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New Items ~ July 2020

FICTION

All adults here by Emma Straub.  A funny and keenly perceptive novel about the life cycle of one family – as the kids become parents, grandchildren become teenagers, and a matriarch confronts the legacy of her mistakes.

The ancestor by Danielle Trussoni.  A bewitching gothic novel of suspense that plunges readers into a world of dark family secrets, the mysteries of human genetics, and the burden of family inheritance.

The astonishing life of August March by Aaron Jackson.  An irrepressibly optimistic oddball orphan is thrust into the wilds of postwar New York City after an extraordinary childhood in a theater.  (Think Candide by way of John Irving, with a hint of Charles Dickens.)

Beach read by Emily Henry.  A romance writer who no longer believes in love and a literary writer stuck in a rut engage in a summer-long challenge that may just upend everything they believe about happily ever after.

Big summer by Jennifer Weiner.  A poignant and unputdownable novel about the power of friendship, the lure of frenemies, and the importance of making peace with yourself through life’s ups and downs.

Blindside by James Patterson.  The mayor of New York has a daughter who’s missing and in danger.  Detective Michael Bennett has a son who’s in prison.  The two strike a deal.

The book of V by Anna Solomon.  A kaleidoscopic novel intertwining the lives of three women across 3 centuries as their stories of sex, power, and desire finally converge in the present day.

The business of lovers by Eric Jerome Dickey.  In this road trip across L.A. there are deep conversations, adult situations, and a sweet love story at every turn.

Close up by Amanda Quick.  Welcome to Burning Cove, California where 1930s Hollywood glamour conceals a ruthless killer….

Dance away with me by Susan Phillips.  Two people determined to withdraw from society instead discover the power of human connection in this deeply felt romance.

The goodbye man by Jeffery Deaver.  Reward-seeker Colter Shaw infiltrates a sinister cult after learning that the only way to get somebody out…is to go in.

Guests of August by Gloria Goldreich.  Five families come together for a summer vacation that will change their lives forever in this tale of love, loss, and hope.

The henna artist by Alka Joshi.  In 1950s Jaipur, a young woman who escaped an abusive marriage and started a new life is confronted by her husband.

Hideaway by Nora Roberts.  A family ranch in Big Sur country and a legacy of Hollywood royalty set the stage for this suspense novel.

The house on Fripp Island by Rebecca Kauffman.  When two families – one rich, one not – vacation together off the coast of South Carolina, little do they know that someone won’t be returning home.

How much of these hills is gold by C Pam Zhang.  Set against the twilight of the American gold rush, two siblings are on the run in an unforgiving landscape – trying not to just survive but to find a home.

How to pronounce knife by Souvankham Thammavongsa.  Spare, unsentimental, and distilled to riveting essentials, these stories honor the surreal, funny, often wrenching realities of trying to build a life far from home.

The jetsetters by Amanda Ward.  When Charlotte wins a Mediterranean cruise, she sees it as the perfect opportunity to reconnect with her adult children.  Each character’s dysfunctions run deep, and each plot twist threatens to sink their sanity, resulting in a funny, moving tale of the complications of familial love.

The last trial by Scott Turow.  A brilliant courtroom chess match about a celebrated criminal defense lawyer and the prosecution of his lifelong friend – a doctor accused of murder.

The love story of Missy Carmichael by Beth Morrey.  Here is a love story of the most important kind: that of coming to love oneself through accepting and returning the love of others – be it people or dogs.

Murder at the Mena House by Erica Neubauer.  Well-heeled travelers from around the world flock to the Mena House Hotel – an exotic gem in Cairo where cocktails flow, adventure dispels the aftershocks of World War I, and deadly dangers wait in the shadows.

The murder of twelve by Jessica Fletcher.  Jessica takes on an Agatha Christie-style mystery when she finds herself stranded in a hotel during a blizzard with 12 strangers and a killer in their midst.

Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld.  A compelling what-might-have-been:  what if Hilary Rodham HADN’T married Bill Clinton?

The second home by Christina Clancy.  Told through the eyes of 3 siblings, this title captures the ache of nostalgia for summers past and the powerful draw of the places we return to again and again.  It is about second homes, second families, and second chances.

The shooting at Château Rock by Martin Walker.  When a local’s troubling death is linked to a Russian oligarch and his multinational conglomerate, Chief Bruno faces one of his toughest cases yet, one that brings together a French notary and a rock star – and of course, Bergerac red and white.

The sight of you by Holly Miller. A romantic and page-turning novel that poses a heartbreaking question:  Would you choose love, if you knew how it would end?

A tender thing by Emily Neuberger.  Set under the dazzling lights of late 1950s Broadway where a controversial new musical pushes the boundaries of love, legacy, and art.

Three things I know are true by Betty Culley.  Life changes forever for Liv when her older brother, Jonah, accidentally shoots himself with the gun of his best friend’s father.

A week at the shore by Barbara Delinsky.  This explores how lives and relationships are forever changed when 3 sisters reunite at their family Rhode Island beach house.

NEW DVDs

The lighthouse (2019) starring Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe

Little women (2019) starring Saoirse Ronan and Emma Watson

Doctor Sleep (2019) starring Ewan McGregor and Rebecca Ferguson

Roma (2018) starring Marina de Tavira

Star Wars: the rise of Skywalker (2019) starring Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill

1917 (2019) starring George MacKay and Dean-Charles Chapman

NEW NONFICTION

The age of Phillis by Honoree Jeffers.  A collection of original poems speaking to the life and times of Phillis Weatley, a Colonial America-era poet brought to Boston as a slave.

Dark mirror by Barton Gellman.  A well-documented account on the far-reaching impact of US domestic surveillance and the resulting intrusions of privacy.

A delayed life by Dita Kraus.  A story of survival that is rare in its coverage of life before and after the Holocaust, addressing the difficult question of what comes after such a tragedy.

Dirt by Bill Buford.  A hilariously self-deprecating, highly obsessive account of the author’s adventures in the world of French haute cuisine, for anyone who has ever found joy in cooking and eating food with their family.

Dress your best life by Dawnn Karen.  How to use fashion psychology to take your look – and your life – to the next level.

Home is a stranger by Parnaz Foroutan.  Unmoored by the death of her father and disenchanted by the American Dream, Foroutan leaves Los Angeles for Iran, 19 years after her family fled the religious police state brought in by the Islamic Theocracy.

In the name of God by Selina O’Grady.  A groundbreaking book on the history of religious tolerance and intolerance that offers an essential narrative to understanding Islam and the West today.

Kooks and degenerates on ice by Thomas Whalen.  Here to celebrate the 50th anniversary – it’s Bobby Orr, the big bad Boston Bruins, and the Stanley Cup championship that transformed hockey.

Rental style by Chelsey Brown.  This doubles as a décor piece and handy design guide and shows readers how to decorate and organize small, rented spaces on a budget.

Sigh, gone by Phuc Tran.  For anyone who has ever felt like they don’t belong, this shares an irreverent, funny, and moving tale of displacement and assimilation woven together with poignant themes from beloved works of classic literature.  The author now lives in Portland, Maine.

24 by Willie Mays.  A memoir by the Baseball Hall of Famer told in 24 chapters to correspond with his well-known uniform number.

Warhol by Blake Gopnik.  The definitive bio of a fascinating and paradoxical figure, one of the most influential artists of his – or any – age.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perspective

Short of walking a mile in another’s shoes, reading someone’s story is one of the best ways to gain understanding. Reading the work of Black authors can help the world to better understand both the difficulties and achievements of people of color in America. From classic artists to new voices and leaders, this list includes a wide range of voices and insights, as well as a variety of genres.  We hope you’ll find something of interest to add to your reading list.

 

Well-Read Black Girl

by Glory Edim

Remember that moment when you first encountered a character who seemed to be written just for you? That feeling of belonging remains with readers the rest of their lives—but not everyone regularly sees themselves in the pages of a book. In this timely anthology, Glory Edim brings together original essays by some of our best black women writers to shine a light on how important it is that we all—regardless of gender, race, religion, or ability—have the opportunity to find ourselves in literature.

“Yes, Well-Read Black Girl is as good as it sounds. . . . [Glory Edim] gathers an all-star cast of contributors—among them Lynn Nottage, Jesmyn Ward, and Gabourey Sidibe.”—O: The Oprah Magazine

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

The Fire Next Time

by James Baldwin

At once a powerful evocation of James Baldwin’s early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice, the book is an intensely personal and provocative document from the iconic author of If Beale Street Could Talk and Go Tell It on the Mountain. It consists of two “letters,” written on the occasion of the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, that exhort Americans, both black and white, to attack the terrible legacy of racism. Described by The New York Times Book Review as “sermon, ultimatum, confession, deposition, testament, and chronicle…all presented in searing, brilliant prose,” The Fire Next Time stands as a classic of literature.

“So eloquent in its passion and so scorching in its candor that it is bound to unsettle any reader.” –The Atlantic

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

Such a Fun Age

by Kiley Reid

A striking and surprising debut novel from an exhilarating new voice, Such a Fun Age is a page-turning and big-hearted story about race and privilege, set around a young black babysitter, her well-intentioned employer, and a surprising connection that threatens to undo them both.

“Kiley Reid has written the most provocative page-turner of the year….[Such a Fun Age] nestl[es] a nuanced take on racial biases and class divides into a page-turning saga of betrayals, twists, and perfectly awkward relationships….The novel feels bound for book-club glory, due to its sheer readability. The dialogue crackles with naturalistic flair. The plotting is breezy and surprising. Plus, while Reid’s feel for both the funny and the political is undeniable, she imbues her flawed heroes with real heart.” —Entertainment Weekly

 

Between the World and Me

By Ta-Nehisi Coates

In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden?

“Extraordinary . . . [Coates] writes an impassioned letter to his teenage son—a letter both loving and full of a parent’s dread—counseling him on the history of American violence against the black body, the young African-American’s extreme vulnerability to wrongful arrest, police violence, and disproportionate incarceration.”— The New Yorker

 

Red at the Bone

by Jacqueline Woodson

An unexpected teenage pregnancy pulls together two families from different social classes, and exposes the private hopes, disappointments, and longings that can bind or divide us from each other. Moving forward and backward in time, Jacqueline Woodson’s taut and powerful new novel uncovers the role that history and community have played in the experiences, decisions, and relationships of these families, and in the life of the new child.

 

“In less than 200 sparsely filled pages, this book manages to encompass issues of class, education, ambition, racial prejudice, sexual desire and orientation, identity, mother-daughter relationships, parenthood and loss….With Red at the Bone, Jacqueline Woodson has indeed risen — even further into the ranks of great literature.” – NPR

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

By Ibram X. Kendi

Some Americans insist that we’re living in a post-racial society. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America–it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues, racist ideas have a long and lingering history, one in which nearly every great American thinker is complicit.

In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. He uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to drive this history: Puritan minister Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, W.E.B. Du Bois, and legendary activist Angela Davis.

