Maine Maple Sunday

Sunday, March 24th 2019, is Maine Maple Sunday.

For those of us who might be interested in touring a sugarhouse, a list of participants can be found here – Maine Maple Sunday Participants.  This is a great map of the many and varied sugarhouses open for tours.

For those of us who might be more interested in reading about Maple, here are a few titles to choose from.

Anytime Mapleson by Mordicai Gerstein.  Have you ever invited bears for breakfast?  Check out this picture book, and enjoy the story.

Maple by Lori Nichols.  A young girl and her maple tree . . .

Maple moon by Connie Brummel Crook.  Have you ever wondered how maple syrup was discovered?  This children’s book gives us a possible answer.

The maple sugar book : together with remarks on pioneering as a way of living in the twentieth century by Helen and Scott Nearing.  The Nearings discuss their experiences with making a living from maple sugaring, and also give a definitive account of an important American industry.

Maple syrup season by Ann Purmell.  Enjoy this picture book of a family working together to create yummy maple syrup.

Miracles on Maple Hill by Virginia Sorensen.  1957 Newbery Medal winner.  The father has returned from the war, moody and tired, so the family leaves the city and moves to the Pennsylvania countryside.

Nature’s sweetness : pure maple syrup by Paul Rossignol.  A good introduction to the maple sugaring process.

Sugaring season : making maple syrup by Diane Burns.  This is another picture filled book describing the process of making maple syrup – from the tree to the table.

Toronto Maple Leafs by Eric Zweig.  Tells the story of the Maple Leafs 100 years of hockey, as well as the importance of professional sports teams to the history and economy of a big city and a big sports league.

Spring!

How could we not post a blog this time of year without thinking about and looking forward to spring?  So in that frame of mind, here are some books that have the word SPRING in their titles.

Heart Spring Mountain by Robin MacArthur.  A young woman returns to her rural Vermont hometown in the wake of a heavy storm to search for her missing mother and unravel a powerful family secret.

Paris Spring by James Naughtie.  Paris, in April of 1968. The cafes are alive with talk of revolution, but for Scottish-American Will Flemyng–a spy working in the British Embassy–the crisis is personal. A few words from a stranger on the Metro change his life. His family is threatened with ruin and he now faces the spy’s oldest fear: exposure. Freddy Craven is the hero and mentor Flemyng would trust with his life, but when he is tempted into a dark, Cold War labyrinth, he chooses the dangerous path and plays his game alone. And when glamorous, globe-trotting journalist Grace Quincy, in pursuit of a big story, is found dead in the Pe-Lachaise cemetery, the question is raised–what side was she on? Certainly she knew too much, and had become dangerous. But to whom?

Spring fever by Mary Kay Andrews.  Annajane Hudgens truly believes she is over her ex-husband, Mason Bayless. So she has no problem attending his wedding. But when fate intervenes and the wedding is called off, Annajane begins to wonder if she’s been given a second chance.

Silent Spring by Rachel Carson.  This was first published in three serialized excerpts in the New Yorker in June of 1962. The book appeared in September of that year and the outcry that followed its publication forced the banning of DDT and spurred revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air, land, and water. Carson’s passionate concern for the future of our planet reverberated powerfully throughout the world, and her eloquent book was instrumental in launching the environmental movement. It is without question one of the landmark books of the twentieth century.

Spring wildflowers of New England by Marilyn J. Dwelley.  Published by Down East Books, can’t you just picture those spring wildflowers poking their heads up?

Come Spring by Ben Ames Williams.  A fictional history of Union, Maine, here is a detailed novel of life in a Maine frontier village at the time of the revolution. Although they are not far from the scene of the war, the Indians and their own daily lives are of more importance to these sturdy pioneers than were wars or rumors of wars.

In the fire of spring by Thomas Tryon.  Not really about spring (but it does have spring in the title), this novel tells the story of women abolitionists in Connecticut.

Beyond the spring : Cordelia Stanwood of Birdsacre by Chandler S. Richmond.  Again, not really spring, but Stanwood was an ornithologist from Maine and known for her photographs.

There now, don’t you feel better already having just thought about Spring?

New Items ~ March 2019

FICTION

The age of light by Whitney Scharer.  Chronicles the tumultuous working and romantic relationships of photographer Man Ray and model-turned-photographer Lee Miller in early 1930s Paris.

