New Titles for January 2018!

FICTION:

 Alive in shape and color edited by Lawrence Block.  17 paintings by great artists and the stories they inspired.

Artemis by Andy Weir.  A small-time smuggler living in a lunar colony schemes to pay off an old debt by pulling off a challenging heist.

The big book of the Continental Op by Dashiell Hammett.  All 38 stories starring the Continental Op – one of the greatest characters in detective fiction.

The body in the casket by Katherine Hall Page.  A chilling New England who-dun-it, inspired by the best Agatha Christie mysteries and with hints of the timeless board game Clue.

A darker sea by James Haley.  A gripping naval saga featuring Commander Bliven Putnam, chronicling the build up to the biggest military conflict between the U.S. and Britain after the Revolution – The War of 1812.

The demon crown by James Rollins.  To save mankind’s future, the members of Sigma Force must make a devil’s bargain as they join forces with their most hated enemy to stop an ancient threat.

 End game by David Baldacci.  Jessica Reel and Will Robie fight a dangerous adversary in Colorado.

The floating world by C. Morgan Babst.  A dazzling novel about family, home, and grief that takes readers into the heart of Hurricane Katrina with the story of a family whose roots stretch back nearly to the foundation of New Orleans.

Fortitude smashed by Taylor Brooke.  Personalized chips are now implanted beneath the thumbnails of every infant, where glowing numbers count down to the moment they will meet their soul mate.  Fate is now a calculation.

Future home of the living god by Louise Erdrich.  A startling portrait of a young woman fighting for her life and her unborn child against oppressive forces that manifest in the wake of a cataclysmic event.

The girl in the tower by Katherine Arden.  A remarkable young woman blazes her own trail from the backwoods of Russia to the court of Moscow.

The ice house by Laura Lee Smith.  This follows the beleaguered MacKinnons as they weather the possible loss of the family business, a serious medical diagnosis, and the slings and arrows of familial discord.

 In this moment by Karen Kingsbury.  A lawyer defends a public high school principal who starts an after-school Bible study program.

Into the drowning deep by Mira Grant.  A claustrophobic, deep-sea tale that will leave readers glad to be safely on dry land.

The library at the edge of the world by Felicity Hayes-McCoy.  A local librarian must find a way to rebuild her community and her own life in this touching, enchanting novel set on Oreland’s stunning Wet Coast.

The Paris secret by Karen Swan.  A tale of forgotten treasures and long-held secrets, this explores a woman’s journey to discovering the truth behind an abandoned apartment and a family whose mysteries may be better left undiscovered.

Past perfect by Danielle Steel.  The story of two families living 100 years apart who come together in time in a startling moment, opening the door to rare friendship and major events in early 20th century history.

Secrets of Cavendon by Barbara Taylor Bradford.  A saga featuring the aristocratic Ingham family and the Swann family, who have loyally served them for generations.

Seven days of us by Francesca Hornak.  A family can’t escape their secrets when they’re forced to spend the Christmas holiday in quarantine in this sharply funny novel.

Two kinds of truth by Michael Connelly.  While he investigates the murder to two pharmacists, an old case comes back to haunt Harry Bosch.

Weave a circle round by Kari Maaren.  A teen learns about herself – and the fabric of the universe – when she goes traveling in time with an immortal 14 year old.  A charming and extraordinarily relatable book with the potential to become a timeless classic.

The whispering room by Dean Koontz.  Former FBI agent and wanted fugitive Jane Hawk tracks down a group that is brainwashing people into committing suicide.

Year One by Nora Roberts.  It began on New Year’s Eve.  The sickness came on suddenly and spread quickly.  The fear spread even faster…  And as the power of science and technology receded, magic rose up in its place.

You can run by Steve Mosby.  A riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma guaranteed to play havoc with both your brain cells and your heartbeat.