As Kendi shows, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. They were created to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation’s racial inequities.

In shedding light on this history, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose racist thinking. In the process, he gives us reason to hope.

“An engrossing and relentless intellectual history of prejudice in America…. The greatest service Kendi [provides] is the ruthless prosecution of American ideas about race for their tensions, contradiction and unintended consequences.”―Washington Post

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

The Invisible Man

By Ralph Ellison

A first novel by an unknown writer, it remained on the bestseller list for sixteen weeks, won the National Book Award for fiction, and established Ralph Ellison as one of the key writers of the century. The nameless narrator of the novel describes growing up in a black community in the South, attending a Negro college from which he is expelled, moving to New York and becoming the chief spokesman of the Harlem branch of “the Brotherhood”, and retreating amid violence and confusion to the basement lair of the Invisible Man he imagines himself to be. The book is a passionate and witty tour de force of style, strongly influenced by T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, Joyce, and Dostoevsky.

“Invisible Man is certainly a book about race in America, and sadly enough, few of the problems it chronicles have disappeared even now. But Ellison’s first novel transcends such a narrow definition. It’s also a book about the human race stumbling down the path to identity, challenged and successful to varying degrees. None of us can ever be sure of the truth beyond ourselves, and possibly not even there. The world is a tricky place, and no one knows this better than the invisible man, who leaves us with these chilling, provocative words: “And it is this which frightens me: Who knows but that, on the lower frequencies, I speak for you?” –Melanie Rehak (New York Times best-selling author)

 

Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do

Jennifer L. Eberhardt

How do we talk about bias? How do we address racial disparities and inequities? What role do our institutions play in creating, maintaining, and magnifying those inequities? What role do we play? With a perspective that is at once scientific, investigative, and informed by personal experience, Dr. Jennifer Eberhardt offers us the language and courage we need to face one of the biggest and most troubling issues of our time. She exposes racial bias at all levels of society—in our neighborhoods, schools, workplaces, and criminal justice system. Yet she also offers us tools to address it. Eberhardt shows us how we can be vulnerable to bias but not doomed to live under its grip. Racial bias is a problem that we all have a role to play in solving.

“Combining storytelling with a deep dive into the science of implicit bias, Eberhardt explains how bias and prejudice form—and she describes their pernicious effects on all of us. But she doesn’t stop at the problem: Her book shines a spotlight on what we can do to fight bias at a personal and institutional level.”—Greater Good Magazine

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

Homegoing

by Yaa Gyasi

Ghana, eighteenth century: two half-sisters are born into different villages, each unaware of the other. One will marry an Englishman and lead a life of comfort in the palatial rooms of the Cape Coast Castle. The other will be captured in a raid on her village, imprisoned in the very same castle, and sold into slavery.

Homegoing follows the parallel paths of these sisters and their descendants through eight generations: from the Gold Coast to the plantations of Mississippi, from the American Civil War to Jazz Age Harlem. Yaa Gyasi’s extraordinary novel illuminates slavery’s troubled legacy both for those who were taken and those who stayed—and shows how the memory of captivity has been inscribed on the soul of our nation.

“[Toni Morrison’s] influence is palpable in Gyasi’s historicity and lyricism; she shares Morrison’s uncanny ability to crystalize, in a single event, slavery’s moral and emotional fallout. . . . No novel has better illustrated the way in which racism became institutionalized in this country.” —Vogue

 

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir

By Patrisse Khan-Cullors  &  Asha Bandele

Raised by a single mother in an impoverished neighborhood in Los Angeles, Patrisse Khan-Cullors experienced firsthand the prejudice and persecution Black Americans endure at the hands of law enforcement. For Patrisse, the most vulnerable people in the country are Black people. Deliberately and ruthlessly targeted by a criminal justice system serving a white privilege agenda, Black people are subjected to unjustifiable racial profiling and police brutality. In 2013, when Trayvon Martin’s killer went free, Patrisse’s outrage led her to co-found Black Lives Matter with Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi.

Condemned as terrorists and as a threat to America, these loving women founded a hashtag that birthed the movement to demand accountability from the authorities who continually turn a blind eye to the injustices inflicted upon people of Black and Brown skin.

Championing human rights in the face of violent racism, Patrisse is a survivor. She transformed her personal pain into political power, giving voice to a people suffering inequality and a movement fueled by her strength and love to tell the country―and the world―that Black Lives Matter

“This is a story of perseverance from a woman who found her voice in a world that often tried to shut her out. When They Call You a Terrorist is more than just a reflection on the American criminal justice system. It’s a call to action for readers to change a culture that allows for violence against people of color.” – TIME Magazine

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

Beloved

by Toni Morrison

Sethe, its protagonist, was born a slave and escaped to Ohio, but eighteen years later she is still not free. She has too many memories of Sweet Home, the beautiful farm where so many hideous things happened. And Sethe’s new home is haunted by the ghost of her baby, who died nameless and whose tombstone is engraved with a single word: Beloved. Filled with bitter poetry and suspense as taut as a rope, Beloved is a towering achievement.

Staring unflinchingly into the abyss of slavery, this spellbinding novel transforms history into a story as powerful as Exodus and as intimate as a lullaby. – NYT

 

So You Want to Talk About Race

By Ijeoma Oluo

Widespread reporting on aspects of white supremacy–from police brutality to the mass incarceration of Black Americans–has put a media spotlight on racism in our society. Still, it is a difficult subject to talk about. How do you tell your roommate her jokes are racist? Why did your sister-in-law take umbrage when you asked to touch her hair–and how do you make it right? How do you explain white privilege to your white, privileged friend?

In So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo guides readers of all races through subjects ranging from intersectionality and affirmative action to “model minorities” in an attempt to make the seemingly impossible possible: honest conversations about race and racism, and how they infect almost every aspect of American life.

“Oluo gives us–both white people and people of color–that language to engage in clear, constructive, and confident dialogue with each other about how to deal with racial prejudices and biases.”

–National Book Review

 

Drinking Coffee Elsewhere

by ZZ Packer

Her impressive range and talent are abundantly evident: Packer dazzles with her command of language, surprising and delighting us with unexpected turns and indelible images, as she takes us into the lives of characters on the periphery, unsure of where they belong. We meet a Brownie troop of black girls who are confronted with a troop of white girls; a young man who goes with his father to the Million Man March and must decide where his allegiance lies; an international group of drifters in Japan, who are starving, unable to find work; a girl in a Baltimore ghetto who has dreams of the larger world she has seen only on the screens in the television store nearby, where the Lithuanian shopkeeper holds out hope for attaining his own American Dream.

“ZZ Packer writes a short story with more complexity and kindness than most people can muster in their creaking 500-page novels. It is the kind of brilliance for narrative that should make her peers envious and her readers very, very grateful.”—Zadie Smith  (New York Times best-selling author)

 

The Autobiography of Malcolm X: As Told to Alex Haley

In the searing pages of this classic autobiography, originally published in 1964, Malcolm X, the Muslim leader, firebrand, and anti-integrationist, tells the extraordinary story of his life and the growth of the Black Muslim movement. His fascinating perspective on the lies and limitations of the American Dream, and the inherent racism in a society that denies its nonwhite citizens the opportunity to dream, gives extraordinary insight into the most urgent issues of our own time. The Autobiography of Malcolm X stands as the definitive statement of a movement and a man whose work was never completed but whose message is timeless. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand America.

 

“Malcolm X’s autobiography seemed to offer something different. His repeated acts of self-creation spoke to me; the blunt poetry of his words, his unadorned insistence on respect, promised a new and uncompromising order, martial in its discipline, forged through sheer force of will.”—Barack Obama

 

Loving Day

By Mat Johnson

Warren Duffy has returned to America for all the worst reasons: His marriage to a beautiful Welsh woman has come apart; his comics shop in Cardiff has failed; and his Irish American father has died, bequeathing to Warren his last possession, a roofless, half-renovated mansion in the heart of black Philadelphia. On his first night in his new home, Warren spies two figures outside in the grass. When he screws up the nerve to confront them, they disappear. The next day he encounters ghosts of a different kind: In the face of a teenage girl he meets at a comics convention he sees the mingled features of his white father and his black mother, both now dead. The girl, Tal, is his daughter, and she’s been raised to think she’s white.

“[Mat Johnson’s] unrelenting examination of blackness, whiteness and everything in between is handled with ruthless candor and riotous humor.”—Los Angeles Times

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

by Michelle Alexander

Once in a great while a book comes along that changes the way we see the world and helps to fuel a nationwide social movement. The New Jim Crow is such a book. Praised by Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier as “brave and bold,” this book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness. With dazzling candor, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” By targeting black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control—relegating millions to a permanent second-class status—even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness.

“Rothstein’s work should make everyone, all across the political spectrum, reconsider what it is we allow those in power to do in the name of ‘social harmony’ and ‘progress’ with more skepticism… The Color of Law shows what happens when Americans lose their natural rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, or in the case of African-Americans, when there are those still waiting to receive them in full.” – American Conservative

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

By Barack Obama

In this lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, the son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. It begins in New York, where Barack Obama learns that his father—a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man—has been killed in a car accident. This sudden death inspires an emotional odyssey—first to a small town in Kansas, from which he retraces the migration of his mother’s family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance.

“Beautifully crafted . . . moving and candid . . . This book belongs on the shelf beside works like James McBride’s The Color of Water and Gregory Howard Williams’s Life on the Color Line as a tale of living astride America’s racial categories.”—Scott Turow

 

Behold the Dreamers

By Imbolo Mbue

Jende Jonga, a Cameroonian immigrant living in Harlem, has come to the United States to provide a better life for himself, his wife, Neni, and their six-year-old son. In the fall of 2007, Jende can hardly believe his luck when he lands a job as a chauffeur for Clark Edwards, a senior executive at Lehman Brothers. Clark demands punctuality, discretion, and loyalty—and Jende is eager to please. Clark’s wife, Cindy, even offers Neni temporary work at the Edwardses’ summer home in the Hamptons. With these opportunities, Jende and Neni can at last gain a foothold in America and imagine a brighter future.

However, the world of great power and privilege conceals troubling secrets, and soon Jende and Neni notice cracks in their employers’ façades.

When the financial world is rocked by the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the Jongas are desperate to keep Jende’s job—even as their marriage threatens to fall apart. As all four lives are dramatically upended, Jende and Neni are forced to make an impossible choice.

“A witty, compassionate, swiftly paced novel that takes on race, immigration, family and the dangers of capitalist excess.”—St. Louis Post-Dispatch

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

 

 

How to Be Less Stupid About Race: On Racism, White Supremacy, and the Racial Divide

By Crystal Marie Fleming

How to Be Less Stupid About Race is your essential guide to breaking through the half-truths and ridiculous misconceptions that have thoroughly corrupted the way race is represented in the classroom, pop culture, media, and politics. Centuries after our nation was founded on genocide, settler colonialism, and slavery, many Americans are kinda-sorta-maybe waking up to the reality that our racial politics are (still) garbage. But in the midst of this reckoning, widespread denial and misunderstandings about race persist, even as white supremacy and racial injustice are more visible than ever before.