As long as we both shall live by JoAnn Chaney.  A masterful examination of a marriage gone very wrong, a marriage with lots of secrets….

Big bang by David Bowman.  Set in the 1950s, this epic presents a brilliant and wholly original take on the years leading up to the Kennedy assassination.

Connections in death by J.D. Robb. Eve Dallas fights to save the innocent – and serve justice to the guilty – on the streets of New York.

The dead ex by Jane Corry.  One man’s disappearance throws four women’s lives into chaos – who will survive?

Death by chocolate malted milkshake by Sara Graves.  Lively characters, an intricate plot, and enticing descriptions of Down East Maine make this cozy mystery a winner.

The dreamers by Karen Walker.  An ordinary town is transformed by a mysterious illness that triggers perpetual sleep.

Forget you know me by Jessica Strawser.  A video call between friends captures a shocking incident no one was supposed to see.  The secrets it exposes threaten to change their lives forever.

Fugitive Red by Jason Starr.  Love on the internet gone wrong when a man tries a dating app but discovers a murdered dead woman instead of a live one.

The girls at 17 Swann Street by Yara Zgheib.  A haunting portrait of a young woman’s struggle with anorexia on an intimate journey to reclaim her life.

Good riddance by Elinor Lipman.  One woman’s trash – a high school yearbook with annotations added through the years – becomes another woman’s treasure, with deliriously entertaining results.

The hiding place by C.J. Tudor.  A teacher with a hidden agenda returns to settle scores at a school he once attended, only to uncover a darker secret than he could have imagined.

Judgment by Joseph Finder.  A thriller about a female judge and the one personal misstep that could lead to her – and her family’s – downfall.

The lost girls of Paris by Pam Jenoff.  A story of friendship and courage centered around three women and a ring of female secret agents during World War II.

New Iberia Blues by James Lee Burke.  The shocking death of a young woman leads Detective Dave Robicheaux into the dark corners of Hollywood, the mafia, and the backwoods of Louisiana.

The night agent by Matthew Quirk.  To find a Russian mole in the White House, an FBI agent must question everything…and trust no one.

The red address book by Sofia Lundberg.  96 year old Doris writes down the memories of her eventful life a she pages through her decades-old address book.  But the most profound moment of her life is still to come…

The ruin of kings by Jenn Lyons.  A jaw-dropping, action-packed story of betrayal, greed, and grand-scale conspiracy.  Virtually un-put-down-able.

The rule of law by John Lescroart.  Attorney Dismas Hardy is called to defend the least likely suspect of his career: his longtime, trusted assistant who is suddenly being charged as an accessory to murder.

The stranger inside by Laura Benedict.  What if you came home to find a stranger living in your home and everyone around you seems to think it is ok?

That Churchill woman by Stephanie Barron.  The life and loves of one of history’s most remarkable women – Winston Churchill’s scandalous American mother, Jennie Jerome.

Turning point by Danielle Steel.  Four American trauma doctors face difficult choices when they join a mass-casualty training program in Paris.

Unmarriageable by Soniah Kamal.  In this one of a kind retelling of Pride and Prejudice set in modern-day Pakistan, Alys Binat has sworn never to marry – until an encounter with one Mr. Darsee at a wedding makes her reconsider.

Untouchable by Jayne Ann Krentz.  A man’s quest to find answers for those who are haunted by the past leads him deeper into the shadows.

NEW DVDs

BlacKkKlansman (2018) starring John David Washington and Adam Driver

The wife (2018) starring Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce

Castle Rock (2018) starring Sissy Spacek, Bill Skarsgard, and Scott Glenn

The old man and the gun (2018) starring Robert Redford and Sissy Spacek

Halloween (2018) starring Jamie Lee Curtis

American Horror Story: Asylum (2012) starring Jessica Lange and James Cromell

Ant-man (2015) starring Paul Rudd

Adrift (2108) starring Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin

NEW MUSIC CDs

This one’s for you too by Luke Combs

A star is born (soundtrack) by Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

2019 Grammy nominees

Dua Lipa (Complete edition) by Dua Lipa

NONFICTION

An Arabian journey by Levison Wood.  The author takes us along on a complex expedition: a circumnavigation of the Arabian Peninsula.  This is a thrilling personal journey and a skillful piece of cultural reportage.

The art of the con by Anthony Amore.  The most notorious fakes, frauds, and forgeries in the art world.

