New Items ~ July 2018

FICTION

All the ever afters by Danielle Teller.  The untold story of Cinderella’s stepmother, this gives life to the brace and resourceful Agnes, better known as one of fairy tales’ most reviled villains.

The atrocities by Jeremy Shipp.  Any fans of haunted houses or strange families will thoroughly enjoy this read.

Beautiful music by Michael Zadoorian.  Set in early 1970s Detroit, a racially divided city still reeling from its violent riot of 1967, this novel is the story of a high school boy’s transformation through music.

The captives by Debra Jo Immergut.  A riveting story of a woman convicted of a brutal crime, the prison psychologist who recognizes her as his high school crush – and the charged reunion that sets off an astonishing chain of events with dangerous consequences for both.

The cast by Danielle Steel.  A magazine columnist meets an array of Hollywood professionals when a producer turns a story about his grandmother into a TV series.

The death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware.  A tarot card reader mistakenly receives an inheritance letter and attends the funeral of the deceased to collect it.

Denver Moon: the mind of Mars by Warren Hammond.  Once considered humanity’s future home, Mars hasn’t worked out like anybody hoped.  Plagued by crime and a terraforming project that’s centuries from completion, Mars is a red hell.

The favorite sister by Jessica Knoll.  This is a blistering paced thriller starring two sisters who join the cast of a reality TV series.  One won’t make it out alive.  So…who did it?

Florida by Lauren Groff.  A literary tour de force of precariousness set in a blistering place, a state shaped like a gun.

The girl who never read Noam Chomsky by Jana Casale.  The interior life of a millennial Everywoman as she matures over the decades.  So much fun, so smart, and ultimately profound and beautiful.

The lonely witness by William Boyle.  When a young woman with a sordid past witnesses a murder, she finds herself fascinated by the killer and decides to track him down herself.

Motherhood by Sheila Heti.  A novel about whether to have children that will spark conversations about womanhood, parenthood, and about how – and for whom – to live.

The optimistic decade by Heather Abel.  You say you want a revolution?  This energetic and entertaining novel about a utopian summer camp and its charismatic leader asks smart questions about good intentions gone terribly wrong.

The outsider by Stephen King.  An unspeakable crime.  A confounding investigation.  Terry Maitland seems like a nice guy, but is he wearing another face?

Shelter in place by Nora Roberts.  Survivors of a mass shooting outside a mall near Portland, Maine develop different coping mechanisms and face a new menace years later.

Social creature by Tara Burton.  Louise has nothing.  Lavinia has everything.  After a chance encounter, the two spiral into an intimate, intense, and possibly toxic friendship.  A Talented Mr. Ripley for the digital age, this takes a classic tale of obsession and makes it irresistibly new.

Sorority by Genevieve Crane.  An addictive, compulsively readable exploration of female friendship and coming of age that will appeal to anyone who has ever been curious about what goes on in a sorority house.

That kind of mother by Rumaan Alam.  Can motherhood ever look beyond race?  Can we learn to recognize the terrible blindness of our respective cultural perspective?

There there by Tommy Orange.  A look at Native American life in Oakland, CA, through the experiences and perspectives of 12 characters.  The author articulates the challenges and complexities not only of Native Americans but also of America itself.

Timberline by Matthew Mayo.  Based in the northern Rocky Mountains at the beginning of the winter months, this is a tale of adventure, survival, determination, and surprise.  Western fans will enjoy.

Time was by Ian McDonald.  Brought together by a secret project designed to hide British targets from German radar, Tom and Ben have found a love that could not be revealed. When the project went wrong, they vanished into nothingness, presumed dead.  Now they are lost in time, hunting each other across decades, leaving clues in books of poetry and trying to make their desperate timelines overlap.

NONFICTION

Beneath a ruthless sun by Gilbert King.  A spellbinding true story of racism, privilege, and official corruption.  By turns sobering, frightening, and thrilling, this meticulous account of the power and tenacity of officially sanctioned racism recalls a dark era that America is still struggling to leave behind.

Birds of a feather by Lorin Lindner.  Parrots and military veterans bond and heal each other in this powerful story of dedicated service to abandoned birds and veterans and how bringing them together helped save them all.

Calypso by David Sedaris.  This is beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk and love a good tumor joke.  It is simultaneously Sedaris’ darkest and warmest book yet – and it just might be his very best.

Fight like a girl by Kate Germano.  One woman’s professional battle against systemic gender bias in the Marines and the lessons it hold for all of us.

First in line by Kate Brower.  An intimate, news-making look at the men who are next in line to the most powerful office in the world – the vice-presidents of the modern era, from Richard Nixon to Joe Biden to Mike Pence.

I’m Keith Hernandez by Keith Hernandez.  The legendary first baseman tells all in this gripping memoir.  His mission was not to write a “boring” baseball book.  Mission accomplished.

The last lobster by Christopher White.  Although Maine has been experiencing a lobster “boom” in the past few years, White says a climate-affected fluctuation in lobster populations may be endangering the industry and the Maine culture it supports.

The lives of the Surrealists by Desmond Morris.  Life histories of the Surrealists, known and unknown by one of the last surviving members of the movement.

One day you’ll thank me by David McGlynn.  A pleasing blend of humor and humility that shows what it means to be a father in America today.  Timeless, funny, and honest stories of raising boys.

Paul Simon: the life by Robert Hilburn.  An intimate, candid, and definitive bio written with Simon’s participation – but without editorial control – by an acclaimed music writer.

Reporter: a memoir by Seymour Hersh.  A revealing memoir of a decades-long career breaking some of the most impactful stories of the last half-century, from Washington to Vietnam to the Middle East.

The restless wave by John McCain.  A memoir by the Republican senator from Arizona, an American hero who reflects on his life – and what matters most.

The rise and fall of the dinosaurs by Steve Brusatte.  Every week a new species of dinosaur is being discovered somewhere in in the world.  EVERY WEEK.  We are in a new golden age of dinosaur science, and this provides an insider’s view of that history.

Ruthless tide by Al Roker.  A gripping narrative history of the 1889 Johnstown Flood – the deadliest flood in US history.