Combining no-holds-barred social critique, humorous personal anecdotes, and analysis of the latest interdisciplinary scholarship on systemic racism, sociologist Crystal M. Fleming provides a fresh, accessible, and irreverent take on everything that’s wrong with our “national conversation about race.”

“Fleming offers a crash course in what will be a radically new perspective for most and a provocative challenge that should inspire those who disagree with her to at least consider their basic preconceptions . . . . A deft, angry analysis for angry times.” —Kirkus Reviews

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

Brown Girl Dreaming

By Jacqueline Woodson

Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.

“Ms. Woodson writes with a sure understanding of the thoughts of young people, offering a poetic, eloquent narrative that is not simply a story . . . but a mature exploration of grown-up issues and self-discovery.”—The New York Times

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration

By Isabel Wilkerson

From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves.

With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties.

“The Warmth of Other Suns is a brilliant and stirring epic, the first book to cover the full half-century of the Great Migration… Wilkerson combines impressive research…with great narrative and literary power. Ms. Wilkerson does for the Great Migration what John Steinbeck did for the Okies in his fiction masterpiece, The Grapes of Wrath; she humanizes history, giving it emotional and psychological depth.”— Wall Street Journal

 

Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More

By Janet Mock

With unflinching honesty and moving prose, Janet Mock relays her experiences of growing up young, multiracial, poor, and trans in America, offering readers accessible language while imparting vital insight about the unique challenges and vulnerabilities of a marginalized and misunderstood population. Though undoubtedly an account of one woman’s quest for self at all costs, Redefining Realness is a powerful vision of possibility and self-realization, pushing us all toward greater acceptance of one another—and of ourselves—showing as never before how to be unapologetic and real.

“An eye-opening and unapologetic story that is much greater than mere disclosure…. An enlightening, much-needed perspective on transgender identity.”, Kirkus Reviews

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

Black Leopard, Red Wolf (The Dark Star Trilogy)

By Marlon James

Tracker is known far and wide for his skills as a hunter: “He has a nose,” people say. Engaged to track down a mysterious boy who disappeared three years earlier, Tracker breaks his own rule of always working alone when he finds himself part of a group that comes together to search for the boy. The band is a hodgepodge, full of unusual characters with secrets of their own, including a shape-shifting man-animal known as Leopard.

Drawing from African history and mythology and his own rich imagination, Marlon James has written a novel unlike anything that’s come before it: a saga of breathtaking adventure that’s also an ambitious, involving read. Defying categorization and full of unforgettable characters, Black Leopard, Red Wolf is both surprising and profound as it explores the fundamentals of truth, the limits of power, and our need to understand them both.

“Black Leopard, Red Wolf is bawdy (OK, filthy), lyrical, poignant, violent (sometimes hyperviolent), riotous, funny (filthily hilarious), complex, mysterious, and always under tight and exquisite control…A world that is both fresh and beautifully realized….Absolutely brilliant.” —LA Times

 

Fire Shut Up in My Bones

By Charles M. Blow

Charles M. Blow’s mother was a fiercely driven woman with five sons, brass knuckles in her glove box, and a job plucking poultry at a factory near their segregated Louisiana town, where slavery’s legacy felt close. When her philandering husband finally pushed her over the edge, she fired a pistol at his fleeing back, missing every shot, thanks to “love that blurred her vision and bent the barrel.” Charles was the baby of the family, fiercely attached to his “do-right” mother. Until one day that divided his life into Before and After—the day an older cousin took advantage of the young boy. The story of how Charles escaped that world to become one of America’s most innovative and respected public figures is a stirring, redemptive journey that works its way into the deepest chambers of the heart.

 “Some truths cannot be taught, only learned through stories – profoundly personal and startlingly honest accounts that open not only our eyes but also our hearts to painful and complicated social realities. Charles Blow’s memoir tells these kinds of truths. No one who reads this book will be able to forget it. It lays bare in so many ways what is beautiful, cruel, hopeful and despairing about race, gender, class and sexuality in the American South and our nation as a whole. This book is more than a personal triumph; it is a true gift to us all.” – Michelle Alexander (author of The New Jim Crow)

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

The Nickel Boys

By Colson Whitehead

When Elwood Curtis, a black boy growing up in 1960s Tallahassee, is unfairly sentenced to a juvenile reformatory called the Nickel Academy, he finds himself trapped in a grotesque chamber of horrors. Elwood’s only salvation is his friendship with fellow “delinquent” Turner, which deepens despite Turner’s conviction that Elwood is hopelessly naive, that the world is crooked, and that the only way to survive is to scheme and avoid trouble. As life at the Academy becomes ever more perilous, the tension between Elwood’s ideals and Turner’s skepticism leads to a decision whose repercussions will echo down the decades.

Based on the real story of a reform school that operated for 111 years and warped the lives of thousands of children, The Nickel Boys is a devastating, driven narrative that showcases a great American novelist writing at the height of his powers.

“Whitehead’s magnetic characters exemplify stoicism and courage, and each supremely crafted scene smolders and flares with injustice and resistance, building to a staggering revelation. Inspired by an actual school, Whitehead’s potently concentrated drama pinpoints the brutality and insidiousness of Jim Crow racism with compassion and protest. . . . A scorching work.” —Booklist, starred review

 

How Not to Get Shot: And Other Advice from White People

By D.L. Hughley, Doug Moe

In America, a black man is three times more likely to be killed in encounters with police than a white guy. If only he had complied with the cop, he might be alive today, pundits say in the aftermath of the latest shooting of an unarmed black man. Or, Maybe he shouldn’t have worn that hoodie … or, moved more slowly … not been out so late … Wait, why are black people allowed to drive, anyway? With so much heartfelt guidance flying around, it seems there’s been a failure to communicate.

This isn’t a new phenomenon. White people have been giving “advice” to black folks for as long as anyone can remember, telling them how to pick cotton, where to sit on a bus, what neighborhood to live in, when they can vote, and how to wear our pants. Despite centuries of whites’ advice, it seems black people still aren’t listening, and the results are tragic.

Now, at last, activist, comedian, and New York Times bestselling author D. L. Hughley offers How Not to Get Shot, an illustrated how-to guide for black people, full of insight from white people, translated by one of the funniest black dudes on the planet. In these pages you will learn how to act, dress, speak, walk, and drive in the safest manner possible. You also will finally understand the white mind. It is a book that can save lives. Or at least laugh through the pain.

“In his hilarious yet soul-shaking truth-telling book, Hughley touches on politics, race, and life as a black American as only he can.” – Black Enterprise

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

Black Enough: Stories of Being Young & Black in America

by Ibi Zoboi

Black Enough is a star-studded anthology edited by National Book Award finalist Ibi Zoboi that will delve into the closeted thoughts, hidden experiences, and daily struggles of black teens across the country. From a spectrum of backgrounds—urban and rural, wealthy and poor, mixed race, immigrants, and more—Black Enough showcases diversity within diversity.

Whether it’s New York Times bestselling author Jason Reynolds writing about #blackboyjoy or Newbery Honor-winning author Renee Watson talking about black girls at camp in Portland, or emerging author Jay Coles’s story about two cowboys kissing in the south—Black Enough is an essential collection full of captivating coming-of-age stories about what it’s like to be young and black in America. (less)

“A compilation of short stories that offers unique perspectives on what it means to be young and black in America today. Each entry is deftly woven and full of such complex humanity that teens will identify with and see some of their own struggles in these characters. The entries offer a rich tableau of the black teen diaspora in an accessible way.” –  School Library Journal

 This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

Americanah

By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West. Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hoped to join her, but with post-9/11 America closed to him, he instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, they reunite in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion—for each other and for their homeland.

“Masterful. . . . An expansive, epic love story. . . . Pulls no punches with regard to race, class and the high-risk, heart-tearing struggle for belonging in a fractured world.” —O, The Oprah Magazine

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

The Hate U Give

By Angie Thomas

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

“Beautifully written in Starr’s authentic first-person voice, this is a marvel of verisimilitude as it insightfully examines two worlds in collision. An inarguably important book that demands the widest possible readership.” – Booklist

 

Five-Carat Soul

By James McBride

The stories in Five-Carat Soul—none of them ever published before—spring from the place where identity, humanity, and history converge. They’re funny and poignant, insightful and unpredictable, imaginative and authentic—all told with McBride’s unrivaled storytelling skill and meticulous eye for character and detail. McBride explores the ways we learn from the world and the people around us. An antiques dealer discovers that a legendary toy commissioned by Civil War General Robert E. Lee now sits in the home of a black minister in Queens. Five strangers find themselves thrown together and face unexpected judgment. An American president draws inspiration from a conversation he overhears in a stable. And members of The Five-Carat Soul Bottom Bone Band recount stories from their own messy and hilarious lives.

“McBride delivers pure gold… Five-Carat Soul shakes with laughter, grips with passion and oozes wisdom.” —Shelf Awareness

 

Don’t Call Us Dead

By Danez Smith

Award-winning poet Danez Smith is a groundbreaking force, celebrated for deft lyrics, urgent subjects, and performative power. Don’t Call Us Dead opens with a heartrending sequence that imagines an afterlife for black men shot by police, a place where suspicion, violence, and grief are forgotten and replaced with the safety, love, and longevity they deserved here on earth. Smith turns then to desire, mortality―the dangers experienced in skin and body and blood―and a diagnosis of HIV positive. “Some of us are killed / in pieces,” Smith writes, “some of us all at once.” Don’t Call Us Dead is an astonishing and ambitious collection, one that confronts, praises, and rebukes America―“Dear White America”―where every day is too often a funeral and not often enough a miracle.

“These poems can’t make history vanish, but they can contend against it with the force of a restorative imagination. Smith’s work is about that imagination―its role in repairing and sustaining communities, and in making the world more bearable. . . . Their poems are enriched to the point of volatility, but they pay out, often, in sudden joy. . . . But they also know the magic trick of making writing on the page operate like the most ecstatic speech.”―The New Yorker

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

The Girl Who Smiled Beads: A Story of War and What Comes After

By Clemantine Wamariya

Clemantine Wamariya was six years old when her mother and father began to speak in whispers, when neighbors began to disappear, and when she heard the loud, ugly sounds her brother said were thunder. In 1994, she and her fifteen-year-old sister, Claire, fled the Rwandan massacre and spent the next six years migrating through seven African countries, searching for safety—perpetually hungry, imprisoned and abused, enduring and escaping refugee camps, finding unexpected kindness, witnessing inhuman cruelty. They did not know whether their parents were dead or alive.

