Gardiner Public Library will be CLOSED on Thursday, November 22nd thru Sunday, November 25th, 2018 for the Thanksgiving weekend. Enjoy time with your family and friends!

Thanksgiving and Marjorie Standish

Thanksgiving and Marjorie Standish.  While the two are not necessarily tied to each other, I do associate both of them with good comfort food.  So as Thanksgiving approaches, I will share with you Marjorie’s recipe for Baked Acorn Squash.  It’s about as simple and delicious as you can get.  It is also featured in the new book, Cooking Maine Style which is edited by Sandra Oliver and features classic recipes of Marjorie Standish.  You can check it out at the Gardiner Public Library.

BAKED ACORN SQUASH

Wash the squash, cut in half lengthwise, remove seeds using a spoon.  Wash once more, turn squash upside-down in a baking pan, pour ¼ inch cold water in pan.

Bake at 400 degrees for ½ hour.  Remove from oven, turn squash right side up.  Salt and pepper it, sprinkle with brown sugar (maple syrup is good, too).  Place piece of butter in each half.  Return to oven, bake 30 minutes longer.  Serve.

 

New Items ~ November 2018

FICTION

An absolutely remarkable thing by Hank Green.  A young graphic artist inspires world-wide hysteria when she accidentally makes first contact with an alien.  After posting a video that goes viral, April must deal with the pressures of becoming an internet sensation.

Blood communion by Anne Rice.  The Vampire Chronicles continues with Lestat’s story of how he became ruler of the vampire world.

The bus on Thursday by Shirley Barrett.  Bridget Jones meets The Exorcist in this funny, dark novel about one woman’s post-cancer retreat to a remote Australian town and the horrors awaiting her.

Death from a top hat by Clayton Rawson.  A detective steeped in the art of magic solves the mystifying murder of two occultists.

Eventide by Kimberley Kalicky.  Three couples hadn’t been out for an overnight on the boat together since their twenties.  Now middle-aged, with adult children, and the baggage that goes with a life, they set out toward Monhegan Island from Portland.

Her kind of case by Jeanne Winer.  A seasoned criminal defense attorney must draw on her experience to save a teenage client who doesn’t want to be saved.

Judas by Jeff Loveness.  In this graphic novel, Judas Iscariot journeys through life and death, grappling with his place in “The Greatest Story Ever Told.”  Every story needs a villain.

The man who came uptown by George Pelecanos.  An ex-offender must choose between the man who got him out and the woman who showed him another path for his life.

The man who couldn’t miss by David Handler.  Stewart “Hoagy” Hoag and his beloved basset hound, Lulu, investigate a murder in a fabled Connecticut summer playhouse.

Sea prayer by Khaled Hosseini.  A short, powerful, illustrated book written in response to the current refugee crisis.  It is composed in the form of a letter from a father to his son on the eve of their journey on a dangerous sea crossing.

A spark of light by Jodi Picoult.  A ripped-from-the-headlines novel about a hostage crisis at a woman’s health clinic.

The stylist by Rosie Nixon.  A young woman is thrown into the fast-paced world of fashion and glamour as she’s forced to navigate the treacherous Hollywood red carpets.

Thirteen days by Sunset Beach by Ramsey Campbell.  A horror novel that’s perfect for readers who shy away from gore and cheap shocks.

Time’s convert by Deborah Harkness.  A novel about what it takes to become a vampire.  During his lover’s journey to immortality, a vampire’s past returns to haunt them both.

Transcription by Kate Atkinson.  Ten years after, figures from a BBC radio producer’s past as an M15 recruit in 1940 confront her.

Trouble brewing by Suzanne Baltsar.  This sweet and savory novel follows a smart, ambitious woman making her way in the male-dominated world of beer brewing.

Washington Black by Esi Edugyan.  High adventure fraught with cliff-hanger twists marks this runaway-slave narrative which goes from Caribbean cane fields, to the fringes of the frozen Arctic.

Weekend at Thrackley by Alan Melville.  This story about guests gathered at a country house for the weekend, originally published in 1934, anticipates Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None, which appeared 5 years later.

