New Items ~ December 2019

FICTION

Agent running in the field by John Le Carre.  A seasoned solitary figure, in a desperate attempt to resist the new political turbulence swirling around him, makes connections that will take him down a very dangerous path.

All this could be yours by Jami Attenberg.  A timely exploration of what it means to be caught in the web of a toxic man who abused his power.  It shows how those webs can tangle a family for generations and what it takes to – maybe, hopefully – break free.

Blue moon by Lee Child.  Jack Reacher comes to the aid of an elderly couple and confronts his most dangerous opponents yet.

The bromance book club by Lyssa Adams.  A baseball player attempts to heal his marriage with the help of his team’s romance-novel book club.

The deserter by Nelson DeMille.  This features a brilliant and unorthodox Army investigator, his troubling new partner, and their hunt for the Army’s most notorious – and dangerous – deserter.

Find me by Andre Aciman.  In this exploration of the varieties of love, the author of Call Me By Your Name revisits its complex and beguiling characters decades after their first meeting.

Ghoster by Jason Arnopp.  A razor-sharp thriller for a social-media obsessed world.  Prepare to never look at your phone the same way again….

Holding on to nothing by Elizabeth Shelburne.  Brings us a present-day Appalachian story cast without sentiment or cliché, but with a genuine and profound understanding of the place and its people.

I lost my girlish laughter by Jane Allen.  This delicious satire of old Hollywood, originally published in 1938 and largely unknown even by cinephiles, gets a welcome reissue.

Kiss the girls and make them cry by Mary Higgins Clark.  A journalist sets out to share a #METoo story from her past and discovers that her abuser has become a powerful businessman who will do anything to keep her quiet.

The night fire by Michael Connelly.  Harry Bosch and Renee Ballard return to take up a case that held the attention of Bosch’s mentor.

Ninth house by Leigh Bardugo.  After mysteriously surviving a multiple homicide, Galaxy Stern comes face to face with dark magic, murder, and more at Yale University.

Nothing to see here by Kevin Wilson.  A moving and uproarious novel about a woman who finds meaning in her life when she begins caring for two children with remarkable and disturbing abilities.

Olive, again by Elizabeth Strout.  The author continues the life of her beloved Olive Kitteridge, a character who has captured the imaginations of millions of readers.

The revisioners by Margaret Sexton.  Here is a bracing window into Southern life and tensions, alternating between two women’s stories set nearly 100 years ago.

Secret Service by Tom Bradby.  What if the next British Prime Minister was really a Russian agent?

When she returned by Lucinda Berry.  Kate vanished from a parking lot 11 years ago, leaving behind her husband and young daughter.  When she shows up at a Montana gas station, clutching an infant and screaming for help, investigators believe she may have been abducted by a cult.

NEW DVDs

The haunting of Hill House (2019) starring Carla Gugino and Elizabeth Reaser

Nevada Smith (1966) starring Steve McQueen and Karl Malden

Discovery of witches (2019) starring Matthew Goode and Teresa Palmer

Ellen – the complete season one (1994) starring Ellen DeGeneres

NEW CDs

Country Music – a film by Ken Burns: the soundtrack

Lover by Taylor Swift

Cuz I love you by Lizzo

Best of en Vogue

NONFICTION

All blood runs red by Phil Keith.  The incredible story of the first African American military pilot, who went on to become a Paris nightclub impresario, a spy in the French Resistance, and an American civil rights pioneer.

Blood by Allison Moorer.  The singer/songwriter’s memoir may serve as solace for those who’ve faced abuse, a signal for those in it to get out, and an eye-opener for others.

Catch and kill by Ronan Farrow.  In a dramatic account of violence and espionage, investigative reporter Farrow exposes serial abuse and a cabal of powerful interests hell-bent on covering up the truth, at any cost.

Good husbandry by Kristin Kimball.  Kimball describes the delicious highs and sometimes excruciating lows of life on Essex Farm – a 500 acre farm that produces a full diet for a community of 250 people.

Home now by Cynthia Anderson.  In this detailed, sensitive portrait of Lewiston’s revitalization by African immigrants, Anderson expertly captures the multi-layered dynamics between Lewiston natives and African immigrants.  The result is a vivid and finely tuned portrait of immigration in America.

If you lived here you’d be home by now by Christopher Ingraham.  The hilarious, charming, and candid story of a writer’s decision to uproot his life and move his family to Red Lake Falls, Minnesota, population 1400 – the community he made famous as “the worst place to live in America” in a story he wrote.

In the dream house by Carmen Machado.  A revolutionary memoir about domestic abuse.  Tracing the full arc of a harrowing relationship with a charismatic but volatile partner, Machado struggles to make sense of how what happened to her shaped the person she was becoming.    A revolutionary memoir about domestic abuse. 

Janis: her life and music by Holly George-Warren.  This blazingly intimate bio establishes the Queen of Rock & Roll as the rule-breaking musical trailblazer and complicated, gender-bending rebel she was.

The less people know about us by Axton Betz-Hamilton.  In this true crime memoir, an identity theft expert tells the story of the duplicity and betrayal that inspired her career and nearly destroyed her family after their identities were stolen.

Lonely Planet’s best in travel 2020.  It really is a big deal.  International Travel publisher, Lonely Planet, has featured Maine as one of this years “Best in Travel” places.  Bring on the international tourists !

The movie musical ! by Jeanine Basinger.  An in-depth look at the singing, dancing, happy-making world of Hollywood musicals, beautifully illustrated – an essential text for anyone who’s ever laughed, cried, or sung along at the movies.

Running to glory by Sam McManis.  A moving account of a champion cross-country team made up primarily of teenager from migrant-worker families.

Scream by Margee Kerr.  Kerr takes readers on a journey on which they will experience the world’s most frightening and terrifying places firsthand.  As she explores places that make people tremble, she shares her personal dread on each of these destinations, which makes the book ever more captivating.

Sitcommentary by Mark Robinson.  From I Love Lucy to Black-ish, sitcoms have often paved the way for social change.  It has challenged the public to revisit social mores and reshape how we think about the world we live in.

Touched by the sun by Carly Simon.  A chance encounter at a summer party on Martha’s Vineyard blossomed into an improbable but enduring friendship between Simon and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

The vagina bible by Jen Gunter.  OB/GYN, writer for the New York Times and Self magazine, Dr. Jen now delivers the definitive book of vagina health, answering questions you couldn’t find the right answers to.

Vanity Fair’s women on women. These essays about women by women pack a feminist wallop, underscoring the combative resilience of notable women who never gave in to what was expected of them.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

New Items ~ September 2019

FICTION

The bitterroots by C.J. Box.  The black sheep of an influential family is accused of assault.

Blood of an exile by Brian Naslund.  A page-turning, edge-of-your-seat read that breathes new life into dragon mythology.

Chances are…. by Richard Russo.  A reunion on Martha’s Vineyard reopens old mysteries and wounds for three Vietnam-era college friends.

Contraband by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington is caught in the web of a national smuggling operation.

Costalegre by Courtney Maum.  A wildly imaginative and curiously touching story of a privileged teenager who has everything a girl could want except for a mother who loves her back.

Delayed rays of a star by Amanda Lee Koe.  A dazzling novel following the lives of 3 groundbreaking women – Marlene Dietrich, Anna May Wong, and Leni Riefenstahl – cinema legends who lit up the 20th century.

The escape room by Megan Goldin.  Four young Wall Street rising stars discover the price of ambition when an escape room challenge turns into a lethal game of revenge.

Evvie Drake starts over by Linda Holmes.  In a sleepy seaside town in Maine, an unlikely relationship develops between a young woman who’s lost her husband and a major league pitcher who’s lost his game.

Fleishman is in trouble by Taffy Brodesser-Akner.  Toby Fleishman is forced to confront his own perception of his actions when his ex-wife drops off their kids at his place and disappears.

The favorite daughter by Kaira Rouda.  The perfect home.  The perfect family.  The perfect lie. You never know how far someone will go to keep a family together.

The Gifted School by Bruce Holsinger.  A previously happy group of friends and parents is nearly destroyed by their own competitiveness when an exclusive school for gifted children opens in the community.

The golden hour by Beatriz Williams.  This creates a dazzling epic of WW II-era Nassau – a hotbed of spies, traitors, and the most infamous couple of the age – the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.

The great unexpected by Dan Mooney.  A curmudgeon and his eccentric new roommate join together to plan an epic escape from a nursing home in this charming, poignant tale.

In West Mills by De’Shawn Winslow.  Follows the residents of a black neighborhood in a tiny North Carolina town over the course of several decades.

Labyrinth by Catherine Coulter.  Agents Savich and Sherlock wend their way through a maze of lies to get to the bottom of a secret.

Lady in the lake by Laura Lippman.  In 1966, a housewife becomes a reporter and investigates the killing of a black woman in Baltimore.

The last astronaut by David Wellington.  Sally Jansen is Earth’s last astronaut – and last hope – in this thriller where a mission to make first contact becomes a struggle for survival in the depths of space.

Lost you by Haylen Beck.  Novel of psychological suspense about two women locked in a desperate fight over a child each believes is rightfully hers.

The marriage clock by Zara Raheem.  Starting on the night of her 26th birthday, an Indian woman has just 3 months to find her true love or else she has to allow her parents to arrange her marriage.

The Nickel boys by Colson Whitehead.  Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

One good deed by David Baldacci.  Archer is a straight-talking former WW II soldier fresh out of prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs.  A great mix of contemporary women’s fiction, an old-fashioned friends-to-lovers story, and a big dose of #metoo reading in one fantastic package.

Shamed by Linda Castillo.  A devastating murder exposes an Amish family’s tortured past.

Simply dead by Eleanor Kuhns.   A teenage midwife in Maine goes missing in 1790.

Tell me everything by Cambria Brockman.  A tight group of college friends at a Maine college fight to keep their relationships from splintering under the pressure of secrets.

The turn of the key by Ruth Ware.  A creepy mystery in which a nanny takes a post at a haunted country house.

