New Items ~ August 2019

FICTION

Almost midnight by Paul Doiron.  A deadly attack on one of Maine’s last wild wolves leads Game Warden Mike Bowditch to an even bigger criminal conspiracy.

Ask again, yes by Mary Beth Keane.  A family saga about 2 Irish American families in a New York suburb, the love between 2 of their children, and the tragedies to tear them apart and destroy the future.

Backlash by Brad Thor.  Cut off from any support, Scot Harvath fights to get his revenge.

Big Sky by Kate Atkinson.  Detective Jackson Brodie uncovers a sinister network in a sleepy seaside town.

The chain by Adrian McKinty.  At once a commentary on social media, greed, revenge, love, and true evil, this will have readers searching for more titles by this author.

The eagle flies at night by Jan Anderson.  What does an ordinary community do when the state settles refugees in their city?  How does the arrival of refugees challenge the hearts and minds of residents?  These are the questions Rev. Giles asks himself and his congregation as they wrestle with an influx to the city of Portland, Maine.

Into the jungle by Erica Ferencik.  A young woman leaves behind everything she knows to take on the Bolivian jungle, but her excursion abroad quickly turns into a fight for her life.

The last house guest by Megan Miranda.  A suspenseful novel about an idyllic town in Maine dealing with the suspicious death of one of their own.

Lock every door by Riley Sager.  A woman whose new job apartment sitting in one of NY’s oldest and most glamorous buildings may cost more than it pays

The long flight home by Alan Hlad.  A fresh angle (which begins in Maine) on the blitz of World War II and focuses on the homing pigeons used by the British, and the people who trained and cared for them.

Lost and found by Danielle Steel.  A photographer embarks on a road trip to reconnect with three men she might have married.

More news tomorrow by Susan Shreve.  Family drama about a daughter’s quest to understand her mother’s mysterious death.

Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner.  A timely exploration of 2 sisters’ lives from the 1950s to the present as they struggle to find their places – and be true to themselves – in a rapidly evolving world.

The new girl by Daniel Silva.  Gabriel Allon, the chief of Israeli intelligence, partners with the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, whose daughter has been kidnapped.

On earth we’re briefly gorgeous by Ocean Vuong.  Little Dog writes a letter to a mother who cannot read, revealing a family history.

The paper wasp by Lauren Acampora.  A woman with big but unfocused ambitions moves to LA to become the personal assistant to her childhood best friend, a rising Hollywood starlet.

Paris, 7 a.m. by Liza Wieland.  A novel of what happened to the poet Elizabeth Bishop during 3 life-changing weeks she spent in Paris amidst the imminent threat of World War II.

The perfect child by Lucinda Berry.  A novel of suspense about a young couple desperate to have a child of their own – and the unsettling consequences of getting what they always wanted.

Queen Bee by Dorothea Benton Frank.  A beekeeper’s quiet life is unsettled by her demanding mother, outgoing sister, and neighboring widower.

Roughhouse Friday by Jaed Coffin.  A meditation on violence and abandonment, masculinity, and our inescapable longing for love.  The author lives in Brunswick, Maine.

Salvation Day by Kali Wallace.  A lethal virus is awoken on an abandoned spaceship in this incredibly fast-paced, claustrophobic thriller.

The Saturday Night Ghost Club by Craig Davidson.  A bittersweet coming of age story in the vein of Stand By Me about a group of misfit kids who spend an unforgettable summer investigating local ghost stories and urban legends.

Summer of ‘69 by Elin Hilderbrand.  Four siblings experience the drama, intrigue, and upheaval of a summer when everything changed – 1969.

Surfside sisters by Nancy Thayer.  A Nantucket woman returns home to find that reunions aren’t always simple.

Under currents by Nora Roberts.  A novel about the power of family to harm – and to heal.

We went to the woods by Caite Dolan-Leach.  They went off the grid.  Their secrets didn’t.  A novel about the allure – and dangers – of disconnecting.

Window on the bay by Debbie Macomber.  When a single mom becomes an empty nester, she spreads her wings to rediscover herself – and her passions.

NEW DVDs

Captain Marvel (2019) starring Brie Larson and Samuel L. Jackson

The public (2019) starring Alec Baldwin, Emilio Estevez, and Gabrielle Union

Mountains of the moon (1989) starring Patrick Bergin and Iain Glen

What they had (2018) starring Hilary Swank, Michael Shannon, and Blythe Danner

A room with a view (1986) starring Helena Bonham Carter, Maggie Smith, and Daniel Day-Lewis

Dancing on the edge (2013) starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Matthew Goode, Jacqueline Bisset

It follows (2014)  starring Maika Monroe and Keir Gilchrist

NONFICTION

Burn the place by Iliana Regan.  A singular expressive debut memoir that traces one chef’s struggle find her place and what happens when she does.

Dutch girl by Robert Matzen.  Near the end of 1939, 10 year old Audrey Hepburn flew from boarding school in England into the Netherlands, which would soon become a war zone.  What she experienced in 5 years of Nazi occupation has never been explored until now.

The honey bus by Meredith May.  An extraordinary story of a girl, her grandfather, and one of nature’s most mysterious and beguiling creatures: the honeybee.

I know what I saw by Linda Godfrey.  Modern-day encounters with monsters of new urban legend and ancient lore.

Invisible heroes of World War II by Jerry Borrowman.  Extraordinary wartime stories of ordinary people.

Love thy neighbor by Ayaz Virji.  A true story about a Muslim doctor’s service to small-town America and the hope of overcoming our country’s climate of hostility and fear.

Mary’s household tips and tricks by Mary Berry.  The Queen of Baking now shares her expertise in home maintenance and care.

Slime by Ruth Kassinger.  How algae created us, plague us, and just might save us.

Songs of America by Jon Meacham.  The author joins Tim McGraw to explore how American was shaped by music.

The Stonewall Reader.  A generous and eclectic assortment of writings about the historical Stonewall Riots.  It is divided into 3 sections:  Before, During, and After Stonewall.

Supernavigators by David Barrie.  A globetrotting voyage of discovery celebrating the navigational gifts of animals; from whales and lobsters to birds and beetles – and many more.

This is really war by Emilie Lucchesi.  The incredible true story of a navy nurse POW in the occupied Philippines.

Wild and crazy guys by Nick Semlyen.  How the comedy mavericks of the ‘80s changed Hollywood forever.

New Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

Another by Christian Robinson

Bear came along by Richard T. Morris

Field trip to the moon by John Hare

How do you care for a very sick bear? by Vanessa Bayer

Hum and swish by Matt Myers

Kindness makes the world go round by Craig Manning

My little chick, from egg to chick– by Geraldine Elschner

A normal pig by K-Fai Steele

Paw Patrol 5-minute stories collection  

Rainbow : a first book of pride by Michael Genhart

Rocket says look up! by Nathan Bryon

This beach is loud! by Samantha Cotterill

Vamos! Let’s go to the market by Raul Gonzalez

CHAPTER BOOKS

Owl diaries # 5 : Warm hearts day by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries # 6 : Baxter is missing by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries # 7 : The Wildwood Bakery by Rebecca Elliott

NON-FICTION

Crossing on time : steam engines, fast ships, and a journey to the new world by David Macaulay

DK findout! Birds by Ben Hoare

DK findout! Castles by Philip Steele

The girl who named Pluto : the story of Venetia Burney by Alice B McGinty

Just right : searching for the Goldilocks planet  by Curtis Manley

Military dogs on the job by Roxanne Troup

Night sky : explore nature with fun facts and activities by Carole Scott

Planetarium by Raman Prinja

Super summer : all kinds of summer facts and fun by Bruce Goldstone

They, she, he, me : free to be! by Maya and Matthew Smith-Gonzalez

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Camp by Kayla Miller

Dinosaur explorers #1 Prehistoric pioneers by Redcode & Albbie

The Giver by P. Craig Russell

Olympians #11 Hephaistos: god of fire by George O’Connor

Putuguq & Kublu and the qalupalik by Roselynn Akulukjuk

The underfoot : the mighty deep by Ben Fisher

Wolfie Monster and the big bad pizza battle by Joey Ellis

MOVIES

Open season with Martin Lawrence

Race to Witch Mountain by Walt Disney with Dwayne Johnson

Ruby’s studio. The friendship show with Dr. Robyn Silverman

The three musketeers by Walt Disney

Wonder Park with Jennifer Garner

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ July 2019

FICTION

America was hard to find by Kathleen Alcott.  Three indelible characters embody the truths about this country in transition during America’s most iconic moments in the later part of the last century: the race to space, the race against the Vietnam War, and the ravages of the AIDS epidemic.

The body in the wake by Katherine Hall Page.  Amateur detective and caterer Faith Fairchild is at her Penobscot Bay, Maine cottage preparing for a summer wedding, when she stumbles across….a body.

Bunny by Mona Awad.  A darkly funny, strange novel about a lonely graduate student drawn into a clique of rich girls who seem to move and speak as one.

Cape May by Chip Cheek.  This explores the social and sexual mores of 1950s America through the eyes of a newly married couple from the genteel south corrupted by sophisticated New England urbanites.

City of girls by Elizabeth Gilbert.  Someone told Vivian Morris in her youth that she would never be an interesting person.  Good thing they didn’t put money on it.

The confessions of Frannie Langton by Sara Collins.  A servant and former slave is accused of murdering her employer and his wife in this thriller that moves from a Jamaican sugar plantation to the fetid streets of Georgian London.

Dark site by Patrick Lee.  Sam Dryden comes under attack from unknown forces as an unremembered episode from his past threatens more than just his life.

Deception Cove by Owen Laukkanen.  An ex-convict, an ex-Marine, and a rescue dog are caught in the cross-hairs of a ruthless gang in remote Washington State.

Disappearing earth by Julia Phillips.  A year in the lives of women and girls on an isolated peninsula in northeastern Russia opens with a chilling crime.

