Gardiner Public Library will be closed on Monday, May 28, 2018, Memorial Day.

Gardiner Public Library will be closed on Friday, June 1, 2018. Staff will be attending a statewide Minerva training.

Maine State Park Pass

Here is a reminder to our patrons that the Gardiner Public Library will once again be providing a Maine State Park pass for you to use free by checking it out with your Gardiner library card.  The pass goes out for three days on a first come/first served basis and allows a vehicle and all its occupants’ free access to a State Park in Maine.

 

Enjoy the warm weather now that it has arrived!

 

Gardiner Head Start Art Exhibit

Gardiner Head Start Art Exhibit is on display in the Children’s Room until Saturday, May 19th. Take some time out of your busy week to come and see the wonderful student works. Enjoying these creations, some of the many life skills that are learned in early school years, became evident.

Friends

Head Start Art Exhibit

 

Sharing

Head Start Art Exhibit

Counting

Head Start Art Exhibit

Colors

Head Start Art Exhibit

Books

Head Start Art Exhibit

Reading

Head Start Art Exhibit

Letters

Head Start Art Exhibit

Playing

Head Start Art Exhibit

Language

Head Start Art Exhibit

Songs

Head Start Art Exhibit

Games

New Items ~ May 2018

FICTION:

Accidental heroes by Danielle Steel.  Strangers pull together to avert a disaster involving two flights from New York to San Francisco.

After Anna by Lisa Scottoline.  Scottoline keeps the pace relentless as she drops a looming threat into the heart of an idyllic suburban community, causing readers to hold their breath in anticipation.

Alternate side by Anna Quindlen.  In this novel about money, class, and self-discovery, the tensions in a tight-knit neighborhood – and a seemingly happy marriage – are exposed by an unexpected act of violence.

Anatomy of a miracle by Jonathan Miles.  A novel about a paralyzed young man’s unexplainable recovery – a stunning exploration of faith, science, mystery, and the meaning of life.

The baby plan by Kate Rorick.  Here we enter the wild, bewildering world of modern pregnancies.  You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll shake your head as you wonder where everyone’s sanity went.

The bishop’s pawn by Steve Berry.  Cotton Malone discovers revelations about the day Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated.

The broken girls by Simone St. James.  A riveting genre-blender that combines a supernatural tale with intertwined mysteries from the 1950s and today.

The disappeared by C.J. Box.  Wyoming game warden, Joe Pickett, has two lethal cases to contend with.

The female persuasion by Meg Wolitzer.  A novel about the flame we all believe is flickering inside of us, waiting to be seen and fanned by the right person at the right time.  It’s a story about the people who guide and the people who follow (and how those roles evolve over time).

 The gunners by Rebecca Kauffman.  Reminiscent of The Big Chill and St. Elmo’s Fire, this novel is just as satisfying and provides readers with an entire cast of characters who feel like old friends upon finishing.

Hard aground by Brendan DuBois.  A riveting Rear Window-type drama of a man trapped in a menacing environment, forced to rely on his wits rather than brawn to solve a crime.

I bring sorrow and other stories of transgression by Patricia Abbott.  One of the stories here is about a Maine fisherman who makes an unusual catch and is the longest story in this sparkling collection.

I’ve got my eyes on you by Mary Higgins Clark.  A high school guidance counselor tries to uncover the identity of her sister’s murderer.

Lake silence by Anne Bishop.  In this thrilling and suspenseful fantasy, an inn owner and her shape-shifting lodger find themselves enmeshed in danger and dark secrets.

Let me lie by Clare MacKintosh.  The police say it was suicide.  Anna says it was murder.  They’re both wrong.  Sometimes it’s safer to let things lie.

No one ever asked by Katie Ganshert.  Challenging perceptions of discrimination and prejudice, this drama explores three women navigating challenges in a changing school district – and in their lives.

The perfume burned his eyes by Michael Imperioli.  16 year old Matthew is moved by his mother from Queens to a posh apartment in Manhattan in 1976 after she gets a large inheritance.  Having just lost his 2 important male models – his father and grandfather – Matthew becomes fascinated by another resident in the new building: the singer Lou Reed.

