New Items ~ June 2018

FICTION

Adjustment Day by Chuck Palahniuk.  Young men take on geriatric politicians who are pushing the country toward a third world war.

American by day by Derek Miller.  A gripping and timely novel that follows Sigrid, a dry-witted Norwegian detective, from Oslo to the U.S. on a quest to find her missing brother.

Big guns by Steve Israel.  From the congressman-turned-novelist comes a comic tale about the mighty firearm industry, a small Long Island town, and Washington politics.

Circe by Madeline Miller.  This tells about Circe’s evolution from insignificant nymph to formidable witch best known for turning Odysseus’ sailors into swine.

Date with malice by Julia Chapman.  Mystery readers who love to escape to Louise Penny’s village of Three Pines will enjoy becoming acquainted with the town of Bruncliffe and its quirky residents.

Dead girl running by Christina Dodd.  Two emotionally damaged characters find hope, self-forgiveness, and love in this modern version of Gaslight that hooks readers and keeps them mesmerized until the end.

The fallen by David Baldacci.  Amos Decker, known as the Memory Man, puts his talents toward solving a string of murders in a Rust Belt town.

Family and other catastrophes by Alexandra Borowitz.  A wedding weekend tests an eccentric family’s bonds.  Humor and heart mix here and it will resonate with anyone who loves their family despite said family’s best efforts.

The flight attendant by Chris Bohjalian.  A flight attendant wakes up in the wrong hotel, in the wrong bed, with a dead man – and no idea what happened.

Home for unwanted girls by Joanna GoodmanPhilomena meets Orphan Train –  the story of a young unwed mother who is forcibly separated from her daughter at birth and the lengths to which they go to find each other.

 Line of glory by Thomas Clagett.  Although the tale has been told many times, Clagett has done a masterful job of delving into the back stories of the characters involved in the Alamo, both Texan and Mexican.

The listener by Robert McCammon.  Race relations are one subject of this seductive slice of supernatural noir set in 1934 New Orleans.

The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner.  A woman is separated from her son when she begins two consecutive life sentences in a California correctional facility.

The merry spinster by Mallory Ortberg.  A collection of darkly playful stories based on classic fold and fairy tales (but with a feminist spin) that find the sinister in the familiar and the familiar in the alien.

Mile High Murder by Marcia Talley.  This mystery takes the reader on a timely and illuminating trip into the often befuddling world of marijuana legislation.

My dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray.  The tale of Alexander Hamilton’s wife – seen growing up in revolutionary New York, passionately entering into marriage, and striving to assure Hamilton’s legacy.

 Noir by Christopher Moore.  A zany tale set on the mean streets of post-World War II San Francisco, and featuring a diverse cast of characters including a hapless bartender, his Chinese sidekick, a doll with sharp angles and dangerous curves, and a black mamba.

The only story by Julian Barnes.  A love affair between a 48 year old and a 19 year old is hardly unheard of, but this reverses gender expectations.

Our little secret by Roz Nay.  Grilled by police about the missing wife of her former boyfriend, Angela reveals the fateful story of their love triangle.

The perfect mother by Aimee Molloy.  An addictive psychological thriller about a group of women whose lives become unexpectedly connected when one of their newborns goes missing.

River’s child by Mark Seiler.  Fasten your seat belt in this fantasy as our spirited heroes ride icebergs from the frozen north, battle wild men, and fall in love while they race to prevent world war.

Robert B. Parker’s old black magic by Ace Atkins.  Ironic, tough-but-tender Boston PI Spenser delves into the black market art scene to investigate a decades-long crime of dangerous proportions.

The saint of wolves and butchers by Alex Grecian.  A chilling thriller about an enigmatic hunter on the trail of a Nazi who has secretly continued his devilish work here in America.

Scot free by Catriona McPherson.  This character-driven romp is sparked by the larger-than-life quirky residents of the Last Ditch Motel, putting this laugh-out-loud whodunit on a par with the early Janet Evanovich.

The Sparsholt affair by Alan Hollinghurst.  Explores richly complex relationships between fathers and sons as it spans 7 transformative decades in England, from the 1940s through the present.

