Digital Maine Library ~ Popular Magazines

I think it’s time to explore the Digital Maine Library a bit more.

Scrolling down the homepage of the Digital Maine Library, I see Popular Magazines.  The blurb leads me to think that I will be able to browse through a magazine, not just access an article I might be looking for.

Clicking on the link takes me to a new page.  Scanning the page, I see many of the links I’m used to seeing – a Search Bar, an Advanced button, the title of the page, as well as Topic Finder  and  Top Searches.  Below the Search Bar, there are two buttons – Subject Guide Search and Publication Search.

Hmmmm . . . . Where to first?

Since I’m thinking/hoping that I will be able to browse through a magazine, I click on Publication Search.  Entering People in the search bar, a drop down menu gives me several suggestions.  I slide down the bar and click on People Weekly.  Below the search bar, I see More Options.  I don’t think I’ll change much here – I do opt for English as Language of Publication.

Clicking the Search button I’m taken to a page that tells me that Journal Title is not found.

Okay, what next?

Clicking on Revise Search takes me back to the previous screen.  This time I see List All Publications.  I click on this link and am taken to a multi-page list.  I try typing People in this search bar.  Seven results appear, including both People and People Weekly.

Hovering my cursor over each of the titles, I see a description of the magazine, the publication number, the publisher, how many issues are published a year, the audience the magazine is intended for, and how many years of the issue are covered in this index.  It looks like the index starts in January 1977 with People Weekly and the most recent issue is March of 2018 of People.

I click on the most recently indexed issue.  The next page gives me a list of the articles in the March 12, 2018 issue of People.

Out of curiosity, I go back to Browse Publications page, and try another magazine.  This time I enter Time.  My search results are similar to People several varied titles as choices.  Time magazine claims to be indexed from 1923 – current.  IT IS!!!  I click on the February 18, 2019 link.  It looks like the entire issue of Time, indexed so that I can look at just the article(s) I’m interested in!

At this point, I have answered my original question – I CAN browse through (but not page through) a popular magazine, though, at least with People, not the most current issue.

 

New Items ~ February 2019

FICTION

Alice isn’t dead by Joseph Fink.  A female big-rig driver crisscrosses America searching for signs of the wife everyone else thinks is dead.

The angel in the glass by Alys Clare.  A physician-sleuth in the year 1604 uncovers dark secrets in his small Devon village in this historical mystery.

Bad news travels fast by Maureen Milliken.  When an Appalachian Trail hiker becomes lost in the woods of Maine, then is found dead, it sets off a chain of events that upsets the fragile peace of the town of Redimere, Maine.

The boy by Tami Hoag.  Nick Fourcade and Annie Broussard, a husband-and-wife detective team, investigate a boy’s murder and the disappearance of his babysitter.

The burglar by Thomas Perry.  An unlikely burglar – young woman in the 20s – realizes she must solve a string of murders or else become the next victim.

Don’t let go by Michel Bussi.  A nail biter of a manhunt on an island drives this thriller after a tourist goes missing, triggering a police chase with nods to both Agatha Christie and Harlan Coben.

Eighteen below by Stefan Ahnhem.  A Scandinavian thriller – a terrifying story of stolen identity and serial murder.

In peppermint peril by Joy Avon.  Returning to her hometown in Maine, Callie Aspen (an organizer of book-themed tea parties) will have to conquer threefold trouble – a mysterious will, a missing heirloom, and a dead body – to restore the festive spirit to her small town.

Josephine Baker’s last dance by Sherry Jones.  A moving and insightful novel based on the life of legendary performer and activist Josephine Baker.

The mansion by Ezekiel Boone.  A family moves into a home equipped with the world’ most intelligent, cutting edge, and intuitive computer server – but a buried secret leads to terrifying and catastrophic consequences.

The only woman in the room by Marie Benedict.  A novel based on the incredible true story of Hedy Lamarr, the glamour icon, actress, and scientist whose groundbreaking invention revolutionized modern communication.

The perilous adventures of the cowboy king by Jerome Charyn.  Here is a novel of Teddy Roosevelt and his times.

The puzzle of the happy hooligan by Stuart Palmer.  After a screenwriter is murdered on a film set, a street-smart school teacher searches for the killer.

Radiant night by Patrick Lohier.  A wounded Iraq War veteran struggling with PTSD and drug addiction embarks on a mission to find a mysterious family heirloom in the depths of the American South.

The reckoning by John Grisham.  In 1946, Pete Banning drove into town, walked into church, and calmly shot and killed the Reverend Dexter Bell.  As if the murder wasn’t shocking enough, it was even more baffling that Pete’s only statement was, “I have nothing to say.”

She lies in wait by Gytha Lodge.  Six friends.  One killer.  Who do you trust?

Someone like me by M.R. Carey.  After fending off a brutal attack by her ex-husband, a woman fears for her sanity.  The truth is something far more terrifying.

The three Beths by Jeff Abbott.   An intense and emotionally gripping suspense novel about a daughter’s desperate search for her missing mother – one that my lead her closer to home than she ever anticipated.

Watching you by Lisa Jewell.  A page-turner about a shocking murder in a picturesque and well-to-do English town.

NONFICTION

Am I dying? by Christopher Kelly.  A complete guide to your symptoms – and what to do next.

The first time: stories and songs from music icons by Matt Everitt.  Follow their lives and careers starting with their first musical memories, first records, and first gigs, and find out the songs that have shaped them along the way.

The ghost photographer by Julie Rieger.  A good primer on getting into the psychic realm, this is also, ultimately, a story of unconditional love and healing by a woman you might just want to have a drink with.

