Wear A Crown Day

Several of the staff here at the Gardiner Public Library would like the world to know ~~~

The Saturday before Halloween shall be considered “Wear A Crown Day”!

For anyone interested, some of us WILL be wearing our crowns this Saturday, October 26th.  We would love you to join us in solidarity!

What type of crown? You might ask, well, that is completely up to you!

Burger King Crowns would be fine, though I don’t know if BK still gives out crowns.  (I’m probably dating myself in even mentioning them).

A jeweled crown would be lovely, but only if you are True Royalty, (as of course, we ALL are!).

Tiaras are a sparkling sensation!

A crown of flowers would smell heavenly, though perhaps a bit hard to find or create this time of year.  But, a crown of autumn leaves could be absolutely stunning!

I am not advocating for a Crown of Thorns, nor a dental crown unless absolutely necessary, but yes, those are crowns for sure.

If you are wondering where and why?  Recently, a young lady, of perhaps 5 came to the circulation desk wearing beautiful gold shoes, an incredibly sparkling dress, and the most beautifulest crown – thus, “Wear A Crown Day” was born!

Pictures from Google Images

Memorial Day

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in service of the United States of America. Over two dozen cities and towns claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day. While Waterloo N.Y. was officially declared the birthplace of Memorial Day by President Lyndon Johnson in May 1966, it’s difficult to prove conclusively the origins of the day.

Regardless of the exact date or location of its origins, one thing is clear – Memorial Day was borne out of the Civil War and a desire to honor our dead. It was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11. “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land,” he proclaimed. The date of Decoration Day, as he called it, was chosen because it wasn’t the anniversary of any particular battle.

On the first Decoration Day, General James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, and 5,000 participants decorated the graves of the 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried there.

The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war).

It is now observed in almost every state on the last Monday in May with Congressional passage of the National Holiday Act of 1971 (P.L. 90 – 363). This helped ensure a three day weekend for Federal holidays, though several southern states have an additional separate day for honoring the Confederate war dead: January 19th in Texas; April 26th in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi; May 10th in South Carolina; and June 3rd (Jefferson Davis’ birthday) in Louisiana and Tennessee.

Red Poppies

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1915, inspired by the poem “In Flanders Fields,” Moina Michael replied with her own poem:

We cherish too, the Poppy red
That grows on fields where valor led,
It seems to signal to the skies
That blood of heroes never dies.

She then conceived of an idea to wear red poppies on Memorial day in honor of those who died serving the nation during war. She was the first to wear one, and sold poppies to her friends and co-workers with the money going to benefit servicemen in need. Later a Madam Guerin from France was visiting the United States and learned of this new custom started by Ms. Michael. When she returned to France she made artificial red poppies to raise money for war orphaned children and widowed women. This tradition spread to other countries. In 1921, the Franco-American Children’s League sold poppies nationally to benefit war orphans of France and Belgium. The League disbanded a year later and Madam Guerin approached the VFW for help.

Shortly before Memorial Day in 1922 the VFW became the first veterans’ organization to nationally sell poppies. Two years later their “Buddy” Poppy program was selling artificial poppies made by disabled veterans. In 1948 the US Post Office honored Ms. Michael for her role in founding the National Poppy movement by issuing a red 3 cent postage stamp with her likeness on it.

National Moment of Remembrance

The “National Moment of Remembrance” resolution was passed on Dec 2000 which asks that at 3 p.m. local time, for all Americans “To voluntarily and informally observe in their own way a Moment of remembrance and respect, pausing from whatever they are doing for a moment of silence or listening to ‘Taps.”

 

This is from the web address –     http://www.usmemorialday.org/?page_id=2

 

 

Easter Eggs

Although we didn’t dye “Easter eggs” as a family when I was growing up, I have always been fascinated by the creative results that are often produced.  These results happen sometimes on purpose, sometimes accidentally.  Yankee magazine published an article in 2012 that is now featured on their New England Today web page telling how to dye eggs using natural, home ingredients.  Give it a try.

The article was written by Christine Chitnis.

DayGlo-dyed eggs have their retro charms, but we think it’s even more fun to make your own colorings using common foods. The result is a subtler, more sophisticated palette–perfect for your holiday centerpiece. The only downside? You’ll need to soak the eggs longer in homemade egg dye–two to three hours–but natural beauty like this is well worth the wait.

Natural Dyed Eggs for Easter

Photo by Ira Garber

How to Make Homemade Egg Dye:

Create the base: Combine 4 cups water, 1 tablespoon white vinegar, and 1 tablespoon salt.