MUSIC CDs

Bloom by Troye Sivan

Sweetener by Ariana Grande

Dancing Queen by Cher

Cry Pretty by Carrie Underwood

The best of Roger Miller

NONFICTION

All you can ever know by Nicole Chung.  What does it mean to love your roots – within your culture, within your family – and what happens when you find them?  Chung explores her complicated feelings about her transracial adoption and the importance of knowing where one comes from.

American like me by America Ferrera.  A vibrant and varied collection of first person accounts from prominent figures about the experience of growing up between cultures.

Buffy Sainte-Marie by Andrea Warner.  Establishing herself among the ranks of folk greats such as Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan, Buffy has released more than 20 albums, survived being blacklisted by two U.S. presidents, and received the only Academy Award ever to be won by a First Nations artist.  This is an intimate look at a beloved folk icon and activist.

The cows are out! by Trudy Price.  Price writes of the daily trials of haying, cow breeding, and milking against a backdrop of gentle and entertaining rural life in Maine.

Death on Katahdin by Randi Minetor.  The author gathers the stories of fatalities, from falls to exposure to cardiac arrest, and presents dozens of misadventures on the mountain including hunting accidents, lightning strikes, and even more than one suspicious death.

Fight like a girl by Clementine Ford.  Through a mixture of memoir, opinion, and investigative journalism, Ford exposes just how unequal the world continues to be for women.

The fighters by C.J. Chivers.  This is classic war reporting.  The author’s stories give heart-rending meaning to the lives and deaths of Americans in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, even if policymakers generally have not.

Grace without God by Katherine Ozment.  The search for meaning, purpose, and belonging in a secular age.

The invisible gorilla by Christopher Chabris.  How our intuitions deceive us because our minds don’t work the way we think they do.  We think we see ourselves and the world as they really are, but we’re actually missing a whole lot.

The oath and the office by Corey Brettschneider.  An essential guide to the presidential powers and limits of the Constitution, for anyone voting – or running – for our highest office.

Rock art critters by Denise Scicluna.  Painting rocks has become a not-uncommon craft activity in recent years.  This book focuses on decorating rocks with images of cute animals using acrylic craft paint.

Second labor: mothers share post-birth stories by Chaya Valier.   24 mothers write bold, honest accounts of post-birth life with a newborn.

Small animals by Kim Brooks.  This interrogates how we weigh risks as parents, how we judge one another’s parenting and what the costs might be – not just to parents, but to children, too – in a culture of constant surveillance.

Sons of freedom by Geoffrey Wawro.  The American contribution to World War I is one of the greatest stories of the 20th century, and yet it has all but vanished from view.  This tells of the forgotten American soldiers, Doughboys who defeated Germany in World War I.

These truths by Jill Lepore.  A magisterial account of the origins and rise of a divided nation, an urgently needed reckoning with the beauty and tragedy of American history.

What to do when you’re new by Keith Rollag.  How to be comfortable, confident, and successful in new situations.

Will the circle be unbroken? by Studs Terkel.  Reflections on death, rebirth, and a hunger for faith.

PICTURE BOOKS

Corduroy takes a bow by Viola Davis

Day you begin by Jacqueline Woodson

Do you believe in unicorns? by Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Dreamers by Yuyi Morales