Halfway to halfway and back by Dick Linford.  A collection of river stories that capture the essence and mood of river guiding and like an old friend and the river itself, lure you back for another trip.

The heartbeat of Wounded Knee by David Treuer.  A sweeping history (and counter-narrative) of Native American life from the Wounded Knee massacre to the present.

Living the dream by John Ford.  More tales from the retired Maine game warden who also wrote Suddenly the Cider Didn’t Taste So Good.

The Martha manual by Martha Stewart.  Essential life skills from America’s most trusted lifestyle expert – together in one practical handbook with hundreds of ideas, instruction, and inspirations.

The minimalist home by Joshua Becker.  A popular minimalist blogger shows you how to methodically turn your home into a place of peace, contentment, and purposeful living.

Never home alone by Rob Dunn.  A natural history of the wilderness in our homes, from the microbes in our showers to the crickets in our basements.

Quarterback by John Feinstein.  Inside the most important position in the National Football League.

 

Questions are the answer by Hal Gregersen.  What if you could unlock a better answer to your most vexing problems – in your workplace community, or home life – just by changing the question?

Rediscovering travel by Seth Kugel.  A guide for the globally curious, this is an indispensable companion for rookie and veteran travelers alike that promises to revolutionize both how and why we vacation.

Rock-and-roll woman by Meredith Ochs.  Here are the 50 fiercest female rockers.

77 things to know before getting a cat by Susan Ewing.  The essential guide to preparing your family and home for a feline companion.

Undo it!  by Dean Ornish.  How simple lifestyle changes can reverse most chronic diseases.

Weird parenting wins by Hillary Frank.  Unconventional – yet effective – parenting strategies such as making a pig snort in a baby’s ear to stop their crying or getting kids to try beets by saying it might turn their poop pink.

Winter’s graces by Susan Stewart.  Filled with unexpected good news about growing older, this highlights 11 qualities that ripen with age, surprising gifts of later life.

Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

Boy who went to Mars by Simon James

Cars and trucks book by Todd Parr

Dad’s camera by Ross Watkins

Douglas, you’re a genius by Ged Adamson

Heads and tails by John Canty

Horse meets Dog by Elliot Kalan

Hugs & kisses for the Grouchy Ladybug  by Eric Carle

I need a hug by Aaron Blabey

Is that you, Eleanor Sue? by Tricia Tusa

Josie’s lost tooth by Jennifer K. Mann

Little owl’s snow by Divya Srinivasan

Love by Stacy McAnulty

Mapping Sam by Joyce Hesselberth

Mia moves out by Miranda Paul

Once upon a star: a poetic journey through space by James Carter

Owls are good at keeping secrets: an unusual alphabet by Sara O’Leary

Pea pod lullaby by Glenda Millard

Where did you come from, baby dear? by George MacDonald

Wonky donkey by Craig Smith

Words to love by by Rick Warren

BEGINNING CHAPTER BOOKS

Amelia Bedelia under the weather by Herman Parish

Biscuit loves the park by Alyssa Satin Capucilli

Daniel can dance by Delphine Finnegan

Llama Llama be my valentine by Anna Dewdney

Pete the kitty and the case of the hiccups by James Dean

Pinkalicious and the flower fairy by Victoria Kann

This makes me happy by Courtney Carbone

Zip and Beep by Chris Barton

CHAPTER BOOKS

Astrid the unstoppable by Maria Parr

Bad kitty: kitten trouble by Nick Bruel

Dragon Pearl by Yoon Ha Lee

Ellie May on April Fools’ Day by Hillary Homzie

TBH, this is SO Awkward… by Lisa Greenwald

NON-FICTION

California and other western wildfires by Rachel Seigel

Countdown: 2979 days to the moon by Suzanne Slade

Cross Niagara: the death-defying tightrope adventures of the Great Blondin by Matt Tavares

Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria, and Nate by Julia Sillett

John McCain an American hero by John Perritano

Kids cooking: students prepare and eat foods from around the world by George Ancona

Starstruck: the cosmic journey of Neil deGrasse Tyson by Kathleen Krull

Trade in our global community by Rachel Eagen

Who was Jane Austen? by Sarah Fabiny

Wild buildings and bridges: architecture inspired by nature by Etta Kaner

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Amulet: SuperNova: book 8 by Kau Kibuishi

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Items ~ January 2019

FICTION

The Adults by Caroline Hulse.  A couple (now separated), plus their daughter, plus their NEW partners, all go on an epic Christmas vacation together.  What could go wrong?

Bitter orange by Claire Fuller.  Whiffs of Shirley Jackson, Daphne du Maurier, and Charlotte Bronte as an upstairs neighbor becomes obsessed with her downstairs neighbor.

The clockmaker’s daughter by Kate Morton.  The story of a love affair and a mysterious murder that cast their shadows across generations set in England from the 1860s until the present day.

The Dakota Winters by Tom Barbash.  An evocative and wildly absorbing novel about the Winters, a family living in New York City’s famed Dakota apartment building in the year leading up to John Lennon’s assassination.

Fire and blood by George R.R. Martin.  Set 300 years before the events of “Game of Thrones”, this is the first volume of the two-part history of the Targaryens in Westeros.

Forever and a day by Anthony Horowitz.   A spy is dead.  A legend is born.  This is how it all began.  It’s the explosive prequel to the first James Bond novel, Casino Royale.

The friend by Sigrid Nunez.  When a woman unexpectedly loses her lifelong best friend and mentor, she finds herself burdened with the unwanted dog he has left behind.