Speed the dawn by Philip Donlay.  Hundreds of white-hot meteor fragments plunge toward Earth near Monterey Bay.  Huge fires ignite the tender-dry landscape, the power grid collapse, and the fires grow.  Donovan Nash realizes he is trapped.

The spirit photographer by Jon Varese.  Historical suspense about a charismatic con man haunted – perhaps literally – by a ghost from his past.

Tomb of the unknown racist by Blanche Boyd.  Explores the intricate world of the white supremacy movement and the treacherous ways that racism shatters families and spreads its dark roots across America.

NEW DVDs

The Post (2017) starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) starring Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill

The Greatest Showman (2017) starring Hugh Jackman and Michelle Williams

NONFICTION

Accidental brothers by Nancy Segal.  The riveting story of two sets of identical twins separated at birth and improbably reunited as adults, a dream case for exploring nature and nurture.

Alt-right by Mike Wendling.  A vital guide to understanding the racist, misogynist, far-right movement that rose to prominence during Donald Trump’s election campaign.

The big ones by Lucy Jones.  A riveting history of natural disasters, their impact on our culture, and new ways of thinking about the ones to come.

Cousins Maine Lobster by Jim Tselikis.  From the co-founders of the Cousins Maine Lobster food truck comes a business book revealing to new entrepreneurs how the authors built their brand through integrity and authenticity.

 Crafting a patterned home by Kristin Nicholas.  Create a unique space that’s all your own – bold and colorful handmade projects to fill your home with pattern.

Darwin comes to town by Menno Schilthuizen.  In this delightful account, readers who assume that pigeons, cockroaches, and rats are the only representatives of city biology will learn that it is far more complex.  This is an expert romp through urban natural history.

The death and life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan.  A landmark work of science, history, and reporting on the past, present and imperiled future of the Great Lakes.

Man vs Baby by Matt Coyne.  A fresh take on the bewilderment and joy of having a baby from a rip-roaring new voice, this combination memoir and advice book is sure to charm parents everywhere.

The milk lady of Bangalore by Shoba Narayan.  Sincere and laugh-out-loud funny, Narayan’s rich and evocative writing transports readers to the busy streets of Bangalore and a fully formed picture of modern India.

My patients and other animals by Suzanne Fincham-Gray.  A moving memoir of a life spent in the company of animals – a veterinarian sheds light on the universal experiences of illness, healing, and how we care for loved ones.

Natural causes by Barbara Ehrenreich.  An epidemic of wellness, the certainty of dying, and killing ourselves to live longer…the author explores how we are killing ourselves to live long, but not better.

No immediate danger by William Vollmann.  A timely, eye-opening book about climate change and energy generation that focuses on the consequences of nuclear power production.

Our towns by James Fallows.  A surprising portrait of the civic and economic reinvention taking place in America, town by town and generally out of view of the national media.  A realistically positive and provocative view of the country between its coasts.  Eastport, Maine is one of the towns examined.

Two sisters by Asne Seierstad.  The riveting story of 2 sisters’ journey to the Islamic State and the father who tries to bring them home.  It’s a relentless thriller and a feat of reporting with profound lessons about belief, extremism, and the meaning of devotion.

Waiting for the last bus by Richard Holloway.  Now in his 9th decade, the former Bishop of Edinburgh presents a positive, meditative exploration of the many lessons we can learn from death along with forgiving ourselves and others.

PICTURE BOOKS

Baby Bear’s Book of Tiny Tales by David McPhail

Bear and Wolf by Daniel Salmieri

Funeral by Matt James

Honey by David Ezra Stein

I Am Enough by Grace Byers

Ladybug Girl and the Rescue Dogs by David Soman

Memoirs of a Parrot by Devin Scillian

On the Other Side of the Garden by Jairo Buitrago

Pip & Pup by Eugene Yelchin

This Is the Nest That Robin Built by Denise Fleming

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Car by Kate Dopirak

Wake Up, Baby Bear! by Lynn Plourde

CHAPTER BOOKS

Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World by Ashley Herring Blake

Mystery of the Bear Cub by Tamra Wight

Mystery of the Missing Fox by Tamra Wight

Serpent’s Secret: Kiranmala and the Kingdom Beyond by Sayantani DasGupta

Sky at Our Feet by Nadia Hashimi

Truth as Told by Mason Buttle by Leslie Connor

Who Killed Darius Drake? by Rodman Philbrick

You Go First by Erin Entrada Kelly

NON-FICTION

A Seal Named Patches by Roxanne Beltran

Bluegrass Boy: The Story of Bill Monroe Father of Bluegrass Music by Barb Rosenstock

Song of the Wild: A First Book of Animals by Nicola Davies

When Paul Met Artie: The Story of Simon & Garfunkel by G. Neri

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Crafty Cat and the Great Butterfly Battle by Charise Mericale Harper

NEW DVDs

Mary and the Witch’s Flower (2018) starring Ruby Barnhill and Kate Winslet.