The unlikely escape of Uriah Heep by H.G. Parry.  The ultimate book-lover’s fantasy, featuring a young scholar with the power to bring literary characters into the world.

Whisper network by Chandler Baker.  A thriller, a murder mystery, and an anthem for any woman who has ever hit a glass ceiling, been the brunt of sexual innuendo, or felt harassed in the workplace.

 NEW MUSIC CDs

The platinum collection: Greatest hits I, II, III    by Queen

Western stars by Bruce Springsteen

No. 6 collaborations project by Ed Sheeran

Rock of ages by Billy Strings

Oklahoma!  (2019 Broadway cast recording)

NONFICTION

Crisis in the red zone by Richard Preston.  More from the author of “The Hot Zone” – the story of the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history and of the outbreaks to come.

Don’t read poetry by Stephanie Burt.  A book about how to read poems.

Last witnesses by Svetlana Alexievich.  From the Nobel Prize-winning writer, here is an oral history of children’s experiences in WW II across Russia.

Leaving the Witness by Amber Scorah.  The author describes her strict upbringing as a third-generation Jehovah’s Witness and her efforts to find her true place in the world apart from the edicts of her family and faith.

On the clock by Emily Guendelsberger.  A bitingly funny, eye-opening story of a college-educated young professional who finds work in the automated and time-starved world of hourly labor.

100 times: a memoir of sexism by Chavisa Woods.  100 personal stories of sexism, harassment, discrimination, and assault – parts of a constant battle ALL women face every day.

Outpost by Dan Richards.  The author visits the far-away places in our world and witnesses the landscapes asking – Why are we drawn to wilderness?  And how do wild places become a space for inspiration and creativity?

The Plaza by Julie Satow.  An unforgettable history of how one illustrious hotel has defined our understanding of money and glamour, from the Gilded Age to the Gog-Go Eighties to today’s Billionaire Row.

Reading behind bars by Jill Grunenwald.  A true story of literature, law, and life as a person librarian.

They called us enemy by George Takei.  A stunning graphic novel recounting the actor/author/activist’s childhood imprisoned within American concentration camps during WW II.  Experience forces that shaped an American icon – and America itself – in this tale of courage, country, loyalty, and love.

Three women by Lisa Taddeo.  The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student, and a restaurant owner.

The volunteer by Jack Fairweather.  True story of a Polish agent who infiltrated Auschwitz, organized a rebellion, and then snuck back out.

We’re still here by Jennifer Silva.  Anyone interested in the lives and motivations of blue-collar workers and their participation in the electoral process should read this.

NEW CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Hide and seek by Kate May Green

When Aidan became a brother by Kyle Lukoff

Bunny’s Book Club goes to school by Annie Silvestro

The new kitten by Joyce Carol Oates

My big bad monster by A. N. Kang

No more monsters under your bed! by Jordan Chouteau

Mighty Reader and the Big Freeze by Will Hillenbrand

Clothesline clues to the first day of school by Kathryn Heling

The pigeon has to go to school by Mo Willems

First day of Groot! by Brendan Deneen

The king of kindergarten by Derrick Barnes

Goodbye, friend! Hello, friend by Cori Doerrfeld

Take your pet to school day by Linda Ashman

The teacup café by Patty Farrin

My teacher is a robot by Jeffrey Brown

The school book by Todd Parr

Fancy Nancy: Shoe-la-la! by Victoria Saxon

The best seat in kindergarten by Katharine Kenah

CHAPTER BOOKS

Babymouse : Tales from the locker by Jennifer L. Holm

Curiosity House : The shrunken head by Lauren Oliver

The forgetting spell by Lauren Myracle

MOVIES

The secret life of pets 2 with Harrison Ford

Pokemon : Detective Pikachu by Rob Letterman

A dog’s journey with Marg Helgenberger

Cinderella by Walt Disney

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Items ~ April 2019

FICTION

The American Agent by Jacqueline Winspear.  Mazie Dobbs investigates the mysterious murder of an American war correspondent in London during the Blitz.

Black Leopard, red wolf by Marlon James.  A swords-and-sorcery epic set in a mythical Africa that is also part detective story, part quest fable, and part inquiry into the nature of truth, belief, and destiny.

Bowlaway by Elizabeth McCracken.  This is about three generations of an unconventional New England family who own and operate a candlepin bowling alley.

Cemetery Road by Greg Iles.  An electrifying tale of friendship, betrayal, and shattering secrets that threaten to destroy a small Mississippi town.

Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Reid.  A gripping novel about the whirlwind rise of an iconic 1970s rock group and their beautiful lead singer, revealing the mystery behind their infamous breakup.

Early riser by Jasper Fforde.  A madcap adventure through the Welsh winter which has grown so deadly most humans literally sleep through it.  Whip-smart, tremendous fun, and an utter delight from start to finish.

Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts.  The story behind the Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the book that inspired the iconic film, through the eyes of author L. Frank Baum’s intrepid wife, Maud.

The huntress by Kate Quinn.  A battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America.

Leading men by Christopher Castellani.  An intriguing tale of Tennessee Williams and his lover of 15 years, Frank Merlo.  It’s a wonderful examination of artists and the people who love them and change their work in large and imperceptible ways.

The lost man by Jane Harper.  Nathan and Bub Bright find their other brother dead at the border of their cattle ranch in the Australian outback.

The Malta exchange by Steve Berry.  The author has the lock on making history zing with breathless suspense and galloping action.  Malta and the Vatican are superb settings for this ecclesiastical extravaganza.

Mission critical by Mark Greaney.  A high-states thriller featuring the world’s most dangerous assassin: the Gray Man.

The military wife by Laura Trentham.  A young widow embraces a second chance at life when she reconnects with those who understand the sacrifices made by American soldiers and their families.

 The object of your affections by Falguni Kothari.  Two best friends rewrite the rules of friendship, love and family…and change everything they thought they knew about motherhood.

The river by Peter Heller.  The story of 2 college students on a wilderness canoe trip – a gripping tale of a friendship tested by fire, white water, and violence.

Run away by Harlan Coben.  You’ve lost your daughter.  She’s addicted to drugs and to an abusive boyfriend.  And she’s made it clear that she doesn’t want to be found.  Then, by chance, you see her playing guitar in Central Park…

The secretary by Renee Knight.  She could be the most dangerous person in the room…    But it would be a mistake to underestimate such a steadfast secretary as Christine.  Because as everyone is about to discover, there’s a dangerous line between obedience and obsession.

Trump Sky Alpha by Mark Doten.  One year after the president has plunged the world into nuclear war, a journalist takes refuge in the Twin Cities Metro Containment Zone.  On assignment, she documents internet humor at the end of the world.  By turns a dystopian nightmare, a cyber thriller, a spot-on treatise on memes, and a tragic tale of love and loss.

The wall by John Lanchester.  Dystopian fiction done just right, with a scenario that’s all too real.  It blends the most compelling issues of our time – rising waters, rising fear, rising political division – into a suspenseful story of love, trust, and survival.

The wedding guest by Jonathan Kellerman.  Milo Sturgis and Alex Delaware investigate the death of a stranger at a wedding reception.

NEW DVDs

Bohemian Rhapsody (2018)  starring Rami Malek

A star is born (2018) starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

Green book (2018) starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali

Can you ever forgive me? (2018) starring Melissa McCarthy and Richard E. Grant

The favourite (2018) starring Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, Rachel Weisz

At eternity’s gate (2018) starring Willem Dafoe

NEW MUSIC CDs

By the way, I forgive you by Brandi Carlile

(the teal album) by Weezer

Look alive by Guster

H.E.R. by H.E.R.

Can’t say I ain’t country by Florida Georgia Line

The essential Dinah Washington by Dinah Washington

NONFICTION

An American summer by Alex Kotlowitz.  This captures the summer of 2013 in neglected Chicago neighborhoods, rendering intimate profiles of residents and the “very public” violence they face every day.  It is a fiercely uncompromising and unforgettable portrait.

The art of dying well by Katy Butler.  An inspiring, informative, and practical guide to navigating end of life issues.

Black is the body by Emily Bernard.  Memoir from a black woman that gives stories of her grandmother’s time, her mother’s time, and her own.

The darkest year by William Klingaman.  A psychological study of the American homefront in 1941 under pressure of total war.

Monhegan by Mark Warner.  A guide to Maine’s fabled island.

Mykonos: portrait of a vanished era by Robert McCabe.  Experience the unspoiled beauty and traditional culture of this legendary Greek island as it was in the late 1950s.

On the run in Nazi Berlin by Bert Lewyn.  160,000 Jews lived in Berlin before World War II.  By 1945, only 3,000 remained.  Lewyn was one of the few, and his memoir – from witnessing the famous 1933 book burning to the aftermath of the war in a displaced persons camp – offers an unparalleled depiction of the life of a runaway Jew caught in the heart of the Nazi empire.

The salt path by Raynor Winn.  A true story of a couple who lost everything and embarked on a transformative journey walking the South West Coast Path in England.

Shortest way home by Pete Buttigieg.  The young mayor of South Bend, Indiana, now in his second term, explains what mayors do and offers ideas for the country as a whole in his memoir.

Sleeping with strangers by David Thomson.  From a celebrated film critic, this is an original, seductive account of sexuality in the movies and of how actors and actresses on screen have fed our desires.

Soar, Adam, soar by Rick Prashaw.  After a tragic accident cut his life short, Adam left a legacy of changed lives and a trove of social media posts documenting his life, relationships, transition, and struggle with epilepsy – all with remarkable transparency and directness.

Tamed by Alice Roberts.  Uncovers the deep history of 10 familiar species with incredible wild pasts:  dogs, apples and wheat, cattle, potatoes and chickens, rice, maize and horses.  The author reveals how becoming part of our world changed these and how they became our allies.

This much country by Kristin Pace.  A memoir of heartbreak, thousand-mile races, the endless Alaskan wilderness and man, many dogs from one of only a handful of women to have completed both the Yukon Quest and the Iditarod.