NEW DVDs:

Victoria and Abdul (2017) starring Judi Dench and Ali Fazal

Come along with me (1982) starring Estelle Parsons and Sylvia Sidney

Baby Driver (1917) starring Ansel Elgort, John Hamm, and Jamie Fox

Holocaust (1978) starring Meryl Streep, James Woods, Michael Moriarty

Summer wishes, winter dreams (1973) starring Joanne Woodward and Sylvia Sidney

Law and order: the third year starring Jerry Orbach and Paul Sorvino

Come back to the 5 & Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean (1982) starring Cher and Karen Black

NONFICTION:

Adventures of a ballad hunter by John Lomax.  Vibrant, amusing, often haunting stories of the people the author met and recorded are the gems of this book which also gives lyrics for dozens of songs, this illuminates vital traditions in American popular culture and the labor that has gone into their preservation.

Ageless soul by Thomas Moore.  The lifelong journey toward meaning and joy is explored.

Bunk by Kevin Young.  This follows the rise of hoaxes, humbug, plagiarists, phonies, post-facts, and fake news.

Cover me by Ray Padgett.  The stories behind the greatest cover songs of all time.

The Family Tree cemetery field guide by Joy Neighbors.  How to find, record, and preserve your ancestors’ graves.

The great Halifax explosion by John Bacon.  The astonishing true story of history’s largest man-made explosion before the atomic bomb, and its world-changing aftermath.

Happiness by Christophe Andre.  25 ways to live joyfully through art.

The mindful way to a good night’s sleep by Tzivia Gover.  Discover how to use dreamwork, meditation, and journaling to sleep deeply and wake up well.

The newcomers by Helen Thorpe.  A powerful and moving account of how refugee teenagers at a Denver public high school learn English and become Americans.

Sense of occasion by Harold Prince.  In this fast-moving, candid, conversational, and entertaining memoir, Prince – the most honored director/producer in the history of the American theater – looks back over his 70 year career.

The tattoo dictionary by Trent Aitken-Smith.  Discover the true meanings behind over 200 popular tattoos with this comprehensive book illustrated with over 100 tattoo designs.

The Third Reich by Thomas Childers.  A riveting study delves deeply into the conditions of the perfect storm that allowed Hitler and his Nazi party to seize and wield unprecedented power.

Total cat mojo by Jackson Galaxy.  The ultimate guide to life with your cat.

William Wegman: being human by William Wegman.  More than 300 photos collected to illustrate the artist’s humanistic and witty approach to his subjects, his beloved Weimaraners.  Divided into 16 themed chapters, this showcases some best known images along with previously unseen gems.

Children’s Books

FICTION

Feather by Ceo Wenxuan

I got the rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison

My lazy cat by Christine Roussey

Papillon goes to the vet by A.N. Kang

Read the book, lemmings! by Ame Dyckman

Seamus’s short story by Heather Hartt-Sussman

Snow scene by Richard Jackson

When the moon comes by Paul Harbridge

When the snow falls by Linda Booth Sweeney

Where, oh where is baby bear? by Ashley Wolff

NON-FICTION

About habitats: seashores by Cathryn Sill

Baby animals playing by Suzi Eszterhas

Beginner’s guide to coding by Marc Scott

Danza!: Amalia Hernandez and el Ballet Folklorico de Mexico by Duncan Tonatiuh

Dazzle ships: World War I and the art of confusion by Chris Barton

Deadliest: 20 dangerous animals by Steve Jenkins

Miguel’s brave knight: young Cervantes and his dream of Don Quixote poems by Margarita Engle

Sergeant Reckless: the true story of the little horse who became a hero by Patricia McCormick

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Titles for November!

FICTION:

 The art of keeping secrets by Rachael Johns.   They started out as “misfit” moms at their sons’ private school.  They shared everything – or so they thought.  Now on a trip to NYC, their tight hold on the secrets they’ve keep for years begins to slip.

Beneath the depths by Bruce Coffin.  A police procedural in which a lawyer who’s already antagonized half the people in Maine winds up dead and, every pine tree in Portland seems chock-full of suspects.

The best kind of people by Zoe Whittail.  A local schoolteacher is arrested, leaving his family to wrestle with the possibility of his guilt, in this novel about loyalty, truth, and happiness.

Fresh complaint by Jeffrey Eugenides.  A collection of stories that the author has been steadily producing through the years.