Paw Pals: Summer Rescues  (2017) 8 episodes of Paw Patrol.

PJ Masks: Cracking the Case (2018) Join Catboy, Owlette and Gekko on their night time missions into the night to save the day in this fun-packed superhero adventure.

PJ Masks: Let’s Go PJ Masks! (2017) Another superhero adventure with Catboy, Owlette and Gekko.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

New Titles – April 2018

FICTION

An American marriage by Tayari Jones.  A newlywed couple’s relationship is tested when the husband is sentenced to 12 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

As you wish by Jude Deveraux.  One fateful summer, three very different women find themselves together in Summer Hill, Virginia, where they find they have much more in common than they realized.

Auntie Poldi and the Sicilian Lions by Mario Giordano.  As types of amateur sleuths go, the category of lusty Bavarian widow has been woefully under-represented…until now.

Bachelor girl by Kim Van Alkemade.  This is inspired by the true story of Jacob Ruppert, the millionaire owner of the NY Yankees, and his mysterious bequest in 1939 to an unknown actress, Helen Winthrope Weyant.

Bring out the dog by Will Mackin.  Navy vet Mackin turns in a virtuoso performance with this collection of loosely interconnected, military-themed short stories.

Caribbean Rim by Randy Wayne White.  Murder, sunken treasure, and pirates both ancient and modern send Doc Ford on a nightmare quest.

Closer than you know by Brad Parks.  A Virginia mom dutifully treading the path toward middle-class respectability is thrown down the rabbit hole when she’s accused of drug dealing and worse.

Court of lions by Jane Johnson.  An epic saga of romance and redemption, this brings one of the great turning points in human history to life, telling the dual stories of a modern woman and the last Moorish sultan of Granada, as they both move towards their cataclysmic destinies.

Dark in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas must find a killer inspired by police thrillers before another victim is murdered.

Dodging and burning by John Copenhaver.  In a small Virginia town still reeling from World War II, a photograph of a murdered woman propels 3 young people into the middle of a far-reaching mystery.

The escape artist by Brad Meltzer.  If you’ve never tried Meltzer, this is the one to read: a government conspiracy traces back through history to the escape artist Harry Houdini.

Finding Georgina by Colleen Faulkner.  What happens AFTER you get what you’ve always wanted?  A mother here is reunited with the daughter who was abducted as a toddler – only to face unexpected and painful challenges.

The French girl by Lexie Elliott.  The shifting dynamics within a group of college friends will keep the reader guessing until the end of this combination of a who-dun-it with a Big Chill vibe.

The innocent wife by Amy Lloyd.  You love him.  You trust him.  So why are you so scared?

Madness is better than defeat by Ned Beauman.  A wild thriller about Manhattan and Hollywood in the 1930s, Mayan gods, and a CIA operation gone terribly wrong.

The One by John Marrs.  This traces the stories of five people who find their soul mates – or do they?

The policeman’s daughter by Trudy Boyce.  Here is a cast of characters that bring the gritty neighborhood to life – a taunt, authentic depiction of life as a female beat cop will resonate with crime fiction fans.

The reluctant fortune teller by Keziah Frost.  This cast of senior citizens shine here and the book will charm any reader looking for a sweet, witty, zany read in the foreseeable future.

The shape of water by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus.  This is no mere movie novelization.  The book and the film still tell the same story – of a mute woman who falls in love with an imprisoned and equally mute creature – but in two very different ways.

Speak no evil by Uzodinma Iweala.  The untimely disclosure of a secret shared between two teens from different backgrounds sets off a cascade of heartbreaking consequences.