Hazards of time travel by Joyce Carol Oates. Time travel and its hazards are made literal in this novel in which a recklessly idealistic girl dares to test the perimeters of her tightly controlled (future) world and is punished by being sent back in time to 1959 middle America.

The little shop of found things by Paula Brackston.  A wonderful blend of history with the time-travel elements and a touch of romance.

Look alive twenty-five by Janet Evanovich.  When several managers of a deli in Trenton disappear, a bounty hunter and her detective boyfriend look for clues.

Master of his fate by Barbara Taylor Bradford.  Victorian England is a country of sharp divides between rich and poor, but James Falconer, who spends his days working at his father’s market stall, is determined to become a merchant prince.

The Moore house by Tony Tremblay.  After something gruesome happens in a N.H. home, a priest and three excommunicated nuns are asked to cleanse the building.  It is only after they give it the all clear that the demons truly begin to unleash their wrath and power.

My sister, the serial killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite.  A short, darkly funny novel about a Nigerian woman whose younger sister has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends.

Nighttown by Timothy Hallinan.  When a professional burglar breaks one of the cardinal rules of burglary (don’t take scores that you’re being paid way too much for), he finds himself on the wrong side of, well, the wrong side.

Nine perfect strangers by Liane Moriarty.  Could ten days at a health resort really change you forever?  In this page turner, nine perfect strangers are about to find out.

Of blood and bone by Nora Roberts.  Sequel to Year One, this is a new tale of terror and magic in a brand new world.

Overkilt by Kaitlyn Dunnett.  A quiet Maine town is beset by a series of disastrous happenings.  Small town charm and a determined sleuth who does a great job uncovering clues in a tale that rings all too true.

Penelope Lemon : game on!  by Inman Majors.  A recently divorced, financially struggling mom faces online dating challenges when a nude picture of her surfaces on the internet.

The Razor by Jack Mitchell.  A riveting sci fi thriller about a man struggling to survive the chaos on a prison planet.

Robert B. Parker’s blood feud by Mike Lupica.  Sunny Randall races to protect her ex-husband – and his Mafia family – from the vengeful plan of a mysterious rival.

The spite game by Anna Snoekstra.  Mercilessly bullied in high school, Ava knows she needs to put the past behind her and move on, but she can’t – not until she’s exacted precise, catastrophic revenge on the people who hurt her the most.

Those who knew by Idra Novey.  A taut, timely novel about what a powerful politician thinks he can get away with and the group of misfits who finally bring him down.

Tony’s wife by Adriana Trigiani.  Love, ambition, and the consequences of both lie at the heart of this epic of two working-class kids who become a successful singing act during the big band era of the 1940s.

Winter in paradise by Elin Hilderbrand.  Irene’s husband is found dead in St. John’s in the Caribbean.  Why so far from home?  He had a second family AND shady dealings on that island.

NEW DVDs

Eighth grade (2018) starring Elsie Fisher

Crazy rich Asians (2018) starring Constance Wu and Henry Golding

Killing Eve (2018) staring Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer

Primal fear (1996) starring Richard Gere and Edward Norton

Serpico (1973) starring Al Pacino

A better life (2011) starring Demian Bichir

NEW MUSIC CDs

Bohemian Rhapsody (soundtrack) featuring Queen

Golden hour by Kacey Musgraves

Honey by Robyn

Shawn Mendes by Shawn Mendes

NONFICTION

All that heaven allows by Mark Griffin.  The definitive biography of the deeply complex and widely misunderstood matinee idol of Hollywood’s golden age – Rock Hudson.

Almost everything by Anne Lamott.  Brief explorations into finding hope and wisdom in times of despair and uncertainty.

The American Revolution: a world war by David Allison.  A new look at the American Revolution: more than the David vs Goliath portrayal, it was the very first world war.

The best comfort good on the planet by Kerry Altiero.  The chef and owner of Café Miranda in Rockland gives some of his favorite recipes.

The end of the end of the earth by Jonathan Franzen.  This is a Silent Spring for today, but instead of challenging readers to change the world, it pushes them to change themselves.

A forever family by Rob Scheer.  An inspirational memoir about the author’s turbulent childhood in the foster care system and the countless obstacles and discrimination he endured in adopting his four children.

Gandhi: the years that changed the world, 1914-1948 by Ramachandra Guha.  The definitive portrait of the life and work of one of the most abidingly influential – and controversial – men in world history.

The library book by Susan Orlean.  This reopens the unsolved mystery of the most catastrophic library fire in American history, the 1986 Los Angeles fire, while exploring the crucial role that libraries play in modern American culture.

My love story by Tina Turner. This sets the record straight about her illustrious career and complicated personal life.

The Smithsonian history of space exploration by Roger Launius.  Comprehensive illustrated guide to the history of U.S. and international space exploration, both manned and unmanned from ancient world to the extraterrestrial future.

Under the darkening sky by Robert Lyman.  A vivid social history of the American expatriate experience in Europe between 1939 and 1941, as the Nazi menace begins a shadow over the continent, heralding the storms of war.

Why religion? : A personal story by Elaine Pagels.  Pagels looks to her own life to help answer questions such as:  Why is religion still around?  Why do so many still believe?  And how do various traditions still shape the way we experience everything from sexuality to politics.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

Happy New Year

Ever wonder about the tradition of the ball dropping in Times Square?  The website www.timeanddate.com says, “A particularly striking aspect of the New Year’s Eve festivities is the ball drop in Times Square in Manhattan, New York City.  The ball is made of crystal and electric lights and is placed on top of a pole, which is 77 feet, or 23 meters, high.  At one minute before midnight on December 31, the ball is lowered slowly down the pole. It comes to rest at the bottom of the pole at exactly midnight.  The event is shown on television across the United States and around the world.  The event has been held every year since 1907, except during World War II.

