New Items ~ February 2020

FICTION

American dirt by Jeanine Cummins.  Intensely suspenseful and deeply humane, this novel makes migrants seeking to cross the southern US border indelibly individual.

The bells of hell by Michael Kurland.  A counter-intelligence agent recruits a number of civilians to help foil a suspected terrorist attack by German spies in New York in 1938.

The better liar by Tanen Jones.  When a woman conceals her sister’s death to claim their joint inheritance, her deception exposes a web of dangerous secrets.

The blaze by Chad Dundas.  One man knows the connection between two extraordinary acts of arson, fifteen years apart, in his Montana hometown – if only he could remember it.

Hindsight by Iris Johansen.  Investigator Kendra Michaels whose former blindness has left her with uniquely insightful observation skills – must put her life on the line to catch a murderer setting his sights on some of society’s most vulnerable.

House on fire by Joseph Finder.  Private investigator Nick Heller infiltrates a powerful and wealthy pharmaceutical family hiding something sinister.

The long petal of the sea by Isabel Allende.  This epic spans decades and crosses continents following two young people as they flee the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War in search of a place to call home.

The poison garden by Alex Marwood.  Insidious secrets and chilling revelations surround a mysterious cult.

Recipe for a perfect wife by Karma Brown.  A modern-day woman finds inspiration in hidden notes left by her home’s previous owner, a quintessential 1950s housewife.

Such a fun age by Kiley Reid.  A story of race and privilege, this is set around a young black babysitter, her well-intentioned employer, and a surprising connection that threatens to undo them both.

To the edge of sorrow by Aharon Appelfeld.  A haunting novel about an unforgettable group of Jewish partisans fighting the Nazis during World War II.

 Trouble in mind by Michael Wiley.  As a result of being shot in the head while working undercover, Sam Kelson suffers from two unusual brain conditions:  disinhibition, causing him to speak only the truth, and autopagnosia which makes him unable to recognize himself in a mirror.

The vanishing by Jayne Ann Krentz.  Decades ago in the small town of Fogg Lake, The Incident occurred: an explosion in the cave system that released unknown gasses.  The residents slept for 2 days.  When they woke up they discovered that things had changed – they had changed.

Westering women by Sandra Dallas.  This focuses on a motley group of women who form a bond traveling to California on the Overland Trail.  Readers will enjoy this modern take on the journey West that’s rife with girl power.

The wife and the widow by Christian White.  Set against the backdrop of an eerie island town in the dead of winter, this takes you to a cliff edge and asks the question: how well do we really know the people we love?

MUSIC CDs

2020 Grammy Nominees

100 Hits: the best 60s.

The Real ‘70s.

100 hits: the best 80s.

Goodbye Yellow Brick Road by Elton John

DVDs

Downton Abbey (2019) starring Hugh Bonneville, Maggie Smith, and Jim Carter

Judy (2019) starring Renee Zellweger

The Rainmaker (1956) starring Burt Lancaster and Katharine Hepburn

The Ring (2002) starring Naomi Watts

The talk of the town (1942) starring Cary Grant, Jean Arthur, and Ronald Coleman

Tales from the Crypt / Vault of Horror (1972) starring Ralph Richardson and Joan Collins

NONFICTION

The baby decision by Merle Bombardieri.  This is a clear, compassionate guide to making a parenting or childfree decision with confidence.

Boys and sex by Peggy Orenstein.  The author interviews young men on hookups, love, porn, consent, and navigating the new masculinity, offering both an examination of sexual culture and a guide on how to improve it.

Falling into joy by Conni Ponturo.  This is a book about joy and how to get it and keep it in our lives.  It is all simpler than we are making it out to be.  We just need to take the small steps towards it.

The in-betweens by Mira Ptacin.  A young writer travels to Etna, Maine to tell the unusual story of America’s longest running camp devoted to mysticism and the world beyond.

Lands of lost borders by Kate Harris.  She and a friend covered 10 countries during a 10 month bike journey from Istanbul to India.  While retracing the path of the ancient Silk Road trade route, they contend with Himalayan-sized hill climbs, unforgiving landscapes, and surly officials.