When Clemantine was twelve, she and her sister were granted refugee status in the United States; there, in Chicago, their lives diverged. Though their bond remained unbreakable, Claire, who had for so long protected and provided for Clemantine, was a single mother struggling to make ends meet, while Clemantine was taken in by a family who raised her as their own. She seemed to live the American dream: attending private school, taking up cheerleading, and, ultimately, graduating from Yale. Yet the years of being treated as less than human, of going hungry and seeing death, could not be erased. She felt at the same time six years old and one hundred years old

“Heartbreaking and honest, this important memoir explores the lasting effects that trauma and destruction have on an individual and emphasizes the human ability to overcome it all and build a new future—even when that new life comes with horrors of its own.” -Real Simple

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

The Underground Railroad

By Colson Whitehead

Cora is a young slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. An outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is on the cusp of womanhood—where greater pain awaits. And so when Caesar, a slave who has recently arrived from Virginia, urges her to join him on the Underground Railroad, she seizes the opportunity and escapes with him. In Colson Whitehead’s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor: engineers and conductors operate a secret network of actual tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora embarks on a harrowing flight from one state to the next, encountering, like Gulliver, strange yet familiar iterations of her own world at each stop. As Whitehead brilliantly re-creates the terrors of the antebellum era, he weaves in the saga of our nation, from the brutal abduction of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the present day. The Underground Railroad is both the gripping tale of one woman’s will to escape the horrors of bondage—and a powerful meditation on the history we all share.

“The Underground Railroad enters the pantheon of . . . the Great American Novels. . . . A wonderful reminder of what great literature is supposed to do: open our eyes, challenge us, and leave us changed by the end.” —Esquire

 

Devil in a Blue Dress

By Walter Mosley

Set in the late 1940s, in the African-American community of Watts, Los Angeles, Devil in a Blue Dress follows Easy Rawlins, a black war veteran just fired from his job at a defense plant. Easy is drinking in a friend’s bar, wondering how he’ll meet his mortgage, when a white man in a linen suit walks in, offering good money if Easy will simply locate Miss Daphne Monet, a blonde beauty known to frequent black jazz clubs.

Devil in a Blue Dress, a defining novel in Walter Mosley’s bestselling Easy Rawlins mystery series, was adapted into a TriStar Pictures film starring Denzel Washington as Easy Rawlins and Don Cheadle as Mouse.

“The social commentary is sly, the dialogue is fabulous, the noir atmosphere so real you could touch it. A first novel? That what they say. Amazing. Smashing.” – Cosmopolitan

 

The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls

By Anissa Gray

The Butler family has had their share of trials—as sisters Althea, Viola, and Lillian can attest—but nothing prepared them for the literal trial that will upend their lives.

Althea, the eldest sister and substitute matriarch, is a force to be reckoned with and her younger sisters have alternately appreciated and chafed at her strong will. They are as stunned as the rest of the small community when she and her husband, Proctor, are arrested, and in a heartbeat the family goes from one of the most respected in town to utter disgrace. The worst part is, not even her sisters are sure exactly what happened.

As Althea awaits her fate, Lillian and Viola must come together in the house they grew up in to care for their sister’s teenage daughters. What unfolds is a stunning portrait of the heart and core of an American family in a story that is as page-turning as it is important.

“The inequities of the justice system, the fortitude of women of color, and the bittersweet struggle to connect are rendered ravishly in this bighearted novel.” —Oprah Magazine

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

The Confessions of Frannie Langton

By Sara Collins

All of London is abuzz with the scandalous case of Frannie Langton, who is accused of the brutal double murder of her employers, renowned scientist George Benham and his eccentric French wife, Marguerite. Crowds pack the courtroom, eagerly following every twist, while the newspapers print lurid theories about the killings and the mysterious woman being held in the Old Bailey.

The testimonies against Frannie are damning. She is a seductress, a witch, a master manipulator, a whore. Frannie claims she cannot recall what happened that fateful evening, or how she came to be covered in the victims’ blood, even if remembering could save her life.

But she does have a tale to tell: a story of her childhood on a Jamaican plantation, her apprenticeship under a debauched scientist who stretched all bounds of ethics, and the events that brought her into the Benhams’ London home—and into a passionate and forbidden relationship.

Though her testimony may seal her conviction, the truth will unmask the perpetrators of crimes far beyond murder and indict the whole of English society itself

 “A well-crafted, searing depiction of race, class and oppression.” – New York Times

 

Secrets We Kept

By Krystal Sital

There, in a lush landscape of fire-petaled immortelle trees and vast plantations of coffee and cocoa, where the three hills along the southern coast act as guardians against hurricanes, Krystal A. Sital grew up idolizing her grandfather, a wealthy Hindu landowner. Years later, to escape crime and economic stagnation on the island, the family resettled in New Jersey, where Krystal’s mother works as a nanny, and the warmth of Trinidad seems a pretty yet distant memory. But when her grandfather lapses into a coma after a fall at home, the women he has terrorized for decades begin to speak, and a brutal past comes to light.

Violence, a rigid ethnic and racial caste system, and a tolerance of domestic abuse―the harsh legacies of plantation slavery―permeate the history of Trinidad. On the island’s plantations, in its growing cities, and in the family’s new home in America, Secrets We Kept tells a story of ambition and cruelty, endurance and love, and most of all, the bonds among women and between generations that help them find peace with the past.

 “One reads Sital’s story appalled and moved by the suffering of these indomitable women…A reader can only applaud the author who has so skillfully preserved them in such loving, precise detail.”

– New York Times

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

How to Be an Antiracist

By Ibram X. Kendi

Antiracism is a transformative concept that reorients and reenergizes the conversation about racism—and, even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. At its core, racism is a powerful system that creates false hierarchies of human value; its warped logic extends beyond race, from the way we regard people of different ethnicities or skin colors to the way we treat people of different sexes, gender identities, and body types. Racism intersects with class and culture and geography and even changes the way we see and value ourselves. In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi takes readers through a widening circle of antiracist ideas—from the most basic concepts to visionary possibilities—that will help readers see all forms of racism clearly, understand their poisonous consequences, and work to oppose them in our systems and in ourselves.

Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science with his own personal story of awakening to antiracism. This is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond the awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a just and equitable society

“What do you do after you have written Stamped From the Beginning, an award-winning history of racist ideas? . . . If you’re Ibram X. Kendi, you craft another stunner of a book. . . . What emerges from these insights is the most courageous book to date on the problem of race in the Western mind, a confessional of self-examination that may, in fact, be our best chance to free ourselves from our national nightmare.”—The New York Times

This title has been ordered, but is not currently available at Gardiner Public Library.

 

Have an author/book we didn’t include? Please let us know in the comments!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’re Back!

Well, we, (the staff), have been back in the building since early May.  Color us ALL happy to be back!

We have been able to accept return items, in a limited capacity, for about 2 weeks.  We are keeping ALL items in quarantine for at least 72 hours before we check them in and off your library cards.  Please don’t worry – there are absolutely no fines being accrued to any items checked out of the Gardiner Public Library at this time.  We are here for you, and want to be the least of your worries right now.

THE BEST NEWS . . .

We have a Pick Up Window available!!!

The window has been open for two weeks now, several hours a day, and being well used and appreciated.  The current hours for pick up are Monday thru Friday from 11:00 to 5:00.  Our pick up window is at the back of the building, to the left of the door.

For now, the only items available are items owned by us, as the state-wide van delivery service is not running.  We are hoping by August that we will be able to use the entire Minerva system, and that the InterLibrary Loan service will be up and running.

You are welcome to request items in several ways.

For those of you who are familiar with making requests through the Minerva system, continue using that system.  Please be aware however that only items owned by Gardiner are available to you.  If you scope to Gardiner, I find it easier to see what we might have here in the building,

A second way to request items is to email us with your request(s).  Please include your name; library barcode; the title(s) and format – book, DVD, CD, magazine – you would like.  The best emails to use are either – arussell@gpl.lib.me.us or scott@gpl.lib.me.us

Last, but by no means least, feel free to call us with any requests.  We will do our absolute best to find the items, let you know they are available, and have them checked out and ready for you to pick up at the window in the back of the building.

If you check your library account on-line, you may notice that it seems you have already checked out your requests and that you have them at home.  Please don’t worry, we are doing our best to keep everyone safe, and have checked the items out to you, so that we may just give them to you once we know who you are.  Yes, with the masks we are all wearing, sometimes it is rather difficult to recognize each other.

Please know – WE MISS EACH AND EVERYONE OF YOU!!!!

The Great Outdoors

The Great Outdoors

Apps and Websites that help you connect with nature/wildlife!

As we mentioned in our previous blog, spending time outdoors, even as little as 15 minutes a day, is an excellent way to take care of your mental and physical health! – We hope these will encourage you to get outside!

Leaves and paws, roots and wings, these resources cover all wild things!

Project Noah

Project Noah is a fun way to explore and document wildlife. The technology platform and community provide a powerful way for research groups to collect important ecological data. The purpose of the project is to mobilize and inspire a new generation of nature lovers. It began as an experiment to see if they could build an app for people to share their nature encounters and has evolved into a powerful global movement for both amateurs and experts. The name “Noah” is an acronym that stands for networked organisms and habitats.

Website: Project Noah

Facebook: Project Noah

Seek by iNaturalist

One of the world’s most popular nature apps, iNaturalist helps you identify the plants and animals around you. Get connected with a community of over a million scientists and naturalists who can help you learn more about nature! What’s more, by recording and sharing your observations, you’ll create research quality data for scientists working to better understand and protect nature. iNaturalist is a joint initiative by the California Academy of Sciences and the National Geographic Society. – Use the power of image recognition technology to identify the plants and animals all around you. Earn badges for seeing different types of plants, bugs, fungi and more!

Website: iNaturalist

Google Play Store: Seek by iNaturalist

Apple App Store: Seek by iNaturalist

The National Wildlife Federation Guide

America is privileged with a stunning array of animals, plants, and wild destinations—each with its own incredible story. Get to know the amazing wildlife in your backyard and beyond.

Website:Wildlife Guide

ANIMAL TRACKS & SCAT

Animals are around us in the woods, but we often don’t know that they are there. They lurk in the thick brush, hide in the trees or are nocturnal and only come out at night. However, if conditions are right, you may stumble upon some scat or tracks that they have left behind… Here are some websites to help you identify what scat and/or tracks belong to which animal!

Here’s a great guide from Alan’s Factory Outlet showing 50 Animal Footprints found in North America!

See the full version here: Ultimate Animal Track Guide

This page on the GreenBelly website gives examples of 36 common animal tracks broken down into categories such as canine, feline, hoof, bird, reptile, rodent, and more. It also gives a little information on walking patterns (such as: zig-zaggers or hoppers) and track characteristics (such as Width/Length and number of toes.)

Link: Animal Tracks Identification Guide

Animal Scat Resources:

WLR Scat Identification Guide: Animal Poop Identification Guide

North Woods Field Guide: Animal Scat Notes

 

BIRDS OF A FEATHER…

Audubon Bird Guide

The Audubon Bird Guide is a free and complete field guide to more than 800 species of North American birds, right in your pocket. Built for all experience levels, it will help you identify the birds around you, keep track of the birds you’ve seen, and see where the birds are with nearby birding hotspots and real-time sightings from eBird!