The soul of America by Jon Meacham.  The Pulitzer Prize winning biographer contextualizes the present political climate through the lens of difficult moments in American history.

Tip of the iceberg by Mark Adams.  A fascinating and funny journey into Alaska, America’s last frontier, retracing the historic 1899 Harriman Expedition.  Tourists will certainly enjoy reading about both the past and the present, and the breezy, self-deprecating tone makes for an obvious vacation diversion.

World War II at sea by Craig Symonds.  Many have argued that WW II was dominated by naval operations; few have shown and explained how and why this was the case.  This combines story-telling verve, expertly illuminating not only the mechanics of large scale warfare on (and below) the sea but offering wisdom into the nature of the war itself.

PICTURE BOOKS

Aquarium by Cynthia Alonso

Dude by Aaron Reynolds

Fall in Line, Holden! by Daniel W Vandever

Geraldine by Elizabeth Lilly

King of Bees by Lester L. Laminack

No Kimchi for Me by Aram Kim

People Don’t Bite People by Lisa Wheeler

Roar: A Dinosaur Tour by Michael Paul

Teddy’s Favorite Toy by Christian Trimmer

Two Problems for Sophia by Jim Averbeck

Vernon is on His Way: Small Stories by Philip C. Stead

CHAPTER BOOKS

Boy Called Bat by Elana Arnold

I Love You, Michael Collins by Lauren Baratz-Logsted

Lulu Is Getting a Sister by Judith Viorst

Spirit Hunters by Ellen Oh

Train I Ride by Paul Mosier

Unicorn in the Barn by Jacqueline K. Ogburn

 

NON-FICTION

Lemonade Stand Cookbook by Kathy Starahs

Rodent Rascals by Roxie Munro

Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist by Jess Keating

What’s on Your Plate? Exploring the World of Food by Whitney Stewart

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Bolivar by Sean Rubin

Time Museum by Matthew Loux

Do You Know Komodo Dragons? By Alain M. Bergeron

NEW DVDs

Early Man (2018) starring Eddie Redmayne and Tom Hiddleston.

G-Force (2009) starring Nicolas Cage and Penelope Cruz.

Gnomeo & Juliet (2011) starring Michael Caine and Emily Blunt.

Strange Magic (2015) starring Evan Rachel Wood and Kristen Chenoweth.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ June 2018

FICTION

Adjustment Day by Chuck Palahniuk.  Young men take on geriatric politicians who are pushing the country toward a third world war.

American by day by Derek Miller.  A gripping and timely novel that follows Sigrid, a dry-witted Norwegian detective, from Oslo to the U.S. on a quest to find her missing brother.

Big guns by Steve Israel.  From the congressman-turned-novelist comes a comic tale about the mighty firearm industry, a small Long Island town, and Washington politics.

Circe by Madeline Miller.  This tells about Circe’s evolution from insignificant nymph to formidable witch best known for turning Odysseus’ sailors into swine.

Date with malice by Julia Chapman.  Mystery readers who love to escape to Louise Penny’s village of Three Pines will enjoy becoming acquainted with the town of Bruncliffe and its quirky residents.

Dead girl running by Christina Dodd.  Two emotionally damaged characters find hope, self-forgiveness, and love in this modern version of Gaslight that hooks readers and keeps them mesmerized until the end.

The fallen by David Baldacci.  Amos Decker, known as the Memory Man, puts his talents toward solving a string of murders in a Rust Belt town.

Family and other catastrophes by Alexandra Borowitz.  A wedding weekend tests an eccentric family’s bonds.  Humor and heart mix here and it will resonate with anyone who loves their family despite said family’s best efforts.

The flight attendant by Chris Bohjalian.  A flight attendant wakes up in the wrong hotel, in the wrong bed, with a dead man – and no idea what happened.

Home for unwanted girls by Joanna GoodmanPhilomena meets Orphan Train –  the story of a young unwed mother who is forcibly separated from her daughter at birth and the lengths to which they go to find each other.

 Line of glory by Thomas Clagett.  Although the tale has been told many times, Clagett has done a masterful job of delving into the back stories of the characters involved in the Alamo, both Texan and Mexican.

The listener by Robert McCammon.  Race relations are one subject of this seductive slice of supernatural noir set in 1934 New Orleans.

The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner.  A woman is separated from her son when she begins two consecutive life sentences in a California correctional facility.

The merry spinster by Mallory Ortberg.  A collection of darkly playful stories based on classic fold and fairy tales (but with a feminist spin) that find the sinister in the familiar and the familiar in the alien.

Mile High Murder by Marcia Talley.  This mystery takes the reader on a timely and illuminating trip into the often befuddling world of marijuana legislation.

My dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray.  The tale of Alexander Hamilton’s wife – seen growing up in revolutionary New York, passionately entering into marriage, and striving to assure Hamilton’s legacy.

 Noir by Christopher Moore.  A zany tale set on the mean streets of post-World War II San Francisco, and featuring a diverse cast of characters including a hapless bartender, his Chinese sidekick, a doll with sharp angles and dangerous curves, and a black mamba.

The only story by Julian Barnes.  A love affair between a 48 year old and a 19 year old is hardly unheard of, but this reverses gender expectations.

Our little secret by Roz Nay.  Grilled by police about the missing wife of her former boyfriend, Angela reveals the fateful story of their love triangle.

The perfect mother by Aimee Molloy.  An addictive psychological thriller about a group of women whose lives become unexpectedly connected when one of their newborns goes missing.

River’s child by Mark Seiler.  Fasten your seat belt in this fantasy as our spirited heroes ride icebergs from the frozen north, battle wild men, and fall in love while they race to prevent world war.

Robert B. Parker’s old black magic by Ace Atkins.  Ironic, tough-but-tender Boston PI Spenser delves into the black market art scene to investigate a decades-long crime of dangerous proportions.

The saint of wolves and butchers by Alex Grecian.  A chilling thriller about an enigmatic hunter on the trail of a Nazi who has secretly continued his devilish work here in America.

Scot free by Catriona McPherson.  This character-driven romp is sparked by the larger-than-life quirky residents of the Last Ditch Motel, putting this laugh-out-loud whodunit on a par with the early Janet Evanovich.

