Marsden Hartley

Do you know who Marsden Hartley was?  If you are interested in what Maine has contributed to the culture of the world, then you should know who he is even if you do not know yet.  Hartley was born in Lewiston, Maine in 1877 and died in Ellsworth in 1943.  His contribution to world culture?  Wikipedia calls him an American Modernist painter and says “he wanted to become ‘the painter of Maine’ and depict American life at a local level.  This aligned Hartley with the Regionalism movement, a group of artists active from the early- to mid-20th century that attempted to represent a distinctly ‘American art.’  He continued to paint in Maine, primarily scenes around Lovell and the Corea coast, until his death in Ellsworth in 1943.  His ashes were scattered on the Androscoggin River.

Colby College Museum of Art in Waterville is currently featuring an exhibition titled Marsden Hartley’s Maine which will run through November 12, 2017.  The museum’s web site at  http://www.colby.edu/museum reports that, “This exhibition will explore Marsden Hartley’s complex, sometimes contradictory, and visually arresting relationship with his native state—from the lush Post-Impressionist inland landscapes with which he launched his career, to the later roughly rendered paintings of Maine’s rugged coastal terrain, its hardy inhabitants, and the magisterial Mount Katahdin.

Hartley’s renowned abstract German series, New Mexico recollections, and Nova Scotia period have been celebrated in previous exhibitions, but Marsden Hartley’s Maine will illuminate Maine as a critical factor in understanding the artist’s high place in American art history. Maine served as an essential slate upon which he pursued new ideas and theories.  It was a lifelong source of inspiration intertwined with his personal history, cultural milieu, and desire to create a regional expression of American modernism.

The exhibition is organized by the Colby College Museum of Art and The Metropolitan Museum of Art.”

Check out this exhibition for the unique style with which Hartley has been celebrated, for the man’s unique view of Maine and its inhabitants, and for the wonderful Colby College Museum of Art building and collection which have a splendor all their own.

 

 

New Books – October 2017

FICTION

Any dream will do by Debbie Macomber.  As Shay Benson begins her life anew by building a relationship with Pastor Drew, her brother’s return threatens to undo it all.

Caroline: Little House revisited by Sarah Miller.  Peeling back the layers of Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie, this reveals another side of Caroline Ingalls, Wilder’s mother.  Not to be missed by Wilder’s grown-up fans or those who enjoy historical fiction.

Crime scene by Jonathan Kellerman.  Clay Edison, a deputy coroner and former star athlete, investigates a possible murder.

The Cuban affair by Nelson DeMille.  Set in 2015 during the early days of the thaw between the US and Cuba – a line from the novel perfectly describes this page-turner:  “Sex, money, and adventure.  Does it get any better than that?”

Don’t let go by Harlan Coben.  Coben explores the big secrets and little lies that can destroy a relationship, a family, and even a town in this powerful thriller.

Enigma by Catherine Coulter.  Agents Savich and Sherlock race against the clock to catch an international criminal and solve the enigma of the man called John Doe.

The followers by Rebecca Wait.  A struggling single mother falls under the spell of a charismatic cult leader, but her rebellious 12 year old daughter isn’t quite so gullible.

 A gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles.  A Russian count undergoes 30 years of house arrest.

Glass Houses by Louise Penny.  Penny shatters the conventions of the crime novel to explore what Gandhi called the court of conscience – a court that supersedes all others.

The golden house by Salman Rushdie.  A modern American epic set against the panorama of contemporary politics and culture – a hurtling, page-turning mystery that is equal parts The Great Gatsby and The Bonfire of the Vanities.

The last Tudor by Phillippa Gregory.  The youngest Grey sister, Mary, is left to face her ruthless cousin, Queen Elizabeth.

A legacy of spies by John LeCarre.  The undisputed master returns with a riveting new book – his first Smiley novel in more than 25 years.

The locals by Jonathan Dee.  Here are the dramas of the 21st century America – rising inequality, working class decline, a new authoritarianism – played out in the classic setting of some of our greatest novels: the small town.

My absolute darling by Gabriel Tallent.  A remarkably self-sufficient 14 year old girl must fight to save herself from her abusive survivalist father.

