New Titles for January 2018!

FICTION:

 Alive in shape and color edited by Lawrence Block.  17 paintings by great artists and the stories they inspired.

Artemis by Andy Weir.  A small-time smuggler living in a lunar colony schemes to pay off an old debt by pulling off a challenging heist.

The big book of the Continental Op by Dashiell Hammett.  All 38 stories starring the Continental Op – one of the greatest characters in detective fiction.

The body in the casket by Katherine Hall Page.  A chilling New England who-dun-it, inspired by the best Agatha Christie mysteries and with hints of the timeless board game Clue.

A darker sea by James Haley.  A gripping naval saga featuring Commander Bliven Putnam, chronicling the build up to the biggest military conflict between the U.S. and Britain after the Revolution – The War of 1812.

The demon crown by James Rollins.  To save mankind’s future, the members of Sigma Force must make a devil’s bargain as they join forces with their most hated enemy to stop an ancient threat.

 End game by David Baldacci.  Jessica Reel and Will Robie fight a dangerous adversary in Colorado.

The floating world by C. Morgan Babst.  A dazzling novel about family, home, and grief that takes readers into the heart of Hurricane Katrina with the story of a family whose roots stretch back nearly to the foundation of New Orleans.

Fortitude smashed by Taylor Brooke.  Personalized chips are now implanted beneath the thumbnails of every infant, where glowing numbers count down to the moment they will meet their soul mate.  Fate is now a calculation.

Future home of the living god by Louise Erdrich.  A startling portrait of a young woman fighting for her life and her unborn child against oppressive forces that manifest in the wake of a cataclysmic event.

The girl in the tower by Katherine Arden.  A remarkable young woman blazes her own trail from the backwoods of Russia to the court of Moscow.

The ice house by Laura Lee Smith.  This follows the beleaguered MacKinnons as they weather the possible loss of the family business, a serious medical diagnosis, and the slings and arrows of familial discord.

 In this moment by Karen Kingsbury.  A lawyer defends a public high school principal who starts an after-school Bible study program.

Into the drowning deep by Mira Grant.  A claustrophobic, deep-sea tale that will leave readers glad to be safely on dry land.

The library at the edge of the world by Felicity Hayes-McCoy.  A local librarian must find a way to rebuild her community and her own life in this touching, enchanting novel set on Oreland’s stunning Wet Coast.

The Paris secret by Karen Swan.  A tale of forgotten treasures and long-held secrets, this explores a woman’s journey to discovering the truth behind an abandoned apartment and a family whose mysteries may be better left undiscovered.

Past perfect by Danielle Steel.  The story of two families living 100 years apart who come together in time in a startling moment, opening the door to rare friendship and major events in early 20th century history.

Secrets of Cavendon by Barbara Taylor Bradford.  A saga featuring the aristocratic Ingham family and the Swann family, who have loyally served them for generations.

Seven days of us by Francesca Hornak.  A family can’t escape their secrets when they’re forced to spend the Christmas holiday in quarantine in this sharply funny novel.

Two kinds of truth by Michael Connelly.  While he investigates the murder to two pharmacists, an old case comes back to haunt Harry Bosch.

Weave a circle round by Kari Maaren.  A teen learns about herself – and the fabric of the universe – when she goes traveling in time with an immortal 14 year old.  A charming and extraordinarily relatable book with the potential to become a timeless classic.

The whispering room by Dean Koontz.  Former FBI agent and wanted fugitive Jane Hawk tracks down a group that is brainwashing people into committing suicide.

Year One by Nora Roberts.  It began on New Year’s Eve.  The sickness came on suddenly and spread quickly.  The fear spread even faster…  And as the power of science and technology receded, magic rose up in its place.

You can run by Steve Mosby.  A riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma guaranteed to play havoc with both your brain cells and your heartbeat.