Across the United States a range of cities and towns hold their own versions of the ball drop.  A variety of objects are lowered or raised during the last minute of the year.  The objects are usually linked to an aspect of local history or industry.  Examples of objects ‘dropped’ or raised in this way include a variety of live and modeled domestic and wild animals, fruit, vegetables, automobiles, industrial machinery, a giant replica of a peach (Atlanta, Georgia), an acorn made of brass and weighing 900 pounds (Raleigh, North Carolina) and ping pong balls (Strasburg, Pennsylvania).”

Still looking for something to do on New Year’s Eve?  Check out these celebrations in Maine’s biggest city of Portland:

https://www.eventbrite.com/d/me–portland/new-years-eve-parties/

Let’s all plan on a wonderful and positive year in 2019!

New Items ~ December 2018

FICTION

The antiquities hunter by Maya Bohnhoff.  A female detective must go undercover in the Mexican jungle to hunt down a mysterious antiquities dealer.  It’s a cross between Romancing the Stone and an Indiana Jones adventure.

Broken field by Jeff Hull.  Told from the perspective of a high school girl and a football coach, this reveals the tensions that tear at the fabric of a small town when a high school hazing incident escalates and threatens a championship season.

Dark sacred night by Michael Connelly.  Renee Ballard teams up with Harry Bosch to solve the murder of a teenage runaway.

Death of a Russian doll by Barbara Early.  What to do when you discover that your boyfriend is married and may have murdered his wife?  Get ready, get set, detect.

Elevation by Stephen King.  A man who is losing weight without getting thinner forms an unlikely alliance with his neighbors who are dealing with prejudice.

Every breath by Nicholas Sparks.  Another tale of love and loss and family.

The glass ocean by Beatriz Williams.  The lives and loves of three remarkable women – two in the past, one in the present – and the tragic final voyage of the HMS Lusitania.

Go to my grave by Catriona McPherson.  Lovers of classic manor house mysteries are in for a treat.

Gone so long by Andre Dubus.  A father, estranged for the worst of reasons, is driven to seek out the daughter he has not seen in decades.

Heads you win by Jeffrey Archer.  When Alex’s father is assassinated by the KGB, he and his mother flip a coin to decide whether to flee to America or Great Britain.

Holy ghost by John Sandford.  Virgil Flowers investigates shooting in a Minnesota town following an attempt to revive its ailing economy.

The Kennedy debutante by Kerri Maher.  A captivating novel following the exploits of Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy, the forgotten and rebellious daughter of one of American’s greatest political dynasties.

Kingdom of the blind by Louise Penny.  When a peculiar letter arrives inviting Armand Gamache to an abandoned farmhouse, he discovers that a complete stranger has named him one of the executors of her will.

The lake on fire by Rosellen Brown.  An epic narrative that begins among 19th century Jewish immigrants on a failing Wisconsin farm and follows them to the big city of Chicago.

The last night out by Catherine O’Connell.  Six friends.  A bride to be.  One murder.  Too many secrets.

Little by Edward Carey.  The tale of an ambitious orphan in Revolutionary Paris, befriended by royalty and radicals, who transforms herself into the legendary Madame Tussaud.

Nantucket counterfeit by Steven Axelrod.  This mystery takes us into the closed, gossip-riddled, back-stabbing world of Nantucket’s community theater.

No good asking by Fran Kimmel.  An overwhelmed family living in the rural plains of western Canada begins to change when an abused 11 year old enter their lives.

One day in December by Josie Silver.  This follows two young Londoners after a missed connection alters the course of their lives.  Two people. Ten chances.  One unforgettable love story.

Past Tense by Lee Child.  Jack Reacher finds trouble – or does trouble find him?

The rain watcher by Tatiana de Rosnay.  A story of family secrets and devastating disaster, set against a Paris backdrop, fraught with revelations and resolutions.

Rainsongs by Sue Hubbard.  An elegiac story of loss and valediction, set amid the stunning Irish landscape.

The red lamp by Mary Roberts Rinehart.   Fans of eerie whodunits with a supernatural tinge will relish this.  A professor tries to stop a murder spree, uncertain whether the culprit is a man or ghost.

Shell game by Sara Paretsky.  Even after decades, this landmark series remains as popular as ever, and the social consciousness behind the stories seems ever more in tune with contemporary events.

Sugar land by Tammy Lynne Stoner.  A southern friend novel about love, Lead Belly, and liberation that reads like the love child of Fannie Flagg and Rita Mae Brown.

The Winters by Lisa Gabriele.  A modern look at Du Maurier’s Rebecca, this is a suspenseful novel set in the moneyed world of the Hamptons, about secrets that refuse to remain buried, and consequences that can’t be escaped.

The witch elm by Tana French.  After Toby Hennessy retreats to his family’s ancestral home, a skull discovered in the backyard exposes his family’s past.

You don’t own me by Mary Higgins Clark.  A TV producer investigates them murder of a physician and whether it was his wife who killed him.

NEW DVDs

Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again (2018) starring Christine Baranski and Cher

Won’t you be my neighbor? (2018) documentary about Mr. Rogers

Three Sovereigns for Sarah (1985) starring Vanessa Redgrave and Kim Hunter

NONFICTION 

Becoming by Michelle Obama.  The former First Lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House and how she balanced work, family, and her husband’s political ascent.