The punishment she deserves by Elizabeth George.  Inspector Thomas Lynley of Scotland Yard and detective sergeant Barbara Havers are approached by a Member of Parliament with a request to investigate the supposed suicide of a constituent’s son.

A reckoning by Linda Spalding.  This is set in the late 1850s as conflicts over slavery and abolition tear apart a Virginia plantation family.

Tangerine by Christine Mangan.  Living in sultry 1956 Tangier with her husband, Alice is dismayed when a troublesome former college roommate comes calling.

This scorched earth by William Gear.  An amazing tour de force depicting a family’s journey from devastation to rebirth following the American Civil War.

To die but once by Jacqueline Winspear.  In the new Maisie Dobbs novel, Winspear does a smashing job describing the bravery exhibited by everyday Britons as the fear of invasion becomes ever more real during World War II.

Trenton Makes by Tadzio Koelb.    Here is a vivid, brutal, razor-sharp debut about a woman who carves out her share of the American dream by living as a man in 1946.

Varina by Charles Frazier.  Frazier returns to the time and place of Cold Mountain, vividly bringing to life the chaos and devastation of the Civil War as he tells the story of the wife of Jefferson Davis – a woman who comes to realize that complicity carries consequences.

Worst fear by Matt Hilton.  In Portland, Maine, private investigator Tess Grey discovers that someone from her past is pursuing a deadly vendetta – and she could be the next to die.

NEW DVDs:

The Phantom Thread (2017) starring Daniel Day-Lewis

The Handmaid’s Tale (2017) starring Elisabeth Moss and Joseph Fiennes

Quiz Show (1994) starring Rob Morrow, Ralph Fiennes, and Paul Scofield

Decoy (1957) starring Beverly Garland

Psycho (1960) starring Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh

 NONFICTION:

Everything you love will burn by Vegas Tenold.  The dark story of the shocking resurgence of white supremacist and nationalist groups, and their path to political power.

Fascism: a warning by Madeleine Albright.  A personal and urgent examination of Fascism in this day and how its legacy shapes today’s world, written by the first woman to serve as U.S. Secretary of State.

A higher loyalty by James Comey.  The former FBI director shares his experience from some of the highest-stakes situations of his career in the past two decades, exploring what good, ethical leadership looks like, and how it drives sound decisions.

Historic New England by Patricia Harris.  A tour of the region’s top 100 national landmarks – touchstones of our collective past that still resonate with our present.

Let it rot! by Stu Campbell.  Since 1975 this has been where gardeners have looked for advice on keeping useful organic stuff out of the trash.

Life without plastic by Chantal Plamondon.  The practical step-by-step guide to avoiding plastic to keep your family and the planet healthy.

The line becomes a river by Francisco Cantu.  A former border patrol agent ponders what it means to be successful at his job.

The Lyme solution by Darin Ingels.  Here’s a five part plan to fight the inflammatory auto-immune response and beat Lyme disease.

More than true by Robert Bly.  Bly revisits a selection of fairy tales and examines how these enduring narratives capture the essence of human nature.

Norman: the doll that needed to be locked away by Stephen Lancaster.  A chilling true tale of life with a doll.  Dedicated readers of horror and internet creepy-pasta stories will thrill to the mounting evil and solution Lancaster and his wife devise to appease Norman.  A must-read for fans of the Chucky and Annabelle movies.

Redemption by Joseph Rosenbloom.  An immersive, humanizing, and demystifying look at the final hours of Dr. King’s life as he seeks to revive the non-violent civil right movement and push to end poverty in America.

Rise, decline, and renewal by Douglas Rooks.  A history of the Democratic Party in Maine from an editor of the Kennebec Journal.