Ingredients to Make Homemade Egg Dye:

— hard-boiled white eggs in their shells
— water
— white vinegar
— salt
— beets, ground coffee, red cabbage, ground turmeric
— knife, pots, strainer, bowls (metal, ceramic, or plastic)

Notes: Save the egg carton (you’ll use it for drying the dyed eggs). And when you transfer your dyes into bowls, don’t use your good dishes or kitchenware, as the colors may stain.

To dye the eggs: Soak in the homemade egg dye until eggshells reach the desired shade (two to three hours); the longer you soak them, the deeper and richer the color will be. Using a spoon, set the eggs into their carton(s), and let them dry thoroughly. When you’re done, you’ll welcome the new season with a lovely, all-natural addition to your spring decor!

RED DYE:

Roughly chop 2 beets, and combine with the base. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes. Strain into a bowl and reserve the liquid for dyeing. Let cool.

BROWN DYE:

Combine 4 tablespoons of ground coffee with the base and stir well. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes. Strain into a bowl and reserve the liquid for dyeing. Let cool.

BLUE DYE:

Shred half of a large red cabbage and combine with the base.  Bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes.  Strain into a bowl and reserve the liquid for dyeing.  Let cool.

YELLOW DYE:

Combine 5 tablespoons of ground turmeric with the base and stir well.  Simmer just until the turmeric dissolves, 2 to 3 minutes.  Pour into a bowl and reserve liquid for dyeing.  Let cool.

 

 

 

 

Happy St. Paddy’s!

H       How to catch a leprechaun
A       Anne of Green Gables
P        Patrick, patron saint of Ireland
       (The) Princes of Ireland
Y        You wouldn’t want to sail on an Irish famine ship!

S        Shamrocks, harps, and shillelaghs
T        Tim O’Toole and the wee folk

P        (A) Pot o’ gold
A       (The) Ancient Celts
T        Tommy Makem’s secret Ireland
R        Rick Steves’ Ireland
I        Irish hearts
C        Celtic moon
K        (The) King of Ireland’s son
       (The) St. Patrick’s Day shamrock mystery

D       Discover Ireland
A       As for Ireland
Y        Your green home

Get Your Holiday Gifts At The Library!

The holidays are coming, MUCH faster than I was expecting!  Time does seem to move faster each year, but the temperature outside was in the 50s only a couple of weeks ago, and now I need my ice scraper in the morning.

 

We all know there are many, MANY holidays in December.  Some of these holidays are simply days – Egg Nog Day, Chester Greenwood Day, Dewey Decimal Day, to name a few.  I’m not sure about you, but these are not “gift” holidays to me.  On the other hand Hanukah, Kwanzaa and Christmas are holidays that are “gift” holidays.

 

So, don’t forget the library in your gift search!  No, I’m not asking you to give us a gift, though it is nice to be remembered.  What I mean is think of us as a source for some of the folks on your shopping list!

 

For the second year in a row, we have calendars.  These calendars contain many wonderful historic pictures of Gardiner and the surrounding communities!  For ten dollars you can share memories about local places with family, or perhaps compare places you know now with what they looked like “back in the day” – whatever day that might have been.

 

Currently we have three titles by local authors available for purchase :  Lou Lou and Pea and the mural mystery by Jill Diamond ; Destination Unknown and Along the Kennebec both by State Representative Gay Grant.  Any of these would make a great gift!

 

Do you have anyone on your list that does not live in our service area?  We would love to sell you a Gardiner Public Library non-resident subscription to use as a gift.  Just think, a gift that truly will last an entire year! And for a whole family as well!

 

Last but by no means least, don’t forget BookIt! the library’s bookstore.  BookIt! is located in Lisa’s Legit Burritos and is well stocked with great titles for you to purchase!  All proceeds from BookIt! go to benefit the library.  Check it out when you are on Water Street in Gardiner!

April Fools tradition popularized

On this day in 1700, English pranksters begin popularizing the annual tradition of April Fools’ Day by playing practical jokes on each other.