Creating compassionate kids by Shauna Tominey.  Young children can surprise us with tough questions.  This essential guide teaches us how to answer them and foster compassion along the way.

The end of ice by Dahr Jamail.  This book will help readers understand how ecosystems have been affected by climate change and how inaction has potentially doomed further generations.

The feather thief by Kirk Johnson.  Beauty, obsession, and the natural history heist of the century.

One-day room makeovers by Martin Amado.  How to get the designer look for less with three easy steps.

The fire this time by Jesmyn Ward.  A new generation speaks about race.

Hidden America by Jeanne Laskas.  From coal miners to cowboys, an extraordinary exploration of the unseen people who make this country work.

How does it feel to be a problem?  by Moustafa Bayoumi.  A look at how young Arab and Muslim Americans are forging lives for themselves in a country that often mistakes them for the enemy.

If we can keep it by Michael Tomasky.  A game-changing account of the deep roots of political polarization in America, including an audacious 14 point plan for how to fix it.

Maid by Stephanie Land.  Work, low pay, and a mother’s will to survive.

Merchants of truth by Jill Abramson.  The business of news and the fight for facts: this is a definitive report on the disruption of the news media over the last decade.

No beast so fierce by Dane Huckelbridge.  American Sniper meets Jaws in this true account of the deadliest animal of all time, the Champawat Tiger – responsible for killing more than 400 humans in northern India and Nepal in the first decade of the 20th century – and the legendary hunter who finally brought it down.

Parkland by Dave Cullen.  This offers an intimate, deeply moving account of the extraordinary teenage survivors who became activist and pushed back against the NRA and feckless Congressional leaders – inspiring millions to join their grassroots  #neveragain  movement.

Women rowing north by Mary Pipher.  How to navigate life’s currents and flourish as we age.

Children’s Books

 PICTURE BOOKS

All you need is love by John Lennon

Donkey egg by Janet Stevens

Dreamland by Noah Klocek

Ear by Piret Raud

Epic adventures of Huggie & Stick by Drew Daywalt

Found by Jeff Newman

Gingerbread Man & the leprechaun loose at school by Laura Murray

Good egg by Jory John

Hands up by Breanna J. McDaniel

Harold Snipperpot’s best disaster ever by Beatrice Alemagna

Hip-hop Lollipop by Susan McElroy Montanari

I love you more than by Taye Diggs

Little Brown by Marla Frazee

Love Z by Jessie Sima

Lucia the luchadora & the million masks by Cynthia Leonor Garza

Mary wears what she wants by Keith Negley

Me and my fear by Francesca Sanna

Niblet & Ralph by Zachariah Ohora

No boring stories by Julie Falatko

Perfect by Max Amato

Say something by Peter H. Reynolds

Spectacular spring by Bruce Goldstone

Squirrel’s family tree by Beth Ferry

Steve goes to Carnival by Joshua Button

The truth about elephants by Maxwell Eaton III

The very last castle by Travis Jonker

When sadness is at your door by Eva Eland

BEGINNING CHAPTER BOOKS

A gift for Goose by Tad Hills

The hair book by Graham Tether

CHAPTER BOOKS

Call of the wraith by Kevin Sands

NON-FICTION

Beavers by Rachel Poliquin

Different families by Steffi Cavell-Clarke

DK findout! Universe by Giles Sparrow

DK findout! Space Travel by Jerry Stone

Maker lab outdoors: 25 super cool projects : build, invent, create, discover by Jack Challoner

Renegade women in film & TV by Elizabeth Weitzman

A round of robins by Katie Hesterman

Secret engineer: how Emily Roebling built the Brooklyn Bridge by Rachel Dougherty

Seeing stars: a complete guide to the 88 constellations by Sara Gillingham

Snowman – cold = puddle by Laura Purdie Salas

MOVIES

Charlie and the chocolate factory with Johnny Depp

Ella enchanted with Anne Hathaway

Enchanted with Amy Adams

Fancy Nancy: Volume 1

Goosebumps 2 with Wendi McLendon-Covey

How to train your dragon 1 and 2 with Jay Baruchel

LEGO Jurassic world : The secret exhibit

Mary Poppins with Julie Andrews

Paw Patrol : Pups save Puplantis

Pegasus : pony with a broken wing with Jonathan Silverman

Fireworks with Suzu Hirose

Kung Fu Panda with Jack Black

Peppa Pig: When I grow up

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Digital Maine Library ~ Popular Magazines

I think it’s time to explore the Digital Maine Library a bit more.