The Sparsholt affair by Alan Hollinghurst.  Explores richly complex relationships between fathers and sons as it spans 7 transformative decades in England, from the 1940s through the present.

Speed the dawn by Philip Donlay.  Hundreds of white-hot meteor fragments plunge toward Earth near Monterey Bay.  Huge fires ignite the tender-dry landscape, the power grid collapse, and the fires grow.  Donovan Nash realizes he is trapped.

The spirit photographer by Jon Varese.  Historical suspense about a charismatic con man haunted – perhaps literally – by a ghost from his past.

Tomb of the unknown racist by Blanche Boyd.  Explores the intricate world of the white supremacy movement and the treacherous ways that racism shatters families and spreads its dark roots across America.

NEW DVDs

The Post (2017) starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) starring Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill

The Greatest Showman (2017) starring Hugh Jackman and Michelle Williams

NONFICTION

Accidental brothers by Nancy Segal.  The riveting story of two sets of identical twins separated at birth and improbably reunited as adults, a dream case for exploring nature and nurture.

Alt-right by Mike Wendling.  A vital guide to understanding the racist, misogynist, far-right movement that rose to prominence during Donald Trump’s election campaign.

The big ones by Lucy Jones.  A riveting history of natural disasters, their impact on our culture, and new ways of thinking about the ones to come.

Cousins Maine Lobster by Jim Tselikis.  From the co-founders of the Cousins Maine Lobster food truck comes a business book revealing to new entrepreneurs how the authors built their brand through integrity and authenticity.

 Crafting a patterned home by Kristin Nicholas.  Create a unique space that’s all your own – bold and colorful handmade projects to fill your home with pattern.

Darwin comes to town by Menno Schilthuizen.  In this delightful account, readers who assume that pigeons, cockroaches, and rats are the only representatives of city biology will learn that it is far more complex.  This is an expert romp through urban natural history.

The death and life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan.  A landmark work of science, history, and reporting on the past, present and imperiled future of the Great Lakes.

Man vs Baby by Matt Coyne.  A fresh take on the bewilderment and joy of having a baby from a rip-roaring new voice, this combination memoir and advice book is sure to charm parents everywhere.

The milk lady of Bangalore by Shoba Narayan.  Sincere and laugh-out-loud funny, Narayan’s rich and evocative writing transports readers to the busy streets of Bangalore and a fully formed picture of modern India.

My patients and other animals by Suzanne Fincham-Gray.  A moving memoir of a life spent in the company of animals – a veterinarian sheds light on the universal experiences of illness, healing, and how we care for loved ones.

Natural causes by Barbara Ehrenreich.  An epidemic of wellness, the certainty of dying, and killing ourselves to live longer…the author explores how we are killing ourselves to live long, but not better.

No immediate danger by William Vollmann.  A timely, eye-opening book about climate change and energy generation that focuses on the consequences of nuclear power production.

Our towns by James Fallows.  A surprising portrait of the civic and economic reinvention taking place in America, town by town and generally out of view of the national media.  A realistically positive and provocative view of the country between its coasts.  Eastport, Maine is one of the towns examined.

Two sisters by Asne Seierstad.  The riveting story of 2 sisters’ journey to the Islamic State and the father who tries to bring them home.  It’s a relentless thriller and a feat of reporting with profound lessons about belief, extremism, and the meaning of devotion.

Waiting for the last bus by Richard Holloway.  Now in his 9th decade, the former Bishop of Edinburgh presents a positive, meditative exploration of the many lessons we can learn from death along with forgiving ourselves and others.

PICTURE BOOKS

Baby Bear’s Book of Tiny Tales by David McPhail

Bear and Wolf by Daniel Salmieri

Funeral by Matt James

Honey by David Ezra Stein

I Am Enough by Grace Byers

Ladybug Girl and the Rescue Dogs by David Soman

Memoirs of a Parrot by Devin Scillian

On the Other Side of the Garden by Jairo Buitrago

Pip & Pup by Eugene Yelchin

This Is the Nest That Robin Built by Denise Fleming

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Car by Kate Dopirak

Wake Up, Baby Bear! by Lynn Plourde

CHAPTER BOOKS

Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World by Ashley Herring Blake

Mystery of the Bear Cub by Tamra Wight

Mystery of the Missing Fox by Tamra Wight

Serpent’s Secret: Kiranmala and the Kingdom Beyond by Sayantani DasGupta

Sky at Our Feet by Nadia Hashimi

Truth as Told by Mason Buttle by Leslie Connor

Who Killed Darius Drake? by Rodman Philbrick

You Go First by Erin Entrada Kelly

NON-FICTION

A Seal Named Patches by Roxanne Beltran

Bluegrass Boy: The Story of Bill Monroe Father of Bluegrass Music by Barb Rosenstock

Song of the Wild: A First Book of Animals by Nicola Davies

When Paul Met Artie: The Story of Simon & Garfunkel by G. Neri

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Crafty Cat and the Great Butterfly Battle by Charise Mericale Harper

NEW DVDs

Mary and the Witch’s Flower (2018) starring Ruby Barnhill and Kate Winslet.

Paw Pals: Summer Rescues  (2017) 8 episodes of Paw Patrol.

PJ Masks: Cracking the Case (2018) Join Catboy, Owlette and Gekko on their night time missions into the night to save the day in this fun-packed superhero adventure.

PJ Masks: Let’s Go PJ Masks! (2017) Another superhero adventure with Catboy, Owlette and Gekko.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ May 2018

FICTION:

Accidental heroes by Danielle Steel.  Strangers pull together to avert a disaster involving two flights from New York to San Francisco.

After Anna by Lisa Scottoline.  Scottoline keeps the pace relentless as she drops a looming threat into the heart of an idyllic suburban community, causing readers to hold their breath in anticipation.

Alternate side by Anna Quindlen.  In this novel about money, class, and self-discovery, the tensions in a tight-knit neighborhood – and a seemingly happy marriage – are exposed by an unexpected act of violence.