Life in medieval Europe by Daniele Cybulskie.  Fact and fiction:  what did people actually eat?  Were they really filthy?  And did they ever get to marry for love?  All this and more.

Llewellyn’s complete book of lucid dreaming by Clare Johnson.  A comprehensive guide to promote creativity, overcome sleep disturbances & enhance health and wellness.

Modern flexitarian.  Plant-inspired recipes you can flex to add fish, meat, or dairy.

Never get angry again by David Lieberman.  A comprehensive and holistic look at the underlying emotional, physical, and spiritual causes of anger, and what the reader can do to gain perspective, allowing them to never get angry again.

Nothing fancy by Alison Roman.  This helps you nail dinner with unfussy food, unstuffy vibes, and the permission to be imperfect.

Quit like a woman by Holly Whitaker.  The radical choice to not drink in a culture obsessed with alcohol.

The third rainbow girl by Emma Eisenberg.  An investigation of the murder of two young women – showing how a violent crime casts a shadow over an entire community.  It follows this crime through the complex history of Appalachia, forming a searing portrait of America – its divisions of gender and class, and of its violence.

Tightrope: Americans reaching for hope by Nicholas Kristof.  This issues a plea – deeply personal and told through the lives of real Americans – to address the crisis in working class America, while focusing on solutions to mend a half century of governmental failure.

Tiny habits by B.J. Fogg.  The expert on habit formations show how you can have a happier, healthier life – by starting small.

Travels with myself and another by Martha Gellhorn.  Dry wit and plenty of whiskey buoyed Gellhorn during terrifying flights, insect-infested hotel rooms, and tropical disease as she chased stories across the globe.

The unique states of America.  This takes us on a journey across the states to discover the country’s most iconic – and unique – destinations and experiences.

The valleys of the assassins by Freya Stark.  She blazed across the Middle East in the 1920s and 1930s searching for the legendary mountain home of the Assassins, a warrior sect that defied both crusaders and caliphs.

Welcome to the goddamn ice cube by Blair Braverman.  Chasing adventure, the author left her California hometown at 19 for dogsledding school in the Norwegian Arctic.  Her vivid account offers plenty of thrills and high-flying danger from Norwegian snowdrifts to Alaskan glaciers.

The yellow house by Sarah Broom.  An unforgettable memoir about the inexorable pull of home and family, set in a shotgun house in New Orleans East.

 New Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

Between us and Abuela: a family story from the border by Mitali Perkins

Frida Kahlo and her animalitos by Monica Brown

I’m not Millie! by Mark Pett

Ida and the whale by Rebecca Gugger

The Invisible Leash by Patrice Karst

Moth by Isabel Thomas

Skulls! by Blair Thornburgh

The way I act  by Steve Metzger

CHAPTER BOOKS

Spies: James Armistead Lafayette by Kyandreia Jones

Spies: Mata Hari by Katherine Factor

Talking leaves by Joseph Bruchac

Terror on the Titanic by Jim Wallace

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The brain: the ultimate thinking machine by Tory Woollcott

Cats: nature and nurture by Andy Hirsch

Flying machines: how the Wright brothers soared by Alison Wilgus

Polar bears: survival on the ice by Jason Viola

Rockets: defying gravity by Anne Drozd

Skyscrapers: the heights of engineering by John Kerschbaum

Wild weather: storms, meteorology, and climate by M.K. Reed

Wings of fire: the hidden kingdom by Tui Sutherland

NONFICTION

2020 Maine summer camps: real kids – real camps – real Maine! by Maine Youth Camping Foundation

Animal by Smithsonian

Animals up close by DK

Are you what you eat? by DK

The Bermuda Triangle by Elizabeth Noll

Bigfoot by Elizabeth Noll

Cells : an owner’s handbook by Carolyn Fisher

Cooking class global feast!: 44 recipes that celebrate the world’s cultures by Deanna Cook

