Summertime At The Library

We have had some wonderful summer events already and have more to come.

Summer Reading Program has started, and if you have not picked up your chart, please come in and pick it up. We have a chart for Readers and a chart for a Listeners. After August 3rd you will be able to pick up your free paperback book after filling up your chart. Teens have a different program where they get a ticket when they check out items.  Check with the YA librarian about this program.
Monday, June 27th, we had a Chewonki program here in the library which was “Owls in Maine”. We had a full house, and the children really seemed to enjoy the owls. 
Every Tuesday morning we have Story and Craft Time at 10:00-11:30 am. This has been a huge success this summer so far. Here is one of the crafts that has been created.
We are showing the Harry Potter movies in succession on Tuesday evenings from 5-7:30 pm and on Wednesdays 10 am – 12:30 pm. All 8 movies, in order: 1 movie per week. Popcorn is included.
Thursday, Aug. 4th from 10:00-11:15 am we have L.C. Bates coming to present “Life in Maine in the early 1900’s”. Weather permitting we will have part of this program outdoors in the garden.
Tuesday, August 16th at 11:30 am will be an Ice Cream social to end the Summer Reading Program.
Please come in, read and have fun!

School Vacation Week at the Gardiner Public Library

We had a wonderfully full school vacation week here in the library. Story time & crafts were on Tuesday morning at 10:30, then a Bugs, Bugs, Bugs program & craft with L.C. Bates Museum in the afternoon funded by Crossroads Youth Center and through a generous grant received by the Maine Community Foundation.  Thursday was an Origami Fish Folding Workshop.  Each program had a great number of people in attendance.

Other things happening were Legos, as well as the train set, doll house, and Puppet Theater. We were so happy here with all the participation for each event. This is what every library dreams of doing during a week off from school.
So thanks to all who came and to all who helped with these events. A special thank you goes to Abby Gifford, Deb, Isabelle and Griffin Files, Upstream, Crossroads Youth Center, and Maine Community Foundation.
Here are some photos from this fabulous week.
L.C. Bates Museum – Bugs! Bugs! Bugs!
L.C. Bates Museum – Bugs! Bugs! Bugs!
L.C. Bates Museum – Bugs! Bugs! Bugs!

 

L.C. Bates Museum – Bugs! Bugs! Bugs!
L.C. Bates Museum – Bugs! Bugs! Bugs!

 

 

Fold A Fish Origami Workshop

 

Fold A Fish Origami Workshop
Fold A Fish Origami Workshop
Fold A Fish Origami Workshop
Fold A Fish Origami Workshop
Ginni Nichols, Children’s Librarian

What’s Going On?!?!?!

 

Over the next couple of weeks, we have several irons in the fire.
National Library Week is celebrated from April 10 – 16 this year.  We have a display of “library” related books for your perusal.
The ALA (American Library Association) theme for the week is “Libraries Transform Lives”.  As part of the promotional campaign, we have blank “speech bubbles” available for folks to let us know how a library may have transformed your life!  Next time you’re in the library, pick up one at the desk, and we’ll add it to our on-going display!
School Vacation week is fast approaching, and we have a couple of programs planned.  On Tuesday, the 19th of April, the L.C. Bates Museum is doing their “Bugs! Bugs! Bugs!” program in the Children’s Room. The program begins at 2:00, so please plan on joining us then!

 