We were rich and we didn’t know it by Tom Phelan.  A tender recollection of growing up on a farm in Ireland in the 1940s, a captivating portrait of a bygone time.

Which side are you on? by James Sullivan.  Presented here is 20th century American history as seen through 100 protest songs.

Children’s Books

 PICTURE BOOKS

 Are you scared, Darth Vader by Adam Rex

The bear, the piano, the dog, and the fiddle by David Litchfield

Because by Mo Willems

Blue by Laura Vaccaro Seeger

Builders & breakers by Steve Light

Carl and the meaning of life by Deborah Freedman

The dress and the girl by Camille Andros

Gittel’s journey: an Ellis Island story by Leslea Newman

The littlest things give the loveliest hugs by Mark Sperring

The pinata that the farm maiden hung by Samantha Vamos

Side by side by Chris Raschka

Thank you, Omu by Oge Mora

The very impatient caterpillar by Ross Burach

 GRAPHIC NOVELS

Aquicorn Cove by Katie O’Neill

Dog Man: Brawl of the wild by Dav Pilkey

The hidden witch by Molly Ostertag

Hilda and the bird parade by Luke Pearson

Rocket to the moon? by Don Brown

Then everything went wrong by Judd Winick

 CHAPTER BOOKS

The assassins curse by Kevin Sands

Because of the rabbit by Cynthia Lord

The bridge home by Padma Venkatraman

The friendship war by Andrew Clements

Grenade by Alan Gratz

The hive queen by Tui Sutherland

Lion down by Stuart Gibbs

Small spaces by Katherine Arden

Swallow’s dance by Wendy Orr

Sweeping up the heart by Kevin Henkes

The unteachables by Gordon Korman

 NON-FICTION

Bloom bloom! by April Sayre Pulley

Calm : mindfulness for kids by Wynne Kinder

The college football championship: the fight for the top spot by Matt Doeden

The earth gives more by Sue Fliess

Inside the Daytona 500 by Todd Kortemeier

Period power : a manifesto for the menstrual movement by Nadya Okamoto

Raindrops roll by April Sayre Pulley

The World Cup : soccer’s global championship by Matt Doeden

 MOVIES

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch with Benedict Cumberbatch

Mary Poppins returns with Emily Blunt

Nutcracker and the four realms with Keira Knightley

Ralph breaks the internet with Sarah Silverman

Spider-Man into the Spider-Verse with Bob Persichetti

  

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Items ~ March 2019

FICTION

The age of light by Whitney Scharer.  Chronicles the tumultuous working and romantic relationships of photographer Man Ray and model-turned-photographer Lee Miller in early 1930s Paris.

As long as we both shall live by JoAnn Chaney.  A masterful examination of a marriage gone very wrong, a marriage with lots of secrets….

Big bang by David Bowman.  Set in the 1950s, this epic presents a brilliant and wholly original take on the years leading up to the Kennedy assassination.

Connections in death by J.D. Robb. Eve Dallas fights to save the innocent – and serve justice to the guilty – on the streets of New York.

The dead ex by Jane Corry.  One man’s disappearance throws four women’s lives into chaos – who will survive?

Death by chocolate malted milkshake by Sara Graves.  Lively characters, an intricate plot, and enticing descriptions of Down East Maine make this cozy mystery a winner.

The dreamers by Karen Walker.  An ordinary town is transformed by a mysterious illness that triggers perpetual sleep.

Forget you know me by Jessica Strawser.  A video call between friends captures a shocking incident no one was supposed to see.  The secrets it exposes threaten to change their lives forever.

Fugitive Red by Jason Starr.  Love on the internet gone wrong when a man tries a dating app but discovers a murdered dead woman instead of a live one.

The girls at 17 Swann Street by Yara Zgheib.  A haunting portrait of a young woman’s struggle with anorexia on an intimate journey to reclaim her life.

Good riddance by Elinor Lipman.  One woman’s trash – a high school yearbook with annotations added through the years – becomes another woman’s treasure, with deliriously entertaining results.

The hiding place by C.J. Tudor.  A teacher with a hidden agenda returns to settle scores at a school he once attended, only to uncover a darker secret than he could have imagined.

Judgment by Joseph Finder.  A thriller about a female judge and the one personal misstep that could lead to her – and her family’s – downfall.

The lost girls of Paris by Pam Jenoff.  A story of friendship and courage centered around three women and a ring of female secret agents during World War II.

New Iberia Blues by James Lee Burke.  The shocking death of a young woman leads Detective Dave Robicheaux into the dark corners of Hollywood, the mafia, and the backwoods of Louisiana.

The night agent by Matthew Quirk.  To find a Russian mole in the White House, an FBI agent must question everything…and trust no one.

The red address book by Sofia Lundberg.  96 year old Doris writes down the memories of her eventful life a she pages through her decades-old address book.  But the most profound moment of her life is still to come…

The ruin of kings by Jenn Lyons.  A jaw-dropping, action-packed story of betrayal, greed, and grand-scale conspiracy.  Virtually un-put-down-able.

The rule of law by John Lescroart.  Attorney Dismas Hardy is called to defend the least likely suspect of his career: his longtime, trusted assistant who is suddenly being charged as an accessory to murder.

The stranger inside by Laura Benedict.  What if you came home to find a stranger living in your home and everyone around you seems to think it is ok?

That Churchill woman by Stephanie Barron.  The life and loves of one of history’s most remarkable women – Winston Churchill’s scandalous American mother, Jennie Jerome.

Turning point by Danielle Steel.  Four American trauma doctors face difficult choices when they join a mass-casualty training program in Paris.

Unmarriageable by Soniah Kamal.  In this one of a kind retelling of Pride and Prejudice set in modern-day Pakistan, Alys Binat has sworn never to marry – until an encounter with one Mr. Darsee at a wedding makes her reconsider.

Untouchable by Jayne Ann Krentz.  A man’s quest to find answers for those who are haunted by the past leads him deeper into the shadows.

NEW DVDs

BlacKkKlansman (2018) starring John David Washington and Adam Driver

The wife (2018) starring Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce

Castle Rock (2018) starring Sissy Spacek, Bill Skarsgard, and Scott Glenn

The old man and the gun (2018) starring Robert Redford and Sissy Spacek

Halloween (2018) starring Jamie Lee Curtis

American Horror Story: Asylum (2012) starring Jessica Lange and James Cromell

Ant-man (2015) starring Paul Rudd

Adrift (2108) starring Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin

NEW MUSIC CDs

This one’s for you too by Luke Combs

A star is born (soundtrack) by Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

2019 Grammy nominees

Dua Lipa (Complete edition) by Dua Lipa

NONFICTION

An Arabian journey by Levison Wood.  The author takes us along on a complex expedition: a circumnavigation of the Arabian Peninsula.  This is a thrilling personal journey and a skillful piece of cultural reportage.

The art of the con by Anthony Amore.  The most notorious fakes, frauds, and forgeries in the art world.

Creating compassionate kids by Shauna Tominey.  Young children can surprise us with tough questions.  This essential guide teaches us how to answer them and foster compassion along the way.

The end of ice by Dahr Jamail.  This book will help readers understand how ecosystems have been affected by climate change and how inaction has potentially doomed further generations.

The feather thief by Kirk Johnson.  Beauty, obsession, and the natural history heist of the century.

One-day room makeovers by Martin Amado.  How to get the designer look for less with three easy steps.

The fire this time by Jesmyn Ward.  A new generation speaks about race.

Hidden America by Jeanne Laskas.  From coal miners to cowboys, an extraordinary exploration of the unseen people who make this country work.

How does it feel to be a problem?  by Moustafa Bayoumi.  A look at how young Arab and Muslim Americans are forging lives for themselves in a country that often mistakes them for the enemy.

If we can keep it by Michael Tomasky.  A game-changing account of the deep roots of political polarization in America, including an audacious 14 point plan for how to fix it.

Maid by Stephanie Land.  Work, low pay, and a mother’s will to survive.

Merchants of truth by Jill Abramson.  The business of news and the fight for facts: this is a definitive report on the disruption of the news media over the last decade.

No beast so fierce by Dane Huckelbridge.  American Sniper meets Jaws in this true account of the deadliest animal of all time, the Champawat Tiger – responsible for killing more than 400 humans in northern India and Nepal in the first decade of the 20th century – and the legendary hunter who finally brought it down.

Parkland by Dave Cullen.  This offers an intimate, deeply moving account of the extraordinary teenage survivors who became activist and pushed back against the NRA and feckless Congressional leaders – inspiring millions to join their grassroots  #neveragain  movement.

Women rowing north by Mary Pipher.  How to navigate life’s currents and flourish as we age.

