Gardiner Public Library will be closed Thursday, November 23rd thru Sunday, November 26th. Enjoy Thanksgiving with your families and friends!

New Titles for November!

FICTION:

 The art of keeping secrets by Rachael Johns.   They started out as “misfit” moms at their sons’ private school.  They shared everything – or so they thought.  Now on a trip to NYC, their tight hold on the secrets they’ve keep for years begins to slip.

Beneath the depths by Bruce Coffin.  A police procedural in which a lawyer who’s already antagonized half the people in Maine winds up dead and, every pine tree in Portland seems chock-full of suspects.

The best kind of people by Zoe Whittail.  A local schoolteacher is arrested, leaving his family to wrestle with the possibility of his guilt, in this novel about loyalty, truth, and happiness.

Fresh complaint by Jeffrey Eugenides.  A collection of stories that the author has been steadily producing through the years.

The girl who takes an eye for an eye by David Lagercrantz.  Lisabeth Salander teams up with an investigative journalist to uncover the secrets of her childhood.

Good me bad me by Ali Land.  Milly’s mother is a serial killer.  Though she loves her mother, the only way to make her stop is to turn her in to the police.  Milly is given a fresh start: a new identity and a home with an affluent foster family.  But Milly has secrets of her own.

Haunted by Richard Patterson. A detective from New York takes his family on a vacation to Maine and is enlisted by local cops to help solve a crime in the woods.

Little fires everywhere by Celeste Ng.  An artist with a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

Merry and bright by Debbie Macomber.  A temp, who works for a strict and stressed boss, is given a social life when family members create an online dating profile for her.

The ninth hour by Alice McDermott.  A powerfully affecting story spanning the 20th century of a widow and her daughter and the nuns who serve their Irish-American community in Brooklyn.

Origin by Dan Brown.  After reconnecting with one of his first students, who is now a billionaire futurist, Professor Robert Langdon must go on a perilous quest with a beautiful museum director.

P.S. from Paris by Marc Levy.  A modern-day love story between a famous actress hiding in Paris and a bestselling writer lying to himself.  They knew their friendship was going to be complicated, but love – and the City of Lights – just might find a way.

Paradox bound by Peter Clines.  An aimless young man escapes his dead-end town when he meets a time-traveling adventuress.  A rousing adventure novel that marries steampunk aesthetics to the seminal concept of protecting American liberty.

Proof of life by J.A. Jance.  When J.P. Beaumont is asked to investigate the death of his nemesis, it leads to an old case once thought solved.

Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor.  This begins with a 13 year old girl’s disappearance from an English village, and then tracks the village through the following years, as teenagers become adults, people grow old and die, and couples get together and separate while what happened to the girl remains a mystery.

The rules of magic by Alice Hoffman.  Hoffman delights us in this prequel to Practical Magic as three siblings discover both the power and curse of their magic.

The Salt Line by Holly Jones.  In the future, the US border has receded behind a salt line – a ring of scorched earth that protects its citizens from deadly disease-carrying ticks.  Those within the zone live safe, if limited, lives in a society controlled by a common fear.  Only adrenaline junkies who pay a fortune to tour what’s left of nature stray past the salt line.

Sourdough by Robin Sloan.  How many novels can boast an obstreperous sourdough starter as a key character?  This is a delightful and heartfelt read.

Star Wars: from a certain point of view.  An anthology of short stories retells the original “Star Wars” from the point of view of supporting characters.

To be where you are by Jan Karon.  Three generations of Kavanaghs face changes in their lives.

Winter solstice by Elin Hilderbrand.  The Quinns celebrate the holidays when one family member returns from the war in Afghanistan but the gathering turns rocky.

NONFICTION:   

American wolf by Nate Blakeslee.  The enthralling story of the rise and reign of O-Six, the celebrated Yellowstone wolf, and the people who loved or feared her.

The best of us by Joyce Maynard.  In this touching memoir, Maynard chronicles her 2nd marriage.  She beautifully renders the joys of falling in love later in life and the pain of watching her husband die of pancreatic cancer.  Her heartfelt story resonate with those who have loved and lost.

The comfort food diaries by Emily Nunn.  Nunn chronicles her journey to heal old wounds and find comfort in the face of loss through travel, home-cooked food, and the company of friends and family.

The encyclopedia of animal predators by Janet Dohner.  Learn about each predator’s traits and behaviors, identify the tracks and signs of more than 50 predators to protect your livestock, poultry, and pets.

Grant by Ron Chernow.  Ulysses Grant was a complex, mostly admirable figure, and this may become the definitive biography for the foreseeable future.

Hiding in the bathroom by Morra Aarons-Mele.  An introvert’s road map to getting out there in the business world (when you’d rather stay home).

In the shadows of the American century by Alfred McCoy.  Can the US extend the “American century” or will China guide the globe for the next 100 years?  McCoy boldly lays out a series of scenarios that could lead to the end of Washington’s world domination by 2030.

Killing England by Bill O’Reilly.  Major events and battles during the Revolutionary War are told from the perspectives of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and others.

Logical family: a memoir by Armistead Maupin.  The author of the Tales of the City series chronicles his odyssey from the old South to freewheeling San Francisco, and his evolution from curious youth to ground-breaking writer and gay rights pioneer.

Mayhem by Sigrid Rausing.  A searingly powerful memoir about the impact of opioid addiction on a family.