12 rounds in Lo’s Gym by Todd Snyder.  Part love letter to Appalachia, part rigorous social critique, readers may find this book – and its narrative of individual and community strength in the face of globalism’s headwinds – a welcome corrective to narratives that blame those in the region for their troubles.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

Museums

Maine has some other great art museums besides the Portland Museum of Art that are perhaps not necessarily on your radar.  For future planning, I would like to suggest an upcoming exhibit at the Bates College Museum of Art at the Olin Arts Center in Lewiston.  Beginning in June and running until October, Bates College Museum of Art will be featuring Maine’s own Dahlov Ipcar in a show that is drawn mainly from private collections.  Find out more about this exciting exhibit at the Bates College Museum of Art web site – http://www.bates.edu/museum/exhibitions/upcoming/dahlov-ipcar-a-life-in-the-arts/

 

 

April Weather In The Library

As we New England-ers know – April weather is and can be VERY temperamental! Here are few titles that seem to be all about April!

 

A After the snow

P Purple rain

R Raining cat and dogs

IInto the storm

L Lonely silver rain

 

W Wailing wind

E Echo through the snow

A And the wind blows free

T ‘Twas a dark and stormy night

H Hailstones and halibut bones

EElectrifying fall of Rainbow City

R Roll of thunder, hear my cry

 

 

 

New Titles – April 2018

FICTION

An American marriage by Tayari Jones.  A newlywed couple’s relationship is tested when the husband is sentenced to 12 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

As you wish by Jude Deveraux.  One fateful summer, three very different women find themselves together in Summer Hill, Virginia, where they find they have much more in common than they realized.

Auntie Poldi and the Sicilian Lions by Mario Giordano.  As types of amateur sleuths go, the category of lusty Bavarian widow has been woefully under-represented…until now.

Bachelor girl by Kim Van Alkemade.  This is inspired by the true story of Jacob Ruppert, the millionaire owner of the NY Yankees, and his mysterious bequest in 1939 to an unknown actress, Helen Winthrope Weyant.

Bring out the dog by Will Mackin.  Navy vet Mackin turns in a virtuoso performance with this collection of loosely interconnected, military-themed short stories.

Caribbean Rim by Randy Wayne White.  Murder, sunken treasure, and pirates both ancient and modern send Doc Ford on a nightmare quest.

Closer than you know by Brad Parks.  A Virginia mom dutifully treading the path toward middle-class respectability is thrown down the rabbit hole when she’s accused of drug dealing and worse.

Court of lions by Jane Johnson.  An epic saga of romance and redemption, this brings one of the great turning points in human history to life, telling the dual stories of a modern woman and the last Moorish sultan of Granada, as they both move towards their cataclysmic destinies.

Dark in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas must find a killer inspired by police thrillers before another victim is murdered.

Dodging and burning by John Copenhaver.  In a small Virginia town still reeling from World War II, a photograph of a murdered woman propels 3 young people into the middle of a far-reaching mystery.

The escape artist by Brad Meltzer.  If you’ve never tried Meltzer, this is the one to read: a government conspiracy traces back through history to the escape artist Harry Houdini.

Finding Georgina by Colleen Faulkner.  What happens AFTER you get what you’ve always wanted?  A mother here is reunited with the daughter who was abducted as a toddler – only to face unexpected and painful challenges.

The French girl by Lexie Elliott.  The shifting dynamics within a group of college friends will keep the reader guessing until the end of this combination of a who-dun-it with a Big Chill vibe.

The innocent wife by Amy Lloyd.  You love him.  You trust him.  So why are you so scared?

Madness is better than defeat by Ned Beauman.  A wild thriller about Manhattan and Hollywood in the 1930s, Mayan gods, and a CIA operation gone terribly wrong.

The One by John Marrs.  This traces the stories of five people who find their soul mates – or do they?

The policeman’s daughter by Trudy Boyce.  Here is a cast of characters that bring the gritty neighborhood to life – a taunt, authentic depiction of life as a female beat cop will resonate with crime fiction fans.

The reluctant fortune teller by Keziah Frost.  This cast of senior citizens shine here and the book will charm any reader looking for a sweet, witty, zany read in the foreseeable future.

The shape of water by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus.  This is no mere movie novelization.  The book and the film still tell the same story – of a mute woman who falls in love with an imprisoned and equally mute creature – but in two very different ways.

Speak no evil by Uzodinma Iweala.  The untimely disclosure of a secret shared between two teens from different backgrounds sets off a cascade of heartbreaking consequences.