The flight portfolio by Julie Orringer.  Based on the true story of Varian Fry’s extraordinary attempt to save the work, and the lives, of Jewish artists fleeing the Holocaust.

The guest book by Sarah Blake.  This sets out to be more than a juicy family saga – it aims to depict the moral evolution of a part of American society.  Its convincing characters and muscular narrative succeed on both accounts.

Have you seen Luis Velez?  by Catherine Hyde.  A novel about two strangers who find that kindness is a powerful antidote to fear.

The heads of Cerberus by Francis Stevens.  A rediscovered sci-fi classic written in 1919 set in a dystopian 22nd century society where the winner takes all, a precursor to “The Hunger Games”….and to Hitler’s Germany.

How we disappeared by Jing-Jing Lee.  A novel set in World War II Singapore about a woman who survived the Japanese occupation and a man who thought he had lost everything.

The invited by Jennifer McMahon.  A chilling ghost story with a twist – in the woods of Vermont a husband and wife don’t simply move into a haunted house, they build one.

Little darlings by Melanie Golding.   “Mother knows best” takes on a sinister new meaning in this unsettling thriller.

Mistress of the Ritz by Melanie Benjamin.  Novel based on the story of the extraordinary real-life American woman who secretly worked for the French Resistance during World War II – while playing hostess to the invading Germans at the iconic Hotel Ritz in Paris.

Necessary people by Anna Pitoniak.  Set against the fast-paced backdrop of TV news, this is a propulsive work of psychological suspense about ambition and privilege, about the thin line between friendship and rivalry, about the people we need in our lives, and the people we don’t.

On a summer tide by Suzanne Fisher.  When her father buys an island off the coast of Maine with the hope of breathing new life into it, his daughter thinks he’s lost his mind.  She soon discovers the island has its own way of living…and loving.

The oracle by Clive Cussler.  A husband and wife treasure hunting team search for an ancient scroll which carries a deadly curse.

The policewomen’s bureau by Edward Conlon.  The NYPD’s “No Girls Allowed” sign fades in this fictional account of a real woman’s struggle for respect and success in a profession that men wanted all to themselves.

Redemption by David Baldacci.  Amos Decker learns that he may have made a mistake on a case he worked as a rookie detective – one with heartbreaking consequences, and he may be the only person who can put it right.

Resistance women by Jennifer Chiaverini.  Historical saga that recreates the danger, romance, and sacrifices of an era and brings to life one courageous American and her circle of women friends who waged a clandestine battle against Hitler in Nazi Berlin.

This storm by James Ellroy.  A massive novel of World War II Los Angeles.

Vessel by Lisa Nichols.  An astronaut returns to Earth after losing her entire crew to an inexplicable disaster, but is her version of what happened in space the truth?  Or is there more to the story?

Waisted by Randy Susan Meyers.  Seven women enrolled in an extreme weight loss documentary discover self-love and sisterhood as they enact a daring revenge against the exploitative filmmakers.

A woman is no man by Etaf Rum.  A Palestinian-American teenager, much like her mother before her, faces the prospect of an arranged marriage.

NONFICTION

The art of inventing hope by Howard Reich.  This offers an unprecedented in-depth conversation between the world’s most revered Holocaust survivor, Elie Wiesel, and the son of survivors, Howard Reich.

The book of pride by Mason Funk.  This captures the true story of the gay rights movement from the 1960s to the present, through richly detailed, studding interviews with the leaders, activists, and ordinary people who witnessed the movement and made it happen.

The cost of these dreams by Wright Thompson.  A collection of true stories about the dream of greatness and its cost in the world of sports.

A fiery gospel by Richard Gamble.  The Battle Hymn of the Republic and the road to righteous war.  Readers with an interest in 19th century American religious and political popular culture will enjoy this bio of the hymn by Gardiner’s own Julia Ward Howe.

Furious hours by Casey Cep.  Harper Lee worked on the true-crime story about a rural preacher accused of murdering five of his family members in the 1970s.  Cep unravels the mystery surrounding Harper Lee’s first and only work of nonfiction, and the shocking true crimes at the center of it.

How to forget by Kate Mulgrew.  In this very honest and examined memoir about returning to Iowa to care for her ailing parents, Mulgrew takes us on an unexpected journey of loss, betrayal, and the transcendent nature of a daughter’s love for her parents.

Questions I am asked about the Holocaust by Hedi Fried.  Now 94, Fried has spent her life educating about the Holocaust as a survivor and answering questions about one of the darkest periods in human history.

Save me the plums by Ruth Reichl.  Gourmet magazine readers will relish the behind-the-scenes peek at the workings of the magazine.  Reichl’s revealing memoir is a deeply personal look at a food world on the brink of change.

A season on the wind by Kenn Kaufman.  A close look at one season in one key site that reveals the amazing science and magic of spring bird migration and the perils of human encroachment.

They were all her property by Stephanie Jones-Rogers.  Bridging women’s history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery.

Woodstock by Dale Bell.  In celebration of the 50th anniversary, this new photo book goes behind the scenes of the hit documentary film, Woodstock.

New Children’s Books for July 2019

PICTURE BOOKS

Bruno, the standing cat by Nadine Robert

Cece loves science and adventure by Kimberly Derting

Count on me by Miguel Tanco

Dear boy, a celebration of cool, clever, compassionate you! by Paris Rosenthal

Ghost cat by Kevan Atteberry

How to read a book by Kwame Alexander

Sea glass summer by Michelle Houts

Tilly & Tank by Jay Fleck

BEGINNER READERS

Fancy Nancy Toodle-oo Miss Moo by Victoria Saxon

First little readers book level B by Liza Charlesworth

Leaf it to Dot by Andrea Cascardi

Rocket out of the park by Andrea Cascardi

CHAPTER BOOKS

The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson

The haunted house by R. A. Montgomery

Princess Island by Shannon Gilligan

Space pup by R. A. Montgomery

Your grandparents are spies by Anson Montomery

Your grandparents are zombies by Anson Montomery

NON-FICTION

Encyclopedia of Strangely Named Animals by Fredrik Colting

How to be a scientist by Steve Mould

The science of flight by Ian Graham

The science of spacecraft by Alex Woolf

The science of vehicles by Roger Canavan

What a waste: trash, recycling, and protecting our planet by Jess French

MOVIES

Bernie the dolphin with Lola Sultan

The cheetah children by PBS with Robyn Keene-Young

Daniel Tiger’s neighborhood: won’t you be our neighbor? Animated

How to train your dragon: the hidden world with Jay Baruchel

Telling time by Rock ‘n learn with Richard Caudie

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ June 2019

FICTION

The A list by J.A. Jance.  An imprisoned fertility doctor seeks revenge.

Anna of Kleve, the princess in the portrait by Alison Weir.  The surprising life of the least known of King Henry VIII’s wives is illuminated in this volume of the Six Tudor Queens series.

At Briarwood School for Girls by Michael Knight.  It’s 1994 and Leonore is a junior at Briarwood.  She plays basketball.  She hates her roommate.  History is her favorite subject.  She has told no one that she’s pregnant.  Everything, in other words, is under control.  Right.  Sure it is.

The better sister by Alafair Burke.  When a Manhattan lawyer is murdered, two estranged sisters – one the dead man’s widow and the other his ex – must set aside mistrust and old resentments.  But can they escape the past?

The book woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Richardson.  Basically about the power of reading and libraries, this also explores the extreme rural poverty of 1930s Appalachia and labor unrest among coal miners.

The bookshop of the broken hearted by Robert Hillman.  A tender novel about love and forgiveness in 1960s Australia, in which a lonely farmer finds his life turned upside down by the arrival of a vibrant librarian who is many years his senior.

A boy and his dog at the end of the world by C.A. Fletcher.  When a beloved family dog is stolen, her owner sets out on a life-changing journey through the ruins of our world to bring her back in this tale of survival, courage, and hope.

The bride test by Helen Hoang.  A superior romance in which a young Vietnamese woman seizes an opportunity to travel to America in hopes of finding a husband and a better life.

The Cornwalls are gone by James Patterson.  An Army intelligence officer must commit a crime or lose her kidnapped husband and daughter.

The Dark Game by Jonathan Janz.  10 writers are selected for a summer-long writing retreat with the most celebrated and reclusive author in the world.  But they are really entering the twisted imagination of a deranged genius, a lethal contest pitting them against one another.

A dream of death by Connie Berry.  On a remote Scottish island, an American antiques dealer wrestles with her own past while sleuthing a killing, staged to recreate a 200 year old unsolved murder.

The farm by Joanne Ramos.  At a luxurious secret facility in upstate New York, women who need money bear children for wealthy would-be mothers.  Excellent – both as a reproductive dystopian narrative and as a social novel about women and class.

If she wakes by Michael Koryta. Slowly emerging from the coma she’s been in since a black cargo van rammed the car she was using to transport a visiting professor who was thus killed, Maine college senior Tara is targeted by a ruthless young hit man.

Lost roses by Martha Kelly.  In 1914, the New York socialite Eliza Ferriday works to help White Russian families escape from the revolution.

Mr. Gandy’s grand tour by Alan Titchmarsh.  Free with no responsibilities, Mr. Gandy sets off for a grand tour of the type popular in the 18th century.  Paris certainly, and Italy.  After that, who knows?  It’s sure to be either an ugly midlife disaster or an opportunity for growth.

Naamah by Sarah Blake.  A retelling of Noah’s ark centered around his wife, Naamah – the woman who helped reshape the world with her hands.

Normal people by Sally Rooney.  The connection between a high school star athlete and a loner ebbs and flows when they go to Trinity College in Dublin.

Rabbits for food by Binnie Kirshenbaum.  A laugh-out-loud funny story of a writer’s slide into depression and institutionalization.