Google Play Store: Audubon Bird Guide

Apple App Store: Audubon Bird Guide

Birds Complete Reference Guide

A complete birding reference app that includes songs, calls, images and videos for over 11,400 species of birds!

Google Play Store: Birds Complete Reference Guide

Apple App Store: Birds Complete Reference Guide

NestWatch

NestWatch is a nationwide monitoring program designed to track status and trends in the reproductive biology of birds, including when nesting occurs, number of eggs laid, how many eggs hatch, and how many hatchlings survive. Have you found an unidentified nest, and want to know what bird it belongs to? With a little detective work, you can determine whose nest or eggs you found with the help of NestWatch!

Website: NestWatch

The Feather Atlas

THE FEATHER ATLAS is an image database dedicated to the identification and study of the flight feathers of North American birds. The feathers illustrated are from the curated collection of the National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory. – Browse feathers, look up particular species, or identify a feather of your own!

Website: The Feather Atlas

A few other bird sources:

Wild Bird Egg Identification: Wild Bird Egg Identification

All About Birds.Org: Bird Guide – Browse By Shape

 

CREEPY CRAWLIES…

Pest World for kids

A great website for kids full of “bug” related information, ebooks, games, crafts, fun facts, and videos!

Website: Pest World For Kids

SnakeSnap

SnakeSnap is a mobile application that uses photo identification to help identify unknown snakes, and teach us about the uses and benefits these animals provide to our eco-system. Built for everyone from an avid snake enthusiast, to anyone just interested in learning more about all snake species. SnakeSnap’s mission is for everyone to learn how to co-exist with these beautiful creatures.

Google Play Store: SnakeSnap!

Apple App Store: SnakeSnap!

The Butterfly Website

A website dedicated to our pretty little winged friends… Discover all kinds of butterfly facts, get checklists, get help identifying butterflies, learn how to say butterfly in different languages, and more!

Website: The Butterfly Website

Check out their dragonfly website as well: The Dragonfly Website

 

A few bee resources:

Did you know there are about 20,000 different species of bees in the world? Use these resources to learn all about bees and other stinging insects such as wasps and hornets!

Stinging Insects 101: Learn the difference between bees, wasps, hornets, and more: Pest World – Stinging Insects

How to identify different types of bees: Mother Nature Network – Bee Identification

”Sciencing”: How to Identify Bees, Wasps & Hornets: Sciencing – Bee Identification

Tick safety

Ticks are arachnids, like spiders and mites. They are mostly found in wooded areas and the open or grassy areas at the edges of wooded areas. Tick-borne diseases have rapidly become a significant public health issue in Maine and throughout much of the United States. The incidence and distribution of these pathogens continues to increase, and can result in severe health issues for those affected. Of the multiple tick-borne diseases found in the U.S., five are known to occur in Maine, including Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, Borrelia miyamotoi disease, and Powassan encephalitis. All five of these diseases can be transmitted by the deer tick (Ixodes scapularis).

The following resources will help with tick protection, prevention, identification, and management.

Maine.gov’s tick information page: Maine.gov – Tick Information

Maine.gov’s downloadable tick guide: Maine.gov – Tick Identification

UMaine’s Cooperative Extension: Tick Lab: University of Maine – Cooperative Extension : Tick Lab

 

PLANTS, TREES, & FUNGI…

PlantNet

PlantNet is an application that allows you to identify and better understand all kinds of plants living in nature (such as flowering plants, trees, grasses, conifers, ferns, vines, wild salads or cacti) simply by photographing them with your smartphone.  PlantNet is also a great citizen science project: all the plants you photograph are collected and analyzed by scientists around the world to better understand the evolution of plant biodiversity and to better preserve it.

Google Play Store: PlantNet Plant Identification

Apple App Store: PlantNet Plant Identification

 Arbor Day Foundation’s  What Tree Is That? (Online)

A Guide to More Common Trees Found in North America

Website: Arbor Day Foundation – What Tree Is That?

Flora Incognita

The Flora Incognita App enables you to identify plants automatically quickly, easily and accurately. In addition to the specific plant species name, a species profile page presents further information such as characteristics, distribution or protection status of the species.

Google Play Store: Flora Incognita

Apple App Store: Flora Incognita

Shroomify – USA Mushroom Identification

Mushroom ID made easy, by selecting the characteristics of the fungi you would like to identify the in-app algorithms work out the most likely matches. The app comes pre-loaded with over 400 common Fungi and over 1000 images. You can also view the ‘Top 20’ of the month which lists all the common Fungi you can find in the month you are in!

Google Play Store: Shroomify – USA Mushroom Identification

Apple App Store: Shroomify – USA Mushroom Identification

A few other fungi resources:

United States Forest Service downloadable field guide: Field Guide to Common Macrofungi in Eastern Forests and Their Ecosystem Functions

David Fischer’s Mushroom website: American Mushrooms

Mushroom Expert website: Mushroom Expert

IN THE SKY

SkySafari – Astronomy App

 

SkySafari is a powerful planetarium that fits in your pocket, puts the universe at your fingertips, and is incredibly easy to use! Simply hold your device to the sky and quickly locate planets, constellations, satellites, and millions of stars and deep sky objects. Packed with interactive information and rich graphics, discover why SkySafari is your perfect stargazing companion under the night sky.

Google Play Store: SkySafari – Astronomy App

Apple App Store: SkySafari – Astronomy App

Star Walk 2 Free – Sky Map, Stars & Constellations

Star Walk is a great astronomy guide to explore the sky day and night, identify stars, constellations, planets, satellites, asteroids, comets, ISS, Hubble Space Telescope and other celestial bodies in real time in the sky above you. Learn a lot about the solar system, constellations, stars, comets, asteroids, spacecraft, nebulas, and more!

Google Play Store: Star Walk 2

Apple App Store: Star Walk 2

Stellarium Web

Stellarium Web is an online planetarium running in your web browser!  It shows a realistic star map, just like what you see with the naked eye, binoculars or a telescope. Includes information on stars, constellations, planets, comets, satellites (such as the ISS), and other deep sky objects.

Website: Stellarium

Field Guide to Clouds

The UCAR Center for Science Education’s Field Guide to Clouds is a portable guidebook to identifying clouds. Learn about the different clouds in the sky, including how they form, how they get their names, and what they can tell you about the weather.

Google Play Store: Field Guide To Clouds

Apple App Store:  Field Guide To Clouds

A few other cloud sources

NASA downloadable Cloud Identification Chart: S’COOL Cloud Identification

Arizona Edu Lecture: Cloud Types

WeatherWizKids: Weather Wiz Kids

 

 

BRING THE OUTDOORS IN!

VIRTUAL TOURS

 

Kenai Flords National Park, Alaska

Rappel into a crevasse, kayak through icebergs, and watch a glacier recede.

Link: https://artsandculture.withgoogle.com/en-us/national-parks-service/kenai-fjords/exit-glacier-tour

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii

Fly over an active volcano, explore a lava tube, and look out across volcanic cliffs.

Link: https://artsandculture.withgoogle.com/en-us/national-parks-service/hawaii-volcanoes/nahuku-lava-tube-tour

Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico

Explore incredible formations, trek by headlamp through a cave, fly with thousands of bats, and even “see through the eyes of a bat.”

Link: https://artsandculture.withgoogle.com/en-us/national-parks-service/carlsbad-caverns/natural-entrance-tour

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Gaze up at the night sky, ride horse-back through a canyon, and see hoodoos up close.

Link: https://artsandculture.withgoogle.com/en-us/national-parks-service/bryce-canyon/sunset-point-tour

Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida

Dive a shipwreck, swim through the third-largest coral reef in the world, and tour a Civil War-era fort.

Link: https://artsandculture.withgoogle.com/en-us/national-parks-service/dry-tortugas/near-little-africa-tour

Great Wall of China Virtual Tour

Commonly considered a wonder of the world, the Great Wall of China boasts a history of over 2,000 years and stretches more than 3,000 miles across several provinces of northern China, making it one of the most impressive ancient structures on the planet.

Link: https://www.thechinaguide.com/destination/great-wall-of-china

The Great Pyramid of Giza Virtual Tour

The Great Pyramid of Giza is a defining symbol of Egypt and the last of the ancient Seven Wonders of the World. It is located on the Giza plateau near the modern city of Cairo and was built over a twenty-year period during the reign of the king Khufu (2589-2566 BCE, also known as Cheops) of the 4th Dynasty.

Link: https://youtu.be/EaQr917lRgI

Fairbanks, Alaska – Virtual Tour

Explore the Midnight Sun and Northern Lights, Float down the Chena River, Experience the thrill of Dog Mushing, and more!

Link:  https://www.explorefairbanks.com/explore-the-area/360/

Great Barrier Reef – Virtual Tour

Explore one of the greatest wonders of the natural world on an engaging and in-depth interactive journey with David Attenborough.

Link: http://attenboroughsreef.com/

VIRTUAL WALKING/HIKING

Tall Sky Walker’s hikes include: Yellowstone National Park, Moraine Lake, Ponderosa Pine Forest, Smith Rock State Park, Waldo Lake, and many more!

Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCP2WJOpZQu2BFUqZ6UN5Tfw

The Flying Dutchman’s hikes include: Olympic National Park, Hoh Rain Forest, Silver Falls State Park, Redwood National Park, Havasupai Falls, and more!

Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOk03SPpDvItHCDQAJljqUA/videos

4K Relaxation Channel includes virtual hikes, walking tours, drone/bird eye views, and many other beautiful nature videos.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg72Hd6UZAgPBAUZplnmPMQ/videos

 

WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

Explore.org – LiveCams

Want to see what African wildlife is up to? Need a dose of cute kittens and puppies? Feel like floating around with some jellyfish, seals, or manatees? Interested in taking a snoop inside a Honey bee hive? Curious what our feathered friends as doing? Want to take a peek at some animal sanctuaries? Just need some Zen? Explore Livecams has got you covered!

Link: https://explore.org/livecams

Smithsonian’s National Zoo – LiveCams

Lions, and cheetahs, and bears, oh my! – The Smithsonian National Zoo has a handful of LiveCams for your viewing pleasure!

Link: https://nationalzoo.si.edu/webcams

Goat Milk Stuff & Beekman Farm – LiveCams

Is there anything cuter than baby goats?! Watch these little cuties sleep, eat, and play on Goat Milk Stuff & Beekman Farms webcams!

Link 1: https://goatmilkstuff.com/pages/goat-cam-livestreams

Link 2: https://beekman1802.com/pages/the-goats

EarthCam – LiveCams

The EarthCam website offers an array of creatures to watch including Giraffes, Meerkats, Wolves, Sea Otters and more! (They also have cams that highlight Iconic Landmarks, Lake Life, Ocean and Sea Life, and more)

Link: https://www.earthcam.com/events/animalcams/

 

GO OUTSIDE!