Sunburn by Laura Lippman.  Modern noir at its best, this will delight old movie lovers, satisfy suspense readers, and reward the author’s legion of fans.

Undiscovered country by Kelly McNees.  The combination of sympathetic yet flawed characters, rich and atmospheric details about Depression era America, and lyrical writing make this historical romance between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok a remarkable portrait.

Widow’s Point by Richard Chizmar.  An author, in search of new material, arranges to be locked inside a “haunted house” with no way of contacting the outside world.  Although no human has stepped foot inside the house in nearly 30 years, he will not be there alone….

NEW DVDs

The shape of water (2017) starring Sally Hawkins, Octavia Spencer, Michael Shannon, and Richard Jenkins

Three billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017) starring Frances McDormand, Sam Rockwell, and Woody Harrelson

Lady Bird (2017) starring Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf

Call me by your name (2017) starring Timothee Chalamet and Armie Hammer

I, Tonya (2017) starring Margot Robbie and Allison Janney

The darkest hour (2017) starring Gary Oldman and Kristin Scott Thomas

Murder on the Orient Express (2017) starring Kenneth Branagh, Michelle Pfieffer, Penelope Cruz, and Judy Dench

The Florida Project (2017) starring Wilem Dafoe

NONFICTION

Breaking sad by Shelly Fisher.  What to say after loss, what not to say, and when to just show up.

Broad band by Claire Evans.  A breakthrough book on the women – written out of history until now – who brought you the internet.

Eat the apple by Matt Young.  A gut-wrenching, beautiful memoir of the consequences of war on the psyche of a young man.

Educated: a memoir by Tara Westover.  An unforgettable memoir about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University.

Fifty weapons that changed the course of history by Joel Levy.  This looks at 50 weapons that have helped shape the last 3,500 years from the very first hand-ax to the AK-47 and beyond.

Happiness is a choice you make by John Leland.  Wisdom and stories from six New Yorkers age 85 and older that challenge notions of aging.

How to be a better person by Kate Hanley.   This fun, enlightening book features 401 everyday activities to help you become a better person and make a positive impact on the people around you.

In praise of difficult women by Karen Karbo.  From Frida Kahlo and Elizabeth Taylor to Nora Ephron, Carrie Fisher, and Lena Dunham, here are life lessons from 29 heroines who dared to break the rules.

Junk beautiful by Sue Whitney.  30 clever furniture refreshed projects to transform your home.

Meet the Frugalwoods by Elizabeth Thames.  The story of why personal finance blogger Elizabeth Thames abandoned a successful career in the city and embraced extreme frugality in order to create a more meaningful purpose-driven life and retire to a homestead in the woods.

Niki Jabbour’s veggie garden remix by Niki Jabbour.  Here are new plants to shake up your garden and add variety, flavor, and fun.

One goal by Amy Bass.  This tells the inspiring story of the soccer team in a town (Lewiston, ME) bristling with racial tension that united Somali refugees and multi-generation Mainers in their quest for state – and ultimately national – glory.

Strange survivors by One Pagan.  Learn how organisms attack and defend in the game of life.

Tomorrow will be different by Sarah McBride.  Love, loss, and the fight for trans equality.

New Children’s Books for April 2018

PICTURE BOOKS

Great dictionary caper by Judy Sierra

This zoo is not for you by Ross Collins

I’m a duck by Eve Bunting

Of thee I sing: a letter to my daughters by Barack Obama

The rabbit listened by Cori Doerrfeld

If I had a horse by Gianna Marino

Word collector by Peter H. Reynolds

Tiptoeing Tiger by Philippa Leathers

Honk! Splat! Vroom by Barry Gott

Nobody’s duck by Mary Sullivan

What do you do with a chance by Kobi Yamada

Digger and the flower by Joseph Kuefler

CHAPTER BOOKS

Just like Jackie by Lindsay Stoddard

Problim children by Natalie Lloyd

Stink: Hamlet and cheese by Megan McDonald

Judy Moody and friends: not-so-lucky Lefty by Megan McDonald

Peg & Cat: the camp problem by Jennifer Oxley

NON-FICTION

No truth without Ruth: the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Kathleen Krull

The United States v. Jackie Robinson by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Gordon: bark to the future! by Ashley Spires

DVDs

Ferdinand (2017) from the creators of Rio and Ice age

Coco (2017) starring Anthony Gonzalez and Gael Grarcia Bernal

Lego Ninjago movie (2017) starring Jackie Chan and Justin Theroux

Lion King (1994) starring Matthew Broderick

 

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

New Books in the Library!