On Thursday, the 21st, a local Origami enthusiast will present a workshop – “Fold A Fish”.  This workshop is geared toward those ages 5 and up.  If you’re like me, I would need the 5 year-old to help me understand the directions, though, perhaps your 5-year-old might need your assistance as well.  Join us in the Children’s Room at 10:30, and learn to “Fold A Fish”.
The Gardiner Library Association’s annual meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, April 26th, from 6:30 – 8:00.  My understanding is that there will be a brief business meeting, followed by a slide presentation by our Archivist, Dawn Thistle.  Dawn will highlight some of the library’s impressive Gardiner resources.  This meeting is open to all.
Last to mention, but certainly not the least – on Saturday, April 23rd we will host a “Mystery In The Archives”.  Perhaps you have noticed the display table in the Young Adult section of the library?  We have obtained two historic documents, perhaps a will? And ??? Or ???  These interesting artifacts are available for you to decipher, and learn a bit before the 23rd.  Take a few minutes the next time you’re here to look them over, and perhaps purchase a ticket for this fun and exciting evening!  Tickets are available at the Adult Circulation Desk at a cost of $30 per person.  Light refreshments will be available.  All proceeds from this event to benefit the Community Archives Room.
Oh, one more thing!  This isn’t an event with a specific day and time, but we are now the proud hosts of a “Coloring Station”.  Sometimes we all need a little time to sit quietly and color, so feel free to use the station in the Hazzard Reading Room.  Crayons, markers and colored pencils are available, as well as a variety of coloring pages.
Looking forward to seeing you at some of these great events!
Ann Russell, Technology Librarian

Summer Destinations in Maine

 In honor of the beginning of summer, I am featuring several destinations featured in the book, Off the Beaten Path:  Maine, a guide to unique places.  If the places piqué your interest, you can find more by checking the book out of the library.  I’ve also included web sites for the destinations featured in this blog.

1.        “L.C. Bates Museum is situated on the campus of the Hinckley School just off Route 201 south of the intersection with Route 23.  The museum was founded by L.C. Bates, a successful entrepreneur from West Paris, Maine, who financed the conversion of the industrial arts building to a museum in 1924.  Thanks to benign neglect, the museum was preserved in a wonderfully archaic state.  The place boasts a copious collection of minerals, baskets by the Penobscot Indians, cases featuring stuffed bear, caribou, and the peculiar calico deer  (among other items).  On the school grounds near the museum are several walking trails, which pass quite a few handsome stone edifices and memorials.  The trails are open to the public during museum hours; ask for a trail brochure at the front desk.”
2.        “Worth visiting when you’re on campus is the Colby College Museum of Art.  The museum, housed in an open, modern wing appended to a more traditional brink structure, contains works by such Maine luminaries as Winslow Homer, John Marin, and Andrew Wyeth.  The museum is particularly known for its collection of paintings by contemporary artist Alex Katz.”
3.        “Learn more about the expedition at the Arnold Historical Society Museum, downstream from Gardiner on the river’s east bank in Pittston.  This fine historical home dates to 1765 and is furnished with period antiques.  The Colburn family lived in the house for nearly 200 years.  Visitors get a quick education in the history of decorative arts and architecture in seeing how the house evolved over the years.  The guide will also tell you about Major Reuben Colburn, the original resident, who hosted General Arnold and Aaron Burr for two nights while the final arrangement for the expedition were ironed out.”
4.       “Another intriguing historic setting may be found in southern Oxford County, not far from Route 25.  Paris Hill is notable both for its assortment of handsome Federal-style homes and as the birthplace of Hannibal Hamlin, a Maine political icon and vice president under Abraham Lincoln during this first term.  This ridgetop setting with view toward the White Mountains serves as a fine back drop for an uncommonly well-preserved village of 19th century houses. “

“The Hamlin Memorial Library in Paris Hill is located adjacent to Hannibal Hamlin’s grand estate on the village green and is the only building open to the public.  This stout granite building served as a local jail between 1822 and 1896.  In 1901, it was purchased by one of Hamlin’s descendants and converted into a library and museum, which it remains to this day.”

http://www.hamlin.lib.me.us/

5.        “In nearby South Paris is the McLaughlin Garden and Horticultural Center, a popular stop for anyone interested in landscaping and plants.  The gardens were started in 1936 by Bernard McLaughlin, an amateur gardener who worked in a local grocery store.  After his death, the home and gardens were acquired by a nonprofit foundation, which now maintains the grounds and is trying to restore them to their former grandeur.”

http://www.mclaughlingarden.org/

 Scott Handville, Assistant Library Directot