Gardiner Public Library will be CLOSED on Monday May 27th, in honor of Memorial Day.

Summer Reading Program Events – 2019

Summer Reading Program 2019

June 17th August 16th

Every Tuesday

Story Hour  @ 10:00AM

Crafts @ 10:30AM

(ages 3-7 yrs)

Special Events

Tuesday, June 18th, 6:00-7:00PM

Marine Mammals of Maine

Wednesdays (6/19-8/14)

9 – Movies!

1 movie/week

 Children’s Room

Wed: 10 am-12:30pm

Popcorn Included!

Tuesday, August 13th

Stuffed Animal Sleepover

Drop off animals on Tuesday, August 13th

Pick up animals Wed., Thurs., or Fri. of that same week.

______________________________________________

Pick Up Tracking Charts & Sea Dogs Game Vouchers Any Time After June 10th

Beginning August 5th

Turn in a Completed Chart for a Free Paperback!

Have Fun & Keep Reading!

This program is sponsored by the Gardiner Public Library.  It is not an MSAD#11 event.

GPL / 152 Water Street, Gardiner ME / 582-3312

New Items ~ May 2019

FICTION

The Ash family by Molly Dektar.  When a young woman leaves her family – and the civilized world – to join an off-the-grid community headed by an enigmatic leader, she discovers that belonging comes with a deadly cost.

Beyond the Point by Claire Gibson.  An inspiring tribute to female friendship and female courage.  Three women are brought together in an enthralling story of friendship, heartbreak, resilience in a novel set at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Boy swallows universe by Trent Dalton.  A story of brotherhood, true love, family, and the most unlikely of friendships, this is the tale of an adolescent boy on the cusp of discovering the man he will be.

Death in Provence by Serena Kent.  This is a clever, light-hearted mystery set in modern Provence featuring the irrepressible Penelope Kite, a young-at-heart divorcee with a knack for stumbling across dead bodies.

Fame adjacent by Sarah Skilton.  The child star that was left behind is about to get her moment to shine in this swoony romantic comedy inspired by a unique, beloved facet of pop culture history:  The Mickey Mouse Club.

The hunting party by Lucy Foley.  Psychological suspense in the tradition of Agatha Christie in which a group of old college friends are snowed in at a hunting lodge…and murder and mayhem ensue.

Infinite detail by Tim Maughan.  A timely and uncanny portrait of a world in the wake of fake news, diminished privacy, and a total shutdown of the internet.

An Irish immigrant story by Jack Cashman.  This historical novel brings the reader through the story of a family that overcomes adversity to thrive in America.

The island of sea women by Lisa See.  The friendship over many decades of two female divers from the Korean island of Jeju is pushed to a breaking point.

Kaddish.com by Nathan Englander.  An excellent comic dissection of Jewish-American life.  This novel reads like Chaim Potok filtered through the sensibility of Mel Brooks.

The last act by Brad Parks.  An out of work actor takes a job for the FBI – using a false name and backstory, he enters a low-security prison and begins to befriend a fellow prisoner who knows the location of documents that can bring down a ruthless drug cartel.  But the cartel is also looking….

The last year of the war by Susan Meissner.  A German American teenager’s life changes forever when her immigrant family is sent to an internment camp during WW II and she becomes friends with another girl at the camp – a Japanese American teenager.

Little faith by Nickolas Butler.  A Wisconsin family grapples with the power and limitations of faith when one of their own falls under the influence of a radical church.

Lost and wanted by Nell Freudenberger.  A physicist at MIT receives a text from her dead best friend.

A puzzle for fools by Patrick Quentin.  A wave of murders rocks a sanitarium – and it’s up to the patients to stop them.

Silent night by Danielle Steel.  After tragedy strikes, a child TV star loses her memory and ability to speak.

Tomorrow there will be sun by Dana Reinhardt.  A private Mexican villa in a tropical paradise is the backdrop of this story of a milestone vacation gone wrong, wrong, wrong as a family falls apart.

When all is said by Anne Griffin.  If you had to pick 5 people to sum up your life, who would they be?  If you were to raise a glass to each of them, what would you say?  And what would you learn about yourself, when all is said?

Wild card by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington clashes with a determined adversary.

Wolf pack by C.J. Box.  Wyoming game warden Joe Pickett encounters bad behavior on his own turf – only to have the FBI and the DOJ ask him to stand down.

NEW DVDs

Aquaman (2018) starring Jason Momoa

If Beale Street could talk (2018) starring Stephen James and Regina King

The bookshop (2018) starring Emily Mortimer, Bill Nighy, and Patricia Clarkson

Vice (2018) starring Christian Bale and Amy Adams

NONFICTION

Biased by Jennifer Eberhardt.  From one of the world’s leading experts on unconscious racial bias, a personal examination of one of the central controversies and culturally powerful issues of our time, and its influence on contemporary race relations and criminal justice.