House that once was by Julie Fogliano

I Just Like You by Suzanne Bloom

Llama Llama loves to read by Anna Dewdney

Parade of elephants by Kevin Henkes

Presto & Zesto in Limboland by Arthur Yorinks

Santa Bruce by Ryan T. Higgins

Secret life of the little brown bat by Laurence Pringle

Stop, go, yes, no!: a story of opposites by Mike Twohy

Surprise by Caroline Hadilaksono

Vegetables in underwear by Jared Chapman

We don’t eat our classmates by Ryan T Higgins

CHAPTER BOOKS

Babymouse: Tales from the locker: Miss Communication by Jennifer L Holm

I survived: the attack of the grizzlies, 1967 by Lauren Tarshis

Ivy & Bean: one big happy family by Annie Barrows

Judy Moody and the right royal tea party  by Megan McDonald

Louisiana’s way home by Kate DiCamillo

Magic tree house: hurricane heroes in Texas #30 by Mary Pope Osborne

My father’s words by Patricia MacLachlan

Trail by Meika Hashimoto

Unforgettable Guinevere St. Clair by Amy Makechnie

Van Gogh deception by Deron Hicks

 NON-FICTION

Hubots: real-world robots inspired by humans by Helaine Becker

New England Patriots story by Thomas K Adamson

Recreate discoveries about light by Anna Claybourne

Recreate discoveries about living things by Anna Claybourne

Recreate discoveries about states of matter by Anna Claybourne

We are grateful : otsaliheliga by Traci Sorell

Why do I poop?  by Kirsty Holmes

Why do I sneeze? by Madeline Tyler

You wouldn’t want to be Sir Isaac Newton: a lonely life you’d rather not lead by Ian Graham

You wouldn’t want to live without coding! by Alex Woolf

You wouldn’t want to live without gaming! by Jim Pipe

You wouldn’t want to live without insects! by Anne Rooney

You wouldn’t want to live without libraries! by Fiona Macdonald

You wouldn’t want to live without nurses! By Fiona Macdonald

You wouldn’t want to live without robots! by Ian Graham

You wouldn’t want to live without satellites! by Ian Graham

You wouldn’t want to live without simple machines! by Anne Rooney

You wouldn’t want to live without writing! By Roger Canavan

 GRAPHIC NOVELS

The bad guys in do-you-think-he-saurus? by Aaron Blabey

Dog man: Lord of the fleas by Dav Pilkey

Snails are just my speed! by Kevin McCloskey

Trees: kings of the forest by Andy Hirsch

 EASY READERS

Mr. Monkey bakes a cake by Jeff Mack

My kite is stuck! and other stories by Salia Yoon

Pete the cat and the cool caterpillar by James Dean

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Digital Maine Library – ChiltonLibrary

A few weeks ago, I blogged a bit about Digital Maine Library    here, what we have known for several years as MARVEL!  I think it’s time for another look at this amazing resource.

As previously mentioned, the website seems to be more colorful – each of the databases appear on the homepage, with pictures, and a bit of information about the database.

Scrolling down the homepage I see ChiltonLibrary.  I click on the link – picture and words are each part of the link – and am taken to the ChiltonLibrary web page.

This page gives me several options.  The tabs along the top are Home (it is the shape of a house) ; Select Vehicle ; ASE Test Prep Quizzes ; Help ; Logout and what looks like and Envelope (this is where I can Ask An Expert.  On the left of the page there are several boxes to fill in with information about a vehicle – Vehicle Selector.  More centered on the page I see information about what information I can find – yes, I know, I did use information twice in the same sentence, but it is what it is!

I’m curious about how far back I can go – how old a vehicle this database will be useful for – 1940 seems to be the answer.  My mother had a 1956 Volkswagen Beetle that she absolutely loved – the small rear window was a big deal for her.  I put that information in the boxes and press the select button.

The next page is titled Your Current Vehicle: 1956 Volkswagen Beetle.  Below that there are two bullet points of data that is available for the vehicle – Repair and Bulletins/Recalls.

I click on Repair.  There is quite a list on the next page!  Above the list is Collapse TOC and Search.  No, I’m sorry, I have absolutely NO idea what TOC means, but it does collapse the list to no list, or opens it to the many choices.

I don’t claim to be a car person – yes, I drive a car, and can and do maintain it, but much if not all of this information is waaaaay beyond my knowledge base.  I see how a person who works with and on vehicles might find this very helpful.

Now I’m curious and check the information on a MUCH newer vehicle – a 2016 Volkswagen Beetle.  This time I am given three choices Repair ; Maintenance and Bulletins/Recalls.  As we just learned, the Repair button is not necessarily useful to me, but the Maintenance and Bulletins/Recalls are something I will find useful.

On the Repair page I am given choices – a Vehicle Configuration Filter.  I don’t have a Beetle, so I’ll make it up as I move through the list.  After making my choices, I am shown a list of what should be done at 5000 miles.  There is a Look Ahead button – this takes me to the 15000 mile service, and beyond that.  Looks like a good place for me!