Blowing the bloody doors off by Michael Caine.  The actor shares the wisdom, stories, insights, and skills that life has taught him in his remarkable career.

Girl, wash your face by Rachel Hollis.  The author presents a guide to becoming a joyous, confident woman by breaking the cycle of negativity and burnout and pursuing a life of exuberance.

Gmorning, gnight! by Lin-Manuel Miranda.  Booklist says, “When the world is bringing you down, this will remind you that you are awesome”.  It’s a book of affirmations to inspire readers at the beginning and end of each day.

Heavy by Kiese Laymon.  In this provocative memoir, Laymon explores what the weight of a lifetime of secrets, lies, and deception does to a black body, a black family, and a nation teetering on the brink of moral collapse.

How to leave by Erin Clune.  Quitting the city and coping with a new reality is the focus of this uproarious memoir/tongue-in-cheek guide to leaving the cool city in which you “found yourself” and moving somewhere far more ordinary – like your hometown.

Killing the SS by Bill O’Reilly.  A look at the postwar manhunt for members of Hitler’s inner circle.

Make time by Jake Knapp.  How to focus on what matters every day.  It’s a simple 4-step system for improving focus, finding greater joy in your work, and getting more out of every day.

Parenting through puberty by Suanne Kowal-Connelly.  Mood swings, acne, and growing pains.  Puberty is tough on kids – and maybe even more so on parents!

Presidents of war by Michael Beschloss.  How American presidents waged wars and expanded the power of the executive branch.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Jane De Hart.  The first full life – private, public, legal, philosophical – of the 107th Supreme Court Justice, one of the most profound and profoundly transformative legal minds of our time.

Tweak by Nic Sheff.  Memoir of a young man’s addiction to methamphetamine tells a raw, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful tale of the road from relapse to recovery.

Vietnam: an epic tragedy by Max Hastings.  No past volume has blended a political and military narrative of the entire conflict with heart-stopping personal experiences.  Hastings marshals testimony from warlords and peasants, statesmen and soldiers.

PICTURE BOOKS

A big mooncake for Little Star by Grace Lin

The crocodile and the dentist by Tar Gomi

First snow by Nancy Viau

Giraffe problems by Jory John

How do dinosaurs learn to read by Jane Yolen

Hungry bunny by Claudia Rueda

I am small by Qin Leng

Kitten and the night watchman by John Sullivan

Little Bear’s big house by Benjamin Chaud

Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers

On Gull Beach by Jane Yolen

Petra by Marianna Coppo

The rough patch by Brian Lies

Sleepy, the goodnight buddy by Drew Daywalt

The snowy nap by Jan Brett

Twig by Aura Parker

Up the mountain path by Marianne Dubuc

The wall in the middle of the book by Jon Agee

Winter is here by Kevin Henkes

CHAPTER BOOKS

Ghost: Track by Jason Reynolds

Inkling by Kenneth Oppel

The jigsaw jungle  by Kristin Levine

Mary Poppins by P. L. Travers

Project Fluffy by Kara LaReau

The rhino in right field by Stacy DeKeyser

Saving Winslow by Sharon Creech

Weather or not by Sarah Mlynowski, Lauren Myracle and Emily Jenkins

You don’t know everything, Jilly P!  by Alex Gino

Zora and me: the cursed ground by T.R.Simon

NON-FICTION

All-of-a-kind family Hanukkah by Emily Jenkins

The brilliant deep: rebuilding the world’s coral reefs by Kate Messner

Little people, big dreams: Georgia O’Keefe by Ma Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Little people, big dreams: Mother Teresa by Ma Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Mason jar science  by Jonathan Adolph

My First Book of Baseball by Beth Bugler and Mark Bechtel

My First Book of Basketball by Beth Bugler and Mark Bechtel

My First Book of Lacrosse by Beth Bugler and Sam Page

A pandemonium of parrots and other animals by Hui Skipp

Peace and me by Ali Winter

The World Series: baseball’s biggest stage by Matt Doeden

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Crush by Svetlana Chmakova

Estranged by Ethan M. Aldridge

Lafayette! by Nathan Hale

Phoebe and her unicorn in unicorn theater by Dana Simpson

PopularMMOs presents a hole new world by Pat & Jen from PopularMMos

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Whose Service Do You Honor?

During the month of November, Gardiner Public Library staff and patrons, together, found a way to honor the military veterans in their lives.

We had stars available for everyone to add the name, military branch, years served, active duty, whatever we thought would be appropriate.

Of course, as a library we added some books and movies to the display.

Our goal was to have more stars than we had books or movies – from the picture above, it looks like we made it!

A HUGE THANK YOU to ALL of the Veterans out there!

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving and Marjorie Standish

Thanksgiving and Marjorie Standish.  While the two are not necessarily tied to each other, I do associate both of them with good comfort food.  So as Thanksgiving approaches, I will share with you Marjorie’s recipe for Baked Acorn Squash.  It’s about as simple and delicious as you can get.  It is also featured in the new book, Cooking Maine Style which is edited by Sandra Oliver and features classic recipes of Marjorie Standish.  You can check it out at the Gardiner Public Library.

BAKED ACORN SQUASH

Wash the squash, cut in half lengthwise, remove seeds using a spoon.  Wash once more, turn squash upside-down in a baking pan, pour ¼ inch cold water in pan.

Bake at 400 degrees for ½ hour.  Remove from oven, turn squash right side up.  Salt and pepper it, sprinkle with brown sugar (maple syrup is good, too).  Place piece of butter in each half.  Return to oven, bake 30 minutes longer.  Serve.