NEW DVDs:

Victoria and Abdul (2017) starring Judi Dench and Ali Fazal

Come along with me (1982) starring Estelle Parsons and Sylvia Sidney

Baby Driver (1917) starring Ansel Elgort, John Hamm, and Jamie Fox

Holocaust (1978) starring Meryl Streep, James Woods, Michael Moriarty

Summer wishes, winter dreams (1973) starring Joanne Woodward and Sylvia Sidney

Law and order: the third year starring Jerry Orbach and Paul Sorvino

Come back to the 5 & Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean (1982) starring Cher and Karen Black

NONFICTION:

Adventures of a ballad hunter by John Lomax.  Vibrant, amusing, often haunting stories of the people the author met and recorded are the gems of this book which also gives lyrics for dozens of songs, this illuminates vital traditions in American popular culture and the labor that has gone into their preservation.

Ageless soul by Thomas Moore.  The lifelong journey toward meaning and joy is explored.

Bunk by Kevin Young.  This follows the rise of hoaxes, humbug, plagiarists, phonies, post-facts, and fake news.

Cover me by Ray Padgett.  The stories behind the greatest cover songs of all time.

The Family Tree cemetery field guide by Joy Neighbors.  How to find, record, and preserve your ancestors’ graves.

The great Halifax explosion by John Bacon.  The astonishing true story of history’s largest man-made explosion before the atomic bomb, and its world-changing aftermath.

Happiness by Christophe Andre.  25 ways to live joyfully through art.

The mindful way to a good night’s sleep by Tzivia Gover.  Discover how to use dreamwork, meditation, and journaling to sleep deeply and wake up well.

The newcomers by Helen Thorpe.  A powerful and moving account of how refugee teenagers at a Denver public high school learn English and become Americans.

Sense of occasion by Harold Prince.  In this fast-moving, candid, conversational, and entertaining memoir, Prince – the most honored director/producer in the history of the American theater – looks back over his 70 year career.

The tattoo dictionary by Trent Aitken-Smith.  Discover the true meanings behind over 200 popular tattoos with this comprehensive book illustrated with over 100 tattoo designs.

The Third Reich by Thomas Childers.  A riveting study delves deeply into the conditions of the perfect storm that allowed Hitler and his Nazi party to seize and wield unprecedented power.

Total cat mojo by Jackson Galaxy.  The ultimate guide to life with your cat.

William Wegman: being human by William Wegman.  More than 300 photos collected to illustrate the artist’s humanistic and witty approach to his subjects, his beloved Weimaraners.  Divided into 16 themed chapters, this showcases some best known images along with previously unseen gems.

Children’s Books

FICTION

Feather by Ceo Wenxuan

I got the rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison

My lazy cat by Christine Roussey

Papillon goes to the vet by A.N. Kang

Read the book, lemmings! by Ame Dyckman

Seamus’s short story by Heather Hartt-Sussman

Snow scene by Richard Jackson

When the moon comes by Paul Harbridge

When the snow falls by Linda Booth Sweeney

Where, oh where is baby bear? by Ashley Wolff

NON-FICTION

About habitats: seashores by Cathryn Sill

Baby animals playing by Suzi Eszterhas

Beginner’s guide to coding by Marc Scott

Danza!: Amalia Hernandez and el Ballet Folklorico de Mexico by Duncan Tonatiuh

Dazzle ships: World War I and the art of confusion by Chris Barton

Deadliest: 20 dangerous animals by Steve Jenkins

Miguel’s brave knight: young Cervantes and his dream of Don Quixote poems by Margarita Engle

Sergeant Reckless: the true story of the little horse who became a hero by Patricia McCormick

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get Your Holiday Gifts At The Library!

The holidays are coming, MUCH faster than I was expecting!  Time does seem to move faster each year, but the temperature outside was in the 50s only a couple of weeks ago, and now I need my ice scraper in the morning.

 

We all know there are many, MANY holidays in December.  Some of these holidays are simply days – Egg Nog Day, Chester Greenwood Day, Dewey Decimal Day, to name a few.  I’m not sure about you, but these are not “gift” holidays to me.  On the other hand Hanukah, Kwanzaa and Christmas are holidays that are “gift” holidays.