North Haven by Sarah Moriarty.  A portrait of the family scars and faults passed along the generations, brilliantly capturing life on the Maine coastline, where time seems to stand still even as the water never stops moving.

The punch escrow by Tal Klein.  Fans of hard SF and time travel will enjoy this imaginative debut.

The right time by Danielle Steel.  The author Alexandra Winslow, writing under the pseudonym Alexander Green, creates a double life that isolates her.

Robert B. Parker’s The hangman’s sonnet by Reed Coleman.  This Jessie Stone novel involves a reclusive folk singer.

Secrets in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas must separate rumors from reality when a woman who traffics in other people’s secrets is silenced.

Seeing red by Sandra Brown.  The TV journalist Kerra Bailey and former federal agent John Trapper join forces to expose a web of conspiracy behind a hotel bombing in Dallas.

Sleeping beauties by Stephen King and Owen King.  The authors tell the highest of high-stakes stories: what might happen if women disappeared from the world of men?

The store by James Patterson.  Two NY writers go undercover to expose the secrets of a powerful retailer.

Strange practice by Vivian Shaw.  Fans who enjoy gaslamp fantasies will appreciate how Shaw brings her Victorian monsters into the modern age.

We shall not all sleep by Estep Nagy.  Set on a small Maine island, this is a richly told story of American class, family, and manipulation – a compelling portrait of a unique and privileged WASP stronghold on the brink of dissolution.

Y is for yesterday by Sue Grafton.  Yesterday was for youthful indiscretions.  Today is for consequences.

NONFICTION

After the eclipse by Sarah Perry.   A mother’s murder, a daughter’s search.  In a fierce memoir of a mother’s murder outside of her daughter’s bedroom in rural Maine, a daughter’s coming-of-age in the wake of immense loss, and her mission to know the woman who gave her life.

Dying: a memoir by Cory Taylor.  This slender volume brings a fresh point of view to end of life care, the concept of having a sense of control over the unknown, and the role of chance in life.  This deep meditation is beautifully written and destined to be an important piece of conversation surrounding death.

The far away brothers by Lauren Markham.  The deeply reported story of identical twin brothers who escape El Salvador’s violence to build new lives in California – fighting to survive, to stay, and to belong.

A farewell to ice by Peter Wadhams.  Based on five decades of research and observation, this is a haunting and unsparing look at the melting ice caps and what their disappearance will mean.

Feeling Jewish by Devorah Baum.  A young critic offers an original, passionate, and erudite account of what it means to feel Jewish – even when you are not.

The four tendencies by Gretchen Rubin.  The indispensable personality profiles that reveal how to make your life better (and other peoples lives better too).

Install your own solar panels by Joe Burdick.  Designing and installing a photovoltaic system to power your home.

Madness by Sam Sax.  An astounding debut collection of poems – Winner of the 2016 National Poetry Series Competition.  In this collection, Sax explodes the linkage between desire, addiction, and the history of mental health.

Nomadland by Jessica Bruder.  A book about low-income Americans (mostly seniors) eking out a living while driving from locale to locale for seasonal employment.

The plant paradox by Steven Gundry.  Most of us have heard of gluten – a protein found in wheat that can cause widespread inflammation in the body.  Americans spend billions on gluten-free diets in an effort to protect their health.  But what if we’ve been missing the root of the problem?

Quakeland by Kathryn Miles.  A journey around the US in search of the truth about the threat of earthquakes leads to spine-tingling discoveries, unnerving experts and ultimately the kind of preparation that will actually help guide us through disasters.

The republic for which it stands by Richard White.  This offers a fresh and integrated interpretation of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age as the seedbed of modern America.

This blessed earth by Ted Genoways.  Both a concise exploration of the history of the American small farm and a vivid, nuanced portrait of one family’s fight to preserve their legacy and the life they love.

What happened by Hillary Clinton.  The former secretary of state relates her experience as the first woman candidate nominated for president by a majority party and reveals what she was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history.

What I found in a thousand towns by Dar Williams.  A beloved folk singer presents an impassioned account of the fall and rise of the small American towns she cherishes.