Someone knows by Lisa Scottoline.  A novel about how a single decision can undo a family, how our past can derail our present, and how not guilty doesn’t always mean innocent.

They all fall down by Rachel Hall.  Seven sinners arrive on a private island for a reckoning that will leave you breathless.

Triple jeopardy by Anne Perry.  Young lawyer Daniel Pitt must defend a British diplomat accused of a theft that may cover up a deadly crime.

Two weeks by Karen Kingsbury.  A pregnant 18 year old has limited time to change her mind about giving her baby up for adoption.

A wonderful stroke of luck by Ann Beattie.  Set in a boarding school in New Hampshire, this is about the complicated relationship between a charismatic teacher and his students, and the secrets we keep from those we love.

Wunderland by Jennifer Epstein.  This is a vividly written and stark chronicle of Nazism and its legacies.  An absorbing exploration of friendship, betrayal, and coming to terms with the past.

DVDs

Fantastic beasts: the crimes of Grindelwald (2018) starring Eddie Redmayne, Jude Law, and Johnny Depp

RBG (2018) starring Ruth Bader Ginsburg

NONFICTION

The accidental veterinarian by Philipp Schott.  For all animal lovers, tales that are always amusing, amazing, and – once in a while – sad.

The art of happy moving by Ali Wenzke.  An upbeat guide to help you survive the moving process from start to finish, filled with strategies and checklists for timing and supplies.

Auschwitz: not long ago, not far away by Robert Jan van Pelt.  This tells a story to shake the conscience of the world. It is the catalogue of the first-ever traveling exhibition about the Auschwitz concentration camp, where 1.1 million people lost their lives.

Down from the mountain by Bryce Andrews.  The story of a grizzly bear named Millie: her life, death, and cubs, and what they reveal about the changing character of the American West today.

A Florida state of mind by James Wright.  An unnatural history of our weirdest state that’s always in the news for everything from alligator attacks to zany crimes.

Life will be the death of me…and you too! by Chelsea Handler.  The comedian chronicles going into therapy and becoming an advocate for change.

Losing Earth by Nathaniel Rich.  By 1979, we knew nearly everything we understand today about climate change – including how to stop it.  Over the next decade, a handful risked their careers in a desperate campaign to convince the world to act before it was too late.  This is their story and ours.

The man they wanted me to be by Jared Sexton.  Deeply personal, this examines how we teach boys what’s expected of men in America and the long-term effects of that socialization – which include depression, shorter lives, misogyny, and suicide.

The matriarch:  Barbara Bush and the making of an American dynasty by Susan Page.  A vivid bio of the former First Lady, one of the most influential and under-appreciated women in American political history.

The Mueller report.  The special counsel’s investigation looms as a turning point in American history.

Playing back the 80s by Jim Beviglia. For those who didn’t grow up in the 80s, this endlessly funny book will show them what the fuss was all about with the music and maybe reveal a few surprises along the way.

Out East by John Glynn.  A gripping portrait of life in a Montauk summer house – a debut memoir of first love, identity and the self-discovery among a group of friends who became family.

The pioneers by David McCullough.  The settling of the Northwest Territory by dauntless pioneers who overcame incredible hardships to build a community based on ideals that would come to define our country.

A woman of no importance by Sonia Purnell.  The true story of a Baltimore socialite who joined a spy organization during World War II and became essential to the French Resistance.

New Children’s Books for June 2019

 PICTURE BOOKS

Babymoon by Hayley Barrett

Diggersaurs by Michael Whaite

Ernestine’s milky way by Kerry Madden-Lunsford

Grumpy monkey by Suzanne Lang

Hello, I’m here by Helen Frost

I love you all year through by Stephanie Stansbie

Karate Kakapo by Loredana Cunti

The night flower by Lara Hawthorne

Raj and the best day ever by Sebastien Braun

The unbudgeable curmudgeon by Matthew Burgess

Wake up, color pup by Taia Morley

Wordy birdy by Tammi Sauer

CHAPTER BOOKS

The adventures of a girl called Bicycle by Christina Uss

Arlo Finch in the valley of fire by John August

The benefits of being an octopus by Ann Braden

Class action by Steven B. Frank

Forgotten city by Michael Ford

Game changer by Tommy Greenwald

The House in Poplar Wood by K.E. Ormsbee

Journey of the pale bear by Susan Fletcher

Lifeboat 12 by Susan Hood

The night diary by Veera Hiranandani                   

Nightbooks by J.A. White

Ra the mighty: cat cetective by A.B. Greenfield

Skylark and Wallcreeper by Anne O’Brien Carelli

Wicked Nix by Lena Coakley

NON-FICTION

Beware of the crocodile by Martin Jenkins

Caterpillar and Bean by Martin Jenkins

Dog days of history: the incredible story of our best friends by Sarah Albee

Inside outside by Anne-Margot Ramstein

Like a lizard by April Pulley Sayre

Map and track rain forests by Heather C. Hudak

Pass go and collect $200: the real story of how monopoly was invented by Tanya Lee Stone

The proper way to meet a hedgehog and other how-to poems by Paul B. Janeczko

Shawn Mendes by Robin Johnson

MOVIES

Frozen by Disney

Hardy Boys Nancy Drew Mysteries Season One with Shaun Cassidy

The kid who would be king with Patrick Stewart

The LEGO movie 2 with Chris Pratt

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ May 2019

FICTION

The Ash family by Molly Dektar.  When a young woman leaves her family – and the civilized world – to join an off-the-grid community headed by an enigmatic leader, she discovers that belonging comes with a deadly cost.

Beyond the Point by Claire Gibson.  An inspiring tribute to female friendship and female courage.  Three women are brought together in an enthralling story of friendship, heartbreak, resilience in a novel set at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Boy swallows universe by Trent Dalton.  A story of brotherhood, true love, family, and the most unlikely of friendships, this is the tale of an adolescent boy on the cusp of discovering the man he will be.

Death in Provence by Serena Kent.  This is a clever, light-hearted mystery set in modern Provence featuring the irrepressible Penelope Kite, a young-at-heart divorcee with a knack for stumbling across dead bodies.

Fame adjacent by Sarah Skilton.  The child star that was left behind is about to get her moment to shine in this swoony romantic comedy inspired by a unique, beloved facet of pop culture history:  The Mickey Mouse Club.

The hunting party by Lucy Foley.  Psychological suspense in the tradition of Agatha Christie in which a group of old college friends are snowed in at a hunting lodge…and murder and mayhem ensue.

Infinite detail by Tim Maughan.  A timely and uncanny portrait of a world in the wake of fake news, diminished privacy, and a total shutdown of the internet.

An Irish immigrant story by Jack Cashman.  This historical novel brings the reader through the story of a family that overcomes adversity to thrive in America.

The island of sea women by Lisa See.  The friendship over many decades of two female divers from the Korean island of Jeju is pushed to a breaking point.

Kaddish.com by Nathan Englander.  An excellent comic dissection of Jewish-American life.  This novel reads like Chaim Potok filtered through the sensibility of Mel Brooks.

The last act by Brad Parks.  An out of work actor takes a job for the FBI – using a false name and backstory, he enters a low-security prison and begins to befriend a fellow prisoner who knows the location of documents that can bring down a ruthless drug cartel.  But the cartel is also looking….

The last year of the war by Susan Meissner.  A German American teenager’s life changes forever when her immigrant family is sent to an internment camp during WW II and she becomes friends with another girl at the camp – a Japanese American teenager.

Little faith by Nickolas Butler.  A Wisconsin family grapples with the power and limitations of faith when one of their own falls under the influence of a radical church.

Lost and wanted by Nell Freudenberger.  A physicist at MIT receives a text from her dead best friend.

A puzzle for fools by Patrick Quentin.  A wave of murders rocks a sanitarium – and it’s up to the patients to stop them.

Silent night by Danielle Steel.  After tragedy strikes, a child TV star loses her memory and ability to speak.

Tomorrow there will be sun by Dana Reinhardt.  A private Mexican villa in a tropical paradise is the backdrop of this story of a milestone vacation gone wrong, wrong, wrong as a family falls apart.

When all is said by Anne Griffin.  If you had to pick 5 people to sum up your life, who would they be?  If you were to raise a glass to each of them, what would you say?  And what would you learn about yourself, when all is said?

Wild card by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington clashes with a determined adversary.

Wolf pack by C.J. Box.  Wyoming game warden Joe Pickett encounters bad behavior on his own turf – only to have the FBI and the DOJ ask him to stand down.

NEW DVDs

Aquaman (2018) starring Jason Momoa

If Beale Street could talk (2018) starring Stephen James and Regina King

The bookshop (2018) starring Emily Mortimer, Bill Nighy, and Patricia Clarkson

Vice (2018) starring Christian Bale and Amy Adams

NONFICTION

Biased by Jennifer Eberhardt.  From one of the world’s leading experts on unconscious racial bias, a personal examination of one of the central controversies and culturally powerful issues of our time, and its influence on contemporary race relations and criminal justice.

The end of absence by Michael Harris.  Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the internet.  This is about reclaiming what we’ve lost in a world of constant connections.

Girl, stop apologizing by Rachel Hollis.  A shame-free plan for embracing and achieving your goals.

Holy envy by Barbara Taylor.  The author recounts her moving discoveries of finding the sacred in unexpected places while teaching the world’s religions to undergrads in rural Georgia, revealing how God delights in confounding our expectations.

It ended badly by Jennifer Wright.  13 of the worst breakups in history – replete with beheadings, uprisings, creepy sex dolls, and celebrity gossip – and its disastrously bad consequences throughout time.

K by Tyler Kepner.  A history of baseball in 10 pitches.

The league of wives by Heath Lee.  The story of a group of women who mobilized and organized in an attempt to bring their POW husbands home from Vietnam.

Mama’s last hug by Frans de Waal.  A captivating survey of animal and human emotions.