 

So, don’t forget the library in your gift search!  No, I’m not asking you to give us a gift, though it is nice to be remembered.  What I mean is think of us as a source for some of the folks on your shopping list!

 

For the second year in a row, we have calendars.  These calendars contain many wonderful historic pictures of Gardiner and the surrounding communities!  For ten dollars you can share memories about local places with family, or perhaps compare places you know now with what they looked like “back in the day” – whatever day that might have been.

 

Currently we have three titles by local authors available for purchase :  Lou Lou and Pea and the mural mystery by Jill Diamond ; Destination Unknown and Along the Kennebec both by State Representative Gay Grant.  Any of these would make a great gift!

 

Do you have anyone on your list that does not live in our service area?  We would love to sell you a Gardiner Public Library non-resident subscription to use as a gift.  Just think, a gift that truly will last an entire year! And for a whole family as well!

 

Last but by no means least, don’t forget BookIt! the library’s bookstore.  BookIt! is located in Lisa’s Legit Burritos and is well stocked with great titles for you to purchase!  All proceeds from BookIt! go to benefit the library.  Check it out when you are on Water Street in Gardiner!

New Items In The Library!

FICTION:

The Amber Shadows by Lucy Ribchester.  This re-creates World War II life and the enclosed world of code-breaking and plays out the suspense in a Hitchcock homage almost worthy of the master.

Before we were yours by Lisa Wingate.  A South Carolina lawyer, researching her grandmother’s past, learns about a Tennessee orphanage that kidnapped children and placed them for adoption with wealthy people.

The blinds by Adam Sternbergh.  A tense, broiling, 21st century Western with a crafty premise and a high body count.

Brave deeds by David Abrams.  Spanning 8 hours, this follows a squad of 6 AWOL soldiers as they attempt to cross war-torn Baghdad on foot to attend the funeral of their leader.

The Captain’s Daughter by Meg Moore.  A gripping novel about a woman who returns to her hometown in coastal Maine and finds herself pondering the age old question of what could have been.

The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor.  A woman inherits a bookstore and discovers her family’s connection to a famous set of photographs.

Deadfall by Linda Fairstein.  The Manhattan prosecutor Alexandra Cooper becomes a suspect.

Down a dark road by Linda Castillo.  Kate Burkholder, an Amish-born (but excommunicated) chief of police, believes that an old friend accused of his wife’s murder may be innocent.

The duchess by Danielle Steel.  A 19th century British duke’s daughter, disinherited by her half-brothers, flees to Paris to make a new life.

Exposed by Lisa Scottoline.  Rosato & DiNunzio, Philadelphia’s most drama-ridden law firm, faces perhaps its most dramatic episode ever when it’s threatened both inside and out.

The followers by Rebecca Wait.  A struggling single mother falls under the spell of a charismatic cult leader, but her rebellious 12 year old daughter isn’t quite so gullible.

A game of ghosts by John Connolly.  The games begin anew as retired police detective Charlie Parker, along with sidekicks Angel and Louis, bring their special brand of cynicism and expertise to this paranormal thriller.

Gather the daughters by Jennie Melamed.  A haunting novel about a cult on an isolated island where nothing is as it seems.

Grace by Paul Lynch.  A sweeping, Dickensian story of a young girl on a life-changing journey across 19th century Ireland on the eve of the Great Famine.

The grip of it by Jac Jemc.  A chilling literary horror novel about a young couple haunted by their newly purchased home.

The half-drowned king by Linnea Hartsuyker.  Steeped in legend and myth, this is a swashbuckling epic of family, love, and betrayal that reimagines the Norse sagas.

House of spies by Daniel Silva.  Gabriel Allon, the Israeli art restorer and spy and now head of Israel’s secret intelligence service, pursues an ISIS mastermind.

I know a secret by Tess Gerritsen.  Jane Rizzoli and Maura Isles pursue a shadowy psychopath keeping secrets and taking lives.