Don’t forget to actually get outside! – Take a hike, go for a bike ride, walk around your neighborhood, or even just hang-out in your back yard! Spending time outdoors, even as little as 15 minutes a day, is an excellent way to take care of your mental and physical health!

 

The American Hiking Society has a few guidelines for safe outdoor use:

-Follow whatever the local government guidelines, such as social distancing, are (every city is under different restrictions right now).

-If possible, stay within close enough distance of your home that you can avoid stopping for gas, snacks, restroom breaks, etc., none of which allow for social distancing.

-Do not carpool with friends or family who are not members of your household.

-Avoid parks or trails that have become crowded, even if the area is officially open.  If the parking lot is crowded, there are already too many people there. Turn around and find another location or go home.

Bass Falls Preserve: https://www.alna.maine.gov/bass-falls-preserve-trail

Curtis Homestead Conservation Area: https://www.tklt.org/curtis

Happy Farm Trail: https://www.midcoastconservancy.org/preserve/sheepscot-valley/happy-farm-trail-whitefield-trails-committee/

Hidden Valley Nature Center: https://www.midcoastconservancy.org/preserve/hidden-valley-nature-center/

The Kennebec Rail Trail: https://www.krrt.org/

Papermill Trail/Miller Park: https://www.traillink.com/trail/papermill-trail/

Salt Bay Heritage Trail: https://www.coastalrivers.org/trail/salt-bay-heritage-trail/

Smithfield Plantation: https://www.historicsmithfield.org/

Stetser Preserve: https://www.mainetrailfinder.com/trails/trail/stetser-preserve-trail

Trout Brook Preserve: https://www.mainetrailfinder.com/trails/trail/trout-brook-preserve-trails

Webber-Rogers Farmstead Conservation Area: https://www.tklt.org/webberrogers

Whitefield Salmon Preserve: https://www.midcoastconservancy.org/preserve/sheepscot-valley/whitefield-salmon-preserve/

Maine Trail Finder

The Maine Trail Finder website is a great resource for finding hiking/biking/walking trails in Maine.  The site enables you to search by activity, difficulty, distance, area, and status.

Visit their site here: https://www.mainetrailfinder.com/

Geocaching

Geocaching is an outdoor recreational activity, in which participants use a GPS or mobile device and other navigational techniques to hide and seek containers, called “geocaches” or “caches”, at specific locations marked by coordinates all over the state.  Geocaching is fun activity for the entire family, a good excuse to get out outdoors and enjoy some fresh air and exercise!

Join the world’s largest treasure hunt:  https://www.geocaching.com/play

Venture Outdoors: Youth Explorer Button Series

This series is great for families who want to feel more comfortable getting outside! The Button Series is comprised of 8 different activities designed for youth ages 5-11. Complete each component in the series to earn a button. Complete all activities to earn a Venture Outdoors special prize.

Join the adventure here: https://www.ventureoutdoors.org/virtual-outdoor-experiences/youth-explorer-button-series/

 

Venture Outdoors: Adult Adventure Learning Series

This series is great for anyone who wants to feel more comfortable getting outside! They provide information to help you learn and engage in a variety of outdoor experiences that can be done both in and outdoors. Categories include: Knot Tying, Trail Basics, Tree Identification, and more

Join the adventure: https://www.ventureoutdoors.org/virtual-outdoor-experiences/adult-adventurer-learning-series/

Right now the American Hiking Society is holding a weekly photo contest (prizes vary) to encourage each other to share our photos of our little outdoor escapes whether it be a hike, a walk around your neighborhood, or just playing in your own backyard, any outdoor activity counts!

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AmericanHiking/

Quarantine Bingo

The Washington Post has created both indoor and outdoor Bingo cards to keep you busy during quarantine!

Link: https://www.washingtonpost.com/travel/2020/05/01/getting-antsy-try-quarantine-bingo/

Looking For Something To Do?

TV/MOVIES

Crackle

Crackle is a free to use video entertainment network featuring full-length movies, TV shows, and original programming. Crackle is available on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles, or online at: www.crackle.com

FilmRise

Filmrise offers a great selection of movie and TV entertainment. Enjoy hit shots, popular movies, riveting documentaries, kids shows, world cinema and more. Pluto is available on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, YouTube, video game consoles, or online at: www.filmrise.com

HappyKids.tv

HappyKids.tv provides safe entertainment for children ages 1-10. Kids can watch non-stop rhymes, music, popular shows, stories, and movies. HappyKids.tv is available on: Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles or online at: https://happykids.tv/

Hoopla

Hoopla is a web and mobile library media streaming platform for TV, movies, music, magazines, audio books, comics, and e-book. Hoopla allows Gardiner Public Library patrons to download or stream media content. Hoopla is available on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles, or online at: https://www.hoopladigital.com/

PBS KIDS

PBS Kids features more than 1,000 videos from over a dozen top PBS KID TV series, including Curious George, The Cat in the Hat Knows A Lot About That, Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood, Dinosaur, Train, Sesame Street and more! PBS KIDS is available on: Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles or online at: https://pbskids.org/

(The also website offers Apps, Albums, E-books, and more.)

Pluto TV

Pluto TV offers 250+ live TV channels & 1000s of movies on-demand. Enjoy news, sports, lifestyle, reality shows, movies, documentaries, and much more. Pluto is available on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles, or online at: www.pluto.tv

Tubi

Tubi is a free to use video entertainment network featuring the largest free library of popular movies and TV Shows. Tubi is available on: Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles or online at: www.tubitv.com

EDUCATIONAL

batteryPOP: 

batteryPOP features the best fun, kid safe educational videos for math, science, health, animals, reading, computers, and more! batteryPOP is available on: Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, or online at: https://www.batterypop.com

The British Museum – Virtual Tour (https://www.britishmuseum.org/)

The British Museum, in the Bloomsbury area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture. Its permanent collection of some eight million works is among the largest and most comprehensive in existence. Visit their touring page here: https://britishmuseum.withgoogle.com/

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden – Daily Videos (http://cincinnatizoo.org/)

The mission and vision of the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden is dedicated to creating adventure, conveying knowledge, conserving nature, and serving the community. The Zoo is currently holding daily Home Safaris on their Facebook page. Visit their page here: https://www.facebook.com/cincinnatizoo/

Georgia Aquarium – Animal Cams (https://www.georgiaaquarium.org/)

The Georgia Aquarium is a public aquarium in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. Georgia Aquarium is home to hundreds of species. The aquarium currently has webcams set up in 9 different animal areas including Beluga Whales, Sea Otters, Penguins, and more! Visit their cams here: https://www.georgiaaquarium.org/webcam/beluga-whale-webcam/

The Houston Zoo – Animal Cams (https://www.houstonzoo.org/)

The Houston Zoo is a 55-acre zoological park located within Hermann Park in Houston, Texas. The Zoo prides itself on connecting communities with animals to inspire action to save wildlife. The zoo currently has webcams set up in 6 different animal areas including chimps, giraffes, elephants, and more! Visit their cams here: https://www.houstonzoo.org/explore/webcams/ or visit their Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/houstonzoo/

The Louvre – Virtual Tour (https://www.louvre.fr/en)

The Louvre, or the Louvre Museum, is the world’s largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. The museum currently has virtual tours of 4 famous exhibits. Visit their touring page here: www.louvre.fr/en/visites-en-ligne#tabs

The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Virtual Tour (https://www.metmuseum.org/)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art of New York City, colloquially “the Met”, is the largest art museum in the United States. “Viewers can experience the magic of standing in an empty gallery after-hours, witnessing a bustling space in time-lapse, or floating high above The Met Cloisters for a bird’s-eye view.” Visit their touring page here: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/online-features/met-360-project

The Museum of Modern Art – Virtual Tour (https://www.moma.org/)

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Manhattan, New York City. Founded in 1929 as an educational institution, The Museum of Modern Art is dedicated to being the foremost museum of modern art in the world. Visit their touring page here: https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/sophie-taeuber-arp/swKioHNhYqZoLw?hl=en

NASA – Virtual Tour (https://www.nasa.gov/)

NASA Glenn Research Center (https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/home/index.html) is a NASA center, located in Cleveland, Ohio. The center designs game-changing technology for spaceflight that enables further exploration of the universe. Visit their touring page here: https://www.nasa.gov/glennvirtualtours

Langley Research Center (https://www.nasa.gov/langley) located in Hampton, Virginia is the oldest of NASA’s field centers. NASA’s Langley Research Center is working to make revolutionary improvements in aviation, conducting comprehensive studies of Earth’s atmosphere, and developing concepts and technologies needed for the journey to the Moon, Mars and solar system. Visit their touring page here: https://oh.larc.nasa.gov/oh/

The San Diego Zoo – Animal Cams (https://zoo.sandiegozoo.org/)

The San Diego Zoo is a zoo in Balboa Park, San Diego, California, is a non-profit wildlife sanctuary which is home to over 3,700 rare and endangered animals from over 650 species and subspecies, and over 700,000 exotic plants. The zoo currently has webcams set up in 11 different animal areas including tigers, polar bears, pandas, and more! Visit their cams here: https://kids.sandiegozoo.org/videos

The Shedd Aquarium – Daily Videos (https://www.sheddaquarium.org/)

Shedd Aquarium is an indoor public aquarium in Chicago, Illinois, The aquarium is currently holding daily animal videos on their Facebook page. Visit today to experience unbelievable animals from around the globe, including sea otters, dolphins, penguins and more! Visit their page here: https://www.facebook.com/sheddaquarium/

Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History – Virtual Tour (https://naturalhistory.si.edu/)

The National Museum of Natural History is a natural history museum administered by the Smithsonian Institution, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. – The Smithsonian has created a room-by-room 360-degree view of the entire museum. Visit their touring page here: https://naturalhistory2.si.edu/vt3/NMNH/

The Smithsonian – Streaming App

The Smithsonian also offers streaming videos. Stream free award-winning entertainment from Smithsonian Channel and explore worlds of history, mystery, science, and pop culture. The Smithsonian streaming app is available on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles, or online at: https://watch.smithsonianchannel.com/

Scholastic – Daily Projects

Children’s book publishers Scholastic has launched Learn at Home, a website offering daily enrichment projects for kids stuck at home, sorted by grade level. Some of the lessons for younger kids use Scholastic’s BookFlix service, but Scholastic has created a generic login and password (username: Learning20, password: Clifford) to unlock access. Visit this website at: https://classroommagazines.scholastic.com/support/learnathome.html

Ted Talks – Streaming App

Ted Talks streaming allows users to browse more than 2,000 Ted Talks from remarkable people, by topic, and mood, from tech and science, to the surprises of your own psychology. The Ted Talks streaming app is available on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles, or online at: https://www.ted.com/

The Vatican Museums – Virtual Tour (http://www.museivaticani.va/content/museivaticani/en.html)