Children’s Books

 PICTURE BOOKS

All you need is love by John Lennon

Donkey egg by Janet Stevens

Dreamland by Noah Klocek

Ear by Piret Raud

Epic adventures of Huggie & Stick by Drew Daywalt

Found by Jeff Newman

Gingerbread Man & the leprechaun loose at school by Laura Murray

Good egg by Jory John

Hands up by Breanna J. McDaniel

Harold Snipperpot’s best disaster ever by Beatrice Alemagna

Hip-hop Lollipop by Susan McElroy Montanari

I love you more than by Taye Diggs

Little Brown by Marla Frazee

Love Z by Jessie Sima

Lucia the luchadora & the million masks by Cynthia Leonor Garza

Mary wears what she wants by Keith Negley

Me and my fear by Francesca Sanna

Niblet & Ralph by Zachariah Ohora

No boring stories by Julie Falatko

Perfect by Max Amato

Say something by Peter H. Reynolds

Spectacular spring by Bruce Goldstone

Squirrel’s family tree by Beth Ferry

Steve goes to Carnival by Joshua Button

The truth about elephants by Maxwell Eaton III

The very last castle by Travis Jonker

When sadness is at your door by Eva Eland

BEGINNING CHAPTER BOOKS

A gift for Goose by Tad Hills

The hair book by Graham Tether

CHAPTER BOOKS

Call of the wraith by Kevin Sands

NON-FICTION

Beavers by Rachel Poliquin

Different families by Steffi Cavell-Clarke

DK findout! Universe by Giles Sparrow

DK findout! Space Travel by Jerry Stone

Maker lab outdoors: 25 super cool projects : build, invent, create, discover by Jack Challoner

Renegade women in film & TV by Elizabeth Weitzman

A round of robins by Katie Hesterman

Secret engineer: how Emily Roebling built the Brooklyn Bridge by Rachel Dougherty

Seeing stars: a complete guide to the 88 constellations by Sara Gillingham

Snowman – cold = puddle by Laura Purdie Salas

MOVIES

Charlie and the chocolate factory with Johnny Depp

Ella enchanted with Anne Hathaway

Enchanted with Amy Adams

Fancy Nancy: Volume 1

Goosebumps 2 with Wendi McLendon-Covey

How to train your dragon 1 and 2 with Jay Baruchel

LEGO Jurassic world : The secret exhibit

Mary Poppins with Julie Andrews

Paw Patrol : Pups save Puplantis

Pegasus : pony with a broken wing with Jonathan Silverman

Fireworks with Suzu Hirose

Kung Fu Panda with Jack Black

Peppa Pig: When I grow up

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ January 2019

FICTION

The Adults by Caroline Hulse.  A couple (now separated), plus their daughter, plus their NEW partners, all go on an epic Christmas vacation together.  What could go wrong?

Bitter orange by Claire Fuller.  Whiffs of Shirley Jackson, Daphne du Maurier, and Charlotte Bronte as an upstairs neighbor becomes obsessed with her downstairs neighbor.

The clockmaker’s daughter by Kate Morton.  The story of a love affair and a mysterious murder that cast their shadows across generations set in England from the 1860s until the present day.

The Dakota Winters by Tom Barbash.  An evocative and wildly absorbing novel about the Winters, a family living in New York City’s famed Dakota apartment building in the year leading up to John Lennon’s assassination.

Fire and blood by George R.R. Martin.  Set 300 years before the events of “Game of Thrones”, this is the first volume of the two-part history of the Targaryens in Westeros.

Forever and a day by Anthony Horowitz.   A spy is dead.  A legend is born.  This is how it all began.  It’s the explosive prequel to the first James Bond novel, Casino Royale.

The friend by Sigrid Nunez.  When a woman unexpectedly loses her lifelong best friend and mentor, she finds herself burdened with the unwanted dog he has left behind.

Hazards of time travel by Joyce Carol Oates. Time travel and its hazards are made literal in this novel in which a recklessly idealistic girl dares to test the perimeters of her tightly controlled (future) world and is punished by being sent back in time to 1959 middle America.

The little shop of found things by Paula Brackston.  A wonderful blend of history with the time-travel elements and a touch of romance.

Look alive twenty-five by Janet Evanovich.  When several managers of a deli in Trenton disappear, a bounty hunter and her detective boyfriend look for clues.

Master of his fate by Barbara Taylor Bradford.  Victorian England is a country of sharp divides between rich and poor, but James Falconer, who spends his days working at his father’s market stall, is determined to become a merchant prince.

The Moore house by Tony Tremblay.  After something gruesome happens in a N.H. home, a priest and three excommunicated nuns are asked to cleanse the building.  It is only after they give it the all clear that the demons truly begin to unleash their wrath and power.

My sister, the serial killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite.  A short, darkly funny novel about a Nigerian woman whose younger sister has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends.

Nighttown by Timothy Hallinan.  When a professional burglar breaks one of the cardinal rules of burglary (don’t take scores that you’re being paid way too much for), he finds himself on the wrong side of, well, the wrong side.

Nine perfect strangers by Liane Moriarty.  Could ten days at a health resort really change you forever?  In this page turner, nine perfect strangers are about to find out.

Of blood and bone by Nora Roberts.  Sequel to Year One, this is a new tale of terror and magic in a brand new world.

Overkilt by Kaitlyn Dunnett.  A quiet Maine town is beset by a series of disastrous happenings.  Small town charm and a determined sleuth who does a great job uncovering clues in a tale that rings all too true.

Penelope Lemon : game on!  by Inman Majors.  A recently divorced, financially struggling mom faces online dating challenges when a nude picture of her surfaces on the internet.

The Razor by Jack Mitchell.  A riveting sci fi thriller about a man struggling to survive the chaos on a prison planet.

Robert B. Parker’s blood feud by Mike Lupica.  Sunny Randall races to protect her ex-husband – and his Mafia family – from the vengeful plan of a mysterious rival.

The spite game by Anna Snoekstra.  Mercilessly bullied in high school, Ava knows she needs to put the past behind her and move on, but she can’t – not until she’s exacted precise, catastrophic revenge on the people who hurt her the most.

Those who knew by Idra Novey.  A taut, timely novel about what a powerful politician thinks he can get away with and the group of misfits who finally bring him down.

Tony’s wife by Adriana Trigiani.  Love, ambition, and the consequences of both lie at the heart of this epic of two working-class kids who become a successful singing act during the big band era of the 1940s.

Winter in paradise by Elin Hilderbrand.  Irene’s husband is found dead in St. John’s in the Caribbean.  Why so far from home?  He had a second family AND shady dealings on that island.

NEW DVDs

Eighth grade (2018) starring Elsie Fisher

Crazy rich Asians (2018) starring Constance Wu and Henry Golding

Killing Eve (2018) staring Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer

Primal fear (1996) starring Richard Gere and Edward Norton

Serpico (1973) starring Al Pacino

A better life (2011) starring Demian Bichir

NEW MUSIC CDs

Bohemian Rhapsody (soundtrack) featuring Queen

Golden hour by Kacey Musgraves

Honey by Robyn

Shawn Mendes by Shawn Mendes

NONFICTION

All that heaven allows by Mark Griffin.  The definitive biography of the deeply complex and widely misunderstood matinee idol of Hollywood’s golden age – Rock Hudson.

Almost everything by Anne Lamott.  Brief explorations into finding hope and wisdom in times of despair and uncertainty.

The American Revolution: a world war by David Allison.  A new look at the American Revolution: more than the David vs Goliath portrayal, it was the very first world war.

The best comfort good on the planet by Kerry Altiero.  The chef and owner of Café Miranda in Rockland gives some of his favorite recipes.

The end of the end of the earth by Jonathan Franzen.  This is a Silent Spring for today, but instead of challenging readers to change the world, it pushes them to change themselves.

A forever family by Rob Scheer.  An inspirational memoir about the author’s turbulent childhood in the foster care system and the countless obstacles and discrimination he endured in adopting his four children.

Gandhi: the years that changed the world, 1914-1948 by Ramachandra Guha.  The definitive portrait of the life and work of one of the most abidingly influential – and controversial – men in world history.

The library book by Susan Orlean.  This reopens the unsolved mystery of the most catastrophic library fire in American history, the 1986 Los Angeles fire, while exploring the crucial role that libraries play in modern American culture.

My love story by Tina Turner. This sets the record straight about her illustrious career and complicated personal life.

The Smithsonian history of space exploration by Roger Launius.  Comprehensive illustrated guide to the history of U.S. and international space exploration, both manned and unmanned from ancient world to the extraterrestrial future.

Under the darkening sky by Robert Lyman.  A vivid social history of the American expatriate experience in Europe between 1939 and 1941, as the Nazi menace begins a shadow over the continent, heralding the storms of war.

Why religion? : A personal story by Elaine Pagels.  Pagels looks to her own life to help answer questions such as:  Why is religion still around?  Why do so many still believe?  And how do various traditions still shape the way we experience everything from sexuality to politics.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ December 2018

FICTION

The antiquities hunter by Maya Bohnhoff.  A female detective must go undercover in the Mexican jungle to hunt down a mysterious antiquities dealer.  It’s a cross between Romancing the Stone and an Indiana Jones adventure.

Broken field by Jeff Hull.  Told from the perspective of a high school girl and a football coach, this reveals the tensions that tear at the fabric of a small town when a high school hazing incident escalates and threatens a championship season.

Dark sacred night by Michael Connelly.  Renee Ballard teams up with Harry Bosch to solve the murder of a teenage runaway.

Death of a Russian doll by Barbara Early.  What to do when you discover that your boyfriend is married and may have murdered his wife?  Get ready, get set, detect.

Elevation by Stephen King.  A man who is losing weight without getting thinner forms an unlikely alliance with his neighbors who are dealing with prejudice.

Every breath by Nicholas Sparks.  Another tale of love and loss and family.

The glass ocean by Beatriz Williams.  The lives and loves of three remarkable women – two in the past, one in the present – and the tragic final voyage of the HMS Lusitania.

Go to my grave by Catriona McPherson.  Lovers of classic manor house mysteries are in for a treat.

Gone so long by Andre Dubus.  A father, estranged for the worst of reasons, is driven to seek out the daughter he has not seen in decades.

Heads you win by Jeffrey Archer.  When Alex’s father is assassinated by the KGB, he and his mother flip a coin to decide whether to flee to America or Great Britain.

Holy ghost by John Sandford.  Virgil Flowers investigates shooting in a Minnesota town following an attempt to revive its ailing economy.

The Kennedy debutante by Kerri Maher.  A captivating novel following the exploits of Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy, the forgotten and rebellious daughter of one of American’s greatest political dynasties.

Kingdom of the blind by Louise Penny.  When a peculiar letter arrives inviting Armand Gamache to an abandoned farmhouse, he discovers that a complete stranger has named him one of the executors of her will.

The lake on fire by Rosellen Brown.  An epic narrative that begins among 19th century Jewish immigrants on a failing Wisconsin farm and follows them to the big city of Chicago.

The last night out by Catherine O’Connell.  Six friends.  A bride to be.  One murder.  Too many secrets.

Little by Edward Carey.  The tale of an ambitious orphan in Revolutionary Paris, befriended by royalty and radicals, who transforms herself into the legendary Madame Tussaud.