A kind of freedom by Margaret Sexton.  An urgent novel that explores the legacy of racial disparity in the South through a poignant and redemptive family history.

The last laugh by Lynn Freed.  A hilarious novel about the riotous, passion-filled adventures of three women who THOUGHT they were past their prime.

The late show by Michael Connelly.  This introduces Rene Ballard, a fierce young detective fighting to prove herself on the LAPD’s toughest beat.

Less by Andrew Greer.  You are a failed novelist and about to turn 50.  A wedding invitation arrives: your boyfriend of the past 9 years is engaged to someone else.  You can’t say yes – it would be too awkward – and you can’t say no – it would look like defeat.  On your desk are a series of invitations to half-baked literary events around the world.  How do you arrange to skip town?  You accept them all.

The lightkeeper’s daughters by Jean Pendziwol.  A decades-old mystery is revisited as an elderly woman shares the story of her childhood with a troubled teen.  A haunting tale of nostalgia and lost chances that is full of last-minute surprises.

The locals by Jonathan Dee.  Here are the dramas of the 21st century America – rising inequality, working class decline, a new authoritarianism – played out in the classic setting of some of our greatest novels – the small town.

The lying game by Ruth Ware.  This introduces 4 women who have been carrying a terrible secret since their boarding school days, a secret that is about to be literally unearthed.

The mapmaker’s daughter by Katherine Hughes.  A fascinating evocation of the major players of the Ottoman renaissance. A captured Venetian encounters a strange blend of civilization and barbarism as she attains the highest rank possible for a woman in the Ottoman Empire.

Mrs. Fletcher by Tom Perrotta.  A mother and son experience existential tizzies following his departure for college.

Secrets of the tulip sisters by Susan Mallery.  Sisters reconnect when one returns to their tulip-centered hometown.

See what I have done by Sarah Schmidt.  This recasts one of the most fascinating murder cases of all time (Lizzie Borden) into an intimate story of a volatile household and a family devoid of love.

Seven stones to stand or fall by Diana Gabaldon.  A collection of short fiction – including two never-before-published novellas – featuring Jamie Fraser, Lord John Grey, Mastery Raymond, and others, all extending the story of Outlander in thrilling new directions.

Sun at midnight by Rosie Thomas.  Love and adventure in this epic story set against the stunning backdrop of Antarctica.

Tom Clancy Point of Contact by Mike Maden.  With typhoons, deadly Chinese and North Korean operatives wielding bats, knives, and guns, and a weaponized thumb drive – the action reaches Clancy level early and stays there.

Use of force by Brad Thor.  The counterterrorism operative Scot Harvath is called in when a missing terrorism suspect drowns off the Italian coast.

We shall not all sleep by Estep Nagy.  Set on a small Maine island, this is a richly told story of American class, family, and manipulation – a compelling portrait of a unique and privileged WASP stronghold on the brink of dissolution.

NEW MUSIC CDs:

Evolve by Imagine Dragons

Come From Away (original Broadway cast recording)

Melodrama by Lorde

Fake Sugar by Beth Ditto

Dear Evan Hansen (original Broadway cast recording)

Divide by Ed Sheeran

NEW DVDs:

The Lost City of Z (2017) starring Charlie Hunnam

Only angels have wings (1939) starring Cary Grant and Jean Arthur

Broadcast News (1987)  starring Holly Hunter and William Hurt

Westworld (1973) starring Yul Brynner and Richard Benjamin

NONFICTION:

The Cooperstown casebook by Jay Jaffe.  Who’s in the baseball hall of fame, who should be in, and who should pack their plaques and go away.

Deaf daughter by Carol Lee Adams.  This memoir reveals what it’s like to be born able to hear, only to be deaf by age 19.

Drawing calm by Susan Evenson.  Relax, refresh, refocus with drawing, painting and collage workshops.

The history of top 40 singles: 1970-1989 by Frank Deangelis.  Once you learn the histories of these hits, you’ll never hear them the same way again.