The Seventies: a photographic journey by Ira Resnick.  The Seventies in America were a time of social and cultural ferment, and Resnick was there with his camera to capture it all.

The threat by Andrew McCabe.  How the FBI protects America in the age of terror and Trump.

Under red skies by Karoline Kan.  A deeply personal and shocking look at how China is coming to terms with its conflicted past as it emerges into a modern, cutting-edge superpower, seen though the stories of three generations of women.

Women warriors by Pamela Toler.  Who says women don’t go to war?  From Vikings and African queens to cross-dressing military doctors and WW II Russian fighter pilots, these are the stories of women for whom battle was not a metaphor.

New Children’s Books for May 2019

 PICTURE BOOKS

Africville by Shauntay Grant

Baby day by Jane Godwin

A day in the life of Marlon Bundo by Marlon Bundo

Kite for the moon by Jane Yolen

Little Fox and the missing moon by Ekaterina Trukhan

Music for Mister Moon by Philip C. Stead

Peg + Cat: math in the bath by Jennifer Oxley

A piglet named Mercy by Kate DiCamillo

The sun shines everywhere by Mary Ann Hoberman

Sweet dreamers by Isabelle Simler

There’s a dinosaur on the 13th floor by Wade Bradford

GRAPHIC NOVELS

5 worlds: the Cobalt Prince by Mark Siegel

Baby-Sitters Club: Mary Anne saves the day by Raina Telgemeier

Baby-Sitters Club: the truth about Stacey by Raina Telgemeier

Endgames  by Ru Xu

Science comics solar system: our place in space by Rosemary Mosco

Super Potato #1: the epic origin of Super Potato by Artur Laperla

CHAPTER BOOKS

Freya & Zoose by Emily Butler

Judy Moody and friends: searching for stinkodon by Megan McDonald

Max and the Midknights by Lincoln Peirce

Merci Suarez changes gears by Meg Medina

Owl diaries: Eva and Baby Mo by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries: Eva and the lost pony by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries: Eva’s big sleepover by Rebecca Elliott

Pay attention, Carter Jones by Gary D. Schmidt

The Princess in black and the hungry bunny horde by Shannon Hale

The Princess in black takes a vacation by Shannon Hale

The remarkable journey of Coyote Sunrise by Dan Gemeinhart

What the wind can tell you by Sarah Marie A. Jette

NON-FICTION

Astronaut, aquanaut by Jennifer Swanson

Knowledge genius by Peter Chrisp

LEGO Star Wars visual dictionary by Simon Beecroft

The magic & mystery of trees by Jen Green

Nature play at home by Nancy Striniste

Ocean emporium: a compilation of creatures by Susie Brooks

Rotten! : vultures, beetles, slime, and nature’s other decomposers by Anita Sanchez

Time to parent: organizing your life to bring out the best in your child and you by Julie Morgenstern

MOVIES

Arthur’s music jamboree a PBS Kids

Arthur’s travel adventures a PBS Kids

Dragons : race to the edge seasons 1 & 2 by Dreamworks

Kiki’s delivery service with Kirsten Dunst

Paddington 2 with Ben Wishaw

Tangled : before ever after with Mandy Moore

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

New Items ~ April 2019

FICTION

The American Agent by Jacqueline Winspear.  Mazie Dobbs investigates the mysterious murder of an American war correspondent in London during the Blitz.

Black Leopard, red wolf by Marlon James.  A swords-and-sorcery epic set in a mythical Africa that is also part detective story, part quest fable, and part inquiry into the nature of truth, belief, and destiny.

Bowlaway by Elizabeth McCracken.  This is about three generations of an unconventional New England family who own and operate a candlepin bowling alley.

Cemetery Road by Greg Iles.  An electrifying tale of friendship, betrayal, and shattering secrets that threaten to destroy a small Mississippi town.

Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Reid.  A gripping novel about the whirlwind rise of an iconic 1970s rock group and their beautiful lead singer, revealing the mystery behind their infamous breakup.

Early riser by Jasper Fforde.  A madcap adventure through the Welsh winter which has grown so deadly most humans literally sleep through it.  Whip-smart, tremendous fun, and an utter delight from start to finish.

Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts.  The story behind the Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the book that inspired the iconic film, through the eyes of author L. Frank Baum’s intrepid wife, Maud.

The huntress by Kate Quinn.  A battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America.

Leading men by Christopher Castellani.  An intriguing tale of Tennessee Williams and his lover of 15 years, Frank Merlo.  It’s a wonderful examination of artists and the people who love them and change their work in large and imperceptible ways.

The lost man by Jane Harper.  Nathan and Bub Bright find their other brother dead at the border of their cattle ranch in the Australian outback.

The Malta exchange by Steve Berry.  The author has the lock on making history zing with breathless suspense and galloping action.  Malta and the Vatican are superb settings for this ecclesiastical extravaganza.

Mission critical by Mark Greaney.  A high-states thriller featuring the world’s most dangerous assassin: the Gray Man.

The military wife by Laura Trentham.  A young widow embraces a second chance at life when she reconnects with those who understand the sacrifices made by American soldiers and their families.

 The object of your affections by Falguni Kothari.  Two best friends rewrite the rules of friendship, love and family…and change everything they thought they knew about motherhood.

The river by Peter Heller.  The story of 2 college students on a wilderness canoe trip – a gripping tale of a friendship tested by fire, white water, and violence.

Run away by Harlan Coben.  You’ve lost your daughter.  She’s addicted to drugs and to an abusive boyfriend.  And she’s made it clear that she doesn’t want to be found.  Then, by chance, you see her playing guitar in Central Park…

The secretary by Renee Knight.  She could be the most dangerous person in the room…    But it would be a mistake to underestimate such a steadfast secretary as Christine.  Because as everyone is about to discover, there’s a dangerous line between obedience and obsession.

Trump Sky Alpha by Mark Doten.  One year after the president has plunged the world into nuclear war, a journalist takes refuge in the Twin Cities Metro Containment Zone.  On assignment, she documents internet humor at the end of the world.  By turns a dystopian nightmare, a cyber thriller, a spot-on treatise on memes, and a tragic tale of love and loss.

The wall by John Lanchester.  Dystopian fiction done just right, with a scenario that’s all too real.  It blends the most compelling issues of our time – rising waters, rising fear, rising political division – into a suspenseful story of love, trust, and survival.

The wedding guest by Jonathan Kellerman.  Milo Sturgis and Alex Delaware investigate the death of a stranger at a wedding reception.

NEW DVDs

Bohemian Rhapsody (2018)  starring Rami Malek

A star is born (2018) starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

Green book (2018) starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali

Can you ever forgive me? (2018) starring Melissa McCarthy and Richard E. Grant

The favourite (2018) starring Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, Rachel Weisz

At eternity’s gate (2018) starring Willem Dafoe

NEW MUSIC CDs

By the way, I forgive you by Brandi Carlile

(the teal album) by Weezer

Look alive by Guster

H.E.R. by H.E.R.

Can’t say I ain’t country by Florida Georgia Line

The essential Dinah Washington by Dinah Washington

NONFICTION

An American summer by Alex Kotlowitz.  This captures the summer of 2013 in neglected Chicago neighborhoods, rendering intimate profiles of residents and the “very public” violence they face every day.  It is a fiercely uncompromising and unforgettable portrait.

The art of dying well by Katy Butler.  An inspiring, informative, and practical guide to navigating end of life issues.

Black is the body by Emily Bernard.  Memoir from a black woman that gives stories of her grandmother’s time, her mother’s time, and her own.

The darkest year by William Klingaman.  A psychological study of the American homefront in 1941 under pressure of total war.

Monhegan by Mark Warner.  A guide to Maine’s fabled island.

Mykonos: portrait of a vanished era by Robert McCabe.  Experience the unspoiled beauty and traditional culture of this legendary Greek island as it was in the late 1950s.

On the run in Nazi Berlin by Bert Lewyn.  160,000 Jews lived in Berlin before World War II.  By 1945, only 3,000 remained.  Lewyn was one of the few, and his memoir – from witnessing the famous 1933 book burning to the aftermath of the war in a displaced persons camp – offers an unparalleled depiction of the life of a runaway Jew caught in the heart of the Nazi empire.

The salt path by Raynor Winn.  A true story of a couple who lost everything and embarked on a transformative journey walking the South West Coast Path in England.

Shortest way home by Pete Buttigieg.  The young mayor of South Bend, Indiana, now in his second term, explains what mayors do and offers ideas for the country as a whole in his memoir.

Sleeping with strangers by David Thomson.  From a celebrated film critic, this is an original, seductive account of sexuality in the movies and of how actors and actresses on screen have fed our desires.

Soar, Adam, soar by Rick Prashaw.  After a tragic accident cut his life short, Adam left a legacy of changed lives and a trove of social media posts documenting his life, relationships, transition, and struggle with epilepsy – all with remarkable transparency and directness.

Tamed by Alice Roberts.  Uncovers the deep history of 10 familiar species with incredible wild pasts:  dogs, apples and wheat, cattle, potatoes and chickens, rice, maize and horses.  The author reveals how becoming part of our world changed these and how they became our allies.

This much country by Kristin Pace.  A memoir of heartbreak, thousand-mile races, the endless Alaskan wilderness and man, many dogs from one of only a handful of women to have completed both the Yukon Quest and the Iditarod.

We were rich and we didn’t know it by Tom Phelan.  A tender recollection of growing up on a farm in Ireland in the 1940s, a captivating portrait of a bygone time.

Which side are you on? by James Sullivan.  Presented here is 20th century American history as seen through 100 protest songs.