The end of absence by Michael Harris.  Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the internet.  This is about reclaiming what we’ve lost in a world of constant connections.

Girl, stop apologizing by Rachel Hollis.  A shame-free plan for embracing and achieving your goals.

Holy envy by Barbara Taylor.  The author recounts her moving discoveries of finding the sacred in unexpected places while teaching the world’s religions to undergrads in rural Georgia, revealing how God delights in confounding our expectations.

It ended badly by Jennifer Wright.  13 of the worst breakups in history – replete with beheadings, uprisings, creepy sex dolls, and celebrity gossip – and its disastrously bad consequences throughout time.

K by Tyler Kepner.  A history of baseball in 10 pitches.

The league of wives by Heath Lee.  The story of a group of women who mobilized and organized in an attempt to bring their POW husbands home from Vietnam.

Mama’s last hug by Frans de Waal.  A captivating survey of animal and human emotions.

The Seventies: a photographic journey by Ira Resnick.  The Seventies in America were a time of social and cultural ferment, and Resnick was there with his camera to capture it all.

The threat by Andrew McCabe.  How the FBI protects America in the age of terror and Trump.

Under red skies by Karoline Kan.  A deeply personal and shocking look at how China is coming to terms with its conflicted past as it emerges into a modern, cutting-edge superpower, seen though the stories of three generations of women.

Women warriors by Pamela Toler.  Who says women don’t go to war?  From Vikings and African queens to cross-dressing military doctors and WW II Russian fighter pilots, these are the stories of women for whom battle was not a metaphor.

New Children’s Books for May 2019

 PICTURE BOOKS

Africville by Shauntay Grant

Baby day by Jane Godwin

A day in the life of Marlon Bundo by Marlon Bundo

Kite for the moon by Jane Yolen

Little Fox and the missing moon by Ekaterina Trukhan

Music for Mister Moon by Philip C. Stead

Peg + Cat: math in the bath by Jennifer Oxley

A piglet named Mercy by Kate DiCamillo

The sun shines everywhere by Mary Ann Hoberman

Sweet dreamers by Isabelle Simler

There’s a dinosaur on the 13th floor by Wade Bradford

GRAPHIC NOVELS

5 worlds: the Cobalt Prince by Mark Siegel

Baby-Sitters Club: Mary Anne saves the day by Raina Telgemeier

Baby-Sitters Club: the truth about Stacey by Raina Telgemeier

Endgames  by Ru Xu

Science comics solar system: our place in space by Rosemary Mosco

Super Potato #1: the epic origin of Super Potato by Artur Laperla

CHAPTER BOOKS

Freya & Zoose by Emily Butler

Judy Moody and friends: searching for stinkodon by Megan McDonald

Max and the Midknights by Lincoln Peirce

Merci Suarez changes gears by Meg Medina

Owl diaries: Eva and Baby Mo by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries: Eva and the lost pony by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries: Eva’s big sleepover by Rebecca Elliott

Pay attention, Carter Jones by Gary D. Schmidt

The Princess in black and the hungry bunny horde by Shannon Hale

The Princess in black takes a vacation by Shannon Hale

The remarkable journey of Coyote Sunrise by Dan Gemeinhart

What the wind can tell you by Sarah Marie A. Jette

NON-FICTION

Astronaut, aquanaut by Jennifer Swanson

Knowledge genius by Peter Chrisp

LEGO Star Wars visual dictionary by Simon Beecroft

The magic & mystery of trees by Jen Green

Nature play at home by Nancy Striniste

Ocean emporium: a compilation of creatures by Susie Brooks

Rotten! : vultures, beetles, slime, and nature’s other decomposers by Anita Sanchez

Time to parent: organizing your life to bring out the best in your child and you by Julie Morgenstern

MOVIES

Arthur’s music jamboree a PBS Kids

Arthur’s travel adventures a PBS Kids

Dragons : race to the edge seasons 1 & 2 by Dreamworks

Kiki’s delivery service with Kirsten Dunst

Paddington 2 with Ben Wishaw

Tangled : before ever after with Mandy Moore

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

Digital Maine Library – Books & Authors

I think it’s time to explore another of the amazing databases among the Digital Maine Library databases provided to us by the Maine State Library.

Okay, I think I’ll check out Books & Authors.