 

New Items ~ November 2018

FICTION

An absolutely remarkable thing by Hank Green.  A young graphic artist inspires world-wide hysteria when she accidentally makes first contact with an alien.  After posting a video that goes viral, April must deal with the pressures of becoming an internet sensation.

Blood communion by Anne Rice.  The Vampire Chronicles continues with Lestat’s story of how he became ruler of the vampire world.

The bus on Thursday by Shirley Barrett.  Bridget Jones meets The Exorcist in this funny, dark novel about one woman’s post-cancer retreat to a remote Australian town and the horrors awaiting her.

Death from a top hat by Clayton Rawson.  A detective steeped in the art of magic solves the mystifying murder of two occultists.

Eventide by Kimberley Kalicky.  Three couples hadn’t been out for an overnight on the boat together since their twenties.  Now middle-aged, with adult children, and the baggage that goes with a life, they set out toward Monhegan Island from Portland.

Her kind of case by Jeanne Winer.  A seasoned criminal defense attorney must draw on her experience to save a teenage client who doesn’t want to be saved.

Judas by Jeff Loveness.  In this graphic novel, Judas Iscariot journeys through life and death, grappling with his place in “The Greatest Story Ever Told.”  Every story needs a villain.

The man who came uptown by George Pelecanos.  An ex-offender must choose between the man who got him out and the woman who showed him another path for his life.

The man who couldn’t miss by David Handler.  Stewart “Hoagy” Hoag and his beloved basset hound, Lulu, investigate a murder in a fabled Connecticut summer playhouse.

Sea prayer by Khaled Hosseini.  A short, powerful, illustrated book written in response to the current refugee crisis.  It is composed in the form of a letter from a father to his son on the eve of their journey on a dangerous sea crossing.

A spark of light by Jodi Picoult.  A ripped-from-the-headlines novel about a hostage crisis at a woman’s health clinic.

The stylist by Rosie Nixon.  A young woman is thrown into the fast-paced world of fashion and glamour as she’s forced to navigate the treacherous Hollywood red carpets.

Thirteen days by Sunset Beach by Ramsey Campbell.  A horror novel that’s perfect for readers who shy away from gore and cheap shocks.

Time’s convert by Deborah Harkness.  A novel about what it takes to become a vampire.  During his lover’s journey to immortality, a vampire’s past returns to haunt them both.

Transcription by Kate Atkinson.  Ten years after, figures from a BBC radio producer’s past as an M15 recruit in 1940 confront her.

Trouble brewing by Suzanne Baltsar.  This sweet and savory novel follows a smart, ambitious woman making her way in the male-dominated world of beer brewing.

Washington Black by Esi Edugyan.  High adventure fraught with cliff-hanger twists marks this runaway-slave narrative which goes from Caribbean cane fields, to the fringes of the frozen Arctic.

Weekend at Thrackley by Alan Melville.  This story about guests gathered at a country house for the weekend, originally published in 1934, anticipates Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None, which appeared 5 years later.

MUSIC CDs

Bloom by Troye Sivan

Sweetener by Ariana Grande

Dancing Queen by Cher

Cry Pretty by Carrie Underwood

The best of Roger Miller

NONFICTION

All you can ever know by Nicole Chung.  What does it mean to love your roots – within your culture, within your family – and what happens when you find them?  Chung explores her complicated feelings about her transracial adoption and the importance of knowing where one comes from.

American like me by America Ferrera.  A vibrant and varied collection of first person accounts from prominent figures about the experience of growing up between cultures.

Buffy Sainte-Marie by Andrea Warner.  Establishing herself among the ranks of folk greats such as Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan, Buffy has released more than 20 albums, survived being blacklisted by two U.S. presidents, and received the only Academy Award ever to be won by a First Nations artist.  This is an intimate look at a beloved folk icon and activist.

The cows are out! by Trudy Price.  Price writes of the daily trials of haying, cow breeding, and milking against a backdrop of gentle and entertaining rural life in Maine.

Death on Katahdin by Randi Minetor.  The author gathers the stories of fatalities, from falls to exposure to cardiac arrest, and presents dozens of misadventures on the mountain including hunting accidents, lightning strikes, and even more than one suspicious death.

Fight like a girl by Clementine Ford.  Through a mixture of memoir, opinion, and investigative journalism, Ford exposes just how unequal the world continues to be for women.

The fighters by C.J. Chivers.  This is classic war reporting.  The author’s stories give heart-rending meaning to the lives and deaths of Americans in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, even if policymakers generally have not.

Grace without God by Katherine Ozment.  The search for meaning, purpose, and belonging in a secular age.

The invisible gorilla by Christopher Chabris.  How our intuitions deceive us because our minds don’t work the way we think they do.  We think we see ourselves and the world as they really are, but we’re actually missing a whole lot.

The oath and the office by Corey Brettschneider.  An essential guide to the presidential powers and limits of the Constitution, for anyone voting – or running – for our highest office.

Rock art critters by Denise Scicluna.  Painting rocks has become a not-uncommon craft activity in recent years.  This book focuses on decorating rocks with images of cute animals using acrylic craft paint.

Second labor: mothers share post-birth stories by Chaya Valier.   24 mothers write bold, honest accounts of post-birth life with a newborn.

Small animals by Kim Brooks.  This interrogates how we weigh risks as parents, how we judge one another’s parenting and what the costs might be – not just to parents, but to children, too – in a culture of constant surveillance.

Sons of freedom by Geoffrey Wawro.  The American contribution to World War I is one of the greatest stories of the 20th century, and yet it has all but vanished from view.  This tells of the forgotten American soldiers, Doughboys who defeated Germany in World War I.