Sunburn by Laura Lippman.  Modern noir at its best, this will delight old movie lovers, satisfy suspense readers, and reward the author’s legion of fans.

Undiscovered country by Kelly McNees.  The combination of sympathetic yet flawed characters, rich and atmospheric details about Depression era America, and lyrical writing make this historical romance between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok a remarkable portrait.

Widow’s Point by Richard Chizmar.  An author, in search of new material, arranges to be locked inside a “haunted house” with no way of contacting the outside world.  Although no human has stepped foot inside the house in nearly 30 years, he will not be there alone….

NEW DVDs

The shape of water (2017) starring Sally Hawkins, Octavia Spencer, Michael Shannon, and Richard Jenkins

Three billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017) starring Frances McDormand, Sam Rockwell, and Woody Harrelson

Lady Bird (2017) starring Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf

Call me by your name (2017) starring Timothee Chalamet and Armie Hammer

I, Tonya (2017) starring Margot Robbie and Allison Janney

The darkest hour (2017) starring Gary Oldman and Kristin Scott Thomas

Murder on the Orient Express (2017) starring Kenneth Branagh, Michelle Pfieffer, Penelope Cruz, and Judy Dench

The Florida Project (2017) starring Wilem Dafoe

NONFICTION

Breaking sad by Shelly Fisher.  What to say after loss, what not to say, and when to just show up.

Broad band by Claire Evans.  A breakthrough book on the women – written out of history until now – who brought you the internet.

Eat the apple by Matt Young.  A gut-wrenching, beautiful memoir of the consequences of war on the psyche of a young man.

Educated: a memoir by Tara Westover.  An unforgettable memoir about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University.

Fifty weapons that changed the course of history by Joel Levy.  This looks at 50 weapons that have helped shape the last 3,500 years from the very first hand-ax to the AK-47 and beyond.

Happiness is a choice you make by John Leland.  Wisdom and stories from six New Yorkers age 85 and older that challenge notions of aging.

How to be a better person by Kate Hanley.   This fun, enlightening book features 401 everyday activities to help you become a better person and make a positive impact on the people around you.

In praise of difficult women by Karen Karbo.  From Frida Kahlo and Elizabeth Taylor to Nora Ephron, Carrie Fisher, and Lena Dunham, here are life lessons from 29 heroines who dared to break the rules.

Junk beautiful by Sue Whitney.  30 clever furniture refreshed projects to transform your home.

Meet the Frugalwoods by Elizabeth Thames.  The story of why personal finance blogger Elizabeth Thames abandoned a successful career in the city and embraced extreme frugality in order to create a more meaningful purpose-driven life and retire to a homestead in the woods.

Niki Jabbour’s veggie garden remix by Niki Jabbour.  Here are new plants to shake up your garden and add variety, flavor, and fun.

One goal by Amy Bass.  This tells the inspiring story of the soccer team in a town (Lewiston, ME) bristling with racial tension that united Somali refugees and multi-generation Mainers in their quest for state – and ultimately national – glory.

Strange survivors by One Pagan.  Learn how organisms attack and defend in the game of life.

Tomorrow will be different by Sarah McBride.  Love, loss, and the fight for trans equality.

New Children’s Books for April 2018

PICTURE BOOKS

Great dictionary caper by Judy Sierra

This zoo is not for you by Ross Collins

I’m a duck by Eve Bunting

Of thee I sing: a letter to my daughters by Barack Obama

The rabbit listened by Cori Doerrfeld

If I had a horse by Gianna Marino

Word collector by Peter H. Reynolds

Tiptoeing Tiger by Philippa Leathers

Honk! Splat! Vroom by Barry Gott

Nobody’s duck by Mary Sullivan

What do you do with a chance by Kobi Yamada

Digger and the flower by Joseph Kuefler

CHAPTER BOOKS

Just like Jackie by Lindsay Stoddard

Problim children by Natalie Lloyd

Stink: Hamlet and cheese by Megan McDonald

Judy Moody and friends: not-so-lucky Lefty by Megan McDonald

Peg & Cat: the camp problem by Jennifer Oxley

NON-FICTION

No truth without Ruth: the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Kathleen Krull

The United States v. Jackie Robinson by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Gordon: bark to the future! by Ashley Spires

DVDs

Ferdinand (2017) from the creators of Rio and Ice age

Coco (2017) starring Anthony Gonzalez and Gael Grarcia Bernal

Lego Ninjago movie (2017) starring Jackie Chan and Justin Theroux

Lion King (1994) starring Matthew Broderick

 

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

Children’s Events ~ Spring 2018

Just letting you know some of the upcoming events in the

Children’s Room this spring.