Do all Indians live in tipis? by Smithsonian Books

ESP by Elizabeth Noll

Ghosts by Elizabeth Noll

Haunted places by Elizabeth Noll

How did I get here? by Philip Bunting

Human body by Smithsonian

Human body: [a book with guts!] by Dan Green

Science by Smithsonian

The science of poop and farts by Alex Woolf

The science of scabs and pus by Ian Graham

The science of snot and phlegm by Fiona Macdonald

UFOs by Elizabeth Noll

Wait, rest, pause: dormancy in nature by Marcie Atkins

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

January Weather

      January rides the wind

      Annie and Snowball and the magical house

N       Name of the wind

U       Uncommon appeal of clouds

A       After the snow

R        Rising storm

       Young snowboarder

 

W      Winter storms

       Energy from wind

      And the wind blows free

      Tracks in the snow

      Hello snow!

       Eye of the storm

R        Really good snowman

New Items ~ January 2020

FICTION

Africaville by Jeffrey Colvin.  Set in a small Nova Scotia Town settled by former slaves, this depicts several generations of one family bound together and torn apart by blood, faith, time, and fate.

After Kilimanjaro by Gayle Woodson.  Medical fiction of this kind is rare – it’s not a thriller or tearjerker, but a thoughtful novel about doctors, the work they do, and the impact that has on their patients.

The Andromeda evolution by Michael Crichton.  In this sequel to the techno-thriller that started it all, the threat returns in a gripping sequel that is terrifyingly realistic and resonant.  The Evolution is coming.

Arapaho summer by Kinley Roby.  In 1867 two Union veterans and two Arapaho women they rescue from a Lakota war party set off on the Oregon Trail in search of a new beginning.

Bloody genius by John Sandford.  Virgil Flowers will have to watch his back – and his mouth – as he investigates a college culture war turned deadly.

The confession club by Elizabeth Berg.  An uplifting novel about friendship, surprising revelations, and a second chance at love.

Crossroad by Bill Cameron.  On a desolate road in the Oregon high desert, an apprentice mortician stumbles upon a horrific crash – and into a vortex of treachery, long-buried secrets, and growing menace.

Dread journey by Dorothy Hughes.  On a transcontinental train, a starlet fears her director may be trying to kill her.

The family upstairs by Lisa Jewell.  Libby Learns the identity of her parents and inherits a London mansion, but this comes with a mystery of multiple murders.

Genesis by Robin Cook.  This takes on the ripped-from-the-headlines topic of harnessing DNA from ancestry websites to catch a killer.

Guilty, not guilty by Felix Francis.  The husband and brother of an unstable woman who’s been strangled get into a battle royal over which of them will get the other convicted of her murder.

The innocents by Michel Crummey.  Orphaned and alone in 1800s Newfoundland, a young brother and sister contend with the dire hazards of their coastal surroundings.

The kill club by Wendy Heard.  A desperate woman at the end of her rope is drawn into an intriguing, but deadly, scheme.  Just try to put this one down.

A minute to midnight by David Baldacci.  When Atlee Pine returns to her hometown to investigate her sister’s kidnapping from 30 years ago, she winds up tracking a potential serial killer.

Nothing more dangerous by Allen Eskens.  In a small Southern town where loyalty to family and to “your people” carries the weight of a sacred oath, defying those unspoken rules can be a deadly proposition.

The off-islander by Peter Colt.  A Boston-born Vietnam vet and P.I. is hired to find a missing father – but my find far more than he bargained for…

The rise of Magicks by Nora Roberts.  This closes out the trilogy “Chronicles of the One”.

Swede Hollow by Ola Larsmo.  A riveting family saga immersed in the gritty, dark side of Swedish immigrant life in America in the early 20th century.

Stuck in Manistique by Dennis Cuesta.  Two troubled lives intersect in a novel combining cozy mystery, comedy, and reflections on fractured relationships.  A hypnotic tale of family secrets that also features delightfully silly humor.