The Vatican Museums are the public art and sculpture museums in the Vatican City – Rome, Italy. The museum currently has 7 site tours including Sistine Chapel, St. Peter’s Basilica, and Raphael’s Room, Visit their virtual tour here: http://www.museivaticani.va/content/museivaticani/en/collezioni/musei/tour-virtuali-elenco.1.html

WeAreTeachers – Website

WeAreTeachers is a website that has tons of resources for learning at home. The website will point users in the direction of fun websites, games, app, and hands-on activities to assist and extend the distance learning for student’s K-5. Visit this website at: www.weareteachers.com/resources-learning-home   *The WeAreTeachers website also provides a great list of Children’s Authors doing online read-alouds & activities. You can view their list here: www.weareteachers.com/virtual-author-activities

 NEWS

ABC News – Streaming App

The ABC News app offers coverage of the most important news stories of the day, breaking news, live streams, and clips covering events at home and worldwide from Good Morning America, World News Tonight with David Muir, Nightline, 20/20, and This Week with George Stephanopoulos. ABC News App is available on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles, or online at: https://abcnews.go.com/

CBSNews Live 24/7 – Streaming App

The CBS News app features CBSN, the 24/7 digital streaming news network from CBS News, as well as on demand video from CBS’s award-winning news programs such as CBS Evening News, CBS The Morning, 60 Minutes, 48 Hours, Sunday Morning, and Face the Nation. Find on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles, or online at: https://www.cbsnews.com/mobile/

Haystacktv – Streaming App

Watch 200+ Local and World News TV channels suchs as CBS Interactive, Newsy, C|Net, and more. The perfect channel or screensaver for those that like to be in the know! The NewsON app is available on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, or online at: www.haystack.tv

NBCNews – Streaming App

Explore world-class video from NBC News and MSNBC. Get the latest clops about the most important news from shows such as Nightly News, TODAY, Meet the Press, Morning Joe, and The Rachel Maddow Show. The NBC App is available on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, video game consoles and online at: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile/

NewsON – Streaming App

Watch live, local newscasts from 200+ local news stations for free. Live news, previous newscasts (up to 48 hours), or news clips from your favorite stations. The NewsON app is available on Roku, Amazon Devices, Google Play Store, Apple App Store, or online at: https://newson.us

E-BOOKS/AUDIOBOOKS

Audible Stories

For as long as schools are closed, Audible is open. Kids (from little listeners to teens) everywhere can instantly stream an incredible collection of stories including titles across six different languages, that will help them continue dreaming, learning, and just being kids. All stories are free to stream on your desktop, laptop, phone, or tablet. Visit this website at: https://stories.audible.com/start-listen

  

CloudLibrary

The CloudLibrary is an easy-to-use digital lending service which hosts a collection of downloadable audiobooks and e-books supported by public, academic, and school libraries from around the state of Maine. The app is compatible with tablets, laptops, smart phones, Kobo eReaders, Nook Readers, Kindle Fires, and Desktops. The CloudLibrary App is available in Google Play Store, The Apple App Store, The Kindle App Store, or online at: https://www.yourcloudlibrary.com/

LibriVox

LibriVox is a group of worldwide volunteers who read and record public domain texts creating free public domain audiobooks for download from their website and other digital library hosting sites on the internet. Visit this website at: https://librivox.org/

ManyBooks

ManyBooks was established in 2004 with the vision to provide an extensive library of books in digital format for free on the Internet. Their library currently has 50,000+ ebooks in genres such as: Romance, Mystery & Thriller, Classic, Science Fiction, Action & Adventure, Biography, and many more! New books are uploaded daily! (ManyBooks has also become a platform where self-publishing authors have the opportunity to introduce their work to our community) Visit this website at: www.manybooks.net/

Open Library

Open Library is an online project (of Internet Archive, a nonprofit organization) intended to create “one web page for every book ever published”. Open Library currently provides online access to 1.7 million public domain books public domain and out-of-print books in PDF, ePub, Daisy, DjVu and ASCII text. Visit this website at: www.openlibrary.org/

Project Gutenberg

Project Gutenberg is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to “encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks”. Users can borrow from a library of over 60,000 ebooks (mostly older literary works), and either download them or read them straight from the website. https://www.gutenberg.org/

Storyline Online

Storyline Online is a free literacy resource for home use. Storyline Online, streams imaginatively produced videos featuring celebrated actors reading children’s books alongside creatively produced illustrations. For each book, supplemental curriculum developed by a literacy specialist is provided, aiming to strengthen comprehension and verbal and written skills for English-language learners worldwide. You can access Storyline Online via their YouTube Channel: www.youtube.com/user/StorylineOnline or Website: www.storylineonline.net

Gardiner Library – Temporary Closure

The Gardiner Public Library is temporarily closed. This decision was made by the Gardiner City Council.  We are sorry, but, at this point, we have no concrete idea when we will reopen.  We will continue to monitor the situation and reassess as more information becomes available.

The decision to close was, and is an incredibly difficult decision.  We are following the directive of the Gardiner City Council, as they are concerned about our patrons and the staff of the City of Gardiner. Early actions to increase social distancing are the best way to contain the spread of COVID-19, according to the CDC. Closing the library, and City Hall, is the best way to protect the health of our community at this time.

While we are closed, we will carry out extra cleaning and disinfecting of the building. We will stop charging all overdue fines.

Our professional librarians will be available during normal business hours via email and telephone to help navigate our digital lending services and resources, and to provide answers to reference questions and readers’ advisory for all the eBooks you’ll be checking out!

We also encourage you to continue to use the Gardiner Public Library by:
Downloading eBooks and audiobooks
Streaming movies and TV shows
Take advantage of Digital Maine Library resources with your Gardiner card
•Browse our website for helpful links, book lists, and resources
•Stay connected with us on Facebook. We will be posting on Facebook each day with helpful information, links, and conversations to keep you engaged and informed during this time.

Additionally, we also recommend the following resources free without a library card:

Scholastic’s Learn at Home website: classroommagazines.scholastic.com
Biblioboard: library.biblioboard.com, collections of e-books, classics from world literature, items from Oxford University’s Bodleian Library, articles, images, books, etc. spanning a wide range of topics.

It is important to remember that COVID-19 is not connected to race, ethnicity or nationality. Sharing accurate information from trusted sources is critical to combat misinformation.

Find reliable and up-to-date information about the outbreak from the following vetted resources:
Maine Center for Disease Control & Prevention; key information from the State of Maine on COVID-19 updates, including preparation and response measures.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; updates on the federal response to COVID-19, including travel advisories and national infection numbers.
World Health Organization; information and guidance regarding the current outbreak of COVID-19, including daily situation reports with international infection numbers.

We look forward to seeing you online and in person again soon!

 

 

New Items ~ March 2020

FICTION

The authenticity project by Clare Pooley.  The story of a solitary green notebook that brings together six strangers and leads to unexpected friendship…and even love.

A beautiful crime by Christopher Bollen.  A twisty story of deception, set in contemporary Venice and featuring a young American couple who have set their sights on a high-stakes con.

Cesare by Jerome Charyn.  Beginning in 1937 Germany, this is a literary thriller and love story born of the horrors of a country whose culture has died, whose history has been warped, and whose soul has disappeared.

The chill by Scott Carson.  A century after an early 20th century New York community is intentionally flooded to redistribute water downstate, an inspector overseeing a dangerously neglected damn uncovers a prophecy that warns of additional sacrifices.

Dead to her by Sarah Pinborough.  A twisty psychological thriller about a savvy second wife who will do almost anything to come out on top.

Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano.  A 12 year old boy tries to start over after becoming the sole survivor of a plane crash in which he lost his immediate family.

Golden in death by J.D. Robb.  Homicide detective Eve Dallas investigates a murder with a mysterious motive – and a terrifying weapon.

Long bright river by Liz Moore.  Mickey risks her job with the Philadelphia police force by going after a murderer and searching for her missing sister.

The mercies by Kiran Hargrave.  On an icy, dark island, men hunt witches…and women fight back.  This chilling tale of religious persecution is served up with a feminist bite.

Mercy House by Alena Dillon.  Inside a century-old row house in Brooklyn, Sister Evelyn and her fellow nuns preside over a safe haven for the abused and abandoned.

The recipe for revolution by Carolyn Chute.  A blistering book about the Settlement, a radical, politically incorrect collective of the disorderly and disaffected in rural Maine.

The regrets by Amy Bonnaffons.  Reality and dream collide in this darkly playful novel about a love affair between the living and the dead.

Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart.  The unforgettable story of a sweet and lonely boy who spends his 1980 childhood in run-down public housing in Glasgow, Scotland, where Thatcher’s policies have put people out of work and where the city’s drug epidemic is around the corner.

A view to a kilt by Kaitlyn Dunnett.  A series of blizzards have kept tourists away from Moosetookalook, Maine, and shoppers out of Liss MacCrimmmon’s Scottish Emporium.  But as warmer weather brings promises of tartan sales and new faces, melting snow reveals cold-blooded murder.

NEW DVDs

A beautiful day in the neighborhood (2019)  starring Matthew Rhys and Tom Hanks

The farewell (2019)  starring Awkwafina

Harriet (2019) starring Cynthia Erivo and Leslie Odom Jr.

Parasite (2019) starring Kang Ho Song and Sun Kyun Lee

Taboo: Season 1 (2017) starring Tom Hardy

Once upon a Time in Hollywood (2019) starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt

NONFICTION

Aftershock: the human toll of war by Richard Cahan.  Haunting World War II images by America’s soldier photographers.

The book you wish your parents had read by Philippa Perry.  Definitive guide for any parent looking to navigate their past, avoid repeating their own parents’ mistakes, and ensure they don’t land their own kids in therapy.

By chance alone by Max Eisen. More than 70 years after the Nazi camps where liberated by the Allies, this details the author’s story of survival:  the back-breaking slave labor in Auschwitz, the infamous “death march”, the painful aftermath of liberation, and his journey of physical and psychological healing.

Decoding boys by Cara Natterson.  Comforting … a common-sensical and gently humorous exploration of male puberty’s many trials.

Esquire dress code.  A man’s guide to personal style as seen by Esquire magazine.

Gay like me: a father writes to his son by Richie Jackson.  This is a celebration of gay identity and parenting, and a powerful warning to the author’s son, other gay men, and the world.  He looks back on his own journey as a gay man coming of age through decades of political and cultural turmoil.

How to do nothing by Jenny Odell.  An argument for unplugging from technology in order to potentially focus attention of important matters.

Last stop Auschwitz by Eddy de Wind.  Written in Auschwitz itself, this one-of-a-kind, minute-by-minute true account is a crucial historical testament to a survivor’s fight for his life.

Something that may shock and discredit you by Daniel Ortberg.  A witty and clever collection of essays and cultural observations spanning pop culture – from the endearingly popular to the staggeringly obscure.

Very stable genius by Philip Rucker.  The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists use firsthand accounts to chart patterns of behavior within the Trump administration.