I go back to Bulletins/Recalls.  This page has a fairly long list of issues to be checked.  I did not re-select my vehicle, so perhaps they don’t all pertain to what I chose, but this is another interesting place to poke around when I’m in the search for a “new to me” vehicle.

Back to the homepage I go.

I click on ASE Test Prep Quizzes.  ASE is short for National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence.  So these are a great resource for anyone interested in becoming certified in automotive repair.  Something I will do my best to remember for future use with folks looking for this information.

Help is exactly what it says – an online manual for using the ChiltonLibrary.

From a Library standpoint, this is another amazing database provided by the Maine State Library, and one that will be very helpful to folks looking for how to repair their (insert make, model and year here).

From a consumer standpoint, I think it will be useful when searching for that perfect “new to me” vehicle!

I JUST CAN’T STOP !

I JUST CAN’T STOP !

Do you remember the first book that you just couldn’t put down?  Like it’s 2 AM and you KNOW that you have to get up at 7 AM but you just can’t stop reading.  You HAVE to find out how things end up before you can even think about sleeping regardless of how tired you may be.  For me, that book was And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie, and I was in eighth grade.

The book’s synopsis from Amazon.com says, “Ten strangers are lured to an isolated island mansion off the Devon coast by a mysterious U. N. Owen. At dinner a recorded message accuses each of them in turn of having a guilty secret, and by the end of the night one of the guests is dead. Stranded by a violent storm, and haunted by a nursery rhyme counting down one by one . . . as one by one . . . they begin to die. Which among them is the killer and will any of them survive?”  As the guests continued to be killed, I had to keep reading to find out who would be next and – most importantly – who was the murderer.  As I grew older and read more and more books, I discovered that this plot was classic Christie and has since been reworked by many mystery authors.  At the time I was enthralled.  I continue to be so many years later.  If you have read this book, you know Christie continues to surprise you right through the last chapter of the book.

The only other book that I remember not being able to put down and having to read until I lost consciousness or finished was Stephen King’s first book Carrie.  Once upon a time, King was an unknown and picking up his first book was stepping into uncharted waters.  I really had no idea what I was getting into.  Amazon.com says of this book, “Stephen King’s legendary debut is  about a teenage outcast and the revenge she enacts on her classmates.  Carrie White may be picked on by her classmates, but she has a gift. She can move things with her mind. Doors lock. Candles fall. This is her power and her problem. Then, an act of kindness, as spontaneous as the vicious taunts of her classmates, offers Carrie a chance to be a normal…until an unexpected cruelty turns her gift into a weapon of horror and destruction that no one will ever forget.”  And how !  As the plotline played out, as Carrie went to the prom of her dreams, as her mother began acting crazier and crazier….this is not something you want to put aside and continue with the next day when you might have some spare time.  Holy mackerel !   What is going to happen next ????

And so….what was YOUR first book where you said, “ I JUST CAN’T STOP ! “ ?

 

New Items ~ October 2018

FICTION

The boy at the keyhole by Stephen Giles.  A boy is left alone in his family’s English estate with a housekeeper whom he beings to suspect has murdered his mother.

A day like any other by Genie Henderson.  Set during the Great Hamptons Hurricane of 1938, a summer colony and locals are caught in the path of a sudden and devastating hurricane in this prophetic fiction that is a warning of storms to come.

Depth of winter by Craig Johnson.  Sheriff Longmire takes on the head of a drug cartel in a remote area of the northern Mexican desert.

Eagle and Crane by Suzanne Rindell.  Two young daredevil flyers confront ugly truths and family secrets during the U.S. internment of Japanese citizens during WW II.

The fall of Gondolin by J.R.R. Tolkien.  Thousands of years before the events of The Lord Of The Rings, a hero named Tuor visits a secret city.

Flight or fright edited by Stephen King.  An anthology about all the things that can go horribly wrong when you are flying.

In his father’s footsteps by Danielle Steel.  The son of two holocaust survivors struggles to become his own person after his marriage falls apart.