FICTION:

The adventures of John Carson in several quarters of the world by Brian Doyle.  A young Robert Louis Stevenson is regaled by his landlord of tales of high adventure.

All grown up by Jami Attenberg.  A wickedly funny novel about a 39 year old single, childfree woman who defies convention as she seeks connection.

The arrangement by Sarah Dunn.  This is about a couple that agrees to have an open marriage, for a limited time only and while adhering to certain rules, is a polished, amusing, and highly entertaining take on modern relationships, parenthood, and suburbia.

The coming by David Osborne.  An historical novel beginning with the Lewis & Clark expedition and ending with the decimation of the Nez Perce tribe.  An epic and sure to be a hit with readers interested in the American western expansion.

Exit West by Mohsin Hamid.  Lovers in a city overwhelmed with violence hear about mysterious doors that will carry them into an alien and uncertain future.

Fast and loose by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington is enjoying a boating excursion off the Maine coast when a chance encounter leaves him somewhat the worse for wear.

Good time coming by C.S. Harris.  A powerful story of war’s destruction of property, people, hopes, and morals during the Civil War in Louisiana.  Top-notchy historical fiction reveals the Civil War in all its brutality.

The hearts of men by Nickolas Butler.  An epic novel of intertwining friendships and families set in the north woods of Wisconsin at a beloved Boy Scout summer camp.

The Hollywood daughter by Kate Alcott.  A Hollywood coming-of-age novel in which Ingrid Bergman’s affair with Roberto Rossellini forces her biggest fan to reconsider everything she was raised to believe.

The lost order by Steve Berry.  In the 12th Cotton Malone thriller, the former Justice Department operative pursues current and historical conspiracies.

Marlena by Julie Buntin.  A novel about love, addiction, and loss: the story of two girls and the feral year that will cost one her life and define the other’s for decades.

Miranda and Caliban by Jacqueline Carey.  This reimagines the back story of Shakespeare’s The Tempest as a tale of star-crossed lovers.

Never let you go by Chevy Stevens.  Eleven years ago Lindsay escaped with her young daughter and left an abusive relationship when her husband was jailed for a hit and run.  Now he is out of prison, and she is sure he will track her down.

Red sister by Mark Lawrence.  This begins a stunning epic fantasy series about a secret order of holy warriors.

The stars are fire by Anita Shreve.  This is a suspenseful novel about an extra-ordinary young woman tested by a catastrophic event and its devastating aftermath – based on the true story of the largest fire in Maine’s history.

Ties by Domenico Starnone.  Four years after leaving his wife and children, Aldo returns to them ready to rebuild.  A slim, studding meditation on marriage, fidelity, honesty, and truth.

The wages of sin by Kaite Welsh.  A tale of murder, subversion and vice in which a female medical student in Victorian Edinburgh is drawn into a murder investigation when she recognizes one of the corpses in her anatomy lecture.

Waking gods by Sylvain Neuvel.  Pure, unadulterated literary escapism featuring giant killer robots and the looming end of humankind.  In a word, unputdownable.

The wanderers by Meg Howrey. Three astronauts and their families must endure the effects of a pioneering deep-space mission.

The widow’s house by Carol Goodman.  Blends the gothic allure of Daphne DuMaurier and the crazed undertones of Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper – this is a harrowing tale of psychological suspense set in New York’s Hudson Valley.

The young wives club by Julie Pennell.  Finding your one true love happens sometime around high school in Toulouse, Louisiana.  If you are lucky, he might be the man you thought he was.  But as four friends are about to find out, not every girl has luck on her side.

NEW DVDs:

A man called Ove (2016) starring Rolf Lassgard

Hell or high water (2016) starring Jeff Bridges and Chris Pine

The legend of Tarzan (2016) starring Alexander Skarsgard and Samuel Jackson

Roots (2016) starring Forest Whitaker and Anna Paquin

Reversal of fortune (1990) starring Jeremy Irons and Glenn Close

NONFICTION:

An American sickness by Elisabeth Rosenthal.  At a moment of drastic political upheaval, here is a shocking investigation into the dangerous, expensive, and dysfunctional American healthcare system, as well as solutions to its myriad of problems.