Why Buddhism is true by Robert Wright.  Neuroscience and psychology findings are used to support Buddhist practice and meditation and show how it holds the key to moral clarity and enduring happiness.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

Non-Fiction Series in the Library

I would like to introduce some wonderful non-fiction book series that are available at our library for both children and adults.  Just type in these titles into our catalog and it will come up with all different subjects from planets, wars, holiday, people, energy and etc.

You Wouldn’t Want To Be – This series is very popular with children.

 

Celebrations In My World – Teaches children about the many Holidays that we celebrate.

 

A True Book – Varies from planets, biographies, food, our senses and many more.

 

A Wicked History – Children can learn about some evil individuals who twisted the course of history.

 

Next Generation Energy – Tells about energy from the sun, wind, earth’s core, etc.

 

Shockwave – Has many helpful subjects pertaining to science, social studies and much more.

 

“Expand the definition of ‘reading’ to include non-fiction, humor, graphic novels, magazines, action adventure, and, yes, ever websites. It’s the pleasure of reading that counts; the focus will naturally broaden. A boy won’t read shark books forever.” – Jon Scieszka

An Alphabet of Maine Titles

A friend and I were talking the other day, and we wondered if it would be possible to create an alphabetical list of books containing Maine places.

My list isn’t quite alphabetical, though the Maine places ARE in alphabetical order.  As you will notice, I did use poetic license with two letters – X and Z.  Please leave a comment if you have ideas for these two special letters!

Summers at Castle AUBURN

The BLUE HILL meadows

CHELSEA Chelsea bang bang

DALLAS Buyers Club

EMBDEN town of yore

FRIENDSHIP makes the heart grow fonder

The GRAY man

HOPE and tears

History of ISLESBOROUGH, Maine

Thomas JEFFERSON builds a library

KENNEBEC gumbo

LIBERTY or death

MOUNT VERNON love story

NORTH HAVEN

The OLD TOWN Canoe Company

Mr. Goodhue remembers PORTLAND

The daring Miss QUIMBY

RANDOLPH Caldecott

SAINT GEORGE and the dragon

TURNER & Hooch

The UNION quilters

Hollywood comes to VINALHAVEN

The three Weissmanns of WESTPORT

Elijah of BuXton

New YORK to Dallas

History of Cape EliZabeth, Maine

New Items In The Library!

FICTION:

The Amber Shadows by Lucy Ribchester.  This re-creates World War II life and the enclosed world of code-breaking and plays out the suspense in a Hitchcock homage almost worthy of the master.

Before we were yours by Lisa Wingate.  A South Carolina lawyer, researching her grandmother’s past, learns about a Tennessee orphanage that kidnapped children and placed them for adoption with wealthy people.

The blinds by Adam Sternbergh.  A tense, broiling, 21st century Western with a crafty premise and a high body count.

Brave deeds by David Abrams.  Spanning 8 hours, this follows a squad of 6 AWOL soldiers as they attempt to cross war-torn Baghdad on foot to attend the funeral of their leader.

The Captain’s Daughter by Meg Moore.  A gripping novel about a woman who returns to her hometown in coastal Maine and finds herself pondering the age old question of what could have been.

The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor.  A woman inherits a bookstore and discovers her family’s connection to a famous set of photographs.

Deadfall by Linda Fairstein.  The Manhattan prosecutor Alexandra Cooper becomes a suspect.

Down a dark road by Linda Castillo.  Kate Burkholder, an Amish-born (but excommunicated) chief of police, believes that an old friend accused of his wife’s murder may be innocent.

The duchess by Danielle Steel.  A 19th century British duke’s daughter, disinherited by her half-brothers, flees to Paris to make a new life.

Exposed by Lisa Scottoline.  Rosato & DiNunzio, Philadelphia’s most drama-ridden law firm, faces perhaps its most dramatic episode ever when it’s threatened both inside and out.

The followers by Rebecca Wait.  A struggling single mother falls under the spell of a charismatic cult leader, but her rebellious 12 year old daughter isn’t quite so gullible.

