New Books in the Library!

FICTION:

The adventures of John Carson in several quarters of the world by Brian Doyle.  A young Robert Louis Stevenson is regaled by his landlord of tales of high adventure.

All grown up by Jami Attenberg.  A wickedly funny novel about a 39 year old single, childfree woman who defies convention as she seeks connection.

The arrangement by Sarah Dunn.  This is about a couple that agrees to have an open marriage, for a limited time only and while adhering to certain rules, is a polished, amusing, and highly entertaining take on modern relationships, parenthood, and suburbia.

The coming by David Osborne.  An historical novel beginning with the Lewis & Clark expedition and ending with the decimation of the Nez Perce tribe.  An epic and sure to be a hit with readers interested in the American western expansion.

Exit West by Mohsin Hamid.  Lovers in a city overwhelmed with violence hear about mysterious doors that will carry them into an alien and uncertain future.

Fast and loose by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington is enjoying a boating excursion off the Maine coast when a chance encounter leaves him somewhat the worse for wear.

Good time coming by C.S. Harris.  A powerful story of war’s destruction of property, people, hopes, and morals during the Civil War in Louisiana.  Top-notchy historical fiction reveals the Civil War in all its brutality.

The hearts of men by Nickolas Butler.  An epic novel of intertwining friendships and families set in the north woods of Wisconsin at a beloved Boy Scout summer camp.

The Hollywood daughter by Kate Alcott.  A Hollywood coming-of-age novel in which Ingrid Bergman’s affair with Roberto Rossellini forces her biggest fan to reconsider everything she was raised to believe.

The lost order by Steve Berry.  In the 12th Cotton Malone thriller, the former Justice Department operative pursues current and historical conspiracies.

Marlena by Julie Buntin.  A novel about love, addiction, and loss: the story of two girls and the feral year that will cost one her life and define the other’s for decades.

Miranda and Caliban by Jacqueline Carey.  This reimagines the back story of Shakespeare’s The Tempest as a tale of star-crossed lovers.

Never let you go by Chevy Stevens.  Eleven years ago Lindsay escaped with her young daughter and left an abusive relationship when her husband was jailed for a hit and run.  Now he is out of prison, and she is sure he will track her down.

Red sister by Mark Lawrence.  This begins a stunning epic fantasy series about a secret order of holy warriors.

The stars are fire by Anita Shreve.  This is a suspenseful novel about an extra-ordinary young woman tested by a catastrophic event and its devastating aftermath – based on the true story of the largest fire in Maine’s history.

Ties by Domenico Starnone.  Four years after leaving his wife and children, Aldo returns to them ready to rebuild.  A slim, studding meditation on marriage, fidelity, honesty, and truth.

The wages of sin by Kaite Welsh.  A tale of murder, subversion and vice in which a female medical student in Victorian Edinburgh is drawn into a murder investigation when she recognizes one of the corpses in her anatomy lecture.

Waking gods by Sylvain Neuvel.  Pure, unadulterated literary escapism featuring giant killer robots and the looming end of humankind.  In a word, unputdownable.

The wanderers by Meg Howrey. Three astronauts and their families must endure the effects of a pioneering deep-space mission.

The widow’s house by Carol Goodman.  Blends the gothic allure of Daphne DuMaurier and the crazed undertones of Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper – this is a harrowing tale of psychological suspense set in New York’s Hudson Valley.

The young wives club by Julie Pennell.  Finding your one true love happens sometime around high school in Toulouse, Louisiana.  If you are lucky, he might be the man you thought he was.  But as four friends are about to find out, not every girl has luck on her side.

NEW DVDs:

A man called Ove (2016) starring Rolf Lassgard

Hell or high water (2016) starring Jeff Bridges and Chris Pine

The legend of Tarzan (2016) starring Alexander Skarsgard and Samuel Jackson

Roots (2016) starring Forest Whitaker and Anna Paquin

Reversal of fortune (1990) starring Jeremy Irons and Glenn Close

NONFICTION:

An American sickness by Elisabeth Rosenthal.  At a moment of drastic political upheaval, here is a shocking investigation into the dangerous, expensive, and dysfunctional American healthcare system, as well as solutions to its myriad of problems.