Although the day, also called All Fools’ Day, has been celebrated for several centuries by different cultures, its exact origins remain a mystery. Some historians speculate that April Fools’ Day dates back to 1582, when France switched from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar, as called for by the Council of Trent in 1563. People who were slow to get the news or failed to recognize that the start of the new year had moved to January 1 and continued to celebrate it during the last week of March through April 1 became the butt of jokes and hoaxes. These included having paper fish placed on their backs and being referred to as “poisson d’avril” (April fish), said to symbolize a young, easily caught fish and a gullible person.
Historians have also linked April Fools’ Day to ancient festivals such as Hilaria, which was celebrated in Rome at the end of March and involved people dressing up in disguises. There’s also speculation that April Fools’ Day was tied to the vernal equinox, or first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, when Mother Nature fooled people with changing, unpredictable weather.
April Fools’ Day spread throughout Britain during the 18th century. In Scotland, the tradition became a two-day event, starting with “hunting the gowk,” in which people were sent on phony errands (gowk is a word for cuckoo bird, a symbol for fool) and followed by Tailie Day, which involved pranks played on people’s derrieres, such as pinning fake tails or “kick me” signs on them.
In modern times, people have gone to great lengths to create elaborate April Fools’ Day hoaxes. Newspapers, radio and TV stations and Web sites have participated in the April 1 tradition of reporting outrageous fictional claims that have fooled their audiences. In 1957, the BBC reported that Swiss farmers were experiencing a record spaghetti crop and showed footage of people harvesting noodles from trees; numerous viewers were fooled. In 1985, Sports Illustrated tricked many of its readers when it ran a made-up article about a rookie pitcher named Sidd Finch who could throw a fastball over 168 miles per hour. In 1996, Taco Bell, the fast-food restaurant chain, duped people when it announced it had agreed to purchase Philadelphia’s Liberty Bell and intended to rename it the Taco Liberty Bell. In 1998, after Burger King advertised a “Left-Handed Whopper,” scores of clueless customers requested the fake sandwich.
Scott Handville, Assistant Library Director

Happy Holidays!

Just because I’m a bit confurious (confused + curious) sometimes, I decided to search the library catalog using the word “holiday”.  My reasons are a bit convoluted, but it boils down to – “Merry Christmas” vs. “Happy Holidays”.

Doing a subject search of the word holiday* with the asterisk, brings up 43 different headings.  There are a couple of Billie Holiday entries, so let’s say 40 holiday entries.  Granted many of the items listed under holiday are items about Christmas, but there are many about other various holidays celebrated in the United States as well as other countries.  Not all of the holidays are Christian, either.
So, Christmas is a holiday, but not the only holiday listed in the library catalog.
Next I did a Google search using the search terms “December holiday*”.  853,000,000 results are listed. WOW!
Like most people worldwide, I click on the link to the Wikipedia entry.  I jump to the December entries.  Wikipedia very nicely separates its entries by several categories.  In total, I count 42 holidays.  42 in December alone!
Again, confurious, I count 25 holidays listed for the last 10 days of December.  Okay, several of the holidays are celebrated on the same day.  As an example, Anastasia of Sirmium feast day, Decemberween, Malkh, Newtonmas, Quaid-e-Azam’s Day and Christmas are all celebrated on December 25th.  Again, WOW!
I can be a traditionalist, I do, and will say “Merry Christmas”.  I also have no problem saying “Happy Holidays!”
As I finish writing this, I guess I will be more apt to say “Happy Holidays”, as I have no idea which of the 6 you may celebrate on the 25thof December.
So, in the end “Happy Holidays to you, and yours!”
Ann Russell, Technology Librarian

Thanksgiving Recipe

How about something different on the Thanksgiving table this year.  The library has a wide selection of cookbooks to peruse.  Try something new!  It may become a new family classic.

From Celebrate! by Sheila Lukins, here is a very easy recipe for
Orange-Ginger Cranberries
2 pounds fresh cranberries, picked over and rinsed
4 cups sugar
2 cups fresh orange juice
2 tablespoons finely minced fresh ginger
1.       Divide the ingredients evenly between two heavy saucepans and stir well.  Cook over medium heat until the berries pop open, about 10 minutes.
2.       Skim the foam off the surface with a metal spoon.  Cool to room temperature.  Then refrigerate, covered, for as long as 2 months.  Serve chilled or at room temperature.
Note:  I prefer to cook the cranberries in small batches for better texture
Happy Thanksgiving!
 Scott Handville, Assistant Library Director

Grandparents Day!

In celebration of Grandparent’s Day – Sunday September 13th– here are a few items about grandparents, grandchildren and or families!
Ann Russell, Technology Librarian

Celebrating Labor Day

In recent years Labor Day has lost some of its old, and original, meanings, but it still stands as the one day in which we celebrate an important American belief.  This belief is in the importance and necessity of hard work to achieve success.  Once a holiday tied to the militancy of the Labor movement, Labor Day now honors all who work.

Oregon was the first state to recognize Labor Day officially on February 2, 1887.  President Grover Cleveland signed a congressional bill on June 28, 1894, making Labor Day a legal holiday.
As labor and management moved closer together and the U.S. workingman’s stand of living rose above that of any in the world, the tie between Labor Day and labor unions gradually diminished.
It has evolved especially into a family festival – the last big celebration of summer, vacation’s end, the final fling before the start of a new school year, and end of summer and prelude to fall.  It has become not just a day, but a weekend – a time for taking to the out-of-doors for trips, picnics, and sporting events.  It is an occasion of togetherness and a time, too, for remembering the multitude of abilities and efforts that made this country great.
from Celebrations: the complete book of American holidaysby Robert Myers available at the Gardiner Public Library.