Marvel – Kids Search

Another wonderful database provided in Marvel.

Kids Search is, as you may have guessed, geared toward the younger user.  It searches several sources at once. 

My first search was “elephant”, using the search bar on the first page.  This brought up over 1800 results!  Next I was given the opportunity to Filter Results By.  My choices were All Results, Magazines, Newspapers, Books & Encyclopedias, Animals, Biographies, Radio & TV News Transcripts, and Primary Source Documents. WOW! Where do I begin to filter??

I clicked on Biographies, and narrowed my search to 15 results, all of these being from electronic encyclopedias.  Scanning through the list, some of the articles give a Lexile number for those folks who need to know what reading level an article is written.  All of the articles happen to be available in Full Text, so clicking on an article brings up the entire article, and I was given the opportunity to Print, E-mail, Save, or Add to folder.  Adding to my folder saves the search for later, so if you are not connected to a printer, you can access the article easily.  Another option here is the Sort By option.  Clicking this drop down box gave me the choices – Relevance, Date Descending, Date Ascending, and Source.  I was also able to Narrow Results By Subjectand Publication.

Moving back to the previous page, filtering my results by Animal gave me 22 results.  These results also give Lexile numbers, and all appear to be Full Text articles, a couple with graphics.  I still had the Sort By options, but the Narrow Results By option is now only Subject.

Primary Source Documents was the next filtering tool I used.  Of the 15 articles, only 2 of them had Lexile numbers, all of them were Full Text articles, and as primary source documents, generally written as first person accounts.  A couple of these articles are Congressional Testimony, which adds an interesting bit to our research.  Here the Sort By options are still the same, but the Narrow Results By option is only Publication.

Photos was my next filtering choice.  Here we have over 300 thumbnail pictures of elephants, with description and source citation.  On this page, Sort By options have lessened, my choices are now Relevance and Title, and there are no Narrow Results By options.

This looks like a WONDERFUL resource for anyone needing information.  It may be titled Kids Search, but . . . . chronologically, I’m no “kid” and I will use this site!!

June is Art Month at the Gardiner Public Library!

Local artist, Mario Del Rio, a.k.a. Cuba, is sponsoring the month of June at Gardiner Public Library for our Year of Reading.

Mario, or Cuba as he says people know him, has donated at piece of his artwork for our June drawing.  Kan 2 Kanvas is the name of this new business venture for Mario.  His medium is spray paint and water in a spray bottle.  All of his art is as “green” as he can make it.  Mario uses recycled or found materials when he is creating – an example of this can be found at the library.  This particular “canvas” is actually the top of a T.V. table that Mario and his manager, Devon Tracy, re-appropriated for a new use.
Mario does custom art work as well – “anything from cell phone covers to cars” is how he puts it.  All of his works are what he refers to as “Astrological Spraypaint”.  Most – if not all – of his paintings are 3D, so if you have the glasses . . .
When asked, Mario suggested art as our theme, specifically “spray paint art”, “graffiti” or “urban art”.  All great ideas, but we are being as general about our theme as possible, so art it is!
Come on in, explore an item involving art in some way, and enter your name for our drawing!

Children’s Room isn’t for children any more!

This is for those adults who do not adventure up into the children’s room, thinking there is nothing there for them. Do I have an author for you!

Phillip Hoose is an amazing children’s writer who lives in Portland, Maine. He has a list of books that he have been published and one that stands out in the library world is The Race to Save the Lord God Bird (2004). This book received the Lupine Award, an award given to an outstanding children’s book with a Maine connection.

Phillip Hoose has a new book coming out in July 2012 that explores another story about a bird referred to as the Moonbird. B95 is a shorebird that was banded in 1995. This bird has flown the distance to the moon and halfway back during its astoundingly long lifetime of nearly 20 years – hence its name. “Meticulously researched and told with inspiring prose and stirring images, this is a gripping, triumphant story of science and survival,” says the Kirkus Review. The book includes photographs, source notes, bibliography and an index.

We anxiously await the arrival of Phillip Hoose’s book. Check his books online and reserve a copy or come into the library. We’d love to see you.

Book jacket illustrations found at Google Images.
 

May is Music Month at the Gardiner Public Library

For those who are taking part in our “Year of Reading”, this month the theme is Music.  Read a book, watch a movie, listen to an item, pop in a music CD, read a magazine, that somehow pertains to music (yes, we are being very relaxed about the relationship of your item to our theme) and have your name entered for the May drawing!

This month’s sponsor is Lisa’s Legit Burritos on Water Street here in Gardiner. They have generously donated a gift certificate to be won by a lucky user of the Gardiner Public library.

We would like to offer a HUGE thank you to our other sponsors!!!

January was sponsored by At Home Veterinary Care, in West Gardiner.

February was sponsored by Book It! The library’s used book store on Water Street here in Gardiner.

March was sponsored by the Community Wellness Center, in Gardiner.

April was sponsored by Black Crow Bakery, in Litchfield.

Please come on in and join the fun!  We would love to have you participate in whatever way works for you.

If you know any Gardiner area business that would like to sponsor a month, give us a call at (207) 582-3312.

From the Children’s Room

Several months ago the Children’s Room started a
1stSaturday of each month story hour.
Time 10 AM to 10:30AM
New books are introduced with an old favorite added in now & then.
Come join us June 2nd for our next Saturday story hour.
The American Library Conference has been held in New Orleans several times in the past so when I read a review for a book about Jean Lafitte, the hero of New Orleans I was curious.
Jean was raised by his Jewish grandmother after his mother died and from her he learned how their family suffered for practicing their faith at the hands of the Spanish government.
He vowed to become a pirate and capture all vessels flying the flag of Spain.  Although a biography for younger children,  Jean Lafitte: the Pirate Who Saved America by Susan G. Rubin, packs a great deal of history in its 47 pages.  I learned fascinating facts about the War of 1812 and the pirates who saved New Orleans.  Hopefully ALA will be held there again!
Book jacket illustration was found a Google images.