Children’s Books

 PICTURE BOOKS

 Are you scared, Darth Vader by Adam Rex

The bear, the piano, the dog, and the fiddle by David Litchfield

Because by Mo Willems

Blue by Laura Vaccaro Seeger

Builders & breakers by Steve Light

Carl and the meaning of life by Deborah Freedman

The dress and the girl by Camille Andros

Gittel’s journey: an Ellis Island story by Leslea Newman

The littlest things give the loveliest hugs by Mark Sperring

The pinata that the farm maiden hung by Samantha Vamos

Side by side by Chris Raschka

Thank you, Omu by Oge Mora

The very impatient caterpillar by Ross Burach

 GRAPHIC NOVELS

Aquicorn Cove by Katie O’Neill

Dog Man: Brawl of the wild by Dav Pilkey

The hidden witch by Molly Ostertag

Hilda and the bird parade by Luke Pearson

Rocket to the moon? by Don Brown

Then everything went wrong by Judd Winick

 CHAPTER BOOKS

The assassins curse by Kevin Sands

Because of the rabbit by Cynthia Lord

The bridge home by Padma Venkatraman

The friendship war by Andrew Clements

Grenade by Alan Gratz

The hive queen by Tui Sutherland

Lion down by Stuart Gibbs

Small spaces by Katherine Arden

Swallow’s dance by Wendy Orr

Sweeping up the heart by Kevin Henkes

The unteachables by Gordon Korman

 NON-FICTION

Bloom bloom! by April Sayre Pulley

Calm : mindfulness for kids by Wynne Kinder

The college football championship: the fight for the top spot by Matt Doeden

The earth gives more by Sue Fliess

Inside the Daytona 500 by Todd Kortemeier

Period power : a manifesto for the menstrual movement by Nadya Okamoto

Raindrops roll by April Sayre Pulley

The World Cup : soccer’s global championship by Matt Doeden

 MOVIES

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch with Benedict Cumberbatch

Mary Poppins returns with Emily Blunt

Nutcracker and the four realms with Keira Knightley

Ralph breaks the internet with Sarah Silverman

Spider-Man into the Spider-Verse with Bob Persichetti

  

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Items ~ October 2018

FICTION

The boy at the keyhole by Stephen Giles.  A boy is left alone in his family’s English estate with a housekeeper whom he beings to suspect has murdered his mother.

A day like any other by Genie Henderson.  Set during the Great Hamptons Hurricane of 1938, a summer colony and locals are caught in the path of a sudden and devastating hurricane in this prophetic fiction that is a warning of storms to come.

Depth of winter by Craig Johnson.  Sheriff Longmire takes on the head of a drug cartel in a remote area of the northern Mexican desert.

Eagle and Crane by Suzanne Rindell.  Two young daredevil flyers confront ugly truths and family secrets during the U.S. internment of Japanese citizens during WW II.

The fall of Gondolin by J.R.R. Tolkien.  Thousands of years before the events of The Lord Of The Rings, a hero named Tuor visits a secret city.

Flight or fright edited by Stephen King.  An anthology about all the things that can go horribly wrong when you are flying.

In his father’s footsteps by Danielle Steel.  The son of two holocaust survivors struggles to become his own person after his marriage falls apart.

Jane Doe by Victoria Stone.  A double life with a single purpose:  revenge.

The last hours by Minette Walters.  When the Black Death enters England in 1348, no one knows what manner of sickness it is – or how it spreads and kills so quickly.

Lethal white by Robert Galbraith.  Detectives Strike and Ellacott investigate a crime a young man may have witnessed as a child.

Leverage in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas puzzles over a bizarre suicide bombing in a Wall Street office building.

The locksmith’s daughter by Karen Brooks.  An intriguing novel rich in historical detail and drama as it tells the story of Queen Elizabeth’s daring, ruthless spymaster and his female protégée.

The mermaid by Christine Henry.  A beautiful historical fairy tale about a mermaid who leaves the sea to live with her true love on the coast of Maine, only to become the star attraction of history’s greatest showman, P.T. Barnum.

The money shot by Stuart Woods.  Teddy Fay races to stop a scheme of extortion and a hostile takeover.

The other woman by Sandie Jones.  A psychological thriller about a man, his new girlfriend, and the mother who will not let him go.

The other woman by Daniel Silva.  Gabriel Allon, the art restorer and assassin, fights the Russians to decide the fate of postwar global order.

Ohio by Stephen Markley.  This follows 4 former classmates who return to their small town, a region ravaged by the Great Recession, an opioid crisis, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The patchwork bride by Sandra Dallas. This tells 3 different stories with homespun style.  Strong female characters and intriguing storytelling draws the reader into this two-hanky read full of love and loss.

Sign of the cross by Glenn Cooper.  Introducing Harvard professor Cal Donovan in the first of an intriguing new series of religious conspiracy thrillers.

The spaceship next door by Gene Doucette.  When a spaceship lands in Sorrow Falls, a lovable and fearless small-town girl is the planet’s only hope for survival.  It’s a warm-hearted ode to a time and place in a community so small that everybody knows everybody else’s business.

Stars uncharted by S.K. Dunstall.  In this rip-roaring space opera, a ragtag band of explorers are out to make the biggest score in the galaxy.

The summer wives by Beatriz Williams.  A postwar fable of love, class, power, and redemption set among the inhabitants of an island of the New England coast.

Trust me by Hank Ryan.  There are three sides to every story.  Yours. Mine. And the truth.

Where the crawdads sing by Delia Owens.  In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

With you always by Rena Olsen.  This examines how easy it is to fall into the wrong relationship…and how impossible it can be to leave.

DVDs

Hereditary (2018) starring Toni Collette and Gabriel Byrne

This is us: season 2 (2018) starring Mandy Moore

Deadpool 2  (2018) starring Ryan Reynolds and Josh Brolin

Book Club (2018) starring Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen

The way we get by (2009) directed by Aron Gaudet

NONFICTION

The death of truth by Michiko Kakutani.  Notes on falsehood in the age of Trump.

Dopesick by Beth Macy.  The only book so far to fully chart the opioid crisis in America – an unforgettable portrait of the families and first responders on the front lines.

Fashion climbing by Bill Cunningham.  The glamorous world of 20th century fashion comes alive in this memoir both because of his exuberant appreciation for stylish clothes and his sharp assessment of those who wore them.

Fear: Trump in the White House by Bob Woodward.  The inside story of President Trump as only Woodward can tell it.

A hard rain by Frye Gaillard.  America in the 1960s, our decade of hope, possibility, and innocence lost.

Leadership in turbulent times by Doris Kearns Goodwin.  Goodwin offers an illuminating exploration into the early development, growth, and exercise of leadership.

No good alternative by William Vollmann.  An eye-opening look at the consequences of coal mining and natural gas production – the second of a two volume work on the ideologies of energy production and the causes of climate change.

On call in the Arctic by Thomas Sims.  An extraordinary memoir recounting the adventures of a young doctor stationed in the Alaskan bush.

The only girl by Robin Green.  A raucous and vividly dishy memoir by the only woman writer on the masthead of Rolling Stone magazine in the early ‘70s.

The power of yes by Amy Newmark.  101 stories about adventure, change and positive thinking from the publishers of Chicken Soup for the Soul.

Proud by Ibtihaj Muhammad.  She is the first female Muslim American to medal at the Olympic Games and was named one of Time’s 100 most influential people.  This is a moving coming of age story from one of the nation’s most influential athletes and illustrates how she rose above all her obstacles.

30 before 30 by Marina Shifrin.  Subtitled: “How I made a mess of my 20s and you can too”, this is a charming and relatable collection of essays documenting a young woman’s attempt to accomplish 30 life goals before turning 30.

The tragedy of Benedict Arnold by Joyce Malcolm.  This sheds new light on the man as well as on the nuanced and complicated time in which he lived.

21 lessons for the 21st century by Yuval Harari.  How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human?  How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news?  Are nations and religions still relevant?  What should we teach our children?

Unhinged by Omarosa Newman.  The former Assistant to the President and Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison in the Trump White House provides her story of corruption and controversy in the current administration.

A year of reading by Elisabeth Ellington.  A month by month guide to classics and crowd-pleasers for you and your book group.

PICTURE BOOKS

 Dam by David Almond

Fruit bowl by Mark Hoffmann

Good Rosie by Kate DiCamillo

Hello, horse by Vivian French

Imagine by Juan Felipe Herrera

Interrupting chicken and the elephant of surprise by David Ezra Stein

Let the children march by Monica Clark-Robinson

Night job by Karen Hesse

No honking allowed! By Stephanie Calmenson

Peppa Pig and the silly sniffles Based on the TV Series

Square by Mac Barnett

Storm by Sam Usher

CHAPTER BOOKS

Bush rescue by Darrel Odgers

Circus lesson by Sally Rippin

Crazy cousins by Sally Rippin

Farm rescue  by Darrel Odgers

Wheelnuts! Craziest race on Earth! Desert dustup by Knife & Packer

Wheelnuts! Craziest race on earth! Spooky smackdown by Knife & Packer

Who is Sonia Sotomayor? by Megan Stine

Winning goal by Sally Rippin

 NON-FICTION

Acadia by Audra Wallace

Blossom to apple by Sarah Ridley

Carlos Santana: sound of the heart, song of the world by Gary Golio

Counting on Katherine: how Katherine Johnson saved Apollo 13 by Helanine Becker

Mae among the stars by Roda Ahmed

Maine by Robin S. Doak

Memphis, Martin, and the mountaintop: the Sanitation Strike of 1968 by Alice Faye Duncan

Seeds to bread by Sarah Ridley

Sisters & champions: the true story of Venus and Serena Williams by Howard Bryant

Turning pages: my life story by Sonia Sotomayor 

Turtle Island: the story of North America’s first people by Eldon Yellowhorn

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ September 2018

FICTION

All we ever wanted by Emily Giffin.  A scandal sends members of two Nashville families into chaos.