Jane Doe by Victoria Stone.  A double life with a single purpose:  revenge.

The last hours by Minette Walters.  When the Black Death enters England in 1348, no one knows what manner of sickness it is – or how it spreads and kills so quickly.

Lethal white by Robert Galbraith.  Detectives Strike and Ellacott investigate a crime a young man may have witnessed as a child.

Leverage in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas puzzles over a bizarre suicide bombing in a Wall Street office building.

The locksmith’s daughter by Karen Brooks.  An intriguing novel rich in historical detail and drama as it tells the story of Queen Elizabeth’s daring, ruthless spymaster and his female protégée.

The mermaid by Christine Henry.  A beautiful historical fairy tale about a mermaid who leaves the sea to live with her true love on the coast of Maine, only to become the star attraction of history’s greatest showman, P.T. Barnum.

The money shot by Stuart Woods.  Teddy Fay races to stop a scheme of extortion and a hostile takeover.

The other woman by Sandie Jones.  A psychological thriller about a man, his new girlfriend, and the mother who will not let him go.

The other woman by Daniel Silva.  Gabriel Allon, the art restorer and assassin, fights the Russians to decide the fate of postwar global order.

Ohio by Stephen Markley.  This follows 4 former classmates who return to their small town, a region ravaged by the Great Recession, an opioid crisis, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The patchwork bride by Sandra Dallas. This tells 3 different stories with homespun style.  Strong female characters and intriguing storytelling draws the reader into this two-hanky read full of love and loss.

Sign of the cross by Glenn Cooper.  Introducing Harvard professor Cal Donovan in the first of an intriguing new series of religious conspiracy thrillers.

The spaceship next door by Gene Doucette.  When a spaceship lands in Sorrow Falls, a lovable and fearless small-town girl is the planet’s only hope for survival.  It’s a warm-hearted ode to a time and place in a community so small that everybody knows everybody else’s business.

Stars uncharted by S.K. Dunstall.  In this rip-roaring space opera, a ragtag band of explorers are out to make the biggest score in the galaxy.

The summer wives by Beatriz Williams.  A postwar fable of love, class, power, and redemption set among the inhabitants of an island of the New England coast.

Trust me by Hank Ryan.  There are three sides to every story.  Yours. Mine. And the truth.

Where the crawdads sing by Delia Owens.  In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

With you always by Rena Olsen.  This examines how easy it is to fall into the wrong relationship…and how impossible it can be to leave.

DVDs

Hereditary (2018) starring Toni Collette and Gabriel Byrne

This is us: season 2 (2018) starring Mandy Moore

Deadpool 2  (2018) starring Ryan Reynolds and Josh Brolin

Book Club (2018) starring Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen

The way we get by (2009) directed by Aron Gaudet

NONFICTION

The death of truth by Michiko Kakutani.  Notes on falsehood in the age of Trump.

Dopesick by Beth Macy.  The only book so far to fully chart the opioid crisis in America – an unforgettable portrait of the families and first responders on the front lines.

Fashion climbing by Bill Cunningham.  The glamorous world of 20th century fashion comes alive in this memoir both because of his exuberant appreciation for stylish clothes and his sharp assessment of those who wore them.

Fear: Trump in the White House by Bob Woodward.  The inside story of President Trump as only Woodward can tell it.

A hard rain by Frye Gaillard.  America in the 1960s, our decade of hope, possibility, and innocence lost.

Leadership in turbulent times by Doris Kearns Goodwin.  Goodwin offers an illuminating exploration into the early development, growth, and exercise of leadership.

No good alternative by William Vollmann.  An eye-opening look at the consequences of coal mining and natural gas production – the second of a two volume work on the ideologies of energy production and the causes of climate change.

On call in the Arctic by Thomas Sims.  An extraordinary memoir recounting the adventures of a young doctor stationed in the Alaskan bush.

The only girl by Robin Green.  A raucous and vividly dishy memoir by the only woman writer on the masthead of Rolling Stone magazine in the early ‘70s.