There’s a lot going on on the home page of Books & Authors.  Tabs across the top of the page include Browse Titles ; Browse Authors ; Browse Genres ; Who?What?When?Where? ; Expert Picks and Award Winners.  The left hand side of the page has an olive green section with two file tabs – Fiction and Non-Fiction.  Below this section there are two different file tabs – Coming Soon and New Arrivals.  The rest of the page has a variety of clickable links, all seemingly attached to pictures of book covers.

Where to start . . .

I click on the Browse Titles tab and am taken to a page listing, you guessed it, Titles!  If I have a specific title in mind there is a search box where I can enter a specific title, or partial title and there it is.  Clicking on the title brings me to a page with information about the book I am looking for – this information includes a link to the author’s page in the Books & Authors database, a short blurb about the book, a list of characters, genres, settings, subjects, and time period, as well as links to awards the book has won, recommended similar titles, and that this title is part of a series.

A quick look shows me that Browse Authors gives pretty much the same types of information.

Browse Genres asks me to pick a genre.  There is a list of Genres in the olive green box to the left of the page, again both Fiction and Non-Fiction.  Clicking on any of the genres gives me options to narrow down my choices.  From here, I find the same types of information as the two previous screens.

Who?What?Where?When? gives me options as well.  This time, there are search boxes after each of the questions, with options of Type and Choose.  I can enter search terms here – Type, or click on the little down arrow – Choose, using either of these options creates a circle diagram, where the circles intersect gives me an idea of who many items this database might access.  More precise percentages are shown below the diagram.  I am able to click on any of the search terms here, or the intersection number and am taken to a page with a list of the titles found.

 The next tab I try is Expert Picks.  This page give me two lists – Expert Picks and Librarian’s Favorites.  Each of these lists has a scroll bar, so that I can slide through the titles, to see what other people might have chosen as a “Pick”.  Each of the lists appear to be in numerical (year) and then in alphabetical order.  Scrolling through the Librarian’s Picks, I see several lists with Bangor in the title – yes, these are indeed lists generated by the Bangor Public Library, in Bangor, Maine!  Clicking on a list brings me to a list of titles, with links to information about the item.  These lists are great, but I had to go out of the page and back in to view a list from the other Pick list – Expert or Librarian.  I found this to be not particularly user friendly.

The last tab at the top of the page is Award Winners.  Clicking here takes me to a list of awards.  The list is in alphabetical order, with the years covered.  This will be fun to use for future display ideas!

Back on the homepage, as I mentioned earlier, there are many book covers with clickable information, as well as ideas, such as Seasonal Suggestions ; Community Picks and Best Sellers.

There is a section titled My Reading Room.  Clicking on here I need to create a user name and login.  Once I have completed this, I am taken to a page where I can keep lists of items – My Books ;  My Authors ;  My Reviews & Ratings and My Profile.  These look interesting, and I’ll have to take some time to add my information.

I think this could be a very useful and fun site to use and play with!

Easter Eggs

Although we didn’t dye “Easter eggs” as a family when I was growing up, I have always been fascinated by the creative results that are often produced.  These results happen sometimes on purpose, sometimes accidentally.  Yankee magazine published an article in 2012 that is now featured on their New England Today web page telling how to dye eggs using natural, home ingredients.  Give it a try.

The article was written by Christine Chitnis.

DayGlo-dyed eggs have their retro charms, but we think it’s even more fun to make your own colorings using common foods. The result is a subtler, more sophisticated palette–perfect for your holiday centerpiece. The only downside? You’ll need to soak the eggs longer in homemade egg dye–two to three hours–but natural beauty like this is well worth the wait.

Natural Dyed Eggs for Easter

Photo by Ira Garber

How to Make Homemade Egg Dye:

Create the base: Combine 4 cups water, 1 tablespoon white vinegar, and 1 tablespoon salt.

Ingredients to Make Homemade Egg Dye:

— hard-boiled white eggs in their shells
— water
— white vinegar
— salt
— beets, ground coffee, red cabbage, ground turmeric
— knife, pots, strainer, bowls (metal, ceramic, or plastic)

Notes: Save the egg carton (you’ll use it for drying the dyed eggs). And when you transfer your dyes into bowls, don’t use your good dishes or kitchenware, as the colors may stain.

To dye the eggs: Soak in the homemade egg dye until eggshells reach the desired shade (two to three hours); the longer you soak them, the deeper and richer the color will be. Using a spoon, set the eggs into their carton(s), and let them dry thoroughly. When you’re done, you’ll welcome the new season with a lovely, all-natural addition to your spring decor!

RED DYE:

Roughly chop 2 beets, and combine with the base. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes. Strain into a bowl and reserve the liquid for dyeing. Let cool.

BROWN DYE:

Combine 4 tablespoons of ground coffee with the base and stir well. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes. Strain into a bowl and reserve the liquid for dyeing. Let cool.