Nantucket counterfeit by Steven Axelrod.  This mystery takes us into the closed, gossip-riddled, back-stabbing world of Nantucket’s community theater.

No good asking by Fran Kimmel.  An overwhelmed family living in the rural plains of western Canada begins to change when an abused 11 year old enter their lives.

One day in December by Josie Silver.  This follows two young Londoners after a missed connection alters the course of their lives.  Two people. Ten chances.  One unforgettable love story.

Past Tense by Lee Child.  Jack Reacher finds trouble – or does trouble find him?

The rain watcher by Tatiana de Rosnay.  A story of family secrets and devastating disaster, set against a Paris backdrop, fraught with revelations and resolutions.

Rainsongs by Sue Hubbard.  An elegiac story of loss and valediction, set amid the stunning Irish landscape.

The red lamp by Mary Roberts Rinehart.   Fans of eerie whodunits with a supernatural tinge will relish this.  A professor tries to stop a murder spree, uncertain whether the culprit is a man or ghost.

Shell game by Sara Paretsky.  Even after decades, this landmark series remains as popular as ever, and the social consciousness behind the stories seems ever more in tune with contemporary events.

Sugar land by Tammy Lynne Stoner.  A southern friend novel about love, Lead Belly, and liberation that reads like the love child of Fannie Flagg and Rita Mae Brown.

The Winters by Lisa Gabriele.  A modern look at Du Maurier’s Rebecca, this is a suspenseful novel set in the moneyed world of the Hamptons, about secrets that refuse to remain buried, and consequences that can’t be escaped.

The witch elm by Tana French.  After Toby Hennessy retreats to his family’s ancestral home, a skull discovered in the backyard exposes his family’s past.

You don’t own me by Mary Higgins Clark.  A TV producer investigates them murder of a physician and whether it was his wife who killed him.

NEW DVDs

Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again (2018) starring Christine Baranski and Cher

Won’t you be my neighbor? (2018) documentary about Mr. Rogers

Three Sovereigns for Sarah (1985) starring Vanessa Redgrave and Kim Hunter

NONFICTION 

Becoming by Michelle Obama.  The former First Lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House and how she balanced work, family, and her husband’s political ascent.

Blowing the bloody doors off by Michael Caine.  The actor shares the wisdom, stories, insights, and skills that life has taught him in his remarkable career.

Girl, wash your face by Rachel Hollis.  The author presents a guide to becoming a joyous, confident woman by breaking the cycle of negativity and burnout and pursuing a life of exuberance.

Gmorning, gnight! by Lin-Manuel Miranda.  Booklist says, “When the world is bringing you down, this will remind you that you are awesome”.  It’s a book of affirmations to inspire readers at the beginning and end of each day.

Heavy by Kiese Laymon.  In this provocative memoir, Laymon explores what the weight of a lifetime of secrets, lies, and deception does to a black body, a black family, and a nation teetering on the brink of moral collapse.

How to leave by Erin Clune.  Quitting the city and coping with a new reality is the focus of this uproarious memoir/tongue-in-cheek guide to leaving the cool city in which you “found yourself” and moving somewhere far more ordinary – like your hometown.

Killing the SS by Bill O’Reilly.  A look at the postwar manhunt for members of Hitler’s inner circle.

Make time by Jake Knapp.  How to focus on what matters every day.  It’s a simple 4-step system for improving focus, finding greater joy in your work, and getting more out of every day.

Parenting through puberty by Suanne Kowal-Connelly.  Mood swings, acne, and growing pains.  Puberty is tough on kids – and maybe even more so on parents!

Presidents of war by Michael Beschloss.  How American presidents waged wars and expanded the power of the executive branch.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Jane De Hart.  The first full life – private, public, legal, philosophical – of the 107th Supreme Court Justice, one of the most profound and profoundly transformative legal minds of our time.

Tweak by Nic Sheff.  Memoir of a young man’s addiction to methamphetamine tells a raw, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful tale of the road from relapse to recovery.

Vietnam: an epic tragedy by Max Hastings.  No past volume has blended a political and military narrative of the entire conflict with heart-stopping personal experiences.  Hastings marshals testimony from warlords and peasants, statesmen and soldiers.

PICTURE BOOKS

A big mooncake for Little Star by Grace Lin

The crocodile and the dentist by Tar Gomi

First snow by Nancy Viau

Giraffe problems by Jory John

How do dinosaurs learn to read by Jane Yolen

Hungry bunny by Claudia Rueda

I am small by Qin Leng

Kitten and the night watchman by John Sullivan

Little Bear’s big house by Benjamin Chaud

Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers

On Gull Beach by Jane Yolen

Petra by Marianna Coppo

The rough patch by Brian Lies

Sleepy, the goodnight buddy by Drew Daywalt

The snowy nap by Jan Brett

Twig by Aura Parker

Up the mountain path by Marianne Dubuc

The wall in the middle of the book by Jon Agee

Winter is here by Kevin Henkes

CHAPTER BOOKS

Ghost: Track by Jason Reynolds

Inkling by Kenneth Oppel

The jigsaw jungle  by Kristin Levine

Mary Poppins by P. L. Travers

Project Fluffy by Kara LaReau

The rhino in right field by Stacy DeKeyser

Saving Winslow by Sharon Creech

Weather or not by Sarah Mlynowski, Lauren Myracle and Emily Jenkins

You don’t know everything, Jilly P!  by Alex Gino

Zora and me: the cursed ground by T.R.Simon

NON-FICTION

All-of-a-kind family Hanukkah by Emily Jenkins

The brilliant deep: rebuilding the world’s coral reefs by Kate Messner

Little people, big dreams: Georgia O’Keefe by Ma Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Little people, big dreams: Mother Teresa by Ma Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Mason jar science  by Jonathan Adolph

My First Book of Baseball by Beth Bugler and Mark Bechtel

My First Book of Basketball by Beth Bugler and Mark Bechtel

My First Book of Lacrosse by Beth Bugler and Sam Page

A pandemonium of parrots and other animals by Hui Skipp

Peace and me by Ali Winter

The World Series: baseball’s biggest stage by Matt Doeden

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Crush by Svetlana Chmakova

Estranged by Ethan M. Aldridge

Lafayette! by Nathan Hale

Phoebe and her unicorn in unicorn theater by Dana Simpson

PopularMMOs presents a hole new world by Pat & Jen from PopularMMos

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ November 2018

FICTION

An absolutely remarkable thing by Hank Green.  A young graphic artist inspires world-wide hysteria when she accidentally makes first contact with an alien.  After posting a video that goes viral, April must deal with the pressures of becoming an internet sensation.

Blood communion by Anne Rice.  The Vampire Chronicles continues with Lestat’s story of how he became ruler of the vampire world.

The bus on Thursday by Shirley Barrett.  Bridget Jones meets The Exorcist in this funny, dark novel about one woman’s post-cancer retreat to a remote Australian town and the horrors awaiting her.

Death from a top hat by Clayton Rawson.  A detective steeped in the art of magic solves the mystifying murder of two occultists.

Eventide by Kimberley Kalicky.  Three couples hadn’t been out for an overnight on the boat together since their twenties.  Now middle-aged, with adult children, and the baggage that goes with a life, they set out toward Monhegan Island from Portland.

Her kind of case by Jeanne Winer.  A seasoned criminal defense attorney must draw on her experience to save a teenage client who doesn’t want to be saved.

Judas by Jeff Loveness.  In this graphic novel, Judas Iscariot journeys through life and death, grappling with his place in “The Greatest Story Ever Told.”  Every story needs a villain.

The man who came uptown by George Pelecanos.  An ex-offender must choose between the man who got him out and the woman who showed him another path for his life.

The man who couldn’t miss by David Handler.  Stewart “Hoagy” Hoag and his beloved basset hound, Lulu, investigate a murder in a fabled Connecticut summer playhouse.

Sea prayer by Khaled Hosseini.  A short, powerful, illustrated book written in response to the current refugee crisis.  It is composed in the form of a letter from a father to his son on the eve of their journey on a dangerous sea crossing.

A spark of light by Jodi Picoult.  A ripped-from-the-headlines novel about a hostage crisis at a woman’s health clinic.

The stylist by Rosie Nixon.  A young woman is thrown into the fast-paced world of fashion and glamour as she’s forced to navigate the treacherous Hollywood red carpets.

Thirteen days by Sunset Beach by Ramsey Campbell.  A horror novel that’s perfect for readers who shy away from gore and cheap shocks.

Time’s convert by Deborah Harkness.  A novel about what it takes to become a vampire.  During his lover’s journey to immortality, a vampire’s past returns to haunt them both.

Transcription by Kate Atkinson.  Ten years after, figures from a BBC radio producer’s past as an M15 recruit in 1940 confront her.

Trouble brewing by Suzanne Baltsar.  This sweet and savory novel follows a smart, ambitious woman making her way in the male-dominated world of beer brewing.

Washington Black by Esi Edugyan.  High adventure fraught with cliff-hanger twists marks this runaway-slave narrative which goes from Caribbean cane fields, to the fringes of the frozen Arctic.

Weekend at Thrackley by Alan Melville.  This story about guests gathered at a country house for the weekend, originally published in 1934, anticipates Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None, which appeared 5 years later.

MUSIC CDs

Bloom by Troye Sivan

Sweetener by Ariana Grande

Dancing Queen by Cher

Cry Pretty by Carrie Underwood

The best of Roger Miller

NONFICTION

All you can ever know by Nicole Chung.  What does it mean to love your roots – within your culture, within your family – and what happens when you find them?  Chung explores her complicated feelings about her transracial adoption and the importance of knowing where one comes from.

American like me by America Ferrera.  A vibrant and varied collection of first person accounts from prominent figures about the experience of growing up between cultures.

Buffy Sainte-Marie by Andrea Warner.  Establishing herself among the ranks of folk greats such as Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan, Buffy has released more than 20 albums, survived being blacklisted by two U.S. presidents, and received the only Academy Award ever to be won by a First Nations artist.  This is an intimate look at a beloved folk icon and activist.