Dodge City by Tom Clavin.  This history of the “wickedest town in the West”, full of colorful characters, focuses on Wyatt Earp and Bat Masterson.

Enduring Vietnam by James Wright.  The Vietnam War remains the all-encompassing event of the baby boomer generation the author claims in this poignant account of those who fought and died there.  This is an important investigation of the war and its effects on an entire generation.

The face of water by Sarah Ruden.  The author elegantly celebrates and translates the bible’s original languages and looks at how passages have been misunderstood over the centuries.

Fallen glory by James Crawford.  This searching survey of some of humankind’s greatest architectural accomplishments looks at the lives and deaths of history’s greatest buildings.

The 40 year old vegan by Sandra Sellini. 75 recipes to make you leaner, cleaner, and greener in the second half of life.

How not to hate your husband after kids by Jancee Dunn.  A hilariously candid account of one woman’s quest to bring her post-baby marriage back from the brink, with life-changing, real-world advice.

March 1917 by Wil Englund.  A riveting history of the month that transformed the world’s greatest nations as Russia faced revolution and America entered World War I.

My Jewish year by Abigail Pogrebin.  This travels through the calendar’s signposts with candor, humor, and a trove of info, capturing the art of Jewish observance through the eyes of a relatable wandering – and wondering – Jew.

My master recipes by Patricia Wells.  165 recipes to inspire confidence in the kitchen – the perfect successor to Julia Child’s classic The Way to Cook.

Never caught by Erica Dunbar.  George Washington had a relentless pursuit – of his runaway slave, Ona Judge.

Strangers tend to tell me things by Amy Dickinson.  America’s most popular advice columnist, “Ask Amy”, shares her journey of family, second chances, and finding love.

2Brides 2Be by Laura Abby.  In response to the dearth of guides on same sex weddings, Abby draws from her own experience and that of wedding planners to create a handbook to help women achieve the wedding of their dreams.

Walking to listen by Andrew Forsthoefel.  A memoir of one young man’s coming of age on a cross-country trek – told through the stories of the people of all ages, races, and inclinations he meets along the highways of America.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Spring Reads!

While you’re waiting for WARM weather to arrive, hang out with these!

Paris Spring by James Naughtie

This novel takes place in Paris, in April of 1968. The cafes are alive with talk of revolution, but for a Scottish-American spy working in the British Embassy–the crisis is personal. A few words from a stranger on the Metro change his life.

Spring Fever by Mary Kay Andrews

Another great novel by Mary Kay Andrews! A woman truly believes she is over her ex-husband, so she has no problem attending his wedding. But when fate intervenes, she begins to wonder if she’s been given a second chance.

Devil in Spring by Lisa Kleypas

New York Times bestselling author LISA KLEYPAS delivers the unforgettable tale of a strong-willed beauty who encounters her match in London.

The Coming by David Osborne

A novel of native-white relations in North America, intimately told through the life of Daytime Smoke–the real-life red-haired son of William Clark and a Nez Perce woman.

National Library Week

In honor of National Library Week – April 9 – 15, 2017 – how about a few titles containing the words library, book or read!

N      Ninja Librarians
I       Inside The Books
A      AD/HD book
L       Lord Of The Libraries
R       Raising Readers
E       Elephant Book
K       Killer Librarian
Ann Russell, Technology Librarian

10 Books That Stayed With Me (That Maybe You Haven’t Read)

Recently I noticed a social media post making the rounds in which you are supposed to list ten books that have stayed with you in some way.  The goal is not to overthink it, but simply take a few minutes and answer.  They don’t have to be great books or the “right” books, just books that have stayed with you, impacting you in some way.  So, in no particular order, here are ten books that have stayed with me:

1.     Nine Stories~ JD Salinger:  A collection of stories that is sometimes disturbing, but always full of melancholy.  My favorites are “For Esme–With Love and Squalor”, “Pretty Mouth and Green My Eyes”, and “De Daumier-Smith’s Blue Period”.
2.    Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret~ Judy Blume:  This emotionally intense and angst-filled novel has a storyline that is issue-oriented and character-driven.  It grabbed my attention in the 4th grade, and has stuck with me ever since!
3.    Big Russ & Me~ Tim Russert:  This biography is truly heartwarming and quite candid.  The beloved television journalist writes about the relationship between him and his father and offers valuable lessons in life.
4.    The Catcher in the Rye~ J.D. Salinger:  If I was stranded on an island and could only take one book, this is the one I would take! Salinger’s classic coming-of-age story is darkly humorous, reflective, and moving.
5.    The Body in the Library~ Agatha Christie:  This is the first Agatha Christie book I ever read, and it had me at the title!  Christie’s writing style is engaging and the storyline is intricately plotted in this Miss Marple case.
6.    Ethan Frome~ Edith Wharton: Admittedly, the tone is quite bleak and melancholic, but Wharton’s writing style is so descriptive and lyrical that I was sucked in on the first page and never put it down until I finished.  I shan’t spoil the story for you!
7.    On Writing: a Memoir of the Craft~ Stephen King:  A practical view of the writer’s craft, King‘s advice is grounded in memories from childhood through his emergence as a writer.  The style is conversational, and the tone is reflective and darkly humorous.
8.    The Murder of Roger Ackroyd~ Agatha Christie:  Not your conventional Agatha Christie story!  It is one of her best known and most controversial novels, with an innovative twist ending, and is considered her masterpiece.
9.    The Notebook~ Nicholas Sparks:  This was Nicholas Sparks’ first published novel, and I think it’s his best work.  The poignant love story was inspired by his wife’s grandparents and is told through scenes from the past and a collection of intensely personal letters.
10.  Wrecked~ Maria Padian:  I just read this YA novel recently.  It’s a multi-faceted interpretation of a sexual assault on a college campus that will leave you thinking how memory and identity, what’s at stake, and who sits in judgment, all shape what we believe.
It’s always nice to see people celebrating books, but my favorite part of book lists is learning about books that I haven’t heard of before or that I haven’t read yet. So with that in mind, what books have stayed with you?
 

Popular YA Reads

The Boys Who Challenged Hitler by Phillip Hoose

If you have a middle schooler at home, chances are it’s difficult to get them to read. Finding a book that is written at their level and also of interest to them is not an easy task. Following are a few selections recommended by some area middle schoolers:

The Boys Who Challenged Hitler by Phillip Hoose tells thetrue story of a group of boys who were resistance fighters after the Nazi invasion in Denmark.
The Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor is about a 17 year old art student at a boarding school in Prague. Her sketchbook is full of hideous monsters. This is Book 1 of a Trilogy.
The Girl I Used To Be by Christy Ottaviano tells us about Olivia, whose parents were killed fourteen years ago. Olivia finds herself involved when her parents’ case is reopened.
This Is Where It Ends by Marieke Nijkamp tells of a tragedy at a school in Alabama. The tale is told from the separate perspectives of four teenagers who are personally involved.
 Sarah Duffy, Library Assistant

Happy Holidays!

H ~ Here Comes The Easter Cat
A ~ Animal Holiday
P ~ Presidents’ Day
P ~ Picture Book Of Hanukkah
Y ~ Yuckiest, Stinkiest, Best Valentine Ever

H ~ Hooray For St. Patrick’s Day!
O ~ Orange You Glad it’s Halloween
L ~ Long-Long’s New Year
I ~ Independence Day
D ~ Double Trouble Groundhog Day
A ~ April Foolishness
Y ~ Year Of The Perfect Christmas Tree
S ~ Story Of Kwanzaa

Ann Russell, Technology Librarian

A Thanksgiving Feast

Thanksgiving is right around the corner, and I thought it might be fun to FEAST on a variety of books.

If you missed the theme – Have a tasty Thanksgiving Day meal!

Shirley Jackson, anyone?