Dodge City by Tom Clavin.  This history of the “wickedest town in the West”, full of colorful characters, focuses on Wyatt Earp and Bat Masterson.

Enduring Vietnam by James Wright.  The Vietnam War remains the all-encompassing event of the baby boomer generation the author claims in this poignant account of those who fought and died there.  This is an important investigation of the war and its effects on an entire generation.

The face of water by Sarah Ruden.  The author elegantly celebrates and translates the bible’s original languages and looks at how passages have been misunderstood over the centuries.

Fallen glory by James Crawford.  This searching survey of some of humankind’s greatest architectural accomplishments looks at the lives and deaths of history’s greatest buildings.

The 40 year old vegan by Sandra Sellini. 75 recipes to make you leaner, cleaner, and greener in the second half of life.

How not to hate your husband after kids by Jancee Dunn.  A hilariously candid account of one woman’s quest to bring her post-baby marriage back from the brink, with life-changing, real-world advice.

March 1917 by Wil Englund.  A riveting history of the month that transformed the world’s greatest nations as Russia faced revolution and America entered World War I.

My Jewish year by Abigail Pogrebin.  This travels through the calendar’s signposts with candor, humor, and a trove of info, capturing the art of Jewish observance through the eyes of a relatable wandering – and wondering – Jew.

My master recipes by Patricia Wells.  165 recipes to inspire confidence in the kitchen – the perfect successor to Julia Child’s classic The Way to Cook.

Never caught by Erica Dunbar.  George Washington had a relentless pursuit – of his runaway slave, Ona Judge.

Strangers tend to tell me things by Amy Dickinson.  America’s most popular advice columnist, “Ask Amy”, shares her journey of family, second chances, and finding love.

2Brides 2Be by Laura Abby.  In response to the dearth of guides on same sex weddings, Abby draws from her own experience and that of wedding planners to create a handbook to help women achieve the wedding of their dreams.

Walking to listen by Andrew Forsthoefel.  A memoir of one young man’s coming of age on a cross-country trek – told through the stories of the people of all ages, races, and inclinations he meets along the highways of America.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Books in the Library

 

 

FICTION:
The assassination of Margaret Thatcherand other stories by Hilary Mantel.  The author turns to contemporary England as the setting for a collection of short stories.
Bitter crossing by D.A. Keeley.  A border agent in Aroostook County tries to break up a smuggling ring.
The city of palaces by Michael Nava.  It begins as a love story of two good people – a Catholic and an atheist – who find each other in the corrupt world of belle epoch Mexico City.
Day of atonement by David Liss.  A historical thriller, this portrays 18thcentury Lisbon in vivid detail, leading up to the great earthquake of 1755.  It paints a vivid picture of the waning days of the Spanish Inquisition and of the truly evil religious leaders who led it.
Deadline by John Sandford.  Dognappers and a murdered reporter draw the attention of the Minnesota investigator Virgil Flowers.
Fives and twenty-fives by Michael Pitre.  A war novel with a voice all its own, this will stand as one of the definite renderings of the Iraq experience.
Florence Gordon by Brian Morton.  A wise novel about a woman who has lived life on her own terms for 75 defiant and determined years, only to find herself suddenly thrust to the center of her family’s various catastrophes.
Gray Mountain by John Grisham.  A downsized Wall Street lawyer joins a legal clinic in a small Virginia town, and becomes involved both in real people’s lives and in litigation against the coal mining industry.
Ice shear by M.P. Cooley.  A small town cop’s murder investigation turns deadly when she uncovers a web of politics and drugs linked to an outlaw motorcycle gang.
Motherless child by Glen Hirshberg.  No fangs, no pretty shirtless vampires, and no romance here – this is fine, old-school horror which will delight fans disgusted with the overabundance of vampire lit now dominating the genre.
The paying guests by Sarah Waters.  An enthralling novel about a widow and her daughter who take a young couple into their home in 1920s London.
Prince Lestat by Anne Rice.  The Vampire Chronicles continue after a long hiatus with the reappearance of Lestat de Lioncourt.
Road ends by Mary Lawson.  A woman finally escapes the responsibility of caring for her parent’s dysfunctional family by moving from Canada to London.  Until, that is, the family starts unraveling and her brother calls her back.
Ruth’s journey by Donald McCaig.  Authorized by the Margaret Mitchell Estate, this is the first-ever prequel to Gone With The Wind.  It recounts the life of Mammy, one of literature’s greatest supporting characters, from her days as a slave girl to the outbreak of the Civil War.
The ship of brides by Jojo Moyes.  Australian brides form friendships as they make their way to England after World War II aboard an aircraft carrier.