A game of ghosts by John Connolly.  The games begin anew as retired police detective Charlie Parker, along with sidekicks Angel and Louis, bring their special brand of cynicism and expertise to this paranormal thriller.

Gather the daughters by Jennie Melamed.  A haunting novel about a cult on an isolated island where nothing is as it seems.

Grace by Paul Lynch.  A sweeping, Dickensian story of a young girl on a life-changing journey across 19th century Ireland on the eve of the Great Famine.

The grip of it by Jac Jemc.  A chilling literary horror novel about a young couple haunted by their newly purchased home.

The half-drowned king by Linnea Hartsuyker.  Steeped in legend and myth, this is a swashbuckling epic of family, love, and betrayal that reimagines the Norse sagas.

House of spies by Daniel Silva.  Gabriel Allon, the Israeli art restorer and spy and now head of Israel’s secret intelligence service, pursues an ISIS mastermind.

I know a secret by Tess Gerritsen.  Jane Rizzoli and Maura Isles pursue a shadowy psychopath keeping secrets and taking lives.

A kind of freedom by Margaret Sexton.  An urgent novel that explores the legacy of racial disparity in the South through a poignant and redemptive family history.

The last laugh by Lynn Freed.  A hilarious novel about the riotous, passion-filled adventures of three women who THOUGHT they were past their prime.

The late show by Michael Connelly.  This introduces Rene Ballard, a fierce young detective fighting to prove herself on the LAPD’s toughest beat.

Less by Andrew Greer.  You are a failed novelist and about to turn 50.  A wedding invitation arrives: your boyfriend of the past 9 years is engaged to someone else.  You can’t say yes – it would be too awkward – and you can’t say no – it would look like defeat.  On your desk are a series of invitations to half-baked literary events around the world.  How do you arrange to skip town?  You accept them all.

The lightkeeper’s daughters by Jean Pendziwol.  A decades-old mystery is revisited as an elderly woman shares the story of her childhood with a troubled teen.  A haunting tale of nostalgia and lost chances that is full of last-minute surprises.

The locals by Jonathan Dee.  Here are the dramas of the 21st century America – rising inequality, working class decline, a new authoritarianism – played out in the classic setting of some of our greatest novels – the small town.

The lying game by Ruth Ware.  This introduces 4 women who have been carrying a terrible secret since their boarding school days, a secret that is about to be literally unearthed.

The mapmaker’s daughter by Katherine Hughes.  A fascinating evocation of the major players of the Ottoman renaissance. A captured Venetian encounters a strange blend of civilization and barbarism as she attains the highest rank possible for a woman in the Ottoman Empire.

Mrs. Fletcher by Tom Perrotta.  A mother and son experience existential tizzies following his departure for college.

Secrets of the tulip sisters by Susan Mallery.  Sisters reconnect when one returns to their tulip-centered hometown.

See what I have done by Sarah Schmidt.  This recasts one of the most fascinating murder cases of all time (Lizzie Borden) into an intimate story of a volatile household and a family devoid of love.

Seven stones to stand or fall by Diana Gabaldon.  A collection of short fiction – including two never-before-published novellas – featuring Jamie Fraser, Lord John Grey, Mastery Raymond, and others, all extending the story of Outlander in thrilling new directions.

Sun at midnight by Rosie Thomas.  Love and adventure in this epic story set against the stunning backdrop of Antarctica.

Tom Clancy Point of Contact by Mike Maden.  With typhoons, deadly Chinese and North Korean operatives wielding bats, knives, and guns, and a weaponized thumb drive – the action reaches Clancy level early and stays there.

Use of force by Brad Thor.  The counterterrorism operative Scot Harvath is called in when a missing terrorism suspect drowns off the Italian coast.

We shall not all sleep by Estep Nagy.  Set on a small Maine island, this is a richly told story of American class, family, and manipulation – a compelling portrait of a unique and privileged WASP stronghold on the brink of dissolution.