Scrolling down the homepage of the Digital Maine Library, I see Popular Magazines.  The blurb leads me to think that I will be able to browse through a magazine, not just access an article I might be looking for.

Clicking on the link takes me to a new page.  Scanning the page, I see many of the links I’m used to seeing – a Search Bar, an Advanced button, the title of the page, as well as Topic Finder  and  Top Searches.  Below the Search Bar, there are two buttons – Subject Guide Search and Publication Search.

Hmmmm . . . . Where to first?

Since I’m thinking/hoping that I will be able to browse through a magazine, I click on Publication Search.  Entering People in the search bar, a drop down menu gives me several suggestions.  I slide down the bar and click on People Weekly.  Below the search bar, I see More Options.  I don’t think I’ll change much here – I do opt for English as Language of Publication.

Clicking the Search button I’m taken to a page that tells me that Journal Title is not found.

Okay, what next?

Clicking on Revise Search takes me back to the previous screen.  This time I see List All Publications.  I click on this link and am taken to a multi-page list.  I try typing People in this search bar.  Seven results appear, including both People and People Weekly.

Hovering my cursor over each of the titles, I see a description of the magazine, the publication number, the publisher, how many issues are published a year, the audience the magazine is intended for, and how many years of the issue are covered in this index.  It looks like the index starts in January 1977 with People Weekly and the most recent issue is March of 2018 of People.

I click on the most recently indexed issue.  The next page gives me a list of the articles in the March 12, 2018 issue of People.

Out of curiosity, I go back to Browse Publications page, and try another magazine.  This time I enter Time.  My search results are similar to People several varied titles as choices.  Time magazine claims to be indexed from 1923 – current.  IT IS!!!  I click on the February 18, 2019 link.  It looks like the entire issue of Time, indexed so that I can look at just the article(s) I’m interested in!

At this point, I have answered my original question – I CAN browse through (but not page through) a popular magazine, though, at least with People, not the most current issue.

 

New Items ~ February 2019

FICTION

Alice isn’t dead by Joseph Fink.  A female big-rig driver crisscrosses America searching for signs of the wife everyone else thinks is dead.

The angel in the glass by Alys Clare.  A physician-sleuth in the year 1604 uncovers dark secrets in his small Devon village in this historical mystery.

Bad news travels fast by Maureen Milliken.  When an Appalachian Trail hiker becomes lost in the woods of Maine, then is found dead, it sets off a chain of events that upsets the fragile peace of the town of Redimere, Maine.

The boy by Tami Hoag.  Nick Fourcade and Annie Broussard, a husband-and-wife detective team, investigate a boy’s murder and the disappearance of his babysitter.

The burglar by Thomas Perry.  An unlikely burglar – young woman in the 20s – realizes she must solve a string of murders or else become the next victim.

Don’t let go by Michel Bussi.  A nail biter of a manhunt on an island drives this thriller after a tourist goes missing, triggering a police chase with nods to both Agatha Christie and Harlan Coben.

Eighteen below by Stefan Ahnhem.  A Scandinavian thriller – a terrifying story of stolen identity and serial murder.

In peppermint peril by Joy Avon.  Returning to her hometown in Maine, Callie Aspen (an organizer of book-themed tea parties) will have to conquer threefold trouble – a mysterious will, a missing heirloom, and a dead body – to restore the festive spirit to her small town.

Josephine Baker’s last dance by Sherry Jones.  A moving and insightful novel based on the life of legendary performer and activist Josephine Baker.

The mansion by Ezekiel Boone.  A family moves into a home equipped with the world’ most intelligent, cutting edge, and intuitive computer server – but a buried secret leads to terrifying and catastrophic consequences.

The only woman in the room by Marie Benedict.  A novel based on the incredible true story of Hedy Lamarr, the glamour icon, actress, and scientist whose groundbreaking invention revolutionized modern communication.

The perilous adventures of the cowboy king by Jerome Charyn.  Here is a novel of Teddy Roosevelt and his times.

The puzzle of the happy hooligan by Stuart Palmer.  After a screenwriter is murdered on a film set, a street-smart school teacher searches for the killer.