The cows are out! by Trudy Price.  Price writes of the daily trials of haying, cow breeding, and milking against a backdrop of gentle and entertaining rural life in Maine.

Death on Katahdin by Randi Minetor.  The author gathers the stories of fatalities, from falls to exposure to cardiac arrest, and presents dozens of misadventures on the mountain including hunting accidents, lightning strikes, and even more than one suspicious death.

Fight like a girl by Clementine Ford.  Through a mixture of memoir, opinion, and investigative journalism, Ford exposes just how unequal the world continues to be for women.

The fighters by C.J. Chivers.  This is classic war reporting.  The author’s stories give heart-rending meaning to the lives and deaths of Americans in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, even if policymakers generally have not.

Grace without God by Katherine Ozment.  The search for meaning, purpose, and belonging in a secular age.

The invisible gorilla by Christopher Chabris.  How our intuitions deceive us because our minds don’t work the way we think they do.  We think we see ourselves and the world as they really are, but we’re actually missing a whole lot.

The oath and the office by Corey Brettschneider.  An essential guide to the presidential powers and limits of the Constitution, for anyone voting – or running – for our highest office.

Rock art critters by Denise Scicluna.  Painting rocks has become a not-uncommon craft activity in recent years.  This book focuses on decorating rocks with images of cute animals using acrylic craft paint.

Second labor: mothers share post-birth stories by Chaya Valier.   24 mothers write bold, honest accounts of post-birth life with a newborn.

Small animals by Kim Brooks.  This interrogates how we weigh risks as parents, how we judge one another’s parenting and what the costs might be – not just to parents, but to children, too – in a culture of constant surveillance.

Sons of freedom by Geoffrey Wawro.  The American contribution to World War I is one of the greatest stories of the 20th century, and yet it has all but vanished from view.  This tells of the forgotten American soldiers, Doughboys who defeated Germany in World War I.

These truths by Jill Lepore.  A magisterial account of the origins and rise of a divided nation, an urgently needed reckoning with the beauty and tragedy of American history.

What to do when you’re new by Keith Rollag.  How to be comfortable, confident, and successful in new situations.

Will the circle be unbroken? by Studs Terkel.  Reflections on death, rebirth, and a hunger for faith.

PICTURE BOOKS

Corduroy takes a bow by Viola Davis

Day you begin by Jacqueline Woodson

Do you believe in unicorns? by Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Dreamers by Yuyi Morales

House that once was by Julie Fogliano

I Just Like You by Suzanne Bloom

Llama Llama loves to read by Anna Dewdney

Parade of elephants by Kevin Henkes

Presto & Zesto in Limboland by Arthur Yorinks

Santa Bruce by Ryan T. Higgins

Secret life of the little brown bat by Laurence Pringle

Stop, go, yes, no!: a story of opposites by Mike Twohy

Surprise by Caroline Hadilaksono

Vegetables in underwear by Jared Chapman

We don’t eat our classmates by Ryan T Higgins

CHAPTER BOOKS

Babymouse: Tales from the locker: Miss Communication by Jennifer L Holm

I survived: the attack of the grizzlies, 1967 by Lauren Tarshis

Ivy & Bean: one big happy family by Annie Barrows

Judy Moody and the right royal tea party  by Megan McDonald

Louisiana’s way home by Kate DiCamillo

Magic tree house: hurricane heroes in Texas #30 by Mary Pope Osborne

My father’s words by Patricia MacLachlan

Trail by Meika Hashimoto

Unforgettable Guinevere St. Clair by Amy Makechnie

Van Gogh deception by Deron Hicks

 NON-FICTION

Hubots: real-world robots inspired by humans by Helaine Becker

New England Patriots story by Thomas K Adamson

Recreate discoveries about light by Anna Claybourne

Recreate discoveries about living things by Anna Claybourne

Recreate discoveries about states of matter by Anna Claybourne

We are grateful : otsaliheliga by Traci Sorell

Why do I poop?  by Kirsty Holmes

Why do I sneeze? by Madeline Tyler

You wouldn’t want to be Sir Isaac Newton: a lonely life you’d rather not lead by Ian Graham

You wouldn’t want to live without coding! by Alex Woolf

You wouldn’t want to live without gaming! by Jim Pipe

You wouldn’t want to live without insects! by Anne Rooney

You wouldn’t want to live without libraries! by Fiona Macdonald

You wouldn’t want to live without nurses! By Fiona Macdonald

You wouldn’t want to live without robots! by Ian Graham

You wouldn’t want to live without satellites! by Ian Graham

You wouldn’t want to live without simple machines! by Anne Rooney

You wouldn’t want to live without writing! By Roger Canavan

 GRAPHIC NOVELS

The bad guys in do-you-think-he-saurus? by Aaron Blabey

Dog man: Lord of the fleas by Dav Pilkey

Snails are just my speed! by Kevin McCloskey

Trees: kings of the forest by Andy Hirsch

 EASY READERS

Mr. Monkey bakes a cake by Jeff Mack

My kite is stuck! and other stories by Salia Yoon

Pete the cat and the cool caterpillar by James Dean

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ August 2018

FICTION

The Bar Harbor Retirement Home for Famous Writers by Terri-Lynne DeFino.  A whimsical, moving novel about a retirement home for literary legends who spar, conjure up new stories, and almost magically change the lives of the people around them.

Before and again by Barbara Delinsky.  A young woman loses her daughter in a car accident and struggles to build a new life for herself in the aftermath of tragedy.

By invitation only by Dorothea Benton Frank.  Two families are brought together when the daughter of a Chicago power broker and the son of a Southern peach farmer decide to wed.

The cabin at the end of the world by Paul Tremblay. The apocalypse begins with a home invasion in this tripwire-taut horror thriller.  This unsettling novel invites readers to ask themselves whether, when faced with the unbelievable, they would do the unthinkable to prevent it.

The darkest time of night by Jeremy Finley.  “The lights took him.”  When the 5 year old grandson of a US Senator vanishes in the woods behind his home, the only witness is his older brother who whispers, “The lights took him,” and then never speaks again.  This fast-paced novel is full of suspense and government cover-ups, perfect for thriller and supernatural fans alike.

The forgotten road by Richard Paul Evans.  The second book in the Broken Road series.  After surviving a plane crash, a man decides to walk the length of Route 66.

The great believers by Rebecca Makkai.  A novel of friendship and redemption in the face of tragedy and loss set in 1980s Chicago and contemporary Paris during the beginning of the AIDS epidemic.

How it happened by Michael Koryta.  Kimberly is no good, a notorious jailhouse snitch, teen mother and addict whose petty crimes are well-known to the rural Maine community where she lives.  So when she confesses to her role in a pair of murders, the locals have little reason to believe her story.

King of ashes by Raymond Feist.  A fantasy novel full of simple magic, fighting, political intrigue, and religious strife.  It’s a tale of two young men whose choices will determine a world’s destiny.

Love and ruin by Paul McLain.  McLain returns to the subject of Ernest Hemingway in a story about his passionate, stormy marriage to Martha Gellhorn – a fiercely independent, ambitious woman who would become one of the greatest war correspondents of the 20th century.

No less days by Amanda Stevens.  As far as David Galloway knows, he can’t die.  He wonders where he fits in the world, in God’s plan for the past and the future.  He believes himself to be the only person on the earth who hasn’t aged in over a century.  He’s wrong about that.

Overkill by Ted Bell.  Putting it all on the line to rescue his kidnapped son pits counterspy Alex Hawke against Russian President Vladimir Putin in this thriller.

The perfect couple by Elin Hilderbrand.  A body is found in Nantucket Harbor hours before a picture perfect wedding.

The President is missing by James Patterson and Bill Clinton.  President Jonathan Duncan, a Gulf War veteran and widower, takes on adversaries at home and abroad.

Something in the water by Catherine Steadman.  A documentary filmmaker and an investment banker must decide whether they should protect a secret.

Spymaster by Brad Thor.  As a war looms, a counter-terrorism operative takes on a new role his own way.

Stay hidden by Paul Doiron.  A woman has been shot to death by a deer hunter on an island off the coast of Maine.  To newly promoted Warden Investigator Mike Bowditch, the case seems open and shut.  But as soon as he arrives on remote Maquoit Island, he discovers mysteries piling up one on top of the other.

Us against you by Fredrick Backman.  A novel about people – about strength and tribal loyalty and what we unwittingly do when trying to show our boys how to be men.

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje.  This tells a dramatic story set in the decade after World War II through the lives of a small group of unexpected characters and two teenagers whose lives are indelibly shaped by their unwitting involvement.

The woman in the woods by John Connolly.  In the woods of Maine, private detective Charles Parker faces a pair of otherworldly foes in a crime novel packed with colorful characters.

NEW DVDs

Love, Simon (2018) starring Nick Robinson and Jennifer Garner

Black Panther (2018) starring Chadwick Boseman

A quiet place (2018) starring Emily Blunt

Isle of dogs (2018) directed by Wes Anderson

The morning after (1986) starring Jane Fonda and Jeff Bridges

NEW MUSIC CDs

Come Tomorrow by Dave Matthews Band

Bigger by Sugarland

Pray for the wicked by Panic! At the Disco

Part of the light by Ray LaMontagne

Deer Tick Volume 1 by Deer Tick

Everybody knows by Stephen Stills and Judy Collins

NONFICTION

Barracoon: the story of the last “black cargo” by Zora Hurston.  This illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade – abducted from Africa on the last “Black Cargo” ship to arrive in the U.S.

Call me American by Abdi Nor Iftin.  The inspirational tale of a boy in war-torn Africa who fell in love with America through movies and escaped his country’s turmoil to move to Portland, Maine – a story of remarkable courage, determination, and triumph.

Cooking Maine style by Marjorie Standish and Sandra Oliver.  Tried and true recipes from DownEast and Marjorie Standish.