Of mess and moxie by Jen Hatmaker.  Wrangling delight out of this wild and glorious life, Hatmaker presents a round of hilarious tales, shameless honesty, and hope for the woman who has forgotten her moxie.

Vacationland by John Hodgman.  Mild departures from the routine inspire neurotic palpitations in these dourly funny essays that peg the stories to several unnerving locals.

Vinyl Me, Please.  100 albums you need in your collection.

Why we sleep by Matthew Walker.  The first sleep study by a leading scientific expert, this reveals groundbreaking explorations of sleep, explaining how we can harness its transformative power to change our lives for the better.

NEW MUSIC CDs:

Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie

Life changes by Thomas Rhett

Lost and gone forever by Guster

Twin Peaks (music from the limited event series)

Through the eyes of love by Melissa Manchester

Flicker by Niall Horan

 NEW DVDs:

Big little lies (2017) starring Nicole Kidman and Reese Witherspoon

The big sick (2017) starring Kumail Nanjiani, Holly Hunter and Ray Romano

Wonder woman (2017) starring Gal Gadot and Chris Pine

Hero (2017) starring Sam Elliott

This is us: the complete first season (2017) starring Mandy Moore

The beguiled  (2017) starring Colin Farrell, Nicole Kidman, and Kirsten Dunst

12 monkeys (1995) starring Bruce Willis and Brad Pitt

 

 

An Alphabet of Maine Titles

A friend and I were talking the other day, and we wondered if it would be possible to create an alphabetical list of books containing Maine places.

My list isn’t quite alphabetical, though the Maine places ARE in alphabetical order.  As you will notice, I did use poetic license with two letters – X and Z.  Please leave a comment if you have ideas for these two special letters!

Summers at Castle AUBURN

The BLUE HILL meadows

CHELSEA Chelsea bang bang

DALLAS Buyers Club

EMBDEN town of yore

FRIENDSHIP makes the heart grow fonder

The GRAY man

HOPE and tears

History of ISLESBOROUGH, Maine

Thomas JEFFERSON builds a library

KENNEBEC gumbo

LIBERTY or death

MOUNT VERNON love story

NORTH HAVEN

The OLD TOWN Canoe Company

Mr. Goodhue remembers PORTLAND

The daring Miss QUIMBY

RANDOLPH Caldecott

SAINT GEORGE and the dragon

TURNER & Hooch

The UNION quilters

Hollywood comes to VINALHAVEN

The three Weissmanns of WESTPORT

Elijah of BuXton

New YORK to Dallas

History of Cape EliZabeth, Maine

For the Love of a Library

Some of my best memories from childhood were spent with a book. I can remember many a time being dropped off at the public library where I would spend hours surrounded by books and I would read to my heart’s content. I could go an adventure, visit a foreign land, or solve a mystery with my favorite detective, Nancy Drew. Many times I would become cross with my mother because she’d pick me up too early, wherein she would inform me that I’d been on my own in a sea of books for hours.

I was lucky enough to spend time in the public libraries of whatever town in which we were stationed. I spent my summers in Maine, visiting my grandmother, Marguerite Kierstead. As a retired schoolteacher, she made sure to feed my voracious appetite for books. As an adult, I am unable to be without a book, and as such, I am a frequent patron of my local library. Gardiner Public Library holds a special place in my heart. It is the same library where my grandmother brought me in the summer, and the same library where I now work once a week.
Anne Davis does an amazing job of overseeing Gardiner Public Library. GPL has quite an extensive collection, is frequented by hundreds of patrons, and is run with a fantastic, albeit skeleton, crew. We should be celebrating the jewel that GPL is in our community, rather than continually questioning its purpose and need.
I am a teacher now myself, and I know of many kids who don’t have books at home. Yes, they can access their school library, however the collections at public libraries tend to be much larger than those at schools. GPL has a wonderful children’s room where kids can enrich their vocabulary and deepen their comprehension by having access to a vast variety of materials.
GPL is just as much a haven for adults as it is kids. We have a beautiful art history collection, a rather large Large Print section, and a wonderful archives room, just to mention a few of the “amenities”. Many people use the internet, attend book clubs, and rent movies for free.
The incredibly knowledgeable staff at GPL is there to serve and support your needs. If you live in one of our participating towns, please support us by becoming a member!
Sarah Duffy, Library Assistant

BookSale!!!

 

Saturday, June 22, 2013 Gardiner Public Library is holding its annual Summer Book Sale from 9:00 – 4:00.  Our sale is part of the Greater Gardiner River Festival. 
We have many, Many, MANY great books for you reading pleasure!  We don’t have everything set up yet, but . . .
Fiction – Lots and lots of great novels, and even some not so great ones, but all fun to read!
Non-Fiction – I have seen some books on animals – both wild and domestic ; cookbooks ; self-help items ; art/drawing books ; craft books and much more!
Children’s and Young Adult items of all sorts!
I have noticed some DVDs and VHS tapes as they have been moved into the Hazzard Reading Room.
Personally, I have not seen any music or “talking books”, but that truly means very little, as I have not handled much of what is available.
As always, the prices are great!!!  Most adult books are $1.00 and children’s are $.50.
Monday the 24th will be “Buck-A-Bag” day (10:30 – 5:00)!  Believe it or not – $1.00 for a bag of books!  Generally a bag will hold 20 items, so come on in!!
Please, come on in and visit as you wander downtown Gardiner enjoying the Greater Gardiner River Festival!