Anatomy of a miracle by Jonathan Miles.  A novel about a paralyzed young man’s unexplainable recovery – a stunning exploration of faith, science, mystery, and the meaning of life.

The baby plan by Kate Rorick.  Here we enter the wild, bewildering world of modern pregnancies.  You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll shake your head as you wonder where everyone’s sanity went.

The bishop’s pawn by Steve Berry.  Cotton Malone discovers revelations about the day Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated.

The broken girls by Simone St. James.  A riveting genre-blender that combines a supernatural tale with intertwined mysteries from the 1950s and today.

The disappeared by C.J. Box.  Wyoming game warden, Joe Pickett, has two lethal cases to contend with.

The female persuasion by Meg Wolitzer.  A novel about the flame we all believe is flickering inside of us, waiting to be seen and fanned by the right person at the right time.  It’s a story about the people who guide and the people who follow (and how those roles evolve over time).

 The gunners by Rebecca Kauffman.  Reminiscent of The Big Chill and St. Elmo’s Fire, this novel is just as satisfying and provides readers with an entire cast of characters who feel like old friends upon finishing.

Hard aground by Brendan DuBois.  A riveting Rear Window-type drama of a man trapped in a menacing environment, forced to rely on his wits rather than brawn to solve a crime.

I bring sorrow and other stories of transgression by Patricia Abbott.  One of the stories here is about a Maine fisherman who makes an unusual catch and is the longest story in this sparkling collection.

I’ve got my eyes on you by Mary Higgins Clark.  A high school guidance counselor tries to uncover the identity of her sister’s murderer.

Lake silence by Anne Bishop.  In this thrilling and suspenseful fantasy, an inn owner and her shape-shifting lodger find themselves enmeshed in danger and dark secrets.

Let me lie by Clare MacKintosh.  The police say it was suicide.  Anna says it was murder.  They’re both wrong.  Sometimes it’s safer to let things lie.

No one ever asked by Katie Ganshert.  Challenging perceptions of discrimination and prejudice, this drama explores three women navigating challenges in a changing school district – and in their lives.

The perfume burned his eyes by Michael Imperioli.  16 year old Matthew is moved by his mother from Queens to a posh apartment in Manhattan in 1976 after she gets a large inheritance.  Having just lost his 2 important male models – his father and grandfather – Matthew becomes fascinated by another resident in the new building: the singer Lou Reed.

The punishment she deserves by Elizabeth George.  Inspector Thomas Lynley of Scotland Yard and detective sergeant Barbara Havers are approached by a Member of Parliament with a request to investigate the supposed suicide of a constituent’s son.

A reckoning by Linda Spalding.  This is set in the late 1850s as conflicts over slavery and abolition tear apart a Virginia plantation family.

Tangerine by Christine Mangan.  Living in sultry 1956 Tangier with her husband, Alice is dismayed when a troublesome former college roommate comes calling.

This scorched earth by William Gear.  An amazing tour de force depicting a family’s journey from devastation to rebirth following the American Civil War.

To die but once by Jacqueline Winspear.  In the new Maisie Dobbs novel, Winspear does a smashing job describing the bravery exhibited by everyday Britons as the fear of invasion becomes ever more real during World War II.

Trenton Makes by Tadzio Koelb.    Here is a vivid, brutal, razor-sharp debut about a woman who carves out her share of the American dream by living as a man in 1946.

Varina by Charles Frazier.  Frazier returns to the time and place of Cold Mountain, vividly bringing to life the chaos and devastation of the Civil War as he tells the story of the wife of Jefferson Davis – a woman who comes to realize that complicity carries consequences.

Worst fear by Matt Hilton.  In Portland, Maine, private investigator Tess Grey discovers that someone from her past is pursuing a deadly vendetta – and she could be the next to die.

NEW DVDs:

The Phantom Thread (2017) starring Daniel Day-Lewis

The Handmaid’s Tale (2017) starring Elisabeth Moss and Joseph Fiennes

Quiz Show (1994) starring Rob Morrow, Ralph Fiennes, and Paul Scofield

Decoy (1957) starring Beverly Garland

Psycho (1960) starring Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh

 NONFICTION:

Everything you love will burn by Vegas Tenold.  The dark story of the shocking resurgence of white supremacist and nationalist groups, and their path to political power.

Fascism: a warning by Madeleine Albright.  A personal and urgent examination of Fascism in this day and how its legacy shapes today’s world, written by the first woman to serve as U.S. Secretary of State.

A higher loyalty by James Comey.  The former FBI director shares his experience from some of the highest-stakes situations of his career in the past two decades, exploring what good, ethical leadership looks like, and how it drives sound decisions.

Historic New England by Patricia Harris.  A tour of the region’s top 100 national landmarks – touchstones of our collective past that still resonate with our present.

Let it rot! by Stu Campbell.  Since 1975 this has been where gardeners have looked for advice on keeping useful organic stuff out of the trash.

Life without plastic by Chantal Plamondon.  The practical step-by-step guide to avoiding plastic to keep your family and the planet healthy.

The line becomes a river by Francisco Cantu.  A former border patrol agent ponders what it means to be successful at his job.

The Lyme solution by Darin Ingels.  Here’s a five part plan to fight the inflammatory auto-immune response and beat Lyme disease.

More than true by Robert Bly.  Bly revisits a selection of fairy tales and examines how these enduring narratives capture the essence of human nature.

Norman: the doll that needed to be locked away by Stephen Lancaster.  A chilling true tale of life with a doll.  Dedicated readers of horror and internet creepy-pasta stories will thrill to the mounting evil and solution Lancaster and his wife devise to appease Norman.  A must-read for fans of the Chucky and Annabelle movies.

Redemption by Joseph Rosenbloom.  An immersive, humanizing, and demystifying look at the final hours of Dr. King’s life as he seeks to revive the non-violent civil right movement and push to end poverty in America.

Rise, decline, and renewal by Douglas Rooks.  A history of the Democratic Party in Maine from an editor of the Kennebec Journal.