NEW DVDs

The Crown: the complete second season (2019) starring Claire Foy, Matt Smith, Victoria Hamilton, Vanessa Kirby, and John Lithgow

It: Chapter two (2019) starring Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy

Never too late (1965) starring Paul Ford and Connie Stevens

NONFICTION

A Bookshop in Berlin by Francoise Frenkel.  A rediscovered, prize-winning memoir of a fearless Jewish bookseller on a harrowing fight for survival across Nazi-occupied Europe.

Dynamic dames by Sloan De Forest.  Celebrate 50 of the most empowering and unforgettable female characters ever to grace the silver screen, as well as the artists who brought them to vibrant life!

Eightysomethings by Katharine Esty.  A practical guide to letting go, aging well, and finding unexpected happiness over the age of 80.

Finding Chika by Mitch Albom.  A moving memoir of love and loss.  You can’t help but fall for Chika.  A page-turner that will not doubt become a classic.

Here all along by Sarah Hurwitz.  Finding meaning, spirituality, and a deeper connection to life – in Judaism (after finally choosing to look there).

Hymns of the Republic by S.C. Gwynne.  An engrossing history of the final gasps of the Civil War, a year in which Americans mourned their fathers and brothers and sons but also the way their lives used to be, the people they used to be, the innocence they had lost.

If you tell by Gregg Oslen.  A shocking and empowering true-crime story of three sisters determined to survive their mother’s house of horrors.  A story of murder, family secrets, and the unbreakable bond of sisterhood.

Letters from an astrophysicist by Neil DeGrasse Tyson.  This is like a scientific Dear Abby advice column that talks about black holes, extraterrestrial sightings, and human predicaments.

The lie by William Dameron.  A candid memoir of denial, stolen identities, betrayal, faking it, and coming out.

On flowers by Amy Merrick.  Lessons from an accidental florist.  Merrick is a rare and special kind of artist who uses flowers to help us see the familiar in a completely new way.

On the plain of snakes by Paul Theroux.  Legendary travel writer Theroux drives the entire length of the U.S.-Mexico border, then goes deep into the hinterland on the back roads to uncover the rich, layered world behind today’s brutal headlines.

Unexplained by Richard Smith.  Real-life supernatural stories for uncertain times and not for the easily frightened.

A warning by Anonymous.  A senior official in the Trump administration offers an assessment of the president and makes a moral appeal.

What we will become by Mimi Lemay.  A mother’s memoir of her transgender child’s odyssey, and HER journey outside the boundaries of the faith and culture that shaped her.

The witches are coming by Lindy West.  In this wickedly funny cultural critique, the author exposes misogyny in the #MeToo era.

You are awesome by Neil Pasricha.  How to navigate change, wrestle with failure, and live an intentional life.

 NEW CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Aalfred and Aalbert by Morag Hood

Around the table that grandad built  by Melanie Heuiser Hill

Astro girl by Ken Wilson-Max

A big bed for Little Snow by Grace Lin

The Christmas tree who loved trains by Anne Silvestro

A day for skating by Sarah Sullivan

Freedom soup by Tami Charles

Good morning, snowplow! by Deborah Bruss

How to hide a lion at Christmas by Helen Stephens

Just in case you want to fly by Julie Fogliano

Little fox in the snow by Jonathan London

Making a friend by Tammi Sauer

The serious goose by Jimmy Kimmel

Small Walt and Mo the Tow by Elizabeth Verdick

The snowflake mistake by Lou Treleaven

Sofia Valdez, future prez by Andrea Beaty

Telling time by David Adler

This is not that kind of book by Christopher Healy

CHAPTER BOOKS

Beverly, right here by Kate DiCamillo

The forgotten girl by India Hill Brown

Night of the new magicians by Mary Pope Osborne

The Princess in Black and the bathtime battle by Shannon Hale

Two dogs in a trench coat go on a class trip by Julie Falatko

Wings of Fire: the poison jungle by Tui Sutherland

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Dog Man. Fetch 22 by Dav Pilkey

Sunny rolls the dice by Jennifer Holm

Welcome to Wanderland by Jackie Ball

NON-FICTION

Can I eat a mammoth? by Madeline King

Do penguins have emotions? by World Book

Greek myths and mazes by Jan Bajtlik

Why are monkeys so flexible? by World Book

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

THANK YOU!!!