The electric woman by Tessa Fontaine.  A story for anyone who has ever imagined running away with the circus, wanted to be someone else, or wanted a loved one to live forever.  This is ultimately about death-defying acts of all kinds, especially that ever constant good old-fashioned unconditional love.

Figures in a landscape by Paul Theroux.  A delectable collection of his recent writing on great places, people, and prose.  Travel essays take us to Ecuador and Hawaii.  We take a helicopter ride with Elizabeth Taylor, eavesdrop on the day-to-day life of a Manhattan dominatrix, and explore New York with Robin Williams.

From broken glass by Steve Ross.  From the survivor of 10 Nazi concentrations camps who went on to create the New England Holocaust Memorial, an inspiring memoir about finding strength in the face of despair.

The guide to humane critter control by Theresa Rooney.  Natural, nontoxic pest solutions to protect your yard and garden.

Hype by Nina Shapiro.  A doctor’s guide to medical myths, exaggerated claims, and bad advice along with how to tell what’s real and what’s not.

Moving forward in mid-career by John Weiss.  Losing a job is one of the most devastating events one can experience.  This is a guide for workers who have been fired or laid off and are in the process of rebuilding not only their careers but also their personal identities independent of a job title.

Northland by Porter Fox.  A quest to rediscover America’s other border – the fascinating but little known northern one.  It’s the world’s largest international boundary, yet it remains obscure even to Amercians.

Pops: fatherhood in pieces by Michael Chabon.  Six essays on fatherhood, showcased around an essay he wrote for GQ about his youngest son, a fashionista since kindergarten.

There are no grown-ups by Pamela Druckerman.  A midlife coming-of-age story where the author investigates life in her 40s and wonders whether her mind will ever catch up with her face.

Upon further review by Mike Pesca.  The greatest sports minds today imagine how the world would change if a play, trade, injury, or referee’s call had just gone the other way.  It’s the greatest what-ifs in sports history.

PICTURE BOOKS

Amanda Panda and the bigger, better birthday by Candice Ransom

Greedy goat by Petr Horacek

Name for baby by Lizi Boyd

Cycle City by Alison Farrell

I really want to see you, Grandma by Tara Gomi

Don’t eat that by Drew Sheneman

Forever or a day by Sarah Jacoby

Frightful ride of Michael McMichael by Bonny Becker

Dog with nice ears by Lauren Child

Busy creature’s day eating! by Mo Willems

Square by Mac Barnett

CHAPTER BOOKS

Breakout by Kate Messner

Whatshisface by Gordon Korman

Front desk by Kelly Yang

Enemy: Detroit, 1954 by Sara Holbrook

Two dogs in a trench coat go to school  by Julie Falatko

Baby Monkey, private eye by Brian Selznick

 NON-FICTION

Forest fairy crafts: enchanting fairies & felt friends from simple supplies by Lenka Vodicka-Paredes

Guide to genealogy by T.J. Resler

Star Wars maker lab by Liz Lee Heinecke

Solo a Star Wars story: the official guide by Pablo Hidalgo

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Positively izzy by Terri Libenson

Be prepared by Vera Brosgol

Star Scouts by Mike Lawrence

Wings of fire: the graphic novel by Tui Sutherland

NEW DVDs

Sight words: level 1 & level 2 & level 3 (2015) starring Brad Caudle and Luci Christian.

Pinkalicious & Peterrific: Pinkamagine it! (2018) animated.

Justice League action: season 1 and part 2 (2018) starring Kevin Conroy.

PJ Masks: save the summer (2018) animated.

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Titles – March 2018

FICTION:

All the castles burned by Michael Nye.  The story of Owen Webb, a basketball player on scholarship at a private boys’ school, and his relationship with two enigmatic men: his father – whose secrets neither Owen nor this mother suspect – and Carson, an older teen.

Daphne by Will Boast.  This turns the myth of Daphne and Apollo into a modern love story about social anxiety and physical debilitation.  It is at once tragic and enchanting.

Death by chocolate cherry cheesecake by Sarah Graves.  While Jacobia Tiptree has moved on from fixing up houses, she still can’t resist the urge to snoop into the occasional murder in Eastport, Maine.

Eternal life by Dara Horn.  What would it really mean to live forever?  This is both a heady time travel novel and a thoughtful meditation on the meaning of life.

Forty dead men by Donis Casey.  Here is a compassionate look at PTSD after World War I.

The great alone by Kristin Hannah.  Alaska, 1974.  Untamed.  Unpredictable.  And for a family in crisis, the ultimate test of the human spirit.

How to stop time by Matt Haig.  A love story across the ages – and for the ages – about a man lost in time, the woman who could save him, and the lifetime it can take to learn how to live.

Munich by Robert Harris.  Two former friends who attended Oxford accompany Hitler and Neville Chamberlain to a meeting in 1938 and are forced to make a consequential decision.

Murder in an English village by Jessica Ellicott.  As friends, the boisterous and brash American Beryl couldn’t be less alike than the prim and proper British Edwina.  But as sleuths in an England recovering from the Great War, they’re the perfect match.

 Need to know by Karen Cleveland.  In pursuit of a Russian sleeper cell on American soil, a CIA analyst uncovers a dangerous secret that will test her loyalty to the agency – and to her family.

New York fantastic edited by Paula Guran.  Fantasy spreads across the five boroughs in this new anthology series collecting fantastic and extraordinary stories set in a specific urban local.

A natural by Ross Raisin.  A transporting and acutely observed novel about a gay British soccer player, this captures both the world of professional soccer and the stifling pressure on the hero and his lover to hide their relationship.

The overneath by Peter Beagle.  Beagle chronicles the lives of unicorns, trolls, and magicians in 13 poignant stories many of which caution readers about magic gone awry and temperamental creatures.

The plea by Steve Cavanagh.  An innocent client.  A wife in jeopardy.  Who will take the plea?  This is perfect for anyone who likes a locked-room mystery wrapped inside a legal thriller on steroids.

Red clocks by Leni Zumas.  Abortion is once again illegal in America, in-vitro fertilization is banned, and the Personhood Amendment grants rights to every embryo.  In a small Oregon fishing town, five very different women navigate these new barriers alongside age-old questions surrounding motherhood, identity, and freedom.

Sadness is a white bird by Moriel Rothman-Zecher.  A young Israeli soldier whose best friends are Palestinian twins is driven to the breaking point by conflicting loyalties.

Self-portrait with boy by Rachel Lyon.  An ambitious young female artist accidentally photographs a boy falling to his death – an image that could jumpstart her career but would also devastate her most intimate friendship.

Semiosis by Sue Burke.  Human survival hinges on a bizarre alliance in this character driven science fiction about first contact.

Seven dead by J. Jefferson Farjeon.  In this classic English mystery, an amateur thief has chosen an isolated house for his first robbery.  But it is no ordinary country home.  While hunting for silverware to steal, he stumbles upon a locked room containing seven dead bodies.

Still me by Jojo Moyes.  Louisa Clark moves to New York and is torn between high society and the life she enjoys at a vintage clothing store.

The storm king by Brendan Duffy.  Haunted by dark secrets and an unsolved mystery, a young doctor returns to his isolated Adirondacks hometown in a tense novel in the vein of Harlan Coben.

Surprise me by Sophie Kinsella.  This delves into the heart of a marriage and shows how those we love and think we know best can sometimes surprise us the most.

The taster by V.S. Alexander.  Amid the turbulence of World War II, a young German woman finds a precarious haven closer to the source of danger than she ever imagined – one that will propel her through the extremes of privilege and terror under Hitler’s dictatorship.

A treacherous curse by Deanna Raybourn.  Members of an Egyptian expedition fall victim to an ancient mummy’s curse.

NEW DVDs:

Get out (2017) starring Daniel Kaluuya and Allison Williams

The Crown (2017) starring Claire Foy and John Lithgow

The two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987) starring Ann-Margret and Claudette Colbert

Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) starring Peter Finch and Glenda Jackson

They shoot horses, don’t they? (1969) starring Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, and Gig Young

NEW MUSIC CDs:

NOW that’s what I call music, Vol. 65

Man of the woods – Justin Timberlake

Always ascending – Franz Ferdinand

Mania – Fall Out Boy

We came here to love by Sebastien Izambard

NONFICTION:

The adventures of the mountain men by Stephen Brennan.  True tales of hunting, trapping, fighting, adventure, and survival in the early to mid-1800s in the Rocky Mountains.

All-American murder by James Patterson.  The story of Aaron Hernandez, the New England Patriots tight end convicted of first degree murder.

Armed in America by Patrick Charles.  A history of gun rights from Colonial militias to concealed carry.

Berlin, 1936 by Oliver Hilmes.  This takes the reader through the 16 days of the Olympiad, describing the events in the German capital through the eyes of a select cast of characters – Nazi leaders and foreign diplomats, sportsmen and journalists, writers and socialites, nightclub owners and jazz musicians.

Bliss more by Light Watkins.  How to succeed at meditation without really trying.

Everything you need to know about social media by Greta Van Susteren.  Step-by-step guide to help readers understand the major social platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Instagram and Snapschat, addressing important moral and behavioral issues.

Fire and fury by Michael Wolff.  With extraordinary access to the Trump White House, Wolff tells the inside story of the most controversial presidency of our time.

A good man with a dog by Roger Guay.  A game warden’s journey from the woods of Maine to the swamps of New Orleans.

I am, I am, I am by Maggie O’Farrell.  An extraordinary memoir told entirely in near-death experiences from one of Britain’s best-selling novelists.

Let’s talk about sleep by Daniel Barone.  A guide to understanding and improving your slumber.

Norwich by Karen Crouse.  The story of the small Vermont town that has likely produced more Olympians per capita than any other place in the country – and whose citizens provide a model for achieving excellence while leading well-rounded lives.

Young China by Zak Dychtwald.  How the restless generation born after 1990 will change their country and the world.