BLUE DYE:

Shred half of a large red cabbage and combine with the base.  Bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes.  Strain into a bowl and reserve the liquid for dyeing.  Let cool.

YELLOW DYE:

Combine 5 tablespoons of ground turmeric with the base and stir well.  Simmer just until the turmeric dissolves, 2 to 3 minutes.  Pour into a bowl and reserve liquid for dyeing.  Let cool.

 

 

 

 

Children’s Events ~ Spring 2019

A few upcoming spring events in the Children’s Room. ~~

Scales & Tails : Amazing Reptiles presented by Chewonki

Tuesday, Apr. 16th at 10:30 am – school vacation week.

Kennebec Valley Child Abuse Prevention event

Friday, Apr. 19th 10-11:30 am.

A local police officer will read a book, followed by snacks and a craft.

Art @ the Library

Tuesday, Apr. 21st, from 6:00 to 7:00 pm.

Ms. Jenn and the Nutrition Detectives will visit us ~

Tuesdays, May. 7th, and Jun. 4th.

We will have stories, songs and a craft at

10:00 am for preschoolers.

Head Start Art Show, Tuesday, May 7th, 5:00 to 6:30 pm

in the Children’s Room.

Story Time & Crafts every Tuesday at 10:00 am.

Babies Love Toddlers on Fridays at 10:00 am.

Adults, caregivers, parents and children are welcome to attend these events.

New Items ~ April 2019

FICTION

The American Agent by Jacqueline Winspear.  Mazie Dobbs investigates the mysterious murder of an American war correspondent in London during the Blitz.

Black Leopard, red wolf by Marlon James.  A swords-and-sorcery epic set in a mythical Africa that is also part detective story, part quest fable, and part inquiry into the nature of truth, belief, and destiny.

Bowlaway by Elizabeth McCracken.  This is about three generations of an unconventional New England family who own and operate a candlepin bowling alley.

Cemetery Road by Greg Iles.  An electrifying tale of friendship, betrayal, and shattering secrets that threaten to destroy a small Mississippi town.

Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Reid.  A gripping novel about the whirlwind rise of an iconic 1970s rock group and their beautiful lead singer, revealing the mystery behind their infamous breakup.

Early riser by Jasper Fforde.  A madcap adventure through the Welsh winter which has grown so deadly most humans literally sleep through it.  Whip-smart, tremendous fun, and an utter delight from start to finish.

Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts.  The story behind the Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the book that inspired the iconic film, through the eyes of author L. Frank Baum’s intrepid wife, Maud.

The huntress by Kate Quinn.  A battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America.

Leading men by Christopher Castellani.  An intriguing tale of Tennessee Williams and his lover of 15 years, Frank Merlo.  It’s a wonderful examination of artists and the people who love them and change their work in large and imperceptible ways.

The lost man by Jane Harper.  Nathan and Bub Bright find their other brother dead at the border of their cattle ranch in the Australian outback.

The Malta exchange by Steve Berry.  The author has the lock on making history zing with breathless suspense and galloping action.  Malta and the Vatican are superb settings for this ecclesiastical extravaganza.

Mission critical by Mark Greaney.  A high-states thriller featuring the world’s most dangerous assassin: the Gray Man.

The military wife by Laura Trentham.  A young widow embraces a second chance at life when she reconnects with those who understand the sacrifices made by American soldiers and their families.

 The object of your affections by Falguni Kothari.  Two best friends rewrite the rules of friendship, love and family…and change everything they thought they knew about motherhood.

The river by Peter Heller.  The story of 2 college students on a wilderness canoe trip – a gripping tale of a friendship tested by fire, white water, and violence.

Run away by Harlan Coben.  You’ve lost your daughter.  She’s addicted to drugs and to an abusive boyfriend.  And she’s made it clear that she doesn’t want to be found.  Then, by chance, you see her playing guitar in Central Park…

The secretary by Renee Knight.  She could be the most dangerous person in the room…    But it would be a mistake to underestimate such a steadfast secretary as Christine.  Because as everyone is about to discover, there’s a dangerous line between obedience and obsession.

Trump Sky Alpha by Mark Doten.  One year after the president has plunged the world into nuclear war, a journalist takes refuge in the Twin Cities Metro Containment Zone.  On assignment, she documents internet humor at the end of the world.  By turns a dystopian nightmare, a cyber thriller, a spot-on treatise on memes, and a tragic tale of love and loss.

The wall by John Lanchester.  Dystopian fiction done just right, with a scenario that’s all too real.  It blends the most compelling issues of our time – rising waters, rising fear, rising political division – into a suspenseful story of love, trust, and survival.