It’s not a come-back.  It’s not a rediscovery.  It is more like delayed appreciation.  Suddenly the author Shirley Jackson is back in the media press.  60 years after she was first published, her more famous pieces were collected into a volume and published by The Library of America in 2010.  Last year a collection of some of her short stories never before collected was published by two of her children under the title Let Me Tell You: new stories, essays, and other writings. Of this new collection, Library Journal says, “Remember the chilling excitement of reading Jackson’s The Lottery for the first time?  You’ll have the same experience over and over again with this new collection.”  Now this month comes a major new biography about this author, Shirley Jackson: a haunted life by Ruth Franklin.  The fly leaf from this new book says, “Placing Jackson within an American Gothic tradition that stretches back to Hawthorne and Poe, Franklin demonstrates how her unique contribution to this genre came from her focus on ‘domestic horror’ ”. The final piece of tribute – at least for now – is the publication of a graphic novel done by her grandson of her most famous short story, “The Lottery”.

I’m confident in saying that no one who has ever read The Lottery will forget it.  I certainly never have.  Two other short story favorites of mine are her One Ordinary Day, with Peanuts and The Summer People
Shirley Jackson is also the author of The Haunting of Hill House which has become extremely well respected as an example of the quiet psychological horror that builds in a “haunted” house.  Stephen King has mentioned her several times as a cause of inspiration for him.  Robert Wise directed a classic haunted house movie starring Julie Harris and Claire Bloom based on the book.  Another novel worth discovering by Jackson (but again, aren’t they all worth discovering?)  is We have always lived in the castle about a “cunning adolescent who has gone to quite unusual lengths to preserve her ideal of family happiness.”
Isn’t it time you join the legion of fans of Shirley Jackson?
Scott Handville, Assistant Library Director

A 1 Diner

In 2006 a local publisher, Tilbury House, published a book by Sarah Rolph that celebrated a local diner, the A 1 Diner.  The book gives a history of the diner featuring both those who work behind the counter and those in the kitchen.  Many recipes that have become customer favorites are revealed in the book.  Below is one of them.  For more of these wonderful recipes and to enjoy the history of this local institution, visit the library to borrow the book, A 1 Diner: real food, recipes, and recollections by Sarah Rolph.

Hazel Newell’s Squash Custard Pie:
This pie is unusual in that it separates during cooking into a squash layer and a custard layer.
5 eggs
1 cup white sugar
1 cup canned squash puree (fresh squash has too much moisture)
1 cup milk
2 cups heavy cream
1 teaspoon vanilla
1  9 inch pie shell, uncooked (bottom only)
Heat the oven to 350 degrees.
In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the eggs and the sugar with a whisk.
Add the squash, the milk, the cream, and the vanilla, and mix, but do not beat.
Pour into the large pie shell and bake for 60-60 minutes until just set.  Chill before serving.

Got Non-Fiction

As a teacher, I am always encouraging my students to read more non-fiction. Recently, I decided I ought to take my own advice and move away from my go-to mysteries. As I pondered what non-fiction area to delve into, I thought back to my childhood and remembered the times spent at camp making terrariums with my aunt. She patiently and carefully showed me what to do and we got busy collecting items for our terrariums. These fond memories sparked my interest and I decided to do some research into terrariums.

I started looking on Minerva, the electronic “card catalog” and I found two great books. Basically, a terrarium is a miniature world in a glass environment. It usually contains a bed of small rocks, moss, and various tiny plants. You can add minerals, sea glass, and even a tiny gnome.
Terrarium Craft : create 50 magical, miniature worlds by Amy Bryant Aiello & Kate Bryant ; photography by Kate Baldwin.
This book had lots of tips about how to create a terrarium, what to include, and the various materials and tools needed.

The New Terrarium : Creating Beautiful Displays for Plants and Nature By Tovah Martin ; photographs by Kindra Clineff.
This book had lots of great ideas on creating beautiful displays.
Caring for a live moss terrarium is fairly easy. All mosses need to be in filtered or dappled light, but should never be in direct sunlight. Even artificial light will work fine. Containers should have a lid unless the opening is very small. A light misting from a spray bottle is required approximately every two to four weeks. Condensation is not uncommon but may be a sign that the terrarium is getting too much sun or temperature fluctuation. If the moss is dry to the touch, give it a good misting, leave the lid off for about an hour to let the moisture evaporate, then move it to a shadier spot.
Terrariums are relatively self-sustaining ecosystems that generally need limited care. Remember to keep the glass clean for better viewing!
         Sarah Duffy, Library Assistant