The power of yes by Amy Newmark.  101 stories about adventure, change and positive thinking from the publishers of Chicken Soup for the Soul.

Proud by Ibtihaj Muhammad.  She is the first female Muslim American to medal at the Olympic Games and was named one of Time’s 100 most influential people.  This is a moving coming of age story from one of the nation’s most influential athletes and illustrates how she rose above all her obstacles.

30 before 30 by Marina Shifrin.  Subtitled: “How I made a mess of my 20s and you can too”, this is a charming and relatable collection of essays documenting a young woman’s attempt to accomplish 30 life goals before turning 30.

The tragedy of Benedict Arnold by Joyce Malcolm.  This sheds new light on the man as well as on the nuanced and complicated time in which he lived.

21 lessons for the 21st century by Yuval Harari.  How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human?  How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news?  Are nations and religions still relevant?  What should we teach our children?

Unhinged by Omarosa Newman.  The former Assistant to the President and Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison in the Trump White House provides her story of corruption and controversy in the current administration.

A year of reading by Elisabeth Ellington.  A month by month guide to classics and crowd-pleasers for you and your book group.

PICTURE BOOKS

 Dam by David Almond

Fruit bowl by Mark Hoffmann

Good Rosie by Kate DiCamillo

Hello, horse by Vivian French

Imagine by Juan Felipe Herrera

Interrupting chicken and the elephant of surprise by David Ezra Stein

Let the children march by Monica Clark-Robinson

Night job by Karen Hesse

No honking allowed! By Stephanie Calmenson

Peppa Pig and the silly sniffles Based on the TV Series

Square by Mac Barnett

Storm by Sam Usher

CHAPTER BOOKS

Bush rescue by Darrel Odgers

Circus lesson by Sally Rippin

Crazy cousins by Sally Rippin

Farm rescue  by Darrel Odgers

Wheelnuts! Craziest race on Earth! Desert dustup by Knife & Packer

Wheelnuts! Craziest race on earth! Spooky smackdown by Knife & Packer

Who is Sonia Sotomayor? by Megan Stine

Winning goal by Sally Rippin

 NON-FICTION

Acadia by Audra Wallace

Blossom to apple by Sarah Ridley

Carlos Santana: sound of the heart, song of the world by Gary Golio

Counting on Katherine: how Katherine Johnson saved Apollo 13 by Helanine Becker

Mae among the stars by Roda Ahmed

Maine by Robin S. Doak

Memphis, Martin, and the mountaintop: the Sanitation Strike of 1968 by Alice Faye Duncan

Seeds to bread by Sarah Ridley

Sisters & champions: the true story of Venus and Serena Williams by Howard Bryant

Turning pages: my life story by Sonia Sotomayor 

Turtle Island: the story of North America’s first people by Eldon Yellowhorn

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Digital Maine Library ~ formerly known as MARVEL!

By now, it may not be a surprise, as the announcement has been made – MARVEL! has changed.  It is now known as Digital Maine Library.  It is still an AMAZING database available to all Maine library card holders.  This database is provided by the Maine State Library.

When I go to the new site, there are several differences.  There is no general search bar visibly available to search the entire site, and there is no alphabet at the top so that I may jump to the database I want.  These are just a couple of the changes I see immediately.

Hmmm . . . At the top of my screen I see the website name, ABOUT, VIDEO TUTORIALS and NEED ASSISTANCE.  Below that, I again see DIGITAL MAINE LIBRARY / GETTING STARTED WITH DIGITAL MAINE LIBRARY / A-Z INDEX / ADVANCED SEARCH.  Below this there is a slide show, with a bit of what we will find here.  Scrolling down the page there are three places I can narrow my search choices – SUBJECT, RESOURCE TYPE and AUDIENCE.

Next there is the content of the site.  At a guess, I would say that there are close to 100 different databases that can be accessed here – WOW!

Okay, I click on the word ABOUT and am taken to a page that gives me some history of MARVEL! and the DIGITAL MAINE LIBRARY.  Very interesting information.

