cat by Christine Roussey

Papillon goes to the vet by A.N. Kang

Read the book, lemmings! by Ame Dyckman

Seamus’s short story by Heather Hartt-Sussman

Snow scene by Richard Jackson

When the moon comes by Paul Harbridge

When the snow falls by Linda Booth Sweeney

Where, oh where is baby bear? by Ashley Wolff


About habitats: seashores by Cathryn Sill

Baby animals playing by Suzi Eszterhas

Beginner’s guide to coding by Marc Scott

Danza!: Amalia Hernandez and el Ballet Folklorico de Mexico by Duncan Tonatiuh

Dazzle ships: World War I and the art of confusion by Chris Barton

Deadliest: 20 dangerous animals by Steve Jenkins

Miguel’s brave knight: young Cervantes and his dream of Don Quixote poems by Margarita Engle

Sergeant Reckless: the true story of the little horse who became a hero by Patricia McCormick

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.







What’s Your Favorite Holiday Movie?

One of my favorite holiday movies is Christmas in Connecticut starring Barbara Stanwyck.  The story is about a famous food writer who lies in her column about living on a farm, raising her children and being a good cook.  In reality she is an unmarried New Yorker who can’t boil an egg.  When her editor insists she will spend Christmas entertaining him and a heroic sailor as a good publicity stunt, her job is on the line.


She quickly rounds up a cottage, husband, baby and cook before the guests arrive, but real trouble begins when ‘married’ Stanwyck begins to fall in love with the engaged navy man.


Check this fun film out from the Gardiner Library sometime.


What’s one of your favorite holiday movies?