 

Treat us like dogs and we will become wolves by Carolyn Chute.  When a journalist sets out to investigate the mysterious leader of the nearby homeschool known as “The Prophet”, she is drawn into the life of his self-sufficient counterculture community called The Settlement.
The visitors by Sally Beauman.  A tale of love and loss, this tells of the hunt for King Tut’s tomb and the historic discovery as witnessed through the eyes of a vulnerable child whose fate becomes entangled in the dramatic quest.
The witch: and other tales re-told by Jean Thompson.  Classic fairy tales are brought into the modern age with stories that capture the magic and horror in everyday life.
The wolf in winter by John Connolly.  Carlie Parker is in Prosperous, Maine investigating the death of a homeless man…and the disappearance of his daughter.
NONFICTION:
Artful Christmas by Susan Wasinger.  30 elegant craft projects for those with Neiman Marcus tastes and Target budgets.
Destination unknown by Gay Grant.  Sent away to live with strangers to escape Nazi bombs during the Second World War in England, Patricia Phillips North kept her experiences as a child evacuee secret until another war and an unlikely friendship helped her heal from long-repressed traumas.
Fields of blood: religion and the history of violence by Karen Armstrong.  A sweeping exploration of religion’s connection to violence.
Ghosts, a natural history by Roger Clarke.  This is replete with apparitions, poltergeists, séances and the human longing to believe.
Hate crimes in cyberspace by Danielle Citron.  Frightening and infuriating, this is a demand for legal accountability for Internet barbarism and deserves widespread exposure and serious consideration.
The homeschooling handbook by Lorilee Lippincott.  How to make homeschooling simple, affordable, fun, and effective.
How to be a Victorian by Ruth Goodman.  A delightful tour through the intimate details of life in Victorian England, told by a historian who has cheerfully endured them all by living in re-created Victorian conditions.
Living hell: the dark side of the Civil Warby Michael Adams.  Mutilation, madness, chronic disease, and advanced physical decay.  Adams clusters the voices of actual soldiers on the firing line or in the hospital ward to create a virtual historical reenactment.
The Nazis next door by Eric Lichtblau.  A Times reporter tracks the disturbingly large post war influx and shows how America became a safe haven for thousands of Nazis after World War II.
On immunity by Eula Biss.  Why do we fear vaccines?  This is a provocative examination by an author who has won the National Book Critics Circle Award.
Only in Spain by Nellie Bennett.  In search of herself, the author fell passionately in love…with the land of flamenco.  This is a foot-stomping, firecracker of a memoir about food, flamenco, and falling in love.
Raw color: the circles of David Smith by David Breslin.  This addresses the relationships between landscape, industry, and the works David Smith realized between the years of 1961-63.  The Circle series was his most ambitious attempt to pair painting and sculpture.
Smoke gets in your eyes by Caitlin Doughty.  A young mortician goes behind the scenes, unafraid of the details of her curious profession.
Some desperate glory by Max Egremont.  The story of World War I through the lives and words of its poets, most of whom during that conflict.
The Swift diet by Kathie Swift.  Devised by a holistic nutritionist, this 4 week plan will be especially useful to readers suffering from Crohn’s and IBS.
The 3 promises by David Pollay.  The author explains how making 3 simple promises to yourself  – “ to find joy every day, do what you love, and to make a difference” – will make your life more positive.
Unbored games by Joshua Glenn.  Compilation of games galore from the indoors to the outdoors, from computer to traditional board games.
The VB6 cookbook by Mark Mittman.  Easy vegan cookbook for healthy vegan meals all day and flexitarian dinners at night.
Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.