Baby teeth by Zoje Stage.  Here’s a “bad seed” novel about a mom desperate to find help for her mute young daughter whose disturbing behavior grows increasingly dangerous.

Clock dance by Anne Tyler.  This is a window into Willa Drake’s life over 50 years and how she adjusts to some of life’s surprises.

Cottage by the sea by Debbie Macomber.  A lonely woman finds love in a charming seaside town.

The Eastern.  Book Two: Later on by Deborah Gould.  In the second book of a trilogy, five families settle on the Eastern River in Pittston, Maine and build a strong and lasting neighborhood.

In a lonely place by Dorothy Hughes.  A classic California noir with a feminist twist, this prescient 1947 novel exposed misogyny in post-World War II American society making it far ahead of its time.

Kill the farm boy by Delilah Dawson.  This is Tolkien’s Fellowship of the Ring on laughing gas.  It’s a rollicking fantasy adventure that upends numerous genre tropes in audacious style.

The last time I lied by Riley Sager.  A painter is in danger when she returns to the summer camp where some of her childhood friends disappeared.

 The late bloomers’ club by Louise Miller.  A delightful novel about two headstrong sisters, a small town’s efforts to do right by the community, and the power of a lost dog to summon true love.

Lying in wait by Liz Nugent.  Laurence Fitzsimons has a mother who’s determined to control everything and everyone around her – even if she has to kill to do it.

Mary B by Katherine Chen.  The overlooked middle sister in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice casts off her prim exterior and takes center stage in this fresh retelling of the classic novel.

The mere wife by Maria Headley.  A modern retelling of the literary classic Beowulf, set in American suburbia as two mothers – a housewife and a battle-hardened veteran – fight to protect those they love.

The other lady vanishes by Amanda Quick.  This sweeps readers back to 1930s Hollywood and California, where the most dazzling of illusions can’t hide the darkest secrets.

Paradox by Catherine Coulter.  Agents Sherlock and Savich look for an escaped psychopath.

A people’s history of the vampire uprising by Raymond Villareal.  In this wildly original novel – part social-political satire, part international mystery – a new virus turns people into something a bit more than human, upending society as we know it.

The Pharaoh Key by Douglas Preston.  Secrets of a mysterious ancient tablet may point the way to untold treasure – or unspeakable danger.

The prisoner in the castle by Susan MacNeal.   A series of baffling murders among a group of imprisoned agents threatens the outcome of World War II in this new Maggie Hope mystery.

The Romanov Empress by C.W. Gortner.  An historical novel about the beloved Empress Maria, the Danish girl who became the mother of the last Russian tsar.

Star of the north by David John.  A thriller about a woman trying to rescue her twin sister from captivity in North Korea, and the North Korean citizens with whom she forms an unlikely alliance.

Tailspin by Sandra Brown.  A pilot navigates treacherous situations when he attempts to deliver a mysterious black box to a doctor in Georgia.

An unwanted guest by Shari Lapena.  A Catskills lodge loses electricity during a blizzard and its guests start mysteriously dropping dead.

Who is Vera Kelly?  by Rosalie Knecht.  Meet an original, wry and whip-smart female spy for the 21st century.

NONFICTION

Another good dog by Cara Achterberg.  A warm and entertaining memoir about what happens when you foster 50 dogs in less than two years – and how the dogs save you as much as you save them.

The contest by Michael Schumacher.  The 1968 election and the war for America’s soul.  A dramatic, deeply informed account of one of the most consequential elections and periods in American history.

Godspeed by Casey Legler.  This electric coming of age memoir charts Legler’s broken childhood – from swimming in the Olympics at 16 while facing crippling loneliness, to her descent into drug addiction, and a desperate penchant for self-destruction that almost took her life – all while grappling with undiagnosed autism.  It’s a raw story of teenage addiction that is beautifully told.

Indianapolis by Lynn Vincent.  The true story of the worst sea disaster in US Naval history and the 50 year fight to exonerate an innocent man.

Light of the stars by Adam Frank.  An intriguing account of the ongoing search for alien civilizations whose failure to appear may be a warning for humans to get their act together.

My life in the Maine Woods by Annette Jackson.  The author recounts her experiences with her game warden husband during the 1930s.

On the Ganges by George Black.  Encounters with saints and sinners on India’s mythic river.  Journey along one of the world’s greatest rivers and catch a glimpse into the lives and cultures of the people who live along its banks.

A Senator’s eye by Angus King.  From the formality of the Capitol Rotunda to a glorious sunrise off the coast of Maine, this is a fascinating collection of informal photos taken by King along with his personal insights and captions.

Slow by Brooke McAlary. Here are plans for simple living in a frantic world.  Free yourself from the frantic and embrace the joy of slow.

The stone crusher by Jeremy Dronfield.  The true story of a father and son’s fight for survival in Auschwitz.  A personal and universal account of brutality at its worst and of family devotion at its best.

The strange case of Dr. Couney by Dawn Raffle.  The extraordinary tale of how a mysterious immigrant “doctor” became the revolutionary innovator of saving premature babies by placing them in incubators in World Fair side shows, on Coney Island, and Atlantic City.

The widower’s notebook by Jonathan Santlofer.  Written with humor and great warmth, this is a portrait of a marriage, an account of the complexities of finding oneself single again after losing your spouse, and a story of the enduring power of familial love.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ July 2018

FICTION

All the ever afters by Danielle Teller.  The untold story of Cinderella’s stepmother, this gives life to the brace and resourceful Agnes, better known as one of fairy tales’ most reviled villains.

The atrocities by Jeremy Shipp.  Any fans of haunted houses or strange families will thoroughly enjoy this read.

Beautiful music by Michael Zadoorian.  Set in early 1970s Detroit, a racially divided city still reeling from its violent riot of 1967, this novel is the story of a high school boy’s transformation through music.

The captives by Debra Jo Immergut.  A riveting story of a woman convicted of a brutal crime, the prison psychologist who recognizes her as his high school crush – and the charged reunion that sets off an astonishing chain of events with dangerous consequences for both.

The cast by Danielle Steel.  A magazine columnist meets an array of Hollywood professionals when a producer turns a story about his grandmother into a TV series.

The death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware.  A tarot card reader mistakenly receives an inheritance letter and attends the funeral of the deceased to collect it.

Denver Moon: the mind of Mars by Warren Hammond.  Once considered humanity’s future home, Mars hasn’t worked out like anybody hoped.  Plagued by crime and a terraforming project that’s centuries from completion, Mars is a red hell.

The favorite sister by Jessica Knoll.  This is a blistering paced thriller starring two sisters who join the cast of a reality TV series.  One won’t make it out alive.  So…who did it?

Florida by Lauren Groff.  A literary tour de force of precariousness set in a blistering place, a state shaped like a gun.

The girl who never read Noam Chomsky by Jana Casale.  The interior life of a millennial Everywoman as she matures over the decades.  So much fun, so smart, and ultimately profound and beautiful.

The lonely witness by William Boyle.  When a young woman with a sordid past witnesses a murder, she finds herself fascinated by the killer and decides to track him down herself.

Motherhood by Sheila Heti.  A novel about whether to have children that will spark conversations about womanhood, parenthood, and about how – and for whom – to live.

The optimistic decade by Heather Abel.  You say you want a revolution?  This energetic and entertaining novel about a utopian summer camp and its charismatic leader asks smart questions about good intentions gone terribly wrong.

The outsider by Stephen King.  An unspeakable crime.  A confounding investigation.  Terry Maitland seems like a nice guy, but is he wearing another face?

Shelter in place by Nora Roberts.  Survivors of a mass shooting outside a mall near Portland, Maine develop different coping mechanisms and face a new menace years later.

Social creature by Tara Burton.  Louise has nothing.  Lavinia has everything.  After a chance encounter, the two spiral into an intimate, intense, and possibly toxic friendship.  A Talented Mr. Ripley for the digital age, this takes a classic tale of obsession and makes it irresistibly new.

Sorority by Genevieve Crane.  An addictive, compulsively readable exploration of female friendship and coming of age that will appeal to anyone who has ever been curious about what goes on in a sorority house.

That kind of mother by Rumaan Alam.  Can motherhood ever look beyond race?  Can we learn to recognize the terrible blindness of our respective cultural perspective?

There there by Tommy Orange.  A look at Native American life in Oakland, CA, through the experiences and perspectives of 12 characters.  The author articulates the challenges and complexities not only of Native Americans but also of America itself.

Timberline by Matthew Mayo.  Based in the northern Rocky Mountains at the beginning of the winter months, this is a tale of adventure, survival, determination, and surprise.  Western fans will enjoy.

Time was by Ian McDonald.  Brought together by a secret project designed to hide British targets from German radar, Tom and Ben have found a love that could not be revealed. When the project went wrong, they vanished into nothingness, presumed dead.  Now they are lost in time, hunting each other across decades, leaving clues in books of poetry and trying to make their desperate timelines overlap.

NONFICTION

Beneath a ruthless sun by Gilbert King.  A spellbinding true story of racism, privilege, and official corruption.  By turns sobering, frightening, and thrilling, this meticulous account of the power and tenacity of officially sanctioned racism recalls a dark era that America is still struggling to leave behind.

Birds of a feather by Lorin Lindner.  Parrots and military veterans bond and heal each other in this powerful story of dedicated service to abandoned birds and veterans and how bringing them together helped save them all.

Calypso by David Sedaris.  This is beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk and love a good tumor joke.  It is simultaneously Sedaris’ darkest and warmest book yet – and it just might be his very best.

Fight like a girl by Kate Germano.  One woman’s professional battle against systemic gender bias in the Marines and the lessons it hold for all of us.

First in line by Kate Brower.  An intimate, news-making look at the men who are next in line to the most powerful office in the world – the vice-presidents of the modern era, from Richard Nixon to Joe Biden to Mike Pence.