Hue 1968 by Mark Bowden.  A stirring history of the 1968 battle that definitively turned the Vietnam War into an American defeat.

Magnetic City by Justin Davidson.  From “New York” magazine’s architecture critic, a walking and reading guide to New York City.

Modern ethics in 77 arguments by Peter Catapano.  Guns, race, and human rights are among the varied ethical issues tackled in this wide-ranging collection.

Notes on a foreign country by Suzy Hansen.  Blending memoir, journalism, and history, this is a moving reflection on America’s place in the world today.  It is a powerful journey of self-discovery and revelation – a profound reckoning with what it means to be American in a moment of grave national and global turmoil.

Scotland: the best 100 places by Peter Irvine.  Extraordinary places to walk, eat, and sleep divided by the themes of reflective, magnificent, and human – all backed up by wonderful photos.

Sons and soldiers by Bruce Henderson.  The untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the US Army to fight Hitler.

Step Parenting by Randall Hicks.  50 one-minute dos and don’ts for stepdads and stepmoms.

The totally unscientific study of the search for human happiness by Paula Poundstone.  This chronicles her amusing and surprisingly personal search for the key to happiness.  A deeply revealing memoir in which the pathos doesn’t kill the humor and one that delivers more than it promises.

Wild things by Bruce Handy.  It’s a profound, eye-opening experience to re-encounter books that you once treasured after decades apart.  A clear-eyed love letter to the greatest children’s books and authors.

Would everybody please stop?  by Jenny Allen.  An Erma Bombeck for the new age with reflections on life and other bad ideas.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

 

Social Media at Gardiner Public Library

Did you know that if you follow  the Gardiner Public Library on Facebook that on Monday we post “Have You Seen This Movie Monday” which features the description of a movie that can be borrowed from the library?  Did you know that every Wednesday we post “Check It Out” which is a description of a book that can be borrowed from the library?  It’s a great way to have a recommendation delivered right to your electronical device.

Gardiner’s Farmers Market Family Fun Day

I was invited to come to the Farmer’s Market Family Fun Day this Wednesday and represent the Gardiner Public Library. It was a beautiful sunny day with plenty to do. Face painting, painting rocks, necklace making, wreath making from herbs, jenga, hula hoops and other things happened. Here are some photos from the wonderful afternoon spent within our area.

Book Sale 2017

 Have you ever wondered what a Library Book Sale might look like???
Following are some pictures of the creation and set up of Gardiner Public Library’s annual Book Sale.
Many, many boxes of books and media have been unloaded from the closet. They appear miraculously (please note the sarcasm in that word) in the Hazzard Reading Room.

The boxes seem to multiply!
The sorting has begun!
More sorting fun!
Empty boxes are beginning to appear!
An empty table!!! It won’t be empty long, I’m sure.
For those of you using an actual computer, and not a device of some type, imagine this photo turned 90 degrees. What appears as the bottom is actually the right side of the picture. This is a wall of EMPTY boxes!!!
It’s truly beginning to take shape!
Looks like every inch of space is being used!
We even use the floor under the tables.

eBooks & eAudios

For those of you who have used and either LOVE or at least tolerated the OverDrive eBook and eAudio service that we here in Gardiner, as well as libraries across the state, have been using for the past several years . . . .

Maine InfoNet, the entity we, as libraries in Maine, work with, has changed our eBook & eAudio provider.
As of Wednesday, March 1st, we are now using the CloudLibrary by Bibliotecha.  The address for the new service is http://yourcloudlibrary.com
Visit the site, and with your valid library card you have access to many, Many, MANY books using your eReader right from your own home!
You will need to download an App.  The CloudLibrary website takes you right to the App Store for easy downloading, and then you are ready to begin!
Assuming this works, there was a great piece on WABI the other day.  Click on the link to find the story.
Take a few minutes and check out this service!

What’s Happening In The Library

As we roll into fall, school starting, apple picking, falling leaves, etc. etc., I took a few minutes to reflect on how busy we were over the summer months.