The wedding guest by Jonathan Kellerman.  Milo Sturgis and Alex Delaware investigate the death of a stranger at a wedding reception.

NEW DVDs

Bohemian Rhapsody (2018)  starring Rami Malek

A star is born (2018) starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

Green book (2018) starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali

Can you ever forgive me? (2018) starring Melissa McCarthy and Richard E. Grant

The favourite (2018) starring Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, Rachel Weisz

At eternity’s gate (2018) starring Willem Dafoe

NEW MUSIC CDs

By the way, I forgive you by Brandi Carlile

(the teal album) by Weezer

Look alive by Guster

H.E.R. by H.E.R.

Can’t say I ain’t country by Florida Georgia Line

The essential Dinah Washington by Dinah Washington

NONFICTION

An American summer by Alex Kotlowitz.  This captures the summer of 2013 in neglected Chicago neighborhoods, rendering intimate profiles of residents and the “very public” violence they face every day.  It is a fiercely uncompromising and unforgettable portrait.

The art of dying well by Katy Butler.  An inspiring, informative, and practical guide to navigating end of life issues.

Black is the body by Emily Bernard.  Memoir from a black woman that gives stories of her grandmother’s time, her mother’s time, and her own.

The darkest year by William Klingaman.  A psychological study of the American homefront in 1941 under pressure of total war.

Monhegan by Mark Warner.  A guide to Maine’s fabled island.

Mykonos: portrait of a vanished era by Robert McCabe.  Experience the unspoiled beauty and traditional culture of this legendary Greek island as it was in the late 1950s.

On the run in Nazi Berlin by Bert Lewyn.  160,000 Jews lived in Berlin before World War II.  By 1945, only 3,000 remained.  Lewyn was one of the few, and his memoir – from witnessing the famous 1933 book burning to the aftermath of the war in a displaced persons camp – offers an unparalleled depiction of the life of a runaway Jew caught in the heart of the Nazi empire.

The salt path by Raynor Winn.  A true story of a couple who lost everything and embarked on a transformative journey walking the South West Coast Path in England.

Shortest way home by Pete Buttigieg.  The young mayor of South Bend, Indiana, now in his second term, explains what mayors do and offers ideas for the country as a whole in his memoir.

Sleeping with strangers by David Thomson.  From a celebrated film critic, this is an original, seductive account of sexuality in the movies and of how actors and actresses on screen have fed our desires.

Soar, Adam, soar by Rick Prashaw.  After a tragic accident cut his life short, Adam left a legacy of changed lives and a trove of social media posts documenting his life, relationships, transition, and struggle with epilepsy – all with remarkable transparency and directness.

Tamed by Alice Roberts.  Uncovers the deep history of 10 familiar species with incredible wild pasts:  dogs, apples and wheat, cattle, potatoes and chickens, rice, maize and horses.  The author reveals how becoming part of our world changed these and how they became our allies.

This much country by Kristin Pace.  A memoir of heartbreak, thousand-mile races, the endless Alaskan wilderness and man, many dogs from one of only a handful of women to have completed both the Yukon Quest and the Iditarod.

We were rich and we didn’t know it by Tom Phelan.  A tender recollection of growing up on a farm in Ireland in the 1940s, a captivating portrait of a bygone time.

Which side are you on? by James Sullivan.  Presented here is 20th century American history as seen through 100 protest songs.

Children’s Books

 PICTURE BOOKS

 Are you scared, Darth Vader by Adam Rex

The bear, the piano, the dog, and the fiddle by David Litchfield

Because by Mo Willems

Blue by Laura Vaccaro Seeger

Builders & breakers by Steve Light

Carl and the meaning of life by Deborah Freedman

The dress and the girl by Camille Andros

Gittel’s journey: an Ellis Island story by Leslea Newman

The littlest things give the loveliest hugs by Mark Sperring

The pinata that the farm maiden hung by Samantha Vamos

Side by side by Chris Raschka

Thank you, Omu by Oge Mora

The very impatient caterpillar by Ross Burach

 GRAPHIC NOVELS

Aquicorn Cove by Katie O’Neill

Dog Man: Brawl of the wild by Dav Pilkey

The hidden witch by Molly Ostertag

Hilda and the bird parade by Luke Pearson

Rocket to the moon? by Don Brown

Then everything went wrong by Judd Winick

 CHAPTER BOOKS

The assassins curse by Kevin Sands

Because of the rabbit by Cynthia Lord

The bridge home by Padma Venkatraman

The friendship war by Andrew Clements

Grenade by Alan Gratz

The hive queen by Tui Sutherland

Lion down by Stuart Gibbs

Small spaces by Katherine Arden

Swallow’s dance by Wendy Orr

Sweeping up the heart by Kevin Henkes

The unteachables by Gordon Korman

 NON-FICTION

Bloom bloom! by April Sayre Pulley

Calm : mindfulness for kids by Wynne Kinder

The college football championship: the fight for the top spot by Matt Doeden

The earth gives more by Sue Fliess

Inside the Daytona 500 by Todd Kortemeier

Period power : a manifesto for the menstrual movement by Nadya Okamoto

Raindrops roll by April Sayre Pulley

The World Cup : soccer’s global championship by Matt Doeden

 MOVIES

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch with Benedict Cumberbatch