12 rounds in Lo’s Gym by Todd Snyder.  Part love letter to Appalachia, part rigorous social critique, readers may find this book – and its narrative of individual and community strength in the face of globalism’s headwinds – a welcome corrective to narratives that blame those in the region for their troubles.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Titles – April 2018

FICTION

An American marriage by Tayari Jones.  A newlywed couple’s relationship is tested when the husband is sentenced to 12 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

As you wish by Jude Deveraux.  One fateful summer, three very different women find themselves together in Summer Hill, Virginia, where they find they have much more in common than they realized.

Auntie Poldi and the Sicilian Lions by Mario Giordano.  As types of amateur sleuths go, the category of lusty Bavarian widow has been woefully under-represented…until now.

Bachelor girl by Kim Van Alkemade.  This is inspired by the true story of Jacob Ruppert, the millionaire owner of the NY Yankees, and his mysterious bequest in 1939 to an unknown actress, Helen Winthrope Weyant.

Bring out the dog by Will Mackin.  Navy vet Mackin turns in a virtuoso performance with this collection of loosely interconnected, military-themed short stories.

Caribbean Rim by Randy Wayne White.  Murder, sunken treasure, and pirates both ancient and modern send Doc Ford on a nightmare quest.

Closer than you know by Brad Parks.  A Virginia mom dutifully treading the path toward middle-class respectability is thrown down the rabbit hole when she’s accused of drug dealing and worse.

Court of lions by Jane Johnson.  An epic saga of romance and redemption, this brings one of the great turning points in human history to life, telling the dual stories of a modern woman and the last Moorish sultan of Granada, as they both move towards their cataclysmic destinies.

Dark in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas must find a killer inspired by police thrillers before another victim is murdered.

Dodging and burning by John Copenhaver.  In a small Virginia town still reeling from World War II, a photograph of a murdered woman propels 3 young people into the middle of a far-reaching mystery.

The escape artist by Brad Meltzer.  If you’ve never tried Meltzer, this is the one to read: a government conspiracy traces back through history to the escape artist Harry Houdini.

Finding Georgina by Colleen Faulkner.  What happens AFTER you get what you’ve always wanted?  A mother here is reunited with the daughter who was abducted as a toddler – only to face unexpected and painful challenges.

The French girl by Lexie Elliott.  The shifting dynamics within a group of college friends will keep the reader guessing until the end of this combination of a who-dun-it with a Big Chill vibe.

The innocent wife by Amy Lloyd.  You love him.  You trust him.  So why are you so scared?

Madness is better than defeat by Ned Beauman.  A wild thriller about Manhattan and Hollywood in the 1930s, Mayan gods, and a CIA operation gone terribly wrong.

The One by John Marrs.  This traces the stories of five people who find their soul mates – or do they?

The policeman’s daughter by Trudy Boyce.  Here is a cast of characters that bring the gritty neighborhood to life – a taunt, authentic depiction of life as a female beat cop will resonate with crime fiction fans.

The reluctant fortune teller by Keziah Frost.  This cast of senior citizens shine here and the book will charm any reader looking for a sweet, witty, zany read in the foreseeable future.

The shape of water by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus.  This is no mere movie novelization.  The book and the film still tell the same story – of a mute woman who falls in love with an imprisoned and equally mute creature – but in two very different ways.

Speak no evil by Uzodinma Iweala.  The untimely disclosure of a secret shared between two teens from different backgrounds sets off a cascade of heartbreaking consequences.

Sunburn by Laura Lippman.  Modern noir at its best, this will delight old movie lovers, satisfy suspense readers, and reward the author’s legion of fans.

Undiscovered country by Kelly McNees.  The combination of sympathetic yet flawed characters, rich and atmospheric details about Depression era America, and lyrical writing make this historical romance between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok a remarkable portrait.

Widow’s Point by Richard Chizmar.  An author, in search of new material, arranges to be locked inside a “haunted house” with no way of contacting the outside world.  Although no human has stepped foot inside the house in nearly 30 years, he will not be there alone….

NEW DVDs

The shape of water (2017) starring Sally Hawkins, Octavia Spencer, Michael Shannon, and Richard Jenkins

Three billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017) starring Frances McDormand, Sam Rockwell, and Woody Harrelson

Lady Bird (2017) starring Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf

Call me by your name (2017) starring Timothee Chalamet and Armie Hammer

I, Tonya (2017) starring Margot Robbie and Allison Janney

The darkest hour (2017) starring Gary Oldman and Kristin Scott Thomas

Murder on the Orient Express (2017) starring Kenneth Branagh, Michelle Pfieffer, Penelope Cruz, and Judy Dench

The Florida Project (2017) starring Wilem Dafoe

NONFICTION

Breaking sad by Shelly Fisher.  What to say after loss, what not to say, and when to just show up.

Broad band by Claire Evans.  A breakthrough book on the women – written out of history until now – who brought you the internet.

Eat the apple by Matt Young.  A gut-wrenching, beautiful memoir of the consequences of war on the psyche of a young man.

Educated: a memoir by Tara Westover.  An unforgettable memoir about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University.

Fifty weapons that changed the course of history by Joel Levy.  This looks at 50 weapons that have helped shape the last 3,500 years from the very first hand-ax to the AK-47 and beyond.

Happiness is a choice you make by John Leland.  Wisdom and stories from six New Yorkers age 85 and older that challenge notions of aging.

How to be a better person by Kate Hanley.   This fun, enlightening book features 401 everyday activities to help you become a better person and make a positive impact on the people around you.

In praise of difficult women by Karen Karbo.  From Frida Kahlo and Elizabeth Taylor to Nora Ephron, Carrie Fisher, and Lena Dunham, here are life lessons from 29 heroines who dared to break the rules.

Junk beautiful by Sue Whitney.  30 clever furniture refreshed projects to transform your home.

Meet the Frugalwoods by Elizabeth Thames.  The story of why personal finance blogger Elizabeth Thames abandoned a successful career in the city and embraced extreme frugality in order to create a more meaningful purpose-driven life and retire to a homestead in the woods.

Niki Jabbour’s veggie garden remix by Niki Jabbour.  Here are new plants to shake up your garden and add variety, flavor, and fun.