These truths by Jill Lepore.  A magisterial account of the origins and rise of a divided nation, an urgently needed reckoning with the beauty and tragedy of American history.

What to do when you’re new by Keith Rollag.  How to be comfortable, confident, and successful in new situations.

Will the circle be unbroken? by Studs Terkel.  Reflections on death, rebirth, and a hunger for faith.

PICTURE BOOKS

Corduroy takes a bow by Viola Davis

Day you begin by Jacqueline Woodson

Do you believe in unicorns? by Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Dreamers by Yuyi Morales

House that once was by Julie Fogliano

I Just Like You by Suzanne Bloom

Llama Llama loves to read by Anna Dewdney

Parade of elephants by Kevin Henkes

Presto & Zesto in Limboland by Arthur Yorinks

Santa Bruce by Ryan T. Higgins

Secret life of the little brown bat by Laurence Pringle

Stop, go, yes, no!: a story of opposites by Mike Twohy

Surprise by Caroline Hadilaksono

Vegetables in underwear by Jared Chapman

We don’t eat our classmates by Ryan T Higgins

CHAPTER BOOKS

Babymouse: Tales from the locker: Miss Communication by Jennifer L Holm

I survived: the attack of the grizzlies, 1967 by Lauren Tarshis

Ivy & Bean: one big happy family by Annie Barrows

Judy Moody and the right royal tea party  by Megan McDonald

Louisiana’s way home by Kate DiCamillo

Magic tree house: hurricane heroes in Texas #30 by Mary Pope Osborne

My father’s words by Patricia MacLachlan

Trail by Meika Hashimoto

Unforgettable Guinevere St. Clair by Amy Makechnie

Van Gogh deception by Deron Hicks

 NON-FICTION

Hubots: real-world robots inspired by humans by Helaine Becker

New England Patriots story by Thomas K Adamson

Recreate discoveries about light by Anna Claybourne

Recreate discoveries about living things by Anna Claybourne

Recreate discoveries about states of matter by Anna Claybourne

We are grateful : otsaliheliga by Traci Sorell

Why do I poop?  by Kirsty Holmes

Why do I sneeze? by Madeline Tyler

You wouldn’t want to be Sir Isaac Newton: a lonely life you’d rather not lead by Ian Graham

You wouldn’t want to live without coding! by Alex Woolf

You wouldn’t want to live without gaming! by Jim Pipe

You wouldn’t want to live without insects! by Anne Rooney

You wouldn’t want to live without libraries! by Fiona Macdonald

You wouldn’t want to live without nurses! By Fiona Macdonald

You wouldn’t want to live without robots! by Ian Graham

You wouldn’t want to live without satellites! by Ian Graham

You wouldn’t want to live without simple machines! by Anne Rooney

You wouldn’t want to live without writing! By Roger Canavan

 GRAPHIC NOVELS

The bad guys in do-you-think-he-saurus? by Aaron Blabey

Dog man: Lord of the fleas by Dav Pilkey

Snails are just my speed! by Kevin McCloskey

Trees: kings of the forest by Andy Hirsch

 EASY READERS

Mr. Monkey bakes a cake by Jeff Mack

My kite is stuck! and other stories by Salia Yoon

Pete the cat and the cool caterpillar by James Dean

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ October 2018

FICTION

The boy at the keyhole by Stephen Giles.  A boy is left alone in his family’s English estate with a housekeeper whom he beings to suspect has murdered his mother.

A day like any other by Genie Henderson.  Set during the Great Hamptons Hurricane of 1938, a summer colony and locals are caught in the path of a sudden and devastating hurricane in this prophetic fiction that is a warning of storms to come.

Depth of winter by Craig Johnson.  Sheriff Longmire takes on the head of a drug cartel in a remote area of the northern Mexican desert.

Eagle and Crane by Suzanne Rindell.  Two young daredevil flyers confront ugly truths and family secrets during the U.S. internment of Japanese citizens during WW II.

The fall of Gondolin by J.R.R. Tolkien.  Thousands of years before the events of The Lord Of The Rings, a hero named Tuor visits a secret city.

Flight or fright edited by Stephen King.  An anthology about all the things that can go horribly wrong when you are flying.

In his father’s footsteps by Danielle Steel.  The son of two holocaust survivors struggles to become his own person after his marriage falls apart.

Jane Doe by Victoria Stone.  A double life with a single purpose:  revenge.

The last hours by Minette Walters.  When the Black Death enters England in 1348, no one knows what manner of sickness it is – or how it spreads and kills so quickly.

Lethal white by Robert Galbraith.  Detectives Strike and Ellacott investigate a crime a young man may have witnessed as a child.

Leverage in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas puzzles over a bizarre suicide bombing in a Wall Street office building.

The locksmith’s daughter by Karen Brooks.  An intriguing novel rich in historical detail and drama as it tells the story of Queen Elizabeth’s daring, ruthless spymaster and his female protégée.

The mermaid by Christine Henry.  A beautiful historical fairy tale about a mermaid who leaves the sea to live with her true love on the coast of Maine, only to become the star attraction of history’s greatest showman, P.T. Barnum.

The money shot by Stuart Woods.  Teddy Fay races to stop a scheme of extortion and a hostile takeover.

The other woman by Sandie Jones.  A psychological thriller about a man, his new girlfriend, and the mother who will not let him go.

The other woman by Daniel Silva.  Gabriel Allon, the art restorer and assassin, fights the Russians to decide the fate of postwar global order.