And it has been a busy summer here at the Gardiner Public Library.  We had 18,793 people walk through our doors. That’s up from 16,489 last summer between June 1stand August 31st.  735 people attended 59 different programs in 2016.  That’s up as well – 683 people attended programs during the summer of 2015.  I wish I could give you accurate statistics about the Summer Reading Programs – both children’s and young adult – but I don’t currently have access to those figures.  From my perspective at the Adult Circulation Desk, I will say that there were definitely many more Young Adult participants this year!
So, what will we be doing this fall?  We have a variety of events in the offing.  Local author, Anne Valley is offering a journaling class – More Joy, Less Stress – journaling for perspective, peace and prosperity.  This is a six week class, on Tuesday mornings from 10:00am to 12:30pm, beginning Tuesday, September 6th.  Registration is limited, but there are still a few spaces available.  Give us a call to reserve your spot – 207-582-3312.
Miss Jenn and the Nutrition Detectives will be here for Story Time & Crafts on Tuesday, September 13th.  Join us then with your little one to learn more about good nutrition!
Tuesday, September 13th begins an eight week series – Voices of the Kennebec.  Over the eight weeks we will host several local authors, as well as a writing workshop.  Please join us on September 13th, from 7:00pm – 8:30pm as we welcome Gay Grant discussing hometown Pulitzer Prize winners Laura E. Richards, Edwin Arlington Robinson, and Robert Peter Tristram Coffin.
In October we are planning another ghost story event.  Thursday, October 27th from 6:30pm to 8:00pm we will host our community in recalling local ghost stories.  If you have a story to share, please email Kelly at hauntedgardiner@yahoo.comand she will gladly add your story to her collection.
Don’t forget – Story Time and Crafts every Tuesday from 10:00am – 11:00am, and Babies Love Babies every Friday from 10:00am – 11:00am in the Children’s Room!
We also have two different book discussion groups that meet monthly.  The Paranormal group meets the first Tuesday of the month, and our more literary group meets the third or fourth Tuesday of the month.  Each of these groups meet from 6:00pm – 7:00pm.
Fall is still young, and I’m sure we will add several events as we discover them.  Keep your eyes open to posters in and around Gardiner, and we’ll see you in the library!
Ann Russell, Technology Librarian

For the Love of a Library

Some of my best memories from childhood were spent with a book. I can remember many a time being dropped off at the public library where I would spend hours surrounded by books and I would read to my heart’s content. I could go an adventure, visit a foreign land, or solve a mystery with my favorite detective, Nancy Drew. Many times I would become cross with my mother because she’d pick me up too early, wherein she would inform me that I’d been on my own in a sea of books for hours.

I was lucky enough to spend time in the public libraries of whatever town in which we were stationed. I spent my summers in Maine, visiting my grandmother, Marguerite Kierstead. As a retired schoolteacher, she made sure to feed my voracious appetite for books. As an adult, I am unable to be without a book, and as such, I am a frequent patron of my local library. Gardiner Public Library holds a special place in my heart. It is the same library where my grandmother brought me in the summer, and the same library where I now work once a week.
Anne Davis does an amazing job of overseeing Gardiner Public Library. GPL has quite an extensive collection, is frequented by hundreds of patrons, and is run with a fantastic, albeit skeleton, crew. We should be celebrating the jewel that GPL is in our community, rather than continually questioning its purpose and need.
I am a teacher now myself, and I know of many kids who don’t have books at home. Yes, they can access their school library, however the collections at public libraries tend to be much larger than those at schools. GPL has a wonderful children’s room where kids can enrich their vocabulary and deepen their comprehension by having access to a vast variety of materials.
GPL is just as much a haven for adults as it is kids. We have a beautiful art history collection, a rather large Large Print section, and a wonderful archives room, just to mention a few of the “amenities”. Many people use the internet, attend book clubs, and rent movies for free.
The incredibly knowledgeable staff at GPL is there to serve and support your needs. If you live in one of our participating towns, please support us by becoming a member!
Sarah Duffy, Library Assistant