Ms. Jenn and the Nutrition Detective will visit us three more times ~

Tuesdays, Apr. 3rd, May 1st and Jun. 5th.

We will have stories, songs and a craft at

10:00am for preschoolers.

Wetlands: Habitats presented by LC Bates Museum on

Tuesday, Apr. 17th at 10:00 am during school vacation week.

KVCAP Child Abuse Prevention event

Friday, Apr. 20th 10-11:30 am.

There will be a book read by a local police officer, snacks and a craft.

Art @ the Library on

Tuesday, Apr. 24th, from 6:00 to 7:00 pm.

Story Time & Crafts every Tuesday at 10:00 am.

Babies Love Babies on Fridays at 10:00 am.

Adults and children are welcome to attend these events.

Calendar
April 2018 calendar of events

Happy St. Paddy’s!

H       How to catch a leprechaun
A       Anne of Green Gables
P        Patrick, patron saint of Ireland
       (The) Princes of Ireland
Y        You wouldn’t want to sail on an Irish famine ship!

S        Shamrocks, harps, and shillelaghs
T        Tim O’Toole and the wee folk

P        (A) Pot o’ gold
A       (The) Ancient Celts
T        Tommy Makem’s secret Ireland
R        Rick Steves’ Ireland
I        Irish hearts
C        Celtic moon
K        (The) King of Ireland’s son
       (The) St. Patrick’s Day shamrock mystery

D       Discover Ireland
A       As for Ireland
Y        Your green home

Latest Snowfall In Maine

Yes, we are tired of it. Yes, it seems it will never go away.  But, have you ever wondered when was the latest recorded snowfall in Maine?

 This was featured on B98.5 FM Central Maine’s Country Radio Station’s website:

The latest recorded snowfall in Maine goes to Caribou, Maine, on May 25, 1974 they recorded 0.2 inches of snow.

So, if you do see some flakes tomorrow and your furnace kicks on, it’s nothing we can’t handle. We’re Mainers!

And this confirms it from the

National Weather Service

Late Season Snowfall across northern Maine

…2nd latest measurable snowfall on record at Caribou, Maine…

A cold upper low tracked across northern Maine during the early morning hours of May 23, 2015.  The air mass was cold enough that the precipitation that fell across far northern Maine fell mainly as snow. A total of three tenths (0.3″) of an inch of snow was observed at Caribou, Maine on May 23, 2015. This broke the previous record for May 23rd of a trace of snow observed in 1990.  It was the greatest snowfall ever observed so late in the season. It was also the 2nd latest measurable snowfall on record at Caribou. The all-time latest measurable snowfall was May 25, 1974 when two tenths (0.2″) of an inch of snow was observed.

New Titles – March 2018

FICTION:

All the castles burned by Michael Nye.  The story of Owen Webb, a basketball player on scholarship at a private boys’ school, and his relationship with two enigmatic men: his father – whose secrets neither Owen nor this mother suspect – and Carson, an older teen.

Daphne by Will Boast.  This turns the myth of Daphne and Apollo into a modern love story about social anxiety and physical debilitation.  It is at once tragic and enchanting.

Death by chocolate cherry cheesecake by Sarah Graves.  While Jacobia Tiptree has moved on from fixing up houses, she still can’t resist the urge to snoop into the occasional murder in Eastport, Maine.

Eternal life by Dara Horn.  What would it really mean to live forever?  This is both a heady time travel novel and a thoughtful meditation on the meaning of life.

Forty dead men by Donis Casey.  Here is a compassionate look at PTSD after World War I.