One goal by Amy Bass.  This tells the inspiring story of the soccer team in a town (Lewiston, ME) bristling with racial tension that united Somali refugees and multi-generation Mainers in their quest for state – and ultimately national – glory.

Strange survivors by One Pagan.  Learn how organisms attack and defend in the game of life.

Tomorrow will be different by Sarah McBride.  Love, loss, and the fight for trans equality.

New Children’s Books for April 2018

PICTURE BOOKS

Great dictionary caper by Judy Sierra

This zoo is not for you by Ross Collins

I’m a duck by Eve Bunting

Of thee I sing: a letter to my daughters by Barack Obama

The rabbit listened by Cori Doerrfeld

If I had a horse by Gianna Marino

Word collector by Peter H. Reynolds

Tiptoeing Tiger by Philippa Leathers

Honk! Splat! Vroom by Barry Gott

Nobody’s duck by Mary Sullivan

What do you do with a chance by Kobi Yamada

Digger and the flower by Joseph Kuefler

CHAPTER BOOKS

Just like Jackie by Lindsay Stoddard

Problim children by Natalie Lloyd

Stink: Hamlet and cheese by Megan McDonald

Judy Moody and friends: not-so-lucky Lefty by Megan McDonald

Peg & Cat: the camp problem by Jennifer Oxley

NON-FICTION

No truth without Ruth: the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Kathleen Krull

The United States v. Jackie Robinson by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Gordon: bark to the future! by Ashley Spires

DVDs

Ferdinand (2017) from the creators of Rio and Ice age

Coco (2017) starring Anthony Gonzalez and Gael Grarcia Bernal

Lego Ninjago movie (2017) starring Jackie Chan and Justin Theroux

Lion King (1994) starring Matthew Broderick

 

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

New Titles – March 2018

FICTION:

All the castles burned by Michael Nye.  The story of Owen Webb, a basketball player on scholarship at a private boys’ school, and his relationship with two enigmatic men: his father – whose secrets neither Owen nor this mother suspect – and Carson, an older teen.

Daphne by Will Boast.  This turns the myth of Daphne and Apollo into a modern love story about social anxiety and physical debilitation.  It is at once tragic and enchanting.

Death by chocolate cherry cheesecake by Sarah Graves.  While Jacobia Tiptree has moved on from fixing up houses, she still can’t resist the urge to snoop into the occasional murder in Eastport, Maine.

Eternal life by Dara Horn.  What would it really mean to live forever?  This is both a heady time travel novel and a thoughtful meditation on the meaning of life.

Forty dead men by Donis Casey.  Here is a compassionate look at PTSD after World War I.

The great alone by Kristin Hannah.  Alaska, 1974.  Untamed.  Unpredictable.  And for a family in crisis, the ultimate test of the human spirit.

How to stop time by Matt Haig.  A love story across the ages – and for the ages – about a man lost in time, the woman who could save him, and the lifetime it can take to learn how to live.

Munich by Robert Harris.  Two former friends who attended Oxford accompany Hitler and Neville Chamberlain to a meeting in 1938 and are forced to make a consequential decision.

Murder in an English village by Jessica Ellicott.  As friends, the boisterous and brash American Beryl couldn’t be less alike than the prim and proper British Edwina.  But as sleuths in an England recovering from the Great War, they’re the perfect match.

 Need to know by Karen Cleveland.  In pursuit of a Russian sleeper cell on American soil, a CIA analyst uncovers a dangerous secret that will test her loyalty to the agency – and to her family.

New York fantastic edited by Paula Guran.  Fantasy spreads across the five boroughs in this new anthology series collecting fantastic and extraordinary stories set in a specific urban local.

A natural by Ross Raisin.  A transporting and acutely observed novel about a gay British soccer player, this captures both the world of professional soccer and the stifling pressure on the hero and his lover to hide their relationship.

The overneath by Peter Beagle.  Beagle chronicles the lives of unicorns, trolls, and magicians in 13 poignant stories many of which caution readers about magic gone awry and temperamental creatures.

The plea by Steve Cavanagh.  An innocent client.  A wife in jeopardy.  Who will take the plea?  This is perfect for anyone who likes a locked-room mystery wrapped inside a legal thriller on steroids.

Red clocks by Leni Zumas.  Abortion is once again illegal in America, in-vitro fertilization is banned, and the Personhood Amendment grants rights to every embryo.  In a small Oregon fishing town, five very different women navigate these new barriers alongside age-old questions surrounding motherhood, identity, and freedom.

Sadness is a white bird by Moriel Rothman-Zecher.  A young Israeli soldier whose best friends are Palestinian twins is driven to the breaking point by conflicting loyalties.

Self-portrait with boy by Rachel Lyon.  An ambitious young female artist accidentally photographs a boy falling to his death – an image that could jumpstart her career but would also devastate her most intimate friendship.

Semiosis by Sue Burke.  Human survival hinges on a bizarre alliance in this character driven science fiction about first contact.

Seven dead by J. Jefferson Farjeon.  In this classic English mystery, an amateur thief has chosen an isolated house for his first robbery.  But it is no ordinary country home.  While hunting for silverware to steal, he stumbles upon a locked room containing seven dead bodies.

Still me by Jojo Moyes.  Louisa Clark moves to New York and is torn between high society and the life she enjoys at a vintage clothing store.

The storm king by Brendan Duffy.  Haunted by dark secrets and an unsolved mystery, a young doctor returns to his isolated Adirondacks hometown in a tense novel in the vein of Harlan Coben.

Surprise me by Sophie Kinsella.  This delves into the heart of a marriage and shows how those we love and think we know best can sometimes surprise us the most.

The taster by V.S. Alexander.  Amid the turbulence of World War II, a young German woman finds a precarious haven closer to the source of danger than she ever imagined – one that will propel her through the extremes of privilege and terror under Hitler’s dictatorship.

A treacherous curse by Deanna Raybourn.  Members of an Egyptian expedition fall victim to an ancient mummy’s curse.