Mary Poppins returns with Emily Blunt

Nutcracker and the four realms with Keira Knightley

Ralph breaks the internet with Sarah Silverman

Spider-Man into the Spider-Verse with Bob Persichetti

  

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

Maine Maple Sunday

Sunday, March 24th 2019, is Maine Maple Sunday.

For those of us who might be interested in touring a sugarhouse, a list of participants can be found here – Maine Maple Sunday Participants.  This is a great map of the many and varied sugarhouses open for tours.

For those of us who might be more interested in reading about Maple, here are a few titles to choose from.

Anytime Mapleson by Mordicai Gerstein.  Have you ever invited bears for breakfast?  Check out this picture book, and enjoy the story.

Maple by Lori Nichols.  A young girl and her maple tree . . .

Maple moon by Connie Brummel Crook.  Have you ever wondered how maple syrup was discovered?  This children’s book gives us a possible answer.

The maple sugar book : together with remarks on pioneering as a way of living in the twentieth century by Helen and Scott Nearing.  The Nearings discuss their experiences with making a living from maple sugaring, and also give a definitive account of an important American industry.

Maple syrup season by Ann Purmell.  Enjoy this picture book of a family working together to create yummy maple syrup.

Miracles on Maple Hill by Virginia Sorensen.  1957 Newbery Medal winner.  The father has returned from the war, moody and tired, so the family leaves the city and moves to the Pennsylvania countryside.

Nature’s sweetness : pure maple syrup by Paul Rossignol.  A good introduction to the maple sugaring process.

Sugaring season : making maple syrup by Diane Burns.  This is another picture filled book describing the process of making maple syrup – from the tree to the table.

Toronto Maple Leafs by Eric Zweig.  Tells the story of the Maple Leafs 100 years of hockey, as well as the importance of professional sports teams to the history and economy of a big city and a big sports league.

Spring!

How could we not post a blog this time of year without thinking about and looking forward to spring?  So in that frame of mind, here are some books that have the word SPRING in their titles.

Heart Spring Mountain by Robin MacArthur.  A young woman returns to her rural Vermont hometown in the wake of a heavy storm to search for her missing mother and unravel a powerful family secret.

Paris Spring by James Naughtie.  Paris, in April of 1968. The cafes are alive with talk of revolution, but for Scottish-American Will Flemyng–a spy working in the British Embassy–the crisis is personal. A few words from a stranger on the Metro change his life. His family is threatened with ruin and he now faces the spy’s oldest fear: exposure. Freddy Craven is the hero and mentor Flemyng would trust with his life, but when he is tempted into a dark, Cold War labyrinth, he chooses the dangerous path and plays his game alone. And when glamorous, globe-trotting journalist Grace Quincy, in pursuit of a big story, is found dead in the Pe-Lachaise cemetery, the question is raised–what side was she on? Certainly she knew too much, and had become dangerous. But to whom?

Spring fever by Mary Kay Andrews.  Annajane Hudgens truly believes she is over her ex-husband, Mason Bayless. So she has no problem attending his wedding. But when fate intervenes and the wedding is called off, Annajane begins to wonder if she’s been given a second chance.

Silent Spring by Rachel Carson.  This was first published in three serialized excerpts in the New Yorker in June of 1962. The book appeared in September of that year and the outcry that followed its publication forced the banning of DDT and spurred revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air, land, and water. Carson’s passionate concern for the future of our planet reverberated powerfully throughout the world, and her eloquent book was instrumental in launching the environmental movement. It is without question one of the landmark books of the twentieth century.

Spring wildflowers of New England by Marilyn J. Dwelley.  Published by Down East Books, can’t you just picture those spring wildflowers poking their heads up?

Come Spring by Ben Ames Williams.  A fictional history of Union, Maine, here is a detailed novel of life in a Maine frontier village at the time of the revolution. Although they are not far from the scene of the war, the Indians and their own daily lives are of more importance to these sturdy pioneers than were wars or rumors of wars.