Now I’m interested to see what VIDEO TUTORIALS is all about, so I click there.  A page of a variety of lessons appears – from some of the databases, to Facebook, G mail and Instagram.  I will have to take some time to check these out.

The NEED ASSISTANCE button takes me to a place with information about who to contact with questions about this site.

In the next line of links, I click on Getting Started with Digital Maine Library.  This page gives me answers to some of the most commonly asked questions regarding the new site.

A-Z Index is just that, an alphabetical list of all the resources available here pops up on the left side of the page.

The last link on this line is Advanced Search.  This takes me to a page that discusses a couple of the ways that the website sorts, searches and then presents the information to us.  I have discovered a Search Bar that is not on the home page.  This Search Bar is the one that will search the entire Digital Maine Library website and not only the databases that I choose to look at.  Personally, I hope that this will be moved to the home page for the convenience of all of us.

Back to the home page.

Below the slideshow there are three boxes – Subject ;  Resource Type and  Audience.  Each of these has up and down arrows in the box.  Clicking on the arrows gives me many ways to narrow my search – perhaps define or refine are a better words.  Each set of arrows has many, MANY choices and ways to pinpoint which database(s) will be most appropriate for my search.

Enough for now, I look forward to exploring more on this site, but that will have to wait for another day!

 

Unsung Heroes

Recently I saw the film, The Way We Get By, directed by Aron Gaudet who grew up in Old Town, Maine.  Many of us here in Maine have heard of the troop greeters at the Bangor Airport.  Actually, I have been there at the same time waiting to fly out.  At the time I didn’t really know what was going on.  This is a wonderful film about some wonderful Mainers who are making a huge impact in such a small, personal way.

The product description from Amazon.com says:   “The SXSW Special Jury Award winning The Way We Get By is a deeply moving film about life and how to live it. Beginning as a seemingly idiosyncratic story about troop greeters – a group of senior citizens who gather daily at a small airport to thank American soldiers departing and returning from Iraq, the film quickly turns into a moving, unsettling and compassionate story about aging, loneliness, war and mortality.

When its three subjects aren’t at the airport, they wrestle with their own problems: failing health, depression, mounting debt. Joan, a grandmother of eight, has a deep connection to the soldiers she meets. The sanguine Jerry keeps his spirits up even as his personal problems mount. And the veteran Bill, who clearly has trouble taking care of himself, finds himself contemplating his own death. Seeking out the telling detail rather than offering sweeping generalizations, the film carefully builds stories of heartbreak and redemption, reminding us how our culture casts our elders, and too often our soldiers, aside. More important, regardless of your politics, The Way We Get By celebrates three unsung heroes who share their love with strangers who need and deserve it.“

You can reserve this film online via the Minerva system or just give us a call and we will do it for you.

New Items ~ September 2018

FICTION

All we ever wanted by Emily Giffin.  A scandal sends members of two Nashville families into chaos.

Baby teeth by Zoje Stage.  Here’s a “bad seed” novel about a mom desperate to find help for her mute young daughter whose disturbing behavior grows increasingly dangerous.

Clock dance by Anne Tyler.  This is a window into Willa Drake’s life over 50 years and how she adjusts to some of life’s surprises.

Cottage by the sea by Debbie Macomber.  A lonely woman finds love in a charming seaside town.

The Eastern.  Book Two: Later on by Deborah Gould.  In the second book of a trilogy, five families settle on the Eastern River in Pittston, Maine and build a strong and lasting neighborhood.

In a lonely place by Dorothy Hughes.  A classic California noir with a feminist twist, this prescient 1947 novel exposed misogyny in post-World War II American society making it far ahead of its time.

Kill the farm boy by Delilah Dawson.  This is Tolkien’s Fellowship of the Ring on laughing gas.  It’s a rollicking fantasy adventure that upends numerous genre tropes in audacious style.

The last time I lied by Riley Sager.  A painter is in danger when she returns to the summer camp where some of her childhood friends disappeared.

 The late bloomers’ club by Louise Miller.  A delightful novel about two headstrong sisters, a small town’s efforts to do right by the community, and the power of a lost dog to summon true love.