NEW DVDs:

Get out (2017) starring Daniel Kaluuya and Allison Williams

The Crown (2017) starring Claire Foy and John Lithgow

The two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987) starring Ann-Margret and Claudette Colbert

Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) starring Peter Finch and Glenda Jackson

They shoot horses, don’t they? (1969) starring Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, and Gig Young

NEW MUSIC CDs:

NOW that’s what I call music, Vol. 65

Man of the woods – Justin Timberlake

Always ascending – Franz Ferdinand

Mania – Fall Out Boy

We came here to love by Sebastien Izambard

NONFICTION:

The adventures of the mountain men by Stephen Brennan.  True tales of hunting, trapping, fighting, adventure, and survival in the early to mid-1800s in the Rocky Mountains.

All-American murder by James Patterson.  The story of Aaron Hernandez, the New England Patriots tight end convicted of first degree murder.

Armed in America by Patrick Charles.  A history of gun rights from Colonial militias to concealed carry.

Berlin, 1936 by Oliver Hilmes.  This takes the reader through the 16 days of the Olympiad, describing the events in the German capital through the eyes of a select cast of characters – Nazi leaders and foreign diplomats, sportsmen and journalists, writers and socialites, nightclub owners and jazz musicians.

Bliss more by Light Watkins.  How to succeed at meditation without really trying.

Everything you need to know about social media by Greta Van Susteren.  Step-by-step guide to help readers understand the major social platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Instagram and Snapschat, addressing important moral and behavioral issues.

Fire and fury by Michael Wolff.  With extraordinary access to the Trump White House, Wolff tells the inside story of the most controversial presidency of our time.

A good man with a dog by Roger Guay.  A game warden’s journey from the woods of Maine to the swamps of New Orleans.

I am, I am, I am by Maggie O’Farrell.  An extraordinary memoir told entirely in near-death experiences from one of Britain’s best-selling novelists.

Let’s talk about sleep by Daniel Barone.  A guide to understanding and improving your slumber.

Norwich by Karen Crouse.  The story of the small Vermont town that has likely produced more Olympians per capita than any other place in the country – and whose citizens provide a model for achieving excellence while leading well-rounded lives.

Young China by Zak Dychtwald.  How the restless generation born after 1990 will change their country and the world.

FICTION – Picture Books:

Bad mood and the stick by Lemony Snicket

Bear and Chicken by Jannie Ho

Big book of Paw Patrol by Mary Tillworth

Big umbrella by Amy June Bates

Chewie and the Porgs by Kevin Shinick

Dear girl by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Don’t forget Dexter! by Lindsay Ward

If my moon was your sun by Andreas Steinhofel

Kate, who tamed the wind by Liz Garton Scanlon

Little Mouse’s big breakfast by Christine Pym

New LiBEARian by Alison Donald

Pete the Cat: big Easter adventure by James Dean

Runaway baby brother by Katy Hudson

Surprise! by Mike Henson

This is the chick by Wendy Hartmann

Very very very long dog by Julia Patton

JUVENILE CHAPTER BOOKS

Heart and mind of Frances Pauley by April Stevens

Lost rainforest : Mez’s magic by Eliot Schrefer

Love sugar magic: a dash of trouble by Anna Meriano

Wishmakers by Tyler Whitesides

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

Can I touch your hair? : poems of race, mistakes, and friendship by Irene Latham

Girl who drew butterflies : how Maria Merian’s art changed science by Joyce Sidman

Hidden figures : the true story of four black women and the space race by Margot Lee Shetterly

Impact! asteroids and the science of saving the world by Elizabeth Rusch

Life on Surtsey : Iceland’s upstart island by Loree Griffin Burns

Made for each other : why dogs and people are perfect partners by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent

Muddy boots : outdoor activities for children by Liza Gardner Walsh

My book of rocks and minerals by Devin Dennie

Out of the box by Jemma Westing

Snowy owl invasion! : tracking an unusual migration by Sandra Markle

Spiders! strange and wonderful by Laurence Pringle

Juvenile Graphic Novels

5 worlds : the sand warrior by Mark Siegel

Aphrodite : goddess of love by George O’Connor

Ares : bringer of war by George O’Connor

Brave by Svetlana Chmakova

The Mutts spring diaries by Patrick McDonnell

Poseidon : earth shaker by George O’Connor

JUVENILE DVDs

Dinosaur train : dinosaurs are different (2015) PBS Kids

The Jetsons & WWE : Robo-Wrestlemania (2017) starring Jeff Bergman and Trevor Devall

The nut job (2014) starring Will Arnett and Katherine Heigl

The stray : a true story (2018) starring Sarah Lancaster and Michael Cassidy

We’re going on a bear hunt (2018) Norton Herrick, film producer and Joanna Harrison, film director.

Wonder (2018) starring Julia Roberts and Jacob Tremblay

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Titles – February 2018

FICTION:

City of endless night by Douglas Preston.  One of the best in the Pendergast series – tense and tightly wound, with death relentlessly circling, stalking, lurking behind every shadow.  A New York City detective and an F.B.I. special agent track down a killer who decapitates numerous victims.

Cry your way home by Damien Walters.  This collection of subversive short horror pieces focuses on the ways girls and women, particularly mothers and daughters, intentionally or inadvertently harm one another.

Death below stairs by Jennifer Ashley.  Victorian class lines are crossed when cook Kat Holloway is drawn into a murder that reaches all the way to the throne.

Elmet by Fiona Mozley.  A not-always-gentle giant and his two children live peacefully in the woods, but the push and pull of old forces will eventually find them, and the results will be explosive.

Fools and mortals by Bernard Cornwell.  In this delightful departure from his popular military historicals, Cornwell conducts a boisterous behind-the-scenes romp through the often sordid world of the Elizabethan stage.

Forest dark by Nicole Krauss.  This follows the strange journeys of two American Jews in Israel who experience mysterious transformations while wandering in the desert.

The girls in the picture by Melanie Benjamin.  A fascinating novel of the friendship and creative partnership between two of Hollywood’s earliest female legends – screenwriter Frances Marion and superstar Mary Pickford.

Glory days by Melissa Fraterrigo.  Here is a stark portrait of the painful transitions of 21 century small-town America.