In the fire of spring by Thomas Tryon.  Not really about spring (but it does have spring in the title), this novel tells the story of women abolitionists in Connecticut.

Beyond the spring : Cordelia Stanwood of Birdsacre by Chandler S. Richmond.  Again, not really spring, but Stanwood was an ornithologist from Maine and known for her photographs.

There now, don’t you feel better already having just thought about Spring?

New Items ~ March 2019

FICTION

The age of light by Whitney Scharer.  Chronicles the tumultuous working and romantic relationships of photographer Man Ray and model-turned-photographer Lee Miller in early 1930s Paris.

As long as we both shall live by JoAnn Chaney.  A masterful examination of a marriage gone very wrong, a marriage with lots of secrets….

Big bang by David Bowman.  Set in the 1950s, this epic presents a brilliant and wholly original take on the years leading up to the Kennedy assassination.

Connections in death by J.D. Robb. Eve Dallas fights to save the innocent – and serve justice to the guilty – on the streets of New York.

The dead ex by Jane Corry.  One man’s disappearance throws four women’s lives into chaos – who will survive?

Death by chocolate malted milkshake by Sara Graves.  Lively characters, an intricate plot, and enticing descriptions of Down East Maine make this cozy mystery a winner.

The dreamers by Karen Walker.  An ordinary town is transformed by a mysterious illness that triggers perpetual sleep.

Forget you know me by Jessica Strawser.  A video call between friends captures a shocking incident no one was supposed to see.  The secrets it exposes threaten to change their lives forever.

Fugitive Red by Jason Starr.  Love on the internet gone wrong when a man tries a dating app but discovers a murdered dead woman instead of a live one.

The girls at 17 Swann Street by Yara Zgheib.  A haunting portrait of a young woman’s struggle with anorexia on an intimate journey to reclaim her life.

Good riddance by Elinor Lipman.  One woman’s trash – a high school yearbook with annotations added through the years – becomes another woman’s treasure, with deliriously entertaining results.

The hiding place by C.J. Tudor.  A teacher with a hidden agenda returns to settle scores at a school he once attended, only to uncover a darker secret than he could have imagined.

Judgment by Joseph Finder.  A thriller about a female judge and the one personal misstep that could lead to her – and her family’s – downfall.

The lost girls of Paris by Pam Jenoff.  A story of friendship and courage centered around three women and a ring of female secret agents during World War II.

New Iberia Blues by James Lee Burke.  The shocking death of a young woman leads Detective Dave Robicheaux into the dark corners of Hollywood, the mafia, and the backwoods of Louisiana.

The night agent by Matthew Quirk.  To find a Russian mole in the White House, an FBI agent must question everything…and trust no one.

The red address book by Sofia Lundberg.  96 year old Doris writes down the memories of her eventful life a she pages through her decades-old address book.  But the most profound moment of her life is still to come…

The ruin of kings by Jenn Lyons.  A jaw-dropping, action-packed story of betrayal, greed, and grand-scale conspiracy.  Virtually un-put-down-able.

The rule of law by John Lescroart.  Attorney Dismas Hardy is called to defend the least likely suspect of his career: his longtime, trusted assistant who is suddenly being charged as an accessory to murder.

The stranger inside by Laura Benedict.  What if you came home to find a stranger living in your home and everyone around you seems to think it is ok?

That Churchill woman by Stephanie Barron.  The life and loves of one of history’s most remarkable women – Winston Churchill’s scandalous American mother, Jennie Jerome.

Turning point by Danielle Steel.  Four American trauma doctors face difficult choices when they join a mass-casualty training program in Paris.

Unmarriageable by Soniah Kamal.  In this one of a kind retelling of Pride and Prejudice set in modern-day Pakistan, Alys Binat has sworn never to marry – until an encounter with one Mr. Darsee at a wedding makes her reconsider.

Untouchable by Jayne Ann Krentz.  A man’s quest to find answers for those who are haunted by the past leads him deeper into the shadows.

NEW DVDs

BlacKkKlansman (2018) starring John David Washington and Adam Driver

The wife (2018) starring Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce

Castle Rock (2018) starring Sissy Spacek, Bill Skarsgard, and Scott Glenn

The old man and the gun (2018) starring Robert Redford and Sissy Spacek

Halloween (2018) starring Jamie Lee Curtis

American Horror Story: Asylum (2012) starring Jessica Lange and James Cromell

Ant-man (2015) starring Paul Rudd

Adrift (2108) starring Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin

NEW MUSIC CDs

This one’s for you too by Luke Combs

A star is born (soundtrack) by Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

2019 Grammy nominees

Dua Lipa (Complete edition) by Dua Lipa

NONFICTION

An Arabian journey by Levison Wood.  The author takes us along on a complex expedition: a circumnavigation of the Arabian Peninsula.  This is a thrilling personal journey and a skillful piece of cultural reportage.