When my time comes by Diane Rehm.  Conversations about whether those who are dying should have the right to determine when life should end.

When time stopped by Ariana Neumann.  In this remarkable memoir, the author dives into the secrets of her father’s past years spent hiding in plain sight in war-torn Berlin, the annihilation of dozens of family members in the Holocaust, and the courageous choice to build anew.

Why we can’t sleep by Ada Calhoun.  The cultural and political contexts of the crises that Generation X face.

 New Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

The Cottingley fairies by Ana Sender

Growing season by Maryann Cocca-Leffler

How to catch a unicorn by Adam Wallace

Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast by Josh Funk

Lana Lynn howls at the moon by Rebecca van Slyke

Listen by Holly McGhee

Look, it’s raining by Mathieu Pierloot

No more naps! by Chris Grabenstein

Not quite narwhal by Jessie Sima

One fox : a counting book thriller by Kate Read

CHAPTER BOOKS

Homerooms & hall passes by Tom O’Donnell

Peg + Cat : Peg up a tree by Jennifer Oxley

Weird little robots by Carolyn Crimi

NON-FICTION

Antibiotics by Tamra Orr

Art Sparks: Draw, Paint, Make, and get Creative by Marlon Abrams

Egg to chicken by Rachel Tonkin

Egg to frog by Rachel Tonkin

Good night stories for rebel girls by Elena Favilli

It started with a big bang by Floor Bal

Life by the river by Holly Duhig

Life in the forest by Holly Duhig

Save the crash-test dummies by Jennifer Swanson

The speed of starlight by Colin Stuart

Stitch camp: 18 crafty projects for kids & tweens by Nicole Blum

Yes, I can listen! by Steve Metzger

DVDS

Abominable with Chloe Bennet

The angry birds movie 2 with Josh Gad

Great Yellowstone thaw by BBC Earth with Kirk Johnson

How to train your dragon. Homecoming with Jay Baruchel

Thomas & friends : Tale of the brave with Olivia Colman

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

Maine Bicentennial

M ~ The moose with loose poops

A ~ A is for Acadia

I ~ In Peppermint peril

N ~ Nautilus

E ~ Emmeline

 

B ~ Bag of bones

I ~ Interrupted forest

C ~ Cousins Maine Lobster

E ~ Eagle flies at night

T ~ Take heart

E ~ Enjoying Maine birds

N ~ Now that you mention it

N ~ No news is bad news

I ~ Irresistible Blueberry Bakeshop & Cafe

A ~ Answer in the tide

L ~ Lighthouse dog to the rescue

New Items ~ February 2020

FICTION

American dirt by Jeanine Cummins.  Intensely suspenseful and deeply humane, this novel makes migrants seeking to cross the southern US border indelibly individual.

The bells of hell by Michael Kurland.  A counter-intelligence agent recruits a number of civilians to help foil a suspected terrorist attack by German spies in New York in 1938.

The better liar by Tanen Jones.  When a woman conceals her sister’s death to claim their joint inheritance, her deception exposes a web of dangerous secrets.

The blaze by Chad Dundas.  One man knows the connection between two extraordinary acts of arson, fifteen years apart, in his Montana hometown – if only he could remember it.

Hindsight by Iris Johansen.  Investigator Kendra Michaels whose former blindness has left her with uniquely insightful observation skills – must put her life on the line to catch a murderer setting his sights on some of society’s most vulnerable.

House on fire by Joseph Finder.  Private investigator Nick Heller infiltrates a powerful and wealthy pharmaceutical family hiding something sinister.

The long petal of the sea by Isabel Allende.  This epic spans decades and crosses continents following two young people as they flee the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War in search of a place to call home.

The poison garden by Alex Marwood.  Insidious secrets and chilling revelations surround a mysterious cult.

Recipe for a perfect wife by Karma Brown.  A modern-day woman finds inspiration in hidden notes left by her home’s previous owner, a quintessential 1950s housewife.

Such a fun age by Kiley Reid.  A story of race and privilege, this is set around a young black babysitter, her well-intentioned employer, and a surprising connection that threatens to undo them both.

To the edge of sorrow by Aharon Appelfeld.  A haunting novel about an unforgettable group of Jewish partisans fighting the Nazis during World War II.

 Trouble in mind by Michael Wiley.  As a result of being shot in the head while working undercover, Sam Kelson suffers from two unusual brain conditions:  disinhibition, causing him to speak only the truth, and autopagnosia which makes him unable to recognize himself in a mirror.

The vanishing by Jayne Ann Krentz.  Decades ago in the small town of Fogg Lake, The Incident occurred: an explosion in the cave system that released unknown gasses.  The residents slept for 2 days.  When they woke up they discovered that things had changed – they had changed.

Westering women by Sandra Dallas.  This focuses on a motley group of women who form a bond traveling to California on the Overland Trail.  Readers will enjoy this modern take on the journey West that’s rife with girl power.

The wife and the widow by Christian White.  Set against the backdrop of an eerie island town in the dead of winter, this takes you to a cliff edge and asks the question: how well do we really know the people we love?

MUSIC CDs

2020 Grammy Nominees

100 Hits: the best 60s.

The Real ‘70s.

100 hits: the best 80s.

Goodbye Yellow Brick Road by Elton John

DVDs

Downton Abbey (2019) starring Hugh Bonneville, Maggie Smith, and Jim Carter

Judy (2019) starring Renee Zellweger

The Rainmaker (1956) starring Burt Lancaster and Katharine Hepburn

The Ring (2002) starring Naomi Watts

The talk of the town (1942) starring Cary Grant, Jean Arthur, and Ronald Coleman

Tales from the Crypt / Vault of Horror (1972) starring Ralph Richardson and Joan Collins

NONFICTION

The baby decision by Merle Bombardieri.  This is a clear, compassionate guide to making a parenting or childfree decision with confidence.

Boys and sex by Peggy Orenstein.  The author interviews young men on hookups, love, porn, consent, and navigating the new masculinity, offering both an examination of sexual culture and a guide on how to improve it.

Falling into joy by Conni Ponturo.  This is a book about joy and how to get it and keep it in our lives.  It is all simpler than we are making it out to be.  We just need to take the small steps towards it.

The in-betweens by Mira Ptacin.  A young writer travels to Etna, Maine to tell the unusual story of America’s longest running camp devoted to mysticism and the world beyond.

Lands of lost borders by Kate Harris.  She and a friend covered 10 countries during a 10 month bike journey from Istanbul to India.  While retracing the path of the ancient Silk Road trade route, they contend with Himalayan-sized hill climbs, unforgiving landscapes, and surly officials.

Life in medieval Europe by Daniele Cybulskie.  Fact and fiction:  what did people actually eat?  Were they really filthy?  And did they ever get to marry for love?  All this and more.

Llewellyn’s complete book of lucid dreaming by Clare Johnson.  A comprehensive guide to promote creativity, overcome sleep disturbances & enhance health and wellness.

Modern flexitarian.  Plant-inspired recipes you can flex to add fish, meat, or dairy.

Never get angry again by David Lieberman.  A comprehensive and holistic look at the underlying emotional, physical, and spiritual causes of anger, and what the reader can do to gain perspective, allowing them to never get angry again.

Nothing fancy by Alison Roman.  This helps you nail dinner with unfussy food, unstuffy vibes, and the permission to be imperfect.

Quit like a woman by Holly Whitaker.  The radical choice to not drink in a culture obsessed with alcohol.

The third rainbow girl by Emma Eisenberg.  An investigation of the murder of two young women – showing how a violent crime casts a shadow over an entire community.  It follows this crime through the complex history of Appalachia, forming a searing portrait of America – its divisions of gender and class, and of its violence.

Tightrope: Americans reaching for hope by Nicholas Kristof.  This issues a plea – deeply personal and told through the lives of real Americans – to address the crisis in working class America, while focusing on solutions to mend a half century of governmental failure.

Tiny habits by B.J. Fogg.  The expert on habit formations show how you can have a happier, healthier life – by starting small.

Travels with myself and another by Martha Gellhorn.  Dry wit and plenty of whiskey buoyed Gellhorn during terrifying flights, insect-infested hotel rooms, and tropical disease as she chased stories across the globe.

The unique states of America.  This takes us on a journey across the states to discover the country’s most iconic – and unique – destinations and experiences.

The valleys of the assassins by Freya Stark.  She blazed across the Middle East in the 1920s and 1930s searching for the legendary mountain home of the Assassins, a warrior sect that defied both crusaders and caliphs.

Welcome to the goddamn ice cube by Blair Braverman.  Chasing adventure, the author left her California hometown at 19 for dogsledding school in the Norwegian Arctic.  Her vivid account offers plenty of thrills and high-flying danger from Norwegian snowdrifts to Alaskan glaciers.

The yellow house by Sarah Broom.  An unforgettable memoir about the inexorable pull of home and family, set in a shotgun house in New Orleans East.

 New Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

Between us and Abuela: a family story from the border by Mitali Perkins

Frida Kahlo and her animalitos by Monica Brown

I’m not Millie! by Mark Pett

Ida and the whale by Rebecca Gugger

The Invisible Leash by Patrice Karst

Moth by Isabel Thomas

Skulls! by Blair Thornburgh

The way I act  by Steve Metzger

CHAPTER BOOKS

Spies: James Armistead Lafayette by Kyandreia Jones

Spies: Mata Hari by Katherine Factor

Talking leaves by Joseph Bruchac

Terror on the Titanic by Jim Wallace

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The brain: the ultimate thinking machine by Tory Woollcott

Cats: nature and nurture by Andy Hirsch

Flying machines: how the Wright brothers soared by Alison Wilgus

Polar bears: survival on the ice by Jason Viola

Rockets: defying gravity by Anne Drozd

Skyscrapers: the heights of engineering by John Kerschbaum

Wild weather: storms, meteorology, and climate by M.K. Reed

Wings of fire: the hidden kingdom by Tui Sutherland

NONFICTION

2020 Maine summer camps: real kids – real camps – real Maine! by Maine Youth Camping Foundation

Animal by Smithsonian

Animals up close by DK

Are you what you eat? by DK

The Bermuda Triangle by Elizabeth Noll

Bigfoot by Elizabeth Noll

Cells : an owner’s handbook by Carolyn Fisher

Cooking class global feast!: 44 recipes that celebrate the world’s cultures by Deanna Cook

Do all Indians live in tipis? by Smithsonian Books

ESP by Elizabeth Noll

Ghosts by Elizabeth Noll

Haunted places by Elizabeth Noll

How did I get here? by Philip Bunting

Human body by Smithsonian

Human body: [a book with guts!] by Dan Green

Science by Smithsonian

The science of poop and farts by Alex Woolf

The science of scabs and pus by Ian Graham

The science of snot and phlegm by Fiona Macdonald

UFOs by Elizabeth Noll

Wait, rest, pause: dormancy in nature by Marcie Atkins

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.