Green by Sam Graham-Felsen.  A novel race and privilege in America that you haven’t seen before:  a coming-of-age story about a life-changing friendship, propelled by an exuberant, unforgettable voice.

Halsey Street by Naima Coster.  A family saga set against the landscape of gentrifying Brooklyn.

Heart Spring Mountain by Robin MacArthur.  A young woman returns to her rural Vermont hometown in the wake of a devastating storm to search for her missing mother and to unravel a powerful family secret.

The immortalists by Chloe Benjamin.  This is a family saga that investigates the question:  If you knew the date of your death, how would you live your life?

The music shop by Rachel Joyce.  This deceptively simple love story is a magical winner that explores the idea that the perfect song can transform one’s life.

The night market by Jonathan Moore.  A sharp and scary near-future thriller that delivers a dark message about society’s love affair with technology.

Now that you mention it by Kristan Higgins.  When a fateful moment requires Nora to return home to Maine after having made a life for herself in Boston, she must decide whether staying is worth sticking around to hear some hard truths.

Operator Down by Brad Taylor.  Pike Logan’s search for a Mossad agent and ally puts him on a collision course with a ruthless military coup in Africa – and tests his loyalties to the Task Force.

Peculiar ground by Lucy Hughes-Hallett.  This is a great English country house novel, spanning three centuries, that explores surprisingly timely themes of immigration and exclusion.

Red sky at noon by Simon Sebag Montefiore.  This novel is set during the epic cavalry ride across the hot grasslands outside Stalingrad during the darkest times of World War II.

Robicheaux by James Lee Burke.  A bereaved detective confronts his past and works to clear his name when he becomes a suspect during the investigation into the murder of a man who killed his wife.

Say my name by Allegra Huston.  A middle aged woman has an extramarital affair with a much younger man.

Sing, unburied, sing by Jesmyn Ward.  A 13 year old boy comes of age in Mississippi while his black mother takes him and his toddler sister to pick up their white father, who is getting released from the state penitentiary.

The wanted by Robert Crais.  A single mother hires Elvis Cole to investigate her teenage son who is on the run after a deadly crime spree.

The woman in the window by A.J. Finn.  A twisty, powerful Hitchcockian thriller about an agoraphobic woman who believes she witnessed a crime in a neighboring house.

NEW MUSIC CDs:

2018 Grammy Nominees

Songs of Experience by U2

Lust For Life by Lana Del Rey

The Rest of Our Life by Tim McGraw & Faith Hill

NEW DVDs:

It   (2017) starring Bill Skarsgard

A Late Quartet   (2012) starring Christopher Walken, Catherine Keener, and Philip Seymour Hoffman

Dunkirk   (2017) directed by Christopher Nolan

Strictly Ballroom   (1993) directed by Baz Luhrmann

Weeds: Season one and two starring Mary-Louise Parker

Nurse Jackie: Season 1 starring Edie Falco

Scavenger Hunt    (1979) starring Richard Benjamin, James Coco, and Ruth Gordon

NONFICTION:

The boy who really, really wanted to have sex by John McNally.  Subtitled “The memoir of a fat kid”, this gives readers an honest and often mischievous look at the author’s working-class childhood in Midwestern America.

The Dogist puppies by Elias Friedman.  An endearing look at puppies.

50 things to do in Maine before you die by Nancy Griffin.  The ultimate to-do list for Mainers and visitors alike.

How Maine changed the world by Nancy Griffin.  This reflects upon the contributions Maine has made that have had significant cultural and historical impacts on both the US and the world.

The joy of acrylic painting by Annie Gonzales.  Expressive painting techniques for beginners.

Maine: life in a day by Susan Conley.  Gathering the work of 50 photographers, this captures the day to day lives of ordinary Mainers.

Remodelista by Julie Carlson.  Simple, stylish storage ideas for all over the organized home.

So you want to talk about race by Ijeoma Oluo. The author explores the complex reality of today’s racial landscape – from white privilege and police brutality to systemic discrimination and the Black Lives Matter movement – offering clarity that readers need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide.

Stop here, this is the place by Susan Conley.  Through Susan’s recollections of moments from her childhood and the ongoing lives of her children, we’re reminded of our own childhoods, and of the necessity to stop and pay attention, to hold on.

Tell me more by Kelly Corrigan.  Stories about the 12 hardest things we have to learn to say such as “I was wrong,” “I know,” and “I love you”.

Treating people well by Lea Berman.  The extraordinary power of civility at work and in life.

The truth matters by Bruce Bartlett. A citizen’s guide to separating facts from lies and stopping fake news in its tracks.

The ultimate instant pot pressure cooker cookbook by Ella Sanders.  200 easy foolproof recipes.

Women and power by Mary Beard.  A look at the roots of misogyny and its manifestations today.

You need a budget by Jesse Mecham.  A proven system for breaking the paycheck to paycheck cycle, getting out of debt, and living the life you want.

New Children’s Books for February 2018

FICTION

Click, clack, moo! I love you by Doreen Cronin

Come home already! by Jory John

Dreadful tale of Prosper Redding by Alexandra Bracken

How to find and elephant by Kate Banks

Journey under the sea by R.A. Montgomery

Library book by Tom Chapin

Love by Matt de la Pena

Magic for sale by Carrie Clickard

Real McCoys by Matthew Swanson

Secret of the ninja by Jay Leibold

Space and beyond by R.A. Montgomery

Surf monkeys by Jay Leibold

Survivor diaries: avalanche! by Terry Lynn Johnson

Valensteins by Ethan Long

NON-FICTION

Lindsey Vonn by Eric Braun

Many: the diversity of life on earth by Nicola Davies

Michael Phelps by Grace Hansen

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: the case of R.B.G. vs. Inequality by Jonah Winter

Simone Biles by Grace Hansen

Strongest man in the world: the legend of Louis Cyr by Lucie Papineau

Super Bowl: chasing football immortality by Matt Doeden

You wouldn’t want to live without bacteria by Roger Canavan

You wouldn’t want to live without boogers by Alex Woolf

You wouldn’t want to live without clocks and calendars! by Fiona Macdonald

You wouldn’t want to live without dentists! by Fiona Macdonald

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.