Stuffed Animal Sleepover!

On Tuesday, Aug. 15th, we had our first ever Stuffed Animal Sleepover at the Gardiner Public Library. It was a huge success and everyone had fun. Children brought in their stuffed animals to leave for the night. We put name tags on the animals and then the fun began!

 

Snacks were served and books were read…

 

 

Everyone had fun at craft time,

playing with the doll house,

 

sliding on the banister….

Until it was time for bed….

Children came back the next morning, Wednesday, Aug. 16th, and picked up their animals. They each took home a picture of the animal having fun in the library and the craft that the animals did.

 

This is definitely an event we will do again!

 

 

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Gardiner’s Farmers Market Family Fun Day

I was invited to come to the Farmer’s Market Family Fun Day this Wednesday and represent the Gardiner Public Library. It was a beautiful sunny day with plenty to do. Face painting, painting rocks, necklace making, wreath making from herbs, jenga, hula hoops and other things happened. Here are some photos from the wonderful afternoon spent within our area.

Summer ’17 Children’s Books

Hattie & Hudson by Chris Van Dusen

This eloquent, evocative book about compassion is perfect for sparking discussions on      prejudice. A sensational choice for a seasonal storytime. (School Library Journal)

Be Quiet by Ryan Higgins

This hilarious and fun read-aloud will be a hit at any story time. Kids will be laughing out loud. (School Library Journal)

Little Pig Saves the Ship by David Hyde Costello

The story will be a familiar one to any young reader who feels too small to join in with older siblings or peers, and offers an empowering message of learning to overcome one’s small stature. (School Library Journal)

The Legend of Rock Paper Scissors by Drew Drywalt

Laugh-out-loud funny and outrageous at times, this read-aloud will have listeners jumping out of their seats. This is the sort of story that makes children love to read.

The Fearless Traveler’s Guide to Wicked Places by Pete Begler

Twelve-year-old Nell Perkins lives in the small town of Mist Falls with her mother, Rose, and her brothers, George and Speedy. A dark cloud filled with evil witches sucks Rose up, and Nell and her brother’s team up with local resident Duke Badger following the cloud into the Dreamlands, the wondrous and horrific realm of all dreams. (School Library Journal)

The Great Treehouse War by Lisa Graff

It’s kids vs. parents in epic fashion, and Graff’s not-quite-fantasy world is every kid’s dream. All of the frustrations young people feel with their parents during a divorce are hilariously hyperbolized in a way that will make children feel vindicated and less alone. The epistolary format allows readers to get to know all of the characters through creative footnotes, sticky notes, newspaper articles, emails, and tiny drawings. Graff’s whimsical, original work is a breath of fresh air.  (School Library Journal)

The Unexpected Life of Oliver Cromwell Pitts by Avi

Wakening to a terrible storm, 12-year-old Oliver Cromwell Pitts finds his English seaside house flooded and his lawyer father gone off to London, leaving the child bereft, penniless, and facing the unsavory possibility of being remanded to the children’s poorhouse. Alas, that is exactly what happens. Happily, circumstances and quick wits allow him to flee the dreadful place, but, his life now in danger, he must escape to London. But how? Because of  his flight and the  fact that he has, er, borrowed some money, he’s wanted by the  authorities and must travel secretly, and the  road to the  capital is long and fraught with danger—there will be no relying on the kindness of  strangers. Will he find his way to London? This story is filled with suspense, surprises, and ultimately satisfaction. (School Library Journal)

Fairy Floss: The Sweet Story of Cotton Candy by Ann Ingalls

When Lillie and her aunt finally get to the World’s Fair, they take in all the sights, including a dazzling array of newfangled gadgets, and when they finally get to John and William’s kiosk, Lillie gets to make a batch of fairy floss herself. Ingalls’ story , centered on the  modernization of cotton candy , is well matched by Blanco’s colorful, whimsical, full-page 1904 World’s Fair scenes, which pack in plenty of  period detail, including clothing, transportation, and images of the  historic exhibits. Have cotton candy ready as a follow-up to this dip into the history of a well-loved amusement-park treat. (Booklist)

Ginni Nichols, Children’s Librarian

News From the Children’s Room

I would like to tell you about some of the new things in the Children’s Room.

I have started an “I can read shelf” for patrons to make it easier to find this type of book. Look for this area to grow as we get all the books for this area together.
I have started a Parenting shelf in the Children’s Room. This will help busy parents find a book for themselves while they are up here.  They are near the train station and the puppet theater.
I also did two sessions on Library Lessons for homeschoolers in the area. This will be offered again if the need arises. Just give me a call, and we can set up a time for a group to come in.
On Tuesday, April 19th at 2:00 we will have a program called “Bugs, Bugs, Bugs” presented by the LC Bates Museum.
Lastly, Summer Reading Program will be starting before you know it.
Keep a look out for more changes to help make your life easier with your children.
See you up in the Children’s Room.
Ginni Nichols, Children’s Librarian

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THE CHILDREN’S ROOM

The value of the public library is often underestimated, especially with regard to the impact on education. Specifically, the public library plays a major role in helping children learn to read, as well as develop reading skills and comprehension.
For example, the Children’s Room here at Gardiner Public Library offers a wealth of knowledge. The Children’s Collection is a vast assortment of print (as well as books on CD) which allows children to be exposed to a variety of fiction and non-fiction. Having such a vast collection contributes to student success beginning at an early age.
Another advantage of the Children’s Room at GPL is our summer reading program, which helps children increase their reading achievement, as well as keeping them from losing progress made during the school year.
Even pre-schoolers can take advantage of the Children’s Room throughout the year by attending Story Hour. Listening to an adult model good reading is a wonderful way to spark children’s interest in reading.
Having access to a wide variety of books is so important to children’s literacy development. Please come visit the Children’s Room at GPL, and bring home an exciting stack of books for your child to delve into!

Political Humor in the Children’s Room

Books about U.S. Presidents & First Ladies that are sure to enlighten & entertain!

 
 
 
 
Charlene Wagner, Children’s Librarian