FICTION – Picture Books:

Bad mood and the stick by Lemony Snicket

Bear and Chicken by Jannie Ho

Big book of Paw Patrol by Mary Tillworth

Big umbrella by Amy June Bates

Chewie and the Porgs by Kevin Shinick

Dear girl by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Don’t forget Dexter! by Lindsay Ward

If my moon was your sun by Andreas Steinhofel

Kate, who tamed the wind by Liz Garton Scanlon

Little Mouse’s big breakfast by Christine Pym

New LiBEARian by Alison Donald

Pete the Cat: big Easter adventure by James Dean

Runaway baby brother by Katy Hudson

Surprise! by Mike Henson

This is the chick by Wendy Hartmann

Very very very long dog by Julia Patton

JUVENILE CHAPTER BOOKS

Heart and mind of Frances Pauley by April Stevens

Lost rainforest : Mez’s magic by Eliot Schrefer

Love sugar magic: a dash of trouble by Anna Meriano

Wishmakers by Tyler Whitesides

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

Can I touch your hair? : poems of race, mistakes, and friendship by Irene Latham

Girl who drew butterflies : how Maria Merian’s art changed science by Joyce Sidman

Hidden figures : the true story of four black women and the space race by Margot Lee Shetterly

Impact! asteroids and the science of saving the world by Elizabeth Rusch

Life on Surtsey : Iceland’s upstart island by Loree Griffin Burns

Made for each other : why dogs and people are perfect partners by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent

Muddy boots : outdoor activities for children by Liza Gardner Walsh

My book of rocks and minerals by Devin Dennie

Out of the box by Jemma Westing

Snowy owl invasion! : tracking an unusual migration by Sandra Markle

Spiders! strange and wonderful by Laurence Pringle

Juvenile Graphic Novels

5 worlds : the sand warrior by Mark Siegel

Aphrodite : goddess of love by George O’Connor

Ares : bringer of war by George O’Connor

Brave by Svetlana Chmakova

The Mutts spring diaries by Patrick McDonnell

Poseidon : earth shaker by George O’Connor

JUVENILE DVDs

Dinosaur train : dinosaurs are different (2015) PBS Kids

The Jetsons & WWE : Robo-Wrestlemania (2017) starring Jeff Bergman and Trevor Devall

The nut job (2014) starring Will Arnett and Katherine Heigl

The stray : a true story (2018) starring Sarah Lancaster and Michael Cassidy

We’re going on a bear hunt (2018) Norton Herrick, film producer and Joanna Harrison, film director.

Wonder (2018) starring Julia Roberts and Jacob Tremblay

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Titles – February 2018

FICTION:

City of endless night by Douglas Preston.  One of the best in the Pendergast series – tense and tightly wound, with death relentlessly circling, stalking, lurking behind every shadow.  A New York City detective and an F.B.I. special agent track down a killer who decapitates numerous victims.

Cry your way home by Damien Walters.  This collection of subversive short horror pieces focuses on the ways girls and women, particularly mothers and daughters, intentionally or inadvertently harm one another.

Death below stairs by Jennifer Ashley.  Victorian class lines are crossed when cook Kat Holloway is drawn into a murder that reaches all the way to the throne.

Elmet by Fiona Mozley.  A not-always-gentle giant and his two children live peacefully in the woods, but the push and pull of old forces will eventually find them, and the results will be explosive.

Fools and mortals by Bernard Cornwell.  In this delightful departure from his popular military historicals, Cornwell conducts a boisterous behind-the-scenes romp through the often sordid world of the Elizabethan stage.

Forest dark by Nicole Krauss.  This follows the strange journeys of two American Jews in Israel who experience mysterious transformations while wandering in the desert.

The girls in the picture by Melanie Benjamin.  A fascinating novel of the friendship and creative partnership between two of Hollywood’s earliest female legends – screenwriter Frances Marion and superstar Mary Pickford.

Glory days by Melissa Fraterrigo.  Here is a stark portrait of the painful transitions of 21 century small-town America.

Green by Sam Graham-Felsen.  A novel race and privilege in America that you haven’t seen before:  a coming-of-age story about a life-changing friendship, propelled by an exuberant, unforgettable voice.

Halsey Street by Naima Coster.  A family saga set against the landscape of gentrifying Brooklyn.

Heart Spring Mountain by Robin MacArthur.  A young woman returns to her rural Vermont hometown in the wake of a devastating storm to search for her missing mother and to unravel a powerful family secret.

The immortalists by Chloe Benjamin.  This is a family saga that investigates the question:  If you knew the date of your death, how would you live your life?

The music shop by Rachel Joyce.  This deceptively simple love story is a magical winner that explores the idea that the perfect song can transform one’s life.

The night market by Jonathan Moore.  A sharp and scary near-future thriller that delivers a dark message about society’s love affair with technology.

Now that you mention it by Kristan Higgins.  When a fateful moment requires Nora to return home to Maine after having made a life for herself in Boston, she must decide whether staying is worth sticking around to hear some hard truths.

Operator Down by Brad Taylor.  Pike Logan’s search for a Mossad agent and ally puts him on a collision course with a ruthless military coup in Africa – and tests his loyalties to the Task Force.

Peculiar ground by Lucy Hughes-Hallett.  This is a great English country house novel, spanning three centuries, that explores surprisingly timely themes of immigration and exclusion.

Red sky at noon by Simon Sebag Montefiore.  This novel is set during the epic cavalry ride across the hot grasslands outside Stalingrad during the darkest times of World War II.

Robicheaux by James Lee Burke.  A bereaved detective confronts his past and works to clear his name when he becomes a suspect during the investigation into the murder of a man who killed his wife.

Say my name by Allegra Huston.  A middle aged woman has an extramarital affair with a much younger man.

Sing, unburied, sing by Jesmyn Ward.  A 13 year old boy comes of age in Mississippi while his black mother takes him and his toddler sister to pick up their white father, who is getting released from the state penitentiary.

The wanted by Robert Crais.  A single mother hires Elvis Cole to investigate her teenage son who is on the run after a deadly crime spree.

The woman in the window by A.J. Finn.  A twisty, powerful Hitchcockian thriller about an agoraphobic woman who believes she witnessed a crime in a neighboring house.

NEW MUSIC CDs:

2018 Grammy Nominees

Songs of Experience by U2

Lust For Life by Lana Del Rey

The Rest of Our Life by Tim McGraw & Faith Hill

NEW DVDs:

It   (2017) starring Bill Skarsgard

A Late Quartet   (2012) starring Christopher Walken, Catherine Keener, and Philip Seymour Hoffman

Dunkirk   (2017) directed by Christopher Nolan

Strictly Ballroom   (1993) directed by Baz Luhrmann

Weeds: Season one and two starring Mary-Louise Parker

Nurse Jackie: Season 1 starring Edie Falco

Scavenger Hunt    (1979) starring Richard Benjamin, James Coco, and Ruth Gordon

NONFICTION:

The boy who really, really wanted to have sex by John McNally.  Subtitled “The memoir of a fat kid”, this gives readers an honest and often mischievous look at the author’s working-class childhood in Midwestern America.

The Dogist puppies by Elias Friedman.  An endearing look at puppies.

50 things to do in Maine before you die by Nancy Griffin.  The ultimate to-do list for Mainers and visitors alike.

How Maine changed the world by Nancy Griffin.  This reflects upon the contributions Maine has made that have had significant cultural and historical impacts on both the US and the world.

The joy of acrylic painting by Annie Gonzales.  Expressive painting techniques for beginners.

Maine: life in a day by Susan Conley.  Gathering the work of 50 photographers, this captures the day to day lives of ordinary Mainers.

Remodelista by Julie Carlson.  Simple, stylish storage ideas for all over the organized home.

So you want to talk about race by Ijeoma Oluo. The author explores the complex reality of today’s racial landscape – from white privilege and police brutality to systemic discrimination and the Black Lives Matter movement – offering clarity that readers need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide.

Stop here, this is the place by Susan Conley.  Through Susan’s recollections of moments from her childhood and the ongoing lives of her children, we’re reminded of our own childhoods, and of the necessity to stop and pay attention, to hold on.

Tell me more by Kelly Corrigan.  Stories about the 12 hardest things we have to learn to say such as “I was wrong,” “I know,” and “I love you”.

Treating people well by Lea Berman.  The extraordinary power of civility at work and in life.

The truth matters by Bruce Bartlett. A citizen’s guide to separating facts from lies and stopping fake news in its tracks.

The ultimate instant pot pressure cooker cookbook by Ella Sanders.  200 easy foolproof recipes.

Women and power by Mary Beard.  A look at the roots of misogyny and its manifestations today.

You need a budget by Jesse Mecham.  A proven system for breaking the paycheck to paycheck cycle, getting out of debt, and living the life you want.

New Children’s Books for February 2018

FICTION

Click, clack, moo! I love you by Doreen Cronin

Come home already! by Jory John

Dreadful tale of Prosper Redding by Alexandra Bracken

How to find and elephant by Kate Banks

Journey under the sea by R.A. Montgomery

Library book by Tom Chapin

Love by Matt de la Pena

Magic for sale by Carrie Clickard

Real McCoys by Matthew Swanson

Secret of the ninja by Jay Leibold

Space and beyond by R.A. Montgomery

Surf monkeys by Jay Leibold

Survivor diaries: avalanche! by Terry Lynn Johnson

Valensteins by Ethan Long

NON-FICTION

Lindsey Vonn by Eric Braun

Many: the diversity of life on earth by Nicola Davies

Michael Phelps by Grace Hansen

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: the case of R.B.G. vs. Inequality by Jonah Winter

Simone Biles by Grace Hansen

Strongest man in the world: the legend of Louis Cyr by Lucie Papineau

Super Bowl: chasing football immortality by Matt Doeden

You wouldn’t want to live without bacteria by Roger Canavan

You wouldn’t want to live without boogers by Alex Woolf

You wouldn’t want to live without clocks and calendars! by Fiona Macdonald

You wouldn’t want to live without dentists! by Fiona Macdonald

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.