The great alone by Kristin Hannah.  Alaska, 1974.  Untamed.  Unpredictable.  And for a family in crisis, the ultimate test of the human spirit.

How to stop time by Matt Haig.  A love story across the ages – and for the ages – about a man lost in time, the woman who could save him, and the lifetime it can take to learn how to live.

Munich by Robert Harris.  Two former friends who attended Oxford accompany Hitler and Neville Chamberlain to a meeting in 1938 and are forced to make a consequential decision.

Murder in an English village by Jessica Ellicott.  As friends, the boisterous and brash American Beryl couldn’t be less alike than the prim and proper British Edwina.  But as sleuths in an England recovering from the Great War, they’re the perfect match.

 Need to know by Karen Cleveland.  In pursuit of a Russian sleeper cell on American soil, a CIA analyst uncovers a dangerous secret that will test her loyalty to the agency – and to her family.

New York fantastic edited by Paula Guran.  Fantasy spreads across the five boroughs in this new anthology series collecting fantastic and extraordinary stories set in a specific urban local.

A natural by Ross Raisin.  A transporting and acutely observed novel about a gay British soccer player, this captures both the world of professional soccer and the stifling pressure on the hero and his lover to hide their relationship.

The overneath by Peter Beagle.  Beagle chronicles the lives of unicorns, trolls, and magicians in 13 poignant stories many of which caution readers about magic gone awry and temperamental creatures.

The plea by Steve Cavanagh.  An innocent client.  A wife in jeopardy.  Who will take the plea?  This is perfect for anyone who likes a locked-room mystery wrapped inside a legal thriller on steroids.

Red clocks by Leni Zumas.  Abortion is once again illegal in America, in-vitro fertilization is banned, and the Personhood Amendment grants rights to every embryo.  In a small Oregon fishing town, five very different women navigate these new barriers alongside age-old questions surrounding motherhood, identity, and freedom.

Sadness is a white bird by Moriel Rothman-Zecher.  A young Israeli soldier whose best friends are Palestinian twins is driven to the breaking point by conflicting loyalties.

Self-portrait with boy by Rachel Lyon.  An ambitious young female artist accidentally photographs a boy falling to his death – an image that could jumpstart her career but would also devastate her most intimate friendship.

Semiosis by Sue Burke.  Human survival hinges on a bizarre alliance in this character driven science fiction about first contact.

Seven dead by J. Jefferson Farjeon.  In this classic English mystery, an amateur thief has chosen an isolated house for his first robbery.  But it is no ordinary country home.  While hunting for silverware to steal, he stumbles upon a locked room containing seven dead bodies.

Still me by Jojo Moyes.  Louisa Clark moves to New York and is torn between high society and the life she enjoys at a vintage clothing store.

The storm king by Brendan Duffy.  Haunted by dark secrets and an unsolved mystery, a young doctor returns to his isolated Adirondacks hometown in a tense novel in the vein of Harlan Coben.

Surprise me by Sophie Kinsella.  This delves into the heart of a marriage and shows how those we love and think we know best can sometimes surprise us the most.

The taster by V.S. Alexander.  Amid the turbulence of World War II, a young German woman finds a precarious haven closer to the source of danger than she ever imagined – one that will propel her through the extremes of privilege and terror under Hitler’s dictatorship.

A treacherous curse by Deanna Raybourn.  Members of an Egyptian expedition fall victim to an ancient mummy’s curse.

NEW DVDs:

Get out (2017) starring Daniel Kaluuya and Allison Williams

The Crown (2017) starring Claire Foy and John Lithgow

The two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987) starring Ann-Margret and Claudette Colbert

Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) starring Peter Finch and Glenda Jackson

They shoot horses, don’t they? (1969) starring Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, and Gig Young

NEW MUSIC CDs:

NOW that’s what I call music, Vol. 65

Man of the woods – Justin Timberlake

Always ascending – Franz Ferdinand

Mania – Fall Out Boy

We came here to love by Sebastien Izambard

NONFICTION:

The adventures of the mountain men by Stephen Brennan.  True tales of hunting, trapping, fighting, adventure, and survival in the early to mid-1800s in the Rocky Mountains.