The girl who takes an eye for an eye by David Lagercrantz.  Lisabeth Salander teams up with an investigative journalist to uncover the secrets of her childhood.

Good me bad me by Ali Land.  Milly’s mother is a serial killer.  Though she loves her mother, the only way to make her stop is to turn her in to the police.  Milly is given a fresh start: a new identity and a home with an affluent foster family.  But Milly has secrets of her own.

Haunted by Richard Patterson. A detective from New York takes his family on a vacation to Maine and is enlisted by local cops to help solve a crime in the woods.

Little fires everywhere by Celeste Ng.  An artist with a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

Merry and bright by Debbie Macomber.  A temp, who works for a strict and stressed boss, is given a social life when family members create an online dating profile for her.

The ninth hour by Alice McDermott.  A powerfully affecting story spanning the 20th century of a widow and her daughter and the nuns who serve their Irish-American community in Brooklyn.

Origin by Dan Brown.  After reconnecting with one of his first students, who is now a billionaire futurist, Professor Robert Langdon must go on a perilous quest with a beautiful museum director.

P.S. from Paris by Marc Levy.  A modern-day love story between a famous actress hiding in Paris and a bestselling writer lying to himself.  They knew their friendship was going to be complicated, but love – and the City of Lights – just might find a way.

Paradox bound by Peter Clines.  An aimless young man escapes his dead-end town when he meets a time-traveling adventuress.  A rousing adventure novel that marries steampunk aesthetics to the seminal concept of protecting American liberty.

Proof of life by J.A. Jance.  When J.P. Beaumont is asked to investigate the death of his nemesis, it leads to an old case once thought solved.

Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor.  This begins with a 13 year old girl’s disappearance from an English village, and then tracks the village through the following years, as teenagers become adults, people grow old and die, and couples get together and separate while what happened to the girl remains a mystery.

The rules of magic by Alice Hoffman.  Hoffman delights us in this prequel to Practical Magic as three siblings discover both the power and curse of their magic.

The Salt Line by Holly Jones.  In the future, the US border has receded behind a salt line – a ring of scorched earth that protects its citizens from deadly disease-carrying ticks.  Those within the zone live safe, if limited, lives in a society controlled by a common fear.  Only adrenaline junkies who pay a fortune to tour what’s left of nature stray past the salt line.

Sourdough by Robin Sloan.  How many novels can boast an obstreperous sourdough starter as a key character?  This is a delightful and heartfelt read.

Star Wars: from a certain point of view.  An anthology of short stories retells the original “Star Wars” from the point of view of supporting characters.

To be where you are by Jan Karon.  Three generations of Kavanaghs face changes in their lives.

Winter solstice by Elin Hilderbrand.  The Quinns celebrate the holidays when one family member returns from the war in Afghanistan but the gathering turns rocky.

NONFICTION:   

American wolf by Nate Blakeslee.  The enthralling story of the rise and reign of O-Six, the celebrated Yellowstone wolf, and the people who loved or feared her.

The best of us by Joyce Maynard.  In this touching memoir, Maynard chronicles her 2nd marriage.  She beautifully renders the joys of falling in love later in life and the pain of watching her husband die of pancreatic cancer.  Her heartfelt story resonate with those who have loved and lost.

The comfort food diaries by Emily Nunn.  Nunn chronicles her journey to heal old wounds and find comfort in the face of loss through travel, home-cooked food, and the company of friends and family.

The encyclopedia of animal predators by Janet Dohner.  Learn about each predator’s traits and behaviors, identify the tracks and signs of more than 50 predators to protect your livestock, poultry, and pets.

Grant by Ron Chernow.  Ulysses Grant was a complex, mostly admirable figure, and this may become the definitive biography for the foreseeable future.

Hiding in the bathroom by Morra Aarons-Mele.  An introvert’s road map to getting out there in the business world (when you’d rather stay home).

In the shadows of the American century by Alfred McCoy.  Can the US extend the “American century” or will China guide the globe for the next 100 years?  McCoy boldly lays out a series of scenarios that could lead to the end of Washington’s world domination by 2030.

Killing England by Bill O’Reilly.  Major events and battles during the Revolutionary War are told from the perspectives of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and others.