Lying in wait by Liz Nugent.  Laurence Fitzsimons has a mother who’s determined to control everything and everyone around her – even if she has to kill to do it.

Mary B by Katherine Chen.  The overlooked middle sister in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice casts off her prim exterior and takes center stage in this fresh retelling of the classic novel.

The mere wife by Maria Headley.  A modern retelling of the literary classic Beowulf, set in American suburbia as two mothers – a housewife and a battle-hardened veteran – fight to protect those they love.

The other lady vanishes by Amanda Quick.  This sweeps readers back to 1930s Hollywood and California, where the most dazzling of illusions can’t hide the darkest secrets.

Paradox by Catherine Coulter.  Agents Sherlock and Savich look for an escaped psychopath.

A people’s history of the vampire uprising by Raymond Villareal.  In this wildly original novel – part social-political satire, part international mystery – a new virus turns people into something a bit more than human, upending society as we know it.

The Pharaoh Key by Douglas Preston.  Secrets of a mysterious ancient tablet may point the way to untold treasure – or unspeakable danger.

The prisoner in the castle by Susan MacNeal.   A series of baffling murders among a group of imprisoned agents threatens the outcome of World War II in this new Maggie Hope mystery.

The Romanov Empress by C.W. Gortner.  An historical novel about the beloved Empress Maria, the Danish girl who became the mother of the last Russian tsar.

Star of the north by David John.  A thriller about a woman trying to rescue her twin sister from captivity in North Korea, and the North Korean citizens with whom she forms an unlikely alliance.

Tailspin by Sandra Brown.  A pilot navigates treacherous situations when he attempts to deliver a mysterious black box to a doctor in Georgia.

An unwanted guest by Shari Lapena.  A Catskills lodge loses electricity during a blizzard and its guests start mysteriously dropping dead.

Who is Vera Kelly?  by Rosalie Knecht.  Meet an original, wry and whip-smart female spy for the 21st century.

NONFICTION

Another good dog by Cara Achterberg.  A warm and entertaining memoir about what happens when you foster 50 dogs in less than two years – and how the dogs save you as much as you save them.

The contest by Michael Schumacher.  The 1968 election and the war for America’s soul.  A dramatic, deeply informed account of one of the most consequential elections and periods in American history.

Godspeed by Casey Legler.  This electric coming of age memoir charts Legler’s broken childhood – from swimming in the Olympics at 16 while facing crippling loneliness, to her descent into drug addiction, and a desperate penchant for self-destruction that almost took her life – all while grappling with undiagnosed autism.  It’s a raw story of teenage addiction that is beautifully told.

Indianapolis by Lynn Vincent.  The true story of the worst sea disaster in US Naval history and the 50 year fight to exonerate an innocent man.

Light of the stars by Adam Frank.  An intriguing account of the ongoing search for alien civilizations whose failure to appear may be a warning for humans to get their act together.

My life in the Maine Woods by Annette Jackson.  The author recounts her experiences with her game warden husband during the 1930s.

On the Ganges by George Black.  Encounters with saints and sinners on India’s mythic river.  Journey along one of the world’s greatest rivers and catch a glimpse into the lives and cultures of the people who live along its banks.

A Senator’s eye by Angus King.  From the formality of the Capitol Rotunda to a glorious sunrise off the coast of Maine, this is a fascinating collection of informal photos taken by King along with his personal insights and captions.

Slow by Brooke McAlary. Here are plans for simple living in a frantic world.  Free yourself from the frantic and embrace the joy of slow.

The stone crusher by Jeremy Dronfield.  The true story of a father and son’s fight for survival in Auschwitz.  A personal and universal account of brutality at its worst and of family devotion at its best.

The strange case of Dr. Couney by Dawn Raffle.  The extraordinary tale of how a mysterious immigrant “doctor” became the revolutionary innovator of saving premature babies by placing them in incubators in World Fair side shows, on Coney Island, and Atlantic City.

The widower’s notebook by Jonathan Santlofer.  Written with humor and great warmth, this is a portrait of a marriage, an account of the complexities of finding oneself single again after losing your spouse, and a story of the enduring power of familial love.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.