I’m Keith Hernandez by Keith Hernandez.  The legendary first baseman tells all in this gripping memoir.  His mission was not to write a “boring” baseball book.  Mission accomplished.

The last lobster by Christopher White.  Although Maine has been experiencing a lobster “boom” in the past few years, White says a climate-affected fluctuation in lobster populations may be endangering the industry and the Maine culture it supports.

The lives of the Surrealists by Desmond Morris.  Life histories of the Surrealists, known and unknown by one of the last surviving members of the movement.

One day you’ll thank me by David McGlynn.  A pleasing blend of humor and humility that shows what it means to be a father in America today.  Timeless, funny, and honest stories of raising boys.

Paul Simon: the life by Robert Hilburn.  An intimate, candid, and definitive bio written with Simon’s participation – but without editorial control – by an acclaimed music writer.

Reporter: a memoir by Seymour Hersh.  A revealing memoir of a decades-long career breaking some of the most impactful stories of the last half-century, from Washington to Vietnam to the Middle East.

The restless wave by John McCain.  A memoir by the Republican senator from Arizona, an American hero who reflects on his life – and what matters most.

The rise and fall of the dinosaurs by Steve Brusatte.  Every week a new species of dinosaur is being discovered somewhere in in the world.  EVERY WEEK.  We are in a new golden age of dinosaur science, and this provides an insider’s view of that history.

Ruthless tide by Al Roker.  A gripping narrative history of the 1889 Johnstown Flood – the deadliest flood in US history.

The soul of America by Jon Meacham.  The Pulitzer Prize winning biographer contextualizes the present political climate through the lens of difficult moments in American history.

Tip of the iceberg by Mark Adams.  A fascinating and funny journey into Alaska, America’s last frontier, retracing the historic 1899 Harriman Expedition.  Tourists will certainly enjoy reading about both the past and the present, and the breezy, self-deprecating tone makes for an obvious vacation diversion.

World War II at sea by Craig Symonds.  Many have argued that WW II was dominated by naval operations; few have shown and explained how and why this was the case.  This combines story-telling verve, expertly illuminating not only the mechanics of large scale warfare on (and below) the sea but offering wisdom into the nature of the war itself.

PICTURE BOOKS

Aquarium by Cynthia Alonso

Dude by Aaron Reynolds

Fall in Line, Holden! by Daniel W Vandever

Geraldine by Elizabeth Lilly

King of Bees by Lester L. Laminack

No Kimchi for Me by Aram Kim

People Don’t Bite People by Lisa Wheeler

Roar: A Dinosaur Tour by Michael Paul

Teddy’s Favorite Toy by Christian Trimmer

Two Problems for Sophia by Jim Averbeck

Vernon is on His Way: Small Stories by Philip C. Stead

CHAPTER BOOKS

Boy Called Bat by Elana Arnold

I Love You, Michael Collins by Lauren Baratz-Logsted

Lulu Is Getting a Sister by Judith Viorst

Spirit Hunters by Ellen Oh

Train I Ride by Paul Mosier

Unicorn in the Barn by Jacqueline K. Ogburn

 

NON-FICTION

Lemonade Stand Cookbook by Kathy Starahs

Rodent Rascals by Roxie Munro

Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist by Jess Keating

What’s on Your Plate? Exploring the World of Food by Whitney Stewart

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Bolivar by Sean Rubin

Time Museum by Matthew Loux

Do You Know Komodo Dragons? By Alain M. Bergeron

NEW DVDs

Early Man (2018) starring Eddie Redmayne and Tom Hiddleston.

G-Force (2009) starring Nicolas Cage and Penelope Cruz.

Gnomeo & Juliet (2011) starring Michael Caine and Emily Blunt.

Strange Magic (2015) starring Evan Rachel Wood and Kristen Chenoweth.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ June 2018

FICTION

Adjustment Day by Chuck Palahniuk.  Young men take on geriatric politicians who are pushing the country toward a third world war.

American by day by Derek Miller.  A gripping and timely novel that follows Sigrid, a dry-witted Norwegian detective, from Oslo to the U.S. on a quest to find her missing brother.

Big guns by Steve Israel.  From the congressman-turned-novelist comes a comic tale about the mighty firearm industry, a small Long Island town, and Washington politics.

Circe by Madeline Miller.  This tells about Circe’s evolution from insignificant nymph to formidable witch best known for turning Odysseus’ sailors into swine.

Date with malice by Julia Chapman.  Mystery readers who love to escape to Louise Penny’s village of Three Pines will enjoy becoming acquainted with the town of Bruncliffe and its quirky residents.

Dead girl running by Christina Dodd.  Two emotionally damaged characters find hope, self-forgiveness, and love in this modern version of Gaslight that hooks readers and keeps them mesmerized until the end.

The fallen by David Baldacci.  Amos Decker, known as the Memory Man, puts his talents toward solving a string of murders in a Rust Belt town.

Family and other catastrophes by Alexandra Borowitz.  A wedding weekend tests an eccentric family’s bonds.  Humor and heart mix here and it will resonate with anyone who loves their family despite said family’s best efforts.

The flight attendant by Chris Bohjalian.  A flight attendant wakes up in the wrong hotel, in the wrong bed, with a dead man – and no idea what happened.

Home for unwanted girls by Joanna GoodmanPhilomena meets Orphan Train –  the story of a young unwed mother who is forcibly separated from her daughter at birth and the lengths to which they go to find each other.

 Line of glory by Thomas Clagett.  Although the tale has been told many times, Clagett has done a masterful job of delving into the back stories of the characters involved in the Alamo, both Texan and Mexican.

The listener by Robert McCammon.  Race relations are one subject of this seductive slice of supernatural noir set in 1934 New Orleans.

The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner.  A woman is separated from her son when she begins two consecutive life sentences in a California correctional facility.

The merry spinster by Mallory Ortberg.  A collection of darkly playful stories based on classic fold and fairy tales (but with a feminist spin) that find the sinister in the familiar and the familiar in the alien.

Mile High Murder by Marcia Talley.  This mystery takes the reader on a timely and illuminating trip into the often befuddling world of marijuana legislation.

My dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray.  The tale of Alexander Hamilton’s wife – seen growing up in revolutionary New York, passionately entering into marriage, and striving to assure Hamilton’s legacy.

 Noir by Christopher Moore.  A zany tale set on the mean streets of post-World War II San Francisco, and featuring a diverse cast of characters including a hapless bartender, his Chinese sidekick, a doll with sharp angles and dangerous curves, and a black mamba.

The only story by Julian Barnes.  A love affair between a 48 year old and a 19 year old is hardly unheard of, but this reverses gender expectations.

Our little secret by Roz Nay.  Grilled by police about the missing wife of her former boyfriend, Angela reveals the fateful story of their love triangle.

The perfect mother by Aimee Molloy.  An addictive psychological thriller about a group of women whose lives become unexpectedly connected when one of their newborns goes missing.

River’s child by Mark Seiler.  Fasten your seat belt in this fantasy as our spirited heroes ride icebergs from the frozen north, battle wild men, and fall in love while they race to prevent world war.

Robert B. Parker’s old black magic by Ace Atkins.  Ironic, tough-but-tender Boston PI Spenser delves into the black market art scene to investigate a decades-long crime of dangerous proportions.

The saint of wolves and butchers by Alex Grecian.  A chilling thriller about an enigmatic hunter on the trail of a Nazi who has secretly continued his devilish work here in America.

Scot free by Catriona McPherson.  This character-driven romp is sparked by the larger-than-life quirky residents of the Last Ditch Motel, putting this laugh-out-loud whodunit on a par with the early Janet Evanovich.

The Sparsholt affair by Alan Hollinghurst.  Explores richly complex relationships between fathers and sons as it spans 7 transformative decades in England, from the 1940s through the present.

Speed the dawn by Philip Donlay.  Hundreds of white-hot meteor fragments plunge toward Earth near Monterey Bay.  Huge fires ignite the tender-dry landscape, the power grid collapse, and the fires grow.  Donovan Nash realizes he is trapped.

The spirit photographer by Jon Varese.  Historical suspense about a charismatic con man haunted – perhaps literally – by a ghost from his past.

Tomb of the unknown racist by Blanche Boyd.  Explores the intricate world of the white supremacy movement and the treacherous ways that racism shatters families and spreads its dark roots across America.

NEW DVDs

The Post (2017) starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) starring Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill

The Greatest Showman (2017) starring Hugh Jackman and Michelle Williams

NONFICTION

Accidental brothers by Nancy Segal.  The riveting story of two sets of identical twins separated at birth and improbably reunited as adults, a dream case for exploring nature and nurture.

Alt-right by Mike Wendling.  A vital guide to understanding the racist, misogynist, far-right movement that rose to prominence during Donald Trump’s election campaign.

The big ones by Lucy Jones.  A riveting history of natural disasters, their impact on our culture, and new ways of thinking about the ones to come.

Cousins Maine Lobster by Jim Tselikis.  From the co-founders of the Cousins Maine Lobster food truck comes a business book revealing to new entrepreneurs how the authors built their brand through integrity and authenticity.

 Crafting a patterned home by Kristin Nicholas.  Create a unique space that’s all your own – bold and colorful handmade projects to fill your home with pattern.

Darwin comes to town by Menno Schilthuizen.  In this delightful account, readers who assume that pigeons, cockroaches, and rats are the only representatives of city biology will learn that it is far more complex.  This is an expert romp through urban natural history.

The death and life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan.  A landmark work of science, history, and reporting on the past, present and imperiled future of the Great Lakes.

Man vs Baby by Matt Coyne.  A fresh take on the bewilderment and joy of having a baby from a rip-roaring new voice, this combination memoir and advice book is sure to charm parents everywhere.

The milk lady of Bangalore by Shoba Narayan.  Sincere and laugh-out-loud funny, Narayan’s rich and evocative writing transports readers to the busy streets of Bangalore and a fully formed picture of modern India.