Radiant night by Patrick Lohier.  A wounded Iraq War veteran struggling with PTSD and drug addiction embarks on a mission to find a mysterious family heirloom in the depths of the American South.

The reckoning by John Grisham.  In 1946, Pete Banning drove into town, walked into church, and calmly shot and killed the Reverend Dexter Bell.  As if the murder wasn’t shocking enough, it was even more baffling that Pete’s only statement was, “I have nothing to say.”

She lies in wait by Gytha Lodge.  Six friends.  One killer.  Who do you trust?

Someone like me by M.R. Carey.  After fending off a brutal attack by her ex-husband, a woman fears for her sanity.  The truth is something far more terrifying.

The three Beths by Jeff Abbott.   An intense and emotionally gripping suspense novel about a daughter’s desperate search for her missing mother – one that my lead her closer to home than she ever anticipated.

Watching you by Lisa Jewell.  A page-turner about a shocking murder in a picturesque and well-to-do English town.

NONFICTION

Am I dying? by Christopher Kelly.  A complete guide to your symptoms – and what to do next.

The first time: stories and songs from music icons by Matt Everitt.  Follow their lives and careers starting with their first musical memories, first records, and first gigs, and find out the songs that have shaped them along the way.

The ghost photographer by Julie Rieger.  A good primer on getting into the psychic realm, this is also, ultimately, a story of unconditional love and healing by a woman you might just want to have a drink with.

Halfway to halfway and back by Dick Linford.  A collection of river stories that capture the essence and mood of river guiding and like an old friend and the river itself, lure you back for another trip.

The heartbeat of Wounded Knee by David Treuer.  A sweeping history (and counter-narrative) of Native American life from the Wounded Knee massacre to the present.

Living the dream by John Ford.  More tales from the retired Maine game warden who also wrote Suddenly the Cider Didn’t Taste So Good.

The Martha manual by Martha Stewart.  Essential life skills from America’s most trusted lifestyle expert – together in one practical handbook with hundreds of ideas, instruction, and inspirations.

The minimalist home by Joshua Becker.  A popular minimalist blogger shows you how to methodically turn your home into a place of peace, contentment, and purposeful living.

Never home alone by Rob Dunn.  A natural history of the wilderness in our homes, from the microbes in our showers to the crickets in our basements.

Quarterback by John Feinstein.  Inside the most important position in the National Football League.

 

Questions are the answer by Hal Gregersen.  What if you could unlock a better answer to your most vexing problems – in your workplace community, or home life – just by changing the question?

Rediscovering travel by Seth Kugel.  A guide for the globally curious, this is an indispensable companion for rookie and veteran travelers alike that promises to revolutionize both how and why we vacation.

Rock-and-roll woman by Meredith Ochs.  Here are the 50 fiercest female rockers.

77 things to know before getting a cat by Susan Ewing.  The essential guide to preparing your family and home for a feline companion.

Undo it!  by Dean Ornish.  How simple lifestyle changes can reverse most chronic diseases.

Weird parenting wins by Hillary Frank.  Unconventional – yet effective – parenting strategies such as making a pig snort in a baby’s ear to stop their crying or getting kids to try beets by saying it might turn their poop pink.

Winter’s graces by Susan Stewart.  Filled with unexpected good news about growing older, this highlights 11 qualities that ripen with age, surprising gifts of later life.

Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

Boy who went to Mars by Simon James

Cars and trucks book by Todd Parr

Dad’s camera by Ross Watkins

Douglas, you’re a genius by Ged Adamson

Heads and tails by John Canty

Horse meets Dog by Elliot Kalan

Hugs & kisses for the Grouchy Ladybug  by Eric Carle

I need a hug by Aaron Blabey

Is that you, Eleanor Sue? by Tricia Tusa

Josie’s lost tooth by Jennifer K. Mann

Little owl’s snow by Divya Srinivasan

Love by Stacy McAnulty

Mapping Sam by Joyce Hesselberth

Mia moves out by Miranda Paul

Once upon a star: a poetic journey through space by James Carter

Owls are good at keeping secrets: an unusual alphabet by Sara O’Leary

Pea pod lullaby by Glenda Millard

Where did you come from, baby dear? by George MacDonald

Wonky donkey by Craig Smith

Words to love by by Rick Warren

BEGINNING CHAPTER BOOKS

Amelia Bedelia under the weather by Herman Parish

Biscuit loves the park by Alyssa Satin Capucilli

Daniel can dance by Delphine Finnegan

Llama Llama be my valentine by Anna Dewdney

Pete the kitty and the case of the hiccups by James Dean

Pinkalicious and the flower fairy by Victoria Kann

This makes me happy by Courtney Carbone

Zip and Beep by Chris Barton

CHAPTER BOOKS

Astrid the unstoppable by Maria Parr

Bad kitty: kitten trouble by Nick Bruel

Dragon Pearl by Yoon Ha Lee

Ellie May on April Fools’ Day by Hillary Homzie

TBH, this is SO Awkward… by Lisa Greenwald

NON-FICTION

California and other western wildfires by Rachel Seigel

Countdown: 2979 days to the moon by Suzanne Slade

Cross Niagara: the death-defying tightrope adventures of the Great Blondin by Matt Tavares

Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria, and Nate by Julia Sillett

John McCain an American hero by John Perritano

Kids cooking: students prepare and eat foods from around the world by George Ancona

Starstruck: the cosmic journey of Neil deGrasse Tyson by Kathleen Krull

Trade in our global community by Rachel Eagen

Who was Jane Austen? by Sarah Fabiny

Wild buildings and bridges: architecture inspired by nature by Etta Kaner

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Amulet: SuperNova: book 8 by Kau Kibuishi

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

Children’s Events ~ February 2018

Just letting you know some of the upcoming events in the

Children’s Room for the month of February.

Ms. Jenn and the Nutrition Detectives will visit twice this month  ~

Tuesday, Feb. 5th and Friday, Feb. 22nd

We will have a story, songs and a craft at

10:00am for preschoolers.

Maine’s Amazing Mammals presented by LC Bates Museum on

Tuesday, Feb. 19th at 10:00am during school vacation week.

Art @ the Library on

Tuesday, Feb. 12th from 6:00 to 7:00 pm.

We will be making Valentines.

Story Time & Crafts every Tuesday at 10:00 am.

Babies Love Toddlers on Fridays at 10:00 am.

Adults and children are welcome to attend these events.

New Items ~ January 2019

FICTION

The Adults by Caroline Hulse.  A couple (now separated), plus their daughter, plus their NEW partners, all go on an epic Christmas vacation together.  What could go wrong?

Bitter orange by Claire Fuller.  Whiffs of Shirley Jackson, Daphne du Maurier, and Charlotte Bronte as an upstairs neighbor becomes obsessed with her downstairs neighbor.

The clockmaker’s daughter by Kate Morton.  The story of a love affair and a mysterious murder that cast their shadows across generations set in England from the 1860s until the present day.

The Dakota Winters by Tom Barbash.  An evocative and wildly absorbing novel about the Winters, a family living in New York City’s famed Dakota apartment building in the year leading up to John Lennon’s assassination.

Fire and blood by George R.R. Martin.  Set 300 years before the events of “Game of Thrones”, this is the first volume of the two-part history of the Targaryens in Westeros.

Forever and a day by Anthony Horowitz.   A spy is dead.  A legend is born.  This is how it all began.  It’s the explosive prequel to the first James Bond novel, Casino Royale.

The friend by Sigrid Nunez.  When a woman unexpectedly loses her lifelong best friend and mentor, she finds herself burdened with the unwanted dog he has left behind.

Hazards of time travel by Joyce Carol Oates. Time travel and its hazards are made literal in this novel in which a recklessly idealistic girl dares to test the perimeters of her tightly controlled (future) world and is punished by being sent back in time to 1959 middle America.

The little shop of found things by Paula Brackston.  A wonderful blend of history with the time-travel elements and a touch of romance.

Look alive twenty-five by Janet Evanovich.  When several managers of a deli in Trenton disappear, a bounty hunter and her detective boyfriend look for clues.

Master of his fate by Barbara Taylor Bradford.  Victorian England is a country of sharp divides between rich and poor, but James Falconer, who spends his days working at his father’s market stall, is determined to become a merchant prince.

The Moore house by Tony Tremblay.  After something gruesome happens in a N.H. home, a priest and three excommunicated nuns are asked to cleanse the building.  It is only after they give it the all clear that the demons truly begin to unleash their wrath and power.