The art of the con by Anthony Amore.  The most notorious fakes, frauds, and forgeries in the art world.

Creating compassionate kids by Shauna Tominey.  Young children can surprise us with tough questions.  This essential guide teaches us how to answer them and foster compassion along the way.

The end of ice by Dahr Jamail.  This book will help readers understand how ecosystems have been affected by climate change and how inaction has potentially doomed further generations.

The feather thief by Kirk Johnson.  Beauty, obsession, and the natural history heist of the century.

One-day room makeovers by Martin Amado.  How to get the designer look for less with three easy steps.

The fire this time by Jesmyn Ward.  A new generation speaks about race.

Hidden America by Jeanne Laskas.  From coal miners to cowboys, an extraordinary exploration of the unseen people who make this country work.

How does it feel to be a problem?  by Moustafa Bayoumi.  A look at how young Arab and Muslim Americans are forging lives for themselves in a country that often mistakes them for the enemy.

If we can keep it by Michael Tomasky.  A game-changing account of the deep roots of political polarization in America, including an audacious 14 point plan for how to fix it.

Maid by Stephanie Land.  Work, low pay, and a mother’s will to survive.

Merchants of truth by Jill Abramson.  The business of news and the fight for facts: this is a definitive report on the disruption of the news media over the last decade.

No beast so fierce by Dane Huckelbridge.  American Sniper meets Jaws in this true account of the deadliest animal of all time, the Champawat Tiger – responsible for killing more than 400 humans in northern India and Nepal in the first decade of the 20th century – and the legendary hunter who finally brought it down.

Parkland by Dave Cullen.  This offers an intimate, deeply moving account of the extraordinary teenage survivors who became activist and pushed back against the NRA and feckless Congressional leaders – inspiring millions to join their grassroots  #neveragain  movement.

Women rowing north by Mary Pipher.  How to navigate life’s currents and flourish as we age.

Children’s Books

 PICTURE BOOKS

All you need is love by John Lennon

Donkey egg by Janet Stevens

Dreamland by Noah Klocek

Ear by Piret Raud

Epic adventures of Huggie & Stick by Drew Daywalt

Found by Jeff Newman

Gingerbread Man & the leprechaun loose at school by Laura Murray

Good egg by Jory John

Hands up by Breanna J. McDaniel

Harold Snipperpot’s best disaster ever by Beatrice Alemagna

Hip-hop Lollipop by Susan McElroy Montanari

I love you more than by Taye Diggs

Little Brown by Marla Frazee

Love Z by Jessie Sima

Lucia the luchadora & the million masks by Cynthia Leonor Garza

Mary wears what she wants by Keith Negley

Me and my fear by Francesca Sanna

Niblet & Ralph by Zachariah Ohora

No boring stories by Julie Falatko

Perfect by Max Amato

Say something by Peter H. Reynolds

Spectacular spring by Bruce Goldstone

Squirrel’s family tree by Beth Ferry

Steve goes to Carnival by Joshua Button

The truth about elephants by Maxwell Eaton III

The very last castle by Travis Jonker

When sadness is at your door by Eva Eland

BEGINNING CHAPTER BOOKS

A gift for Goose by Tad Hills

The hair book by Graham Tether

CHAPTER BOOKS

Call of the wraith by Kevin Sands

NON-FICTION

Beavers by Rachel Poliquin

Different families by Steffi Cavell-Clarke

DK findout! Universe by Giles Sparrow

DK findout! Space Travel by Jerry Stone

Maker lab outdoors: 25 super cool projects : build, invent, create, discover by Jack Challoner

Renegade women in film & TV by Elizabeth Weitzman

A round of robins by Katie Hesterman

Secret engineer: how Emily Roebling built the Brooklyn Bridge by Rachel Dougherty

Seeing stars: a complete guide to the 88 constellations by Sara Gillingham

Snowman – cold = puddle by Laura Purdie Salas

MOVIES

Charlie and the chocolate factory with Johnny Depp

Ella enchanted with Anne Hathaway

Enchanted with Amy Adams

Fancy Nancy: Volume 1

Goosebumps 2 with Wendi McLendon-Covey

How to train your dragon 1 and 2 with Jay Baruchel

LEGO Jurassic world : The secret exhibit

Mary Poppins with Julie Andrews

Paw Patrol : Pups save Puplantis

Pegasus : pony with a broken wing with Jonathan Silverman

Fireworks with Suzu Hirose

Kung Fu Panda with Jack Black

Peppa Pig: When I grow up

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.