Logical family: a memoir by Armistead Maupin.  The author of the Tales of the City series chronicles his odyssey from the old South to freewheeling San Francisco, and his evolution from curious youth to ground-breaking writer and gay rights pioneer.

Mayhem by Sigrid Rausing.  A searingly powerful memoir about the impact of opioid addiction on a family.

Of mess and moxie by Jen Hatmaker.  Wrangling delight out of this wild and glorious life, Hatmaker presents a round of hilarious tales, shameless honesty, and hope for the woman who has forgotten her moxie.

Vacationland by John Hodgman.  Mild departures from the routine inspire neurotic palpitations in these dourly funny essays that peg the stories to several unnerving locals.

Vinyl Me, Please.  100 albums you need in your collection.

Why we sleep by Matthew Walker.  The first sleep study by a leading scientific expert, this reveals groundbreaking explorations of sleep, explaining how we can harness its transformative power to change our lives for the better.

NEW MUSIC CDs:

Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie

Life changes by Thomas Rhett

Lost and gone forever by Guster

Twin Peaks (music from the limited event series)

Through the eyes of love by Melissa Manchester

Flicker by Niall Horan

 NEW DVDs:

Big little lies (2017) starring Nicole Kidman and Reese Witherspoon

The big sick (2017) starring Kumail Nanjiani, Holly Hunter and Ray Romano

Wonder woman (2017) starring Gal Gadot and Chris Pine

Hero (2017) starring Sam Elliott

This is us: the complete first season (2017) starring Mandy Moore

The beguiled  (2017) starring Colin Farrell, Nicole Kidman, and Kirsten Dunst

12 monkeys (1995) starring Bruce Willis and Brad Pitt

 

 

New Books – October 2017

FICTION

Any dream will do by Debbie Macomber.  As Shay Benson begins her life anew by building a relationship with Pastor Drew, her brother’s return threatens to undo it all.

Caroline: Little House revisited by Sarah Miller.  Peeling back the layers of Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie, this reveals another side of Caroline Ingalls, Wilder’s mother.  Not to be missed by Wilder’s grown-up fans or those who enjoy historical fiction.

Crime scene by Jonathan Kellerman.  Clay Edison, a deputy coroner and former star athlete, investigates a possible murder.

The Cuban affair by Nelson DeMille.  Set in 2015 during the early days of the thaw between the US and Cuba – a line from the novel perfectly describes this page-turner:  “Sex, money, and adventure.  Does it get any better than that?”

Don’t let go by Harlan Coben.  Coben explores the big secrets and little lies that can destroy a relationship, a family, and even a town in this powerful thriller.

Enigma by Catherine Coulter.  Agents Savich and Sherlock race against the clock to catch an international criminal and solve the enigma of the man called John Doe.

The followers by Rebecca Wait.  A struggling single mother falls under the spell of a charismatic cult leader, but her rebellious 12 year old daughter isn’t quite so gullible.

 A gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles.  A Russian count undergoes 30 years of house arrest.

Glass Houses by Louise Penny.  Penny shatters the conventions of the crime novel to explore what Gandhi called the court of conscience – a court that supersedes all others.

The golden house by Salman Rushdie.  A modern American epic set against the panorama of contemporary politics and culture – a hurtling, page-turning mystery that is equal parts The Great Gatsby and The Bonfire of the Vanities.

The last Tudor by Phillippa Gregory.  The youngest Grey sister, Mary, is left to face her ruthless cousin, Queen Elizabeth.

A legacy of spies by John LeCarre.  The undisputed master returns with a riveting new book – his first Smiley novel in more than 25 years.

The locals by Jonathan Dee.  Here are the dramas of the 21st century America – rising inequality, working class decline, a new authoritarianism – played out in the classic setting of some of our greatest novels: the small town.

My absolute darling by Gabriel Tallent.  A remarkably self-sufficient 14 year old girl must fight to save herself from her abusive survivalist father.

North Haven by Sarah Moriarty.  A portrait of the family scars and faults passed along the generations, brilliantly capturing life on the Maine coastline, where time seems to stand still even as the water never stops moving.