All-American murder by James Patterson.  The story of Aaron Hernandez, the New England Patriots tight end convicted of first degree murder.

Armed in America by Patrick Charles.  A history of gun rights from Colonial militias to concealed carry.

Berlin, 1936 by Oliver Hilmes.  This takes the reader through the 16 days of the Olympiad, describing the events in the German capital through the eyes of a select cast of characters – Nazi leaders and foreign diplomats, sportsmen and journalists, writers and socialites, nightclub owners and jazz musicians.

Bliss more by Light Watkins.  How to succeed at meditation without really trying.

Everything you need to know about social media by Greta Van Susteren.  Step-by-step guide to help readers understand the major social platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Instagram and Snapschat, addressing important moral and behavioral issues.

Fire and fury by Michael Wolff.  With extraordinary access to the Trump White House, Wolff tells the inside story of the most controversial presidency of our time.

A good man with a dog by Roger Guay.  A game warden’s journey from the woods of Maine to the swamps of New Orleans.

I am, I am, I am by Maggie O’Farrell.  An extraordinary memoir told entirely in near-death experiences from one of Britain’s best-selling novelists.

Let’s talk about sleep by Daniel Barone.  A guide to understanding and improving your slumber.

Norwich by Karen Crouse.  The story of the small Vermont town that has likely produced more Olympians per capita than any other place in the country – and whose citizens provide a model for achieving excellence while leading well-rounded lives.

Young China by Zak Dychtwald.  How the restless generation born after 1990 will change their country and the world.

FICTION – Picture Books:

Bad mood and the stick by Lemony Snicket

Bear and Chicken by Jannie Ho

Big book of Paw Patrol by Mary Tillworth

Big umbrella by Amy June Bates

Chewie and the Porgs by Kevin Shinick

Dear girl by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Don’t forget Dexter! by Lindsay Ward

If my moon was your sun by Andreas Steinhofel

Kate, who tamed the wind by Liz Garton Scanlon

Little Mouse’s big breakfast by Christine Pym

New LiBEARian by Alison Donald

Pete the Cat: big Easter adventure by James Dean

Runaway baby brother by Katy Hudson

Surprise! by Mike Henson

This is the chick by Wendy Hartmann

Very very very long dog by Julia Patton

JUVENILE CHAPTER BOOKS

Heart and mind of Frances Pauley by April Stevens

Lost rainforest : Mez’s magic by Eliot Schrefer

Love sugar magic: a dash of trouble by Anna Meriano

Wishmakers by Tyler Whitesides

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

Can I touch your hair? : poems of race, mistakes, and friendship by Irene Latham

Girl who drew butterflies : how Maria Merian’s art changed science by Joyce Sidman

Hidden figures : the true story of four black women and the space race by Margot Lee Shetterly

Impact! asteroids and the science of saving the world by Elizabeth Rusch

Life on Surtsey : Iceland’s upstart island by Loree Griffin Burns

Made for each other : why dogs and people are perfect partners by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent

Muddy boots : outdoor activities for children by Liza Gardner Walsh

My book of rocks and minerals by Devin Dennie

Out of the box by Jemma Westing

Snowy owl invasion! : tracking an unusual migration by Sandra Markle

Spiders! strange and wonderful by Laurence Pringle

Juvenile Graphic Novels

5 worlds : the sand warrior by Mark Siegel

Aphrodite : goddess of love by George O’Connor

Ares : bringer of war by George O’Connor

Brave by Svetlana Chmakova

The Mutts spring diaries by Patrick McDonnell

Poseidon : earth shaker by George O’Connor

JUVENILE DVDs

Dinosaur train : dinosaurs are different (2015) PBS Kids

The Jetsons & WWE : Robo-Wrestlemania (2017) starring Jeff Bergman and Trevor Devall

The nut job (2014) starring Will Arnett and Katherine Heigl

The stray : a true story (2018) starring Sarah Lancaster and Michael Cassidy

We’re going on a bear hunt (2018) Norton Herrick, film producer and Joanna Harrison, film director.

Wonder (2018) starring Julia Roberts and Jacob Tremblay

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.