NEW MUSIC CDs:

Evolve by Imagine Dragons

Come From Away (original Broadway cast recording)

Melodrama by Lorde

Fake Sugar by Beth Ditto

Dear Evan Hansen (original Broadway cast recording)

Divide by Ed Sheeran

NEW DVDs:

The Lost City of Z (2017) starring Charlie Hunnam

Only angels have wings (1939) starring Cary Grant and Jean Arthur

Broadcast News (1987)  starring Holly Hunter and William Hurt

Westworld (1973) starring Yul Brynner and Richard Benjamin

NONFICTION:

The Cooperstown casebook by Jay Jaffe.  Who’s in the baseball hall of fame, who should be in, and who should pack their plaques and go away.

Deaf daughter by Carol Lee Adams.  This memoir reveals what it’s like to be born able to hear, only to be deaf by age 19.

Drawing calm by Susan Evenson.  Relax, refresh, refocus with drawing, painting and collage workshops.

The history of top 40 singles: 1970-1989 by Frank Deangelis.  Once you learn the histories of these hits, you’ll never hear them the same way again.

Hue 1968 by Mark Bowden.  A stirring history of the 1968 battle that definitively turned the Vietnam War into an American defeat.

Magnetic City by Justin Davidson.  From “New York” magazine’s architecture critic, a walking and reading guide to New York City.

Modern ethics in 77 arguments by Peter Catapano.  Guns, race, and human rights are among the varied ethical issues tackled in this wide-ranging collection.

Notes on a foreign country by Suzy Hansen.  Blending memoir, journalism, and history, this is a moving reflection on America’s place in the world today.  It is a powerful journey of self-discovery and revelation – a profound reckoning with what it means to be American in a moment of grave national and global turmoil.

Scotland: the best 100 places by Peter Irvine.  Extraordinary places to walk, eat, and sleep divided by the themes of reflective, magnificent, and human – all backed up by wonderful photos.

Sons and soldiers by Bruce Henderson.  The untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the US Army to fight Hitler.

Step Parenting by Randall Hicks.  50 one-minute dos and don’ts for stepdads and stepmoms.

The totally unscientific study of the search for human happiness by Paula Poundstone.  This chronicles her amusing and surprisingly personal search for the key to happiness.  A deeply revealing memoir in which the pathos doesn’t kill the humor and one that delivers more than it promises.

Wild things by Bruce Handy.  It’s a profound, eye-opening experience to re-encounter books that you once treasured after decades apart.  A clear-eyed love letter to the greatest children’s books and authors.

Would everybody please stop?  by Jenny Allen.  An Erma Bombeck for the new age with reflections on life and other bad ideas.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

 

An Archival Vacation…

No matter what you have planned (or what may already be planned for you)  you can always take an armchair vacation in the Archives!

Here are some pleasure-seeking snaps from our collection, because wanting to savor every ounce of summer is not just a modern thing here in Maine….

Whether boating or swimming…

Among close friends or with a crowd…

At a lake or on the ocean…

With your special someone or the whole family…

Playing hard or taking it easy…

Catching up on reading or staying ahead of the traffic…

Hitting the open road or plying the open water…

Taking a tour or guiding yourself…

Visiting landmarks or discovering your own…

Creating whimsy or seeking it out…

Appreciating the man-made or Mother Nature’s wonders…

Eating well or feeding your mind…

For an afternoon or overnight…

Planning ahead or taking it as it comes…

Seeking rural outposts or exploring the towns…

Whether on the move or in the comfort of your own armchair…

Enjoy every bit of summer!

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Stuffed Animal Sleepover!

On Tuesday, Aug. 15th, we had our first ever Stuffed Animal Sleepover at the Gardiner Public Library. It was a huge success and everyone had fun. Children brought in their stuffed animals to leave for the night. We put name tags on the animals and then the fun began!

 

Snacks were served and books were read…

 

 

Everyone had fun at craft time,

playing with the doll house,

 

sliding on the banister….

Until it was time for bed….

Children came back the next morning, Wednesday, Aug. 16th, and picked up their animals. They each took home a picture of the animal having fun in the library and the craft that the animals did.

 

This is definitely an event we will do again!

 

 

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What Should I Read Next?

What do you do when you have discovered a new (or new-to-you) author, and you want another book that is just like the one you finished?