The punch escrow by Tal Klein.  Fans of hard SF and time travel will enjoy this imaginative debut.

The right time by Danielle Steel.  The author Alexandra Winslow, writing under the pseudonym Alexander Green, creates a double life that isolates her.

Robert B. Parker’s The hangman’s sonnet by Reed Coleman.  This Jessie Stone novel involves a reclusive folk singer.

Secrets in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas must separate rumors from reality when a woman who traffics in other people’s secrets is silenced.

Seeing red by Sandra Brown.  The TV journalist Kerra Bailey and former federal agent John Trapper join forces to expose a web of conspiracy behind a hotel bombing in Dallas.

Sleeping beauties by Stephen King and Owen King.  The authors tell the highest of high-stakes stories: what might happen if women disappeared from the world of men?

The store by James Patterson.  Two NY writers go undercover to expose the secrets of a powerful retailer.

Strange practice by Vivian Shaw.  Fans who enjoy gaslamp fantasies will appreciate how Shaw brings her Victorian monsters into the modern age.

We shall not all sleep by Estep Nagy.  Set on a small Maine island, this is a richly told story of American class, family, and manipulation – a compelling portrait of a unique and privileged WASP stronghold on the brink of dissolution.

Y is for yesterday by Sue Grafton.  Yesterday was for youthful indiscretions.  Today is for consequences.

NONFICTION

After the eclipse by Sarah Perry.   A mother’s murder, a daughter’s search.  In a fierce memoir of a mother’s murder outside of her daughter’s bedroom in rural Maine, a daughter’s coming-of-age in the wake of immense loss, and her mission to know the woman who gave her life.

Dying: a memoir by Cory Taylor.  This slender volume brings a fresh point of view to end of life care, the concept of having a sense of control over the unknown, and the role of chance in life.  This deep meditation is beautifully written and destined to be an important piece of conversation surrounding death.

The far away brothers by Lauren Markham.  The deeply reported story of identical twin brothers who escape El Salvador’s violence to build new lives in California – fighting to survive, to stay, and to belong.

A farewell to ice by Peter Wadhams.  Based on five decades of research and observation, this is a haunting and unsparing look at the melting ice caps and what their disappearance will mean.

Feeling Jewish by Devorah Baum.  A young critic offers an original, passionate, and erudite account of what it means to feel Jewish – even when you are not.

The four tendencies by Gretchen Rubin.  The indispensable personality profiles that reveal how to make your life better (and other peoples lives better too).

Install your own solar panels by Joe Burdick.  Designing and installing a photovoltaic system to power your home.

Madness by Sam Sax.  An astounding debut collection of poems – Winner of the 2016 National Poetry Series Competition.  In this collection, Sax explodes the linkage between desire, addiction, and the history of mental health.

Nomadland by Jessica Bruder.  A book about low-income Americans (mostly seniors) eking out a living while driving from locale to locale for seasonal employment.

The plant paradox by Steven Gundry.  Most of us have heard of gluten – a protein found in wheat that can cause widespread inflammation in the body.  Americans spend billions on gluten-free diets in an effort to protect their health.  But what if we’ve been missing the root of the problem?

Quakeland by Kathryn Miles.  A journey around the US in search of the truth about the threat of earthquakes leads to spine-tingling discoveries, unnerving experts and ultimately the kind of preparation that will actually help guide us through disasters.

The republic for which it stands by Richard White.  This offers a fresh and integrated interpretation of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age as the seedbed of modern America.

This blessed earth by Ted Genoways.  Both a concise exploration of the history of the American small farm and a vivid, nuanced portrait of one family’s fight to preserve their legacy and the life they love.

What happened by Hillary Clinton.  The former secretary of state relates her experience as the first woman candidate nominated for president by a majority party and reveals what she was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history.

What I found in a thousand towns by Dar Williams.  A beloved folk singer presents an impassioned account of the fall and rise of the small American towns she cherishes.

Why Buddhism is true by Robert Wright.  Neuroscience and psychology findings are used to support Buddhist practice and meditation and show how it holds the key to moral clarity and enduring happiness.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.