Ohio by Stephen Markley.  This follows 4 former classmates who return to their small town, a region ravaged by the Great Recession, an opioid crisis, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The patchwork bride by Sandra Dallas. This tells 3 different stories with homespun style.  Strong female characters and intriguing storytelling draws the reader into this two-hanky read full of love and loss.

Sign of the cross by Glenn Cooper.  Introducing Harvard professor Cal Donovan in the first of an intriguing new series of religious conspiracy thrillers.

The spaceship next door by Gene Doucette.  When a spaceship lands in Sorrow Falls, a lovable and fearless small-town girl is the planet’s only hope for survival.  It’s a warm-hearted ode to a time and place in a community so small that everybody knows everybody else’s business.

Stars uncharted by S.K. Dunstall.  In this rip-roaring space opera, a ragtag band of explorers are out to make the biggest score in the galaxy.

The summer wives by Beatriz Williams.  A postwar fable of love, class, power, and redemption set among the inhabitants of an island of the New England coast.

Trust me by Hank Ryan.  There are three sides to every story.  Yours. Mine. And the truth.

Where the crawdads sing by Delia Owens.  In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

With you always by Rena Olsen.  This examines how easy it is to fall into the wrong relationship…and how impossible it can be to leave.

DVDs

Hereditary (2018) starring Toni Collette and Gabriel Byrne

This is us: season 2 (2018) starring Mandy Moore

Deadpool 2  (2018) starring Ryan Reynolds and Josh Brolin

Book Club (2018) starring Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen

The way we get by (2009) directed by Aron Gaudet

NONFICTION

The death of truth by Michiko Kakutani.  Notes on falsehood in the age of Trump.

Dopesick by Beth Macy.  The only book so far to fully chart the opioid crisis in America – an unforgettable portrait of the families and first responders on the front lines.

Fashion climbing by Bill Cunningham.  The glamorous world of 20th century fashion comes alive in this memoir both because of his exuberant appreciation for stylish clothes and his sharp assessment of those who wore them.

Fear: Trump in the White House by Bob Woodward.  The inside story of President Trump as only Woodward can tell it.

A hard rain by Frye Gaillard.  America in the 1960s, our decade of hope, possibility, and innocence lost.

Leadership in turbulent times by Doris Kearns Goodwin.  Goodwin offers an illuminating exploration into the early development, growth, and exercise of leadership.

No good alternative by William Vollmann.  An eye-opening look at the consequences of coal mining and natural gas production – the second of a two volume work on the ideologies of energy production and the causes of climate change.

On call in the Arctic by Thomas Sims.  An extraordinary memoir recounting the adventures of a young doctor stationed in the Alaskan bush.

The only girl by Robin Green.  A raucous and vividly dishy memoir by the only woman writer on the masthead of Rolling Stone magazine in the early ‘70s.

The power of yes by Amy Newmark.  101 stories about adventure, change and positive thinking from the publishers of Chicken Soup for the Soul.

Proud by Ibtihaj Muhammad.  She is the first female Muslim American to medal at the Olympic Games and was named one of Time’s 100 most influential people.  This is a moving coming of age story from one of the nation’s most influential athletes and illustrates how she rose above all her obstacles.

30 before 30 by Marina Shifrin.  Subtitled: “How I made a mess of my 20s and you can too”, this is a charming and relatable collection of essays documenting a young woman’s attempt to accomplish 30 life goals before turning 30.

The tragedy of Benedict Arnold by Joyce Malcolm.  This sheds new light on the man as well as on the nuanced and complicated time in which he lived.

21 lessons for the 21st century by Yuval Harari.  How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human?  How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news?  Are nations and religions still relevant?  What should we teach our children?

Unhinged by Omarosa Newman.  The former Assistant to the President and Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison in the Trump White House provides her story of corruption and controversy in the current administration.

A year of reading by Elisabeth Ellington.  A month by month guide to classics and crowd-pleasers for you and your book group.

PICTURE BOOKS

 Dam by David Almond

Fruit bowl by Mark Hoffmann

Good Rosie by Kate DiCamillo

Hello, horse by Vivian French

Imagine by Juan Felipe Herrera

Interrupting chicken and the elephant of surprise by David Ezra Stein

Let the children march by Monica Clark-Robinson

Night job by Karen Hesse

No honking allowed! By Stephanie Calmenson

Peppa Pig and the silly sniffles Based on the TV Series

Square by Mac Barnett

Storm by Sam Usher

CHAPTER BOOKS

Bush rescue by Darrel Odgers

Circus lesson by Sally Rippin

Crazy cousins by Sally Rippin

Farm rescue  by Darrel Odgers

Wheelnuts! Craziest race on Earth! Desert dustup by Knife & Packer

Wheelnuts! Craziest race on earth! Spooky smackdown by Knife & Packer

Who is Sonia Sotomayor? by Megan Stine

Winning goal by Sally Rippin

 NON-FICTION

Acadia by Audra Wallace

Blossom to apple by Sarah Ridley

Carlos Santana: sound of the heart, song of the world by Gary Golio

Counting on Katherine: how Katherine Johnson saved Apollo 13 by Helanine Becker

Mae among the stars by Roda Ahmed

Maine by Robin S. Doak

Memphis, Martin, and the mountaintop: the Sanitation Strike of 1968 by Alice Faye Duncan

Seeds to bread by Sarah Ridley

Sisters & champions: the true story of Venus and Serena Williams by Howard Bryant

Turning pages: my life story by Sonia Sotomayor 

Turtle Island: the story of North America’s first people by Eldon Yellowhorn

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.