My sister, the serial killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite.  A short, darkly funny novel about a Nigerian woman whose younger sister has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends.

Nighttown by Timothy Hallinan.  When a professional burglar breaks one of the cardinal rules of burglary (don’t take scores that you’re being paid way too much for), he finds himself on the wrong side of, well, the wrong side.

Nine perfect strangers by Liane Moriarty.  Could ten days at a health resort really change you forever?  In this page turner, nine perfect strangers are about to find out.

Of blood and bone by Nora Roberts.  Sequel to Year One, this is a new tale of terror and magic in a brand new world.

Overkilt by Kaitlyn Dunnett.  A quiet Maine town is beset by a series of disastrous happenings.  Small town charm and a determined sleuth who does a great job uncovering clues in a tale that rings all too true.

Penelope Lemon : game on!  by Inman Majors.  A recently divorced, financially struggling mom faces online dating challenges when a nude picture of her surfaces on the internet.

The Razor by Jack Mitchell.  A riveting sci fi thriller about a man struggling to survive the chaos on a prison planet.

Robert B. Parker’s blood feud by Mike Lupica.  Sunny Randall races to protect her ex-husband – and his Mafia family – from the vengeful plan of a mysterious rival.

The spite game by Anna Snoekstra.  Mercilessly bullied in high school, Ava knows she needs to put the past behind her and move on, but she can’t – not until she’s exacted precise, catastrophic revenge on the people who hurt her the most.

Those who knew by Idra Novey.  A taut, timely novel about what a powerful politician thinks he can get away with and the group of misfits who finally bring him down.

Tony’s wife by Adriana Trigiani.  Love, ambition, and the consequences of both lie at the heart of this epic of two working-class kids who become a successful singing act during the big band era of the 1940s.

Winter in paradise by Elin Hilderbrand.  Irene’s husband is found dead in St. John’s in the Caribbean.  Why so far from home?  He had a second family AND shady dealings on that island.

NEW DVDs

Eighth grade (2018) starring Elsie Fisher

Crazy rich Asians (2018) starring Constance Wu and Henry Golding

Killing Eve (2018) staring Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer

Primal fear (1996) starring Richard Gere and Edward Norton

Serpico (1973) starring Al Pacino

A better life (2011) starring Demian Bichir

NEW MUSIC CDs

Bohemian Rhapsody (soundtrack) featuring Queen

Golden hour by Kacey Musgraves

Honey by Robyn

Shawn Mendes by Shawn Mendes

NONFICTION

All that heaven allows by Mark Griffin.  The definitive biography of the deeply complex and widely misunderstood matinee idol of Hollywood’s golden age – Rock Hudson.

Almost everything by Anne Lamott.  Brief explorations into finding hope and wisdom in times of despair and uncertainty.

The American Revolution: a world war by David Allison.  A new look at the American Revolution: more than the David vs Goliath portrayal, it was the very first world war.

The best comfort good on the planet by Kerry Altiero.  The chef and owner of Café Miranda in Rockland gives some of his favorite recipes.

The end of the end of the earth by Jonathan Franzen.  This is a Silent Spring for today, but instead of challenging readers to change the world, it pushes them to change themselves.

A forever family by Rob Scheer.  An inspirational memoir about the author’s turbulent childhood in the foster care system and the countless obstacles and discrimination he endured in adopting his four children.

Gandhi: the years that changed the world, 1914-1948 by Ramachandra Guha.  The definitive portrait of the life and work of one of the most abidingly influential – and controversial – men in world history.

The library book by Susan Orlean.  This reopens the unsolved mystery of the most catastrophic library fire in American history, the 1986 Los Angeles fire, while exploring the crucial role that libraries play in modern American culture.

My love story by Tina Turner. This sets the record straight about her illustrious career and complicated personal life.

The Smithsonian history of space exploration by Roger Launius.  Comprehensive illustrated guide to the history of U.S. and international space exploration, both manned and unmanned from ancient world to the extraterrestrial future.

Under the darkening sky by Robert Lyman.  A vivid social history of the American expatriate experience in Europe between 1939 and 1941, as the Nazi menace begins a shadow over the continent, heralding the storms of war.

Why religion? : A personal story by Elaine Pagels.  Pagels looks to her own life to help answer questions such as:  Why is religion still around?  Why do so many still believe?  And how do various traditions still shape the way we experience everything from sexuality to politics.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.