Minerva Tips

Secret Hint –  If you are reserving an extremely popular title on Minerva, look for and reserve the large print copy.  Chances are that it will have fewer reserves on it, and you will therefore get it faster.

 A couple of examples would be The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins – 237 holds on the regular print copy, compared to 20 holds on the large print copy.
 Or . . .
Guilty Wives by James Patterson – 129 holds on the regular print and 20 on the large print edition.

Marvelous Marvel

Have you “checked out” Marvel recently?  From many library websites around Maine, including the Gardiner Public Library website, you may access this wonderful database provided by the Maine State Library.

One of the MANY databases that are available to you with your library card is the Dictionary of Literary Biography.  With just a few quick clicks, you can access information about many of your favorite authors.
For fun, I tried Nora Roberts, and immediately learned her birthday, her nationality, and place of birth.  Further information includes awards she has received, as well as the year received; a list of titles complete as of the date the site was updated; pseudonym, with the titles; information about her books; as well as possible further reading about her in books, periodicals, and online.
Next I looked for Stephen King.  Nora Roberts appeared in only one database; the name Stephen King, when using the Search All Literature Databases of the Dictionary of Literary Biography, brings up 44 documents on five pages.  The source for most of these is the Contemporary Authors section of this database, but the type of information includes biography information, as well as criticism.
We know this works well with contemporary authors, how about some of the classics?
William Shakespearebrings up four articles, two about Nicholas Shakespeare and two about William Shakespeare.  All four of the articles are biographical in nature.  If I wasn’t sure which author I was interested in, the sources could be of assistance – Nicholas Shakespeare is in Contemporary Authors Online, and William Shakespeare is in Dictionary of Literary Biography.  Perhaps there are folks who would consider William Shakespeare a contemporary, but since he was born in about 1564, I would like to think that contemporary doesn’t fit!  So, choosing the William Shakespeare articles gives us biographical information, a list of his writings, criticisms, papers, suggested further readings about the author, as well as a list of play productions during his lifetime.
I don’t know about you, but this seems like an incredible resource!!  Think of the papers/essays we have written or need to write!  Authors and all of their work – WOW!!!

Battle of the Book

Do you think that you are smarter than a 5th grader?  I am not so sure this is a true statement for me anymore.  I am a judge for the Battle of the Book over at Pittston Consolidated School and part of my duty as judge is to read 5 YA titles.  Okay, what is YA?  YA is a fairly new genre to the publishing world that concentrates on the teen and pre-teen audience.  Please think of the Harry Potter series and the Twilight series…. very large audiences and huge profits for the publishers.  Though these blockbusters are not titles for the battle, I did read books I never would have read if not for my responsibilities.

I took my duties very seriously, judges are well respected entities and I did not want to besmirch anyone.  I thought I had the titles down pat, but the teens could answer any trivia, tidbit, and theme question we threw at them, all in 30 seconds!  These students read, studied, dissected, and reviewed each title until the event.  I am so proud of the young adults that joined in on the fun.  Their teachers should be our heroes because they accomplished a very difficult feat…. they made reading fun and they made readers champions.  So, I challenge our library readers to pick up a YA title soon, these books are worlds away from my days of reading the Nancy Drew series and dreaming of the time that I would be able to drive around town in a roadster!

April is Garden Month at the library.

For those who are taking part in our “Year of Reading”, this month the theme is Gardens/Gardening.  Read a book, watch a movie, listen to an item, read a magazine, that somehow pertains to gardens and/or gardening (yes we are being very relaxed about the relationship of your item to our theme) and have your name entered for the April drawing!  This month’s sponsor is the Black Crow Bakery in Litchfield. They have generously donated a gift certificate to be won by a lucky user of the Gardiner Public library.

January was sponsored by At Home Veterinary Care, in West Gardiner.

February was sponsored by Book It! The library’s used book store on Water Street here in Gardiner.

March was sponsored by the Community Wellness Center, in Gardiner.

Please come on in and join the fun!  We would love to have you participate in whatever way works for you.

If you know any Gardiner area business that would like to sponsor a month, give us a call at (207) 582-3312.

What are you reading right now?

Several years ago I watched an HBO movie on the life of Temple Grandin, a woman born with severe autism, who became a PhD professor at Colorado State University.  When I read a recent review for a new children’s book about this remarkable woman I knew it was one we should have in our collection.
Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World, by Sy Montgomery is truly a memorable story for children as well as for adults.
                                       Charlene Wagner, Children’s Librarian

 

The question was asked, “What are you reading right now?” Well, my life at this time is a little to busy to finish a book. So I will tell you what I have been trying to read lately. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green is a new novel for Teens. It is about a girl with cancer named Hazel and a boy named Augustus. It has love, illness, Indianapolis, Amsterdam and all kinds of stuff.  I would love to catch you reading this book.
                                                              Ginni Nichols, YA Librarian

 

 
 
Of the several titles I have finished recently, Craft Activism: people, ideas and projects from the new community of handmade and how you can join in, by Joan Tapper was full of fun and interesting information.  This book has patterns, as well as interesting background about several crafting groups in the United States.  I found fascinating, some of the community art projects in the book. Truly a fun and colorful read!
                                                   Ann Russell, Technology Librarian
 
 
All of the titles mentioned are items owned by the Gardiner Public Library.  Check the website, or give us a call, and we will hold the item for you.
 
All of the book jacket illustrations were found as Google images.