My patients and other animals by Suzanne Fincham-Gray.  A moving memoir of a life spent in the company of animals – a veterinarian sheds light on the universal experiences of illness, healing, and how we care for loved ones.

Natural causes by Barbara Ehrenreich.  An epidemic of wellness, the certainty of dying, and killing ourselves to live longer…the author explores how we are killing ourselves to live long, but not better.

No immediate danger by William Vollmann.  A timely, eye-opening book about climate change and energy generation that focuses on the consequences of nuclear power production.

Our towns by James Fallows.  A surprising portrait of the civic and economic reinvention taking place in America, town by town and generally out of view of the national media.  A realistically positive and provocative view of the country between its coasts.  Eastport, Maine is one of the towns examined.

Two sisters by Asne Seierstad.  The riveting story of 2 sisters’ journey to the Islamic State and the father who tries to bring them home.  It’s a relentless thriller and a feat of reporting with profound lessons about belief, extremism, and the meaning of devotion.

Waiting for the last bus by Richard Holloway.  Now in his 9th decade, the former Bishop of Edinburgh presents a positive, meditative exploration of the many lessons we can learn from death along with forgiving ourselves and others.

PICTURE BOOKS

Baby Bear’s Book of Tiny Tales by David McPhail

Bear and Wolf by Daniel Salmieri

Funeral by Matt James

Honey by David Ezra Stein

I Am Enough by Grace Byers

Ladybug Girl and the Rescue Dogs by David Soman

Memoirs of a Parrot by Devin Scillian

On the Other Side of the Garden by Jairo Buitrago

Pip & Pup by Eugene Yelchin

This Is the Nest That Robin Built by Denise Fleming

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Car by Kate Dopirak

Wake Up, Baby Bear! by Lynn Plourde

CHAPTER BOOKS

Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World by Ashley Herring Blake

Mystery of the Bear Cub by Tamra Wight

Mystery of the Missing Fox by Tamra Wight

Serpent’s Secret: Kiranmala and the Kingdom Beyond by Sayantani DasGupta

Sky at Our Feet by Nadia Hashimi

Truth as Told by Mason Buttle by Leslie Connor

Who Killed Darius Drake? by Rodman Philbrick

You Go First by Erin Entrada Kelly

NON-FICTION

A Seal Named Patches by Roxanne Beltran

Bluegrass Boy: The Story of Bill Monroe Father of Bluegrass Music by Barb Rosenstock

Song of the Wild: A First Book of Animals by Nicola Davies

When Paul Met Artie: The Story of Simon & Garfunkel by G. Neri

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Crafty Cat and the Great Butterfly Battle by Charise Mericale Harper

NEW DVDs

Mary and the Witch’s Flower (2018) starring Ruby Barnhill and Kate Winslet.

Paw Pals: Summer Rescues  (2017) 8 episodes of Paw Patrol.

PJ Masks: Cracking the Case (2018) Join Catboy, Owlette and Gekko on their night time missions into the night to save the day in this fun-packed superhero adventure.

PJ Masks: Let’s Go PJ Masks! (2017) Another superhero adventure with Catboy, Owlette and Gekko.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ May 2018

FICTION:

Accidental heroes by Danielle Steel.  Strangers pull together to avert a disaster involving two flights from New York to San Francisco.

After Anna by Lisa Scottoline.  Scottoline keeps the pace relentless as she drops a looming threat into the heart of an idyllic suburban community, causing readers to hold their breath in anticipation.

Alternate side by Anna Quindlen.  In this novel about money, class, and self-discovery, the tensions in a tight-knit neighborhood – and a seemingly happy marriage – are exposed by an unexpected act of violence.

Anatomy of a miracle by Jonathan Miles.  A novel about a paralyzed young man’s unexplainable recovery – a stunning exploration of faith, science, mystery, and the meaning of life.

The baby plan by Kate Rorick.  Here we enter the wild, bewildering world of modern pregnancies.  You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll shake your head as you wonder where everyone’s sanity went.

The bishop’s pawn by Steve Berry.  Cotton Malone discovers revelations about the day Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated.

The broken girls by Simone St. James.  A riveting genre-blender that combines a supernatural tale with intertwined mysteries from the 1950s and today.

The disappeared by C.J. Box.  Wyoming game warden, Joe Pickett, has two lethal cases to contend with.

The female persuasion by Meg Wolitzer.  A novel about the flame we all believe is flickering inside of us, waiting to be seen and fanned by the right person at the right time.  It’s a story about the people who guide and the people who follow (and how those roles evolve over time).

 The gunners by Rebecca Kauffman.  Reminiscent of The Big Chill and St. Elmo’s Fire, this novel is just as satisfying and provides readers with an entire cast of characters who feel like old friends upon finishing.

Hard aground by Brendan DuBois.  A riveting Rear Window-type drama of a man trapped in a menacing environment, forced to rely on his wits rather than brawn to solve a crime.

I bring sorrow and other stories of transgression by Patricia Abbott.  One of the stories here is about a Maine fisherman who makes an unusual catch and is the longest story in this sparkling collection.

I’ve got my eyes on you by Mary Higgins Clark.  A high school guidance counselor tries to uncover the identity of her sister’s murderer.

Lake silence by Anne Bishop.  In this thrilling and suspenseful fantasy, an inn owner and her shape-shifting lodger find themselves enmeshed in danger and dark secrets.

Let me lie by Clare MacKintosh.  The police say it was suicide.  Anna says it was murder.  They’re both wrong.  Sometimes it’s safer to let things lie.

No one ever asked by Katie Ganshert.  Challenging perceptions of discrimination and prejudice, this drama explores three women navigating challenges in a changing school district – and in their lives.

The perfume burned his eyes by Michael Imperioli.  16 year old Matthew is moved by his mother from Queens to a posh apartment in Manhattan in 1976 after she gets a large inheritance.  Having just lost his 2 important male models – his father and grandfather – Matthew becomes fascinated by another resident in the new building: the singer Lou Reed.

The punishment she deserves by Elizabeth George.  Inspector Thomas Lynley of Scotland Yard and detective sergeant Barbara Havers are approached by a Member of Parliament with a request to investigate the supposed suicide of a constituent’s son.

A reckoning by Linda Spalding.  This is set in the late 1850s as conflicts over slavery and abolition tear apart a Virginia plantation family.

Tangerine by Christine Mangan.  Living in sultry 1956 Tangier with her husband, Alice is dismayed when a troublesome former college roommate comes calling.

This scorched earth by William Gear.  An amazing tour de force depicting a family’s journey from devastation to rebirth following the American Civil War.

To die but once by Jacqueline Winspear.  In the new Maisie Dobbs novel, Winspear does a smashing job describing the bravery exhibited by everyday Britons as the fear of invasion becomes ever more real during World War II.

Trenton Makes by Tadzio Koelb.    Here is a vivid, brutal, razor-sharp debut about a woman who carves out her share of the American dream by living as a man in 1946.

Varina by Charles Frazier.  Frazier returns to the time and place of Cold Mountain, vividly bringing to life the chaos and devastation of the Civil War as he tells the story of the wife of Jefferson Davis – a woman who comes to realize that complicity carries consequences.

Worst fear by Matt Hilton.  In Portland, Maine, private investigator Tess Grey discovers that someone from her past is pursuing a deadly vendetta – and she could be the next to die.

NEW DVDs:

The Phantom Thread (2017) starring Daniel Day-Lewis

The Handmaid’s Tale (2017) starring Elisabeth Moss and Joseph Fiennes

Quiz Show (1994) starring Rob Morrow, Ralph Fiennes, and Paul Scofield

Decoy (1957) starring Beverly Garland

Psycho (1960) starring Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh

 NONFICTION:

Everything you love will burn by Vegas Tenold.  The dark story of the shocking resurgence of white supremacist and nationalist groups, and their path to political power.

Fascism: a warning by Madeleine Albright.  A personal and urgent examination of Fascism in this day and how its legacy shapes today’s world, written by the first woman to serve as U.S. Secretary of State.

A higher loyalty by James Comey.  The former FBI director shares his experience from some of the highest-stakes situations of his career in the past two decades, exploring what good, ethical leadership looks like, and how it drives sound decisions.

Historic New England by Patricia Harris.  A tour of the region’s top 100 national landmarks – touchstones of our collective past that still resonate with our present.

Let it rot! by Stu Campbell.  Since 1975 this has been where gardeners have looked for advice on keeping useful organic stuff out of the trash.

Life without plastic by Chantal Plamondon.  The practical step-by-step guide to avoiding plastic to keep your family and the planet healthy.

The line becomes a river by Francisco Cantu.  A former border patrol agent ponders what it means to be successful at his job.

The Lyme solution by Darin Ingels.  Here’s a five part plan to fight the inflammatory auto-immune response and beat Lyme disease.

More than true by Robert Bly.  Bly revisits a selection of fairy tales and examines how these enduring narratives capture the essence of human nature.

Norman: the doll that needed to be locked away by Stephen Lancaster.  A chilling true tale of life with a doll.  Dedicated readers of horror and internet creepy-pasta stories will thrill to the mounting evil and solution Lancaster and his wife devise to appease Norman.  A must-read for fans of the Chucky and Annabelle movies.

Redemption by Joseph Rosenbloom.  An immersive, humanizing, and demystifying look at the final hours of Dr. King’s life as he seeks to revive the non-violent civil right movement and push to end poverty in America.

Rise, decline, and renewal by Douglas Rooks.  A history of the Democratic Party in Maine from an editor of the Kennebec Journal.

12 rounds in Lo’s Gym by Todd Snyder.  Part love letter to Appalachia, part rigorous social critique, readers may find this book – and its narrative of individual and community strength in the face of globalism’s headwinds – a welcome corrective to narratives that blame those in the region for their troubles.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.