You’ve read EVERYTHING you can get your hands on by ______ (fill in the blank) and want to read something JUST like (s)he writes.

Fascination with puppy dog tales – yes, I noticed the pun as well – has you craving more animal stories.

What do you do?  Yes, your local librarian is a wonderful help, but when you finish the book at midnight, and really, ReAlLy, REALLY need a new author SOON, please don’t call us! At least, not a midnight!

A fantastic website for you to find that new author, or subject area, or whatever piece of the title you just finished that sends you searching is part of the MARVEL database.  As I have mentioned in previous blog posts, this amazing resource is provided to all libraries in Maine, and with your current library card you will discover some great new authors and books.

Once you or I access the MARVEL database, which can be accessed through the library website, we need to scroll down, and click on the NOVELIST database.  There are two choices for Novelist – NoveList K-8 Plus and NoveList Plus.  As you might assume, one is geared more to the juvenile, but they both work the same way.

Okay, I’m here.  I type James Patterson in the search bar near the top of the page.  I’m doing a “Basic Search” at this point.  My results show me several things.  On the left side of the page there are several ways to “Refine Results”.  The majority of the page seems to be taken up by several tabs.  These tabs include Books ; Audiobooks ; Series ; Authors and Lists & Articles.

Since the Books tab is the first one (and open), I’ll see what it has to say.

My results include 389 citations.  I know Patterson is prolific, but 389???  Anyway, back to NoveList I go.  As I scroll down the first page, I see books by Patterson, books about Patterson, compilations that include Patterson, and books that he co-authored.  Many choices, but since I have read ALL of his stuff and am looking for something new, I click on the next tab.

Audiobooks appears to be exactly that – James Patterson books that have been recorded for our listening pleasure.  I do notice that the narrator of each audiobook is listed, and as a listener, there are some readers that I particularly enjoy listening to, as well as some that I would rather not hear again.  As I scroll down the first page, I realize that some of the titles are listed more than once and see that perhaps there is a choice of Abridged vs. Unabridged.  All in all, an interesting “tab” to look at.

The next tab is Series.  This one shows me the 22 series that Mr. Patterson writes.

The Authors tab lists six authors who in some way have been associated with James Patterson.  A couple of these authors appear to have written about him, or have co-authored works with him, or simply have the same name.

The last tab is Lists & Articles.  This is exactly what it claims – Lists and Articles about James Patterson.  A great resource for anyone interested in who Mr. Patterson is.

As I explored each of these tabs I noticed several things they had in common.  Below each citation there is a bit of information, as well as a few links.  I see a five-star popularity scale, whether the title is written for Adults, Teens or younger and the Read-alikes.  This is the piece I’m interested in right now.

I click on the Title Read-alikes link for one of the titles on this page.  If there were a specific title I LOVED this would be the time to choose it.  I am taken to a page with several new titles.  There is a “Reason” given for each of the titles on this page.

This process works the same way when I click on Author Read-alikes.  I am taken to a page with several – nine seem to be the maximum number – new authors that might be of interest.

Back to the original “James Patterson” search page I go.  This time I click on the book title itself, and am taken to a page with a description of the book, the genre and tone.  Also on this page, the far right column shows me Read-alikes.  I see the book covers, author and a link to this new title.  I know, I know, “Don’t judge a book by its’ cover”, but … .

I can also search for those “puppy tales” I’m interested in.  The search bar is near the top of each of the NoveList pages, so I type in puppy tales.

Yup, this works as well!  I’m taken to pages that include more than 600 “puppy tales”.

Now, I’ve jumped around this great resource, my clock tells me it’s 2:00a.m., I didn’t disturb my local librarian, I’ve found some new reading ideas, and requested them to be picked up at the library.  This looks like several ticks in the WIN column to me!

Social Media at Gardiner Public Library

Did you know that if you follow  the Gardiner Public Library on Facebook that on Monday we post “Have You Seen This Movie Monday” which features the description of a movie that can be borrowed from the library?  Did you know that every Wednesday we post “Check It Out” which is a description of a book that can be borrowed from the library?  It’s a great way to have a recommendation delivered right to your electronical device.