Thank you for visiting us.

THank you for your donations.

ThAnk you for keeping us laughing.

ThaNk you to our volunteers.

ThanK you for your kind comments.

 

Thank You for sharing your stories.

Thank yOu for making us an anchor destination of Gardiner.

Thank yoU for making the Gardiner Public Library such a great place to work in 2019.

Holidays – Any And All You May Celebrate!

Believe it or not, we are in the midst of the “Holiday” season.

As humans, particularly American humans, we love to celebrate!  There are holidays every – yes, EVERY – day of the year.  From National Short Girl Appreciation Day (December 21, the shortest day of the year), and Cyber Monday and Cider Monday (both the Monday after Thanksgiving) to National Crossword Puzzle Day and National Bacon Day.  Each of these “holidays” are generally celebrated in December, so are part of the “Holiday Season”.

Traditionally, we think of “The Holidays” as one of the big three – Christmas, Chanukah and Kwanzaa.  Again, as Americans, whichever holiday we celebrate, we often give gifts to our loved ones.

Okay, here’s the plug for the library – –

If you didn’t know, we have several items currently available that would make great gifts for those folks you share with.

Well, what do you have, you might ask . . .

Currently, we have both note cards and prints available.  Local artist Kay Morris has given us a beautiful winter view of the front of the library.  The print is ten dollars, and the note cards are ten for fifteen dollars.

Lovely book bags are also available.  These bags have the library logo on the front and are very well made.  The bags are fifteen dollars each.

And . . . Books, we have books!

Four titles are available written by local authors ; Destination Unknown by former State Representative Gay Grant.  The Eastern. Book one, The early years : a novel and  The Eastern. Book two, Later on : a novel by Deborah Gould ;  Maine ingenuity : from waterwheels to M.I.T. by Michael McCaslin.  Each of these titles are seventeen dollars and ninety-five cents.  There are also a nice assortment of used books available, ranging in price from one to five dollars.

Is there anyone on your list that does not live in our service area?  We would love to sell you a Gardiner Public Library non-resident subscription to use as a gift.  Just think, a gift that truly will last an entire year! And for the whole family as well!

We even have pre-wrapped some of the above items, just to remove more of your stress.

So, to each of you, Happy Holidays – Each And Every One You May Celebrate!

Holiday Treats

Time for holiday treats!  I’m not a baker by any means, so when I thought about posting a recipe for cookies or bars I wanted to find something with few ingredients and limited instructions.  Bingo ! Marjorie Standish saves the day again.  Here is her recipe for Quick Party Bars which is featured in her book Cooking Down East.  Enjoy.

Quick Party Bars

1 stick margarine

½ cup light brown sugar

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla

½ cup flour

½ cup oatmeal

1 cup chocolate bits

Nuts

Cream shortening.  Add light brown sugar.  Add vanilla, egg and beat until light and creamy.  Add sifted flour, fold in oatmeal.  No baking powder in recipe.  Turn into buttered 8 by 8 inch pan and bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.

Place pan on rack to cook.  Then spread 1 cup semisweet chocolate bits, melted, all over top of baked bars.  Sprinkle chopped nuts on top.  Cool and cut into bars.

 

New Items ~ December 2019

FICTION

Agent running in the field by John Le Carre.  A seasoned solitary figure, in a desperate attempt to resist the new political turbulence swirling around him, makes connections that will take him down a very dangerous path.

All this could be yours by Jami Attenberg.  A timely exploration of what it means to be caught in the web of a toxic man who abused his power.  It shows how those webs can tangle a family for generations and what it takes to – maybe, hopefully – break free.

Blue moon by Lee Child.  Jack Reacher comes to the aid of an elderly couple and confronts his most dangerous opponents yet.

The bromance book club by Lyssa Adams.  A baseball player attempts to heal his marriage with the help of his team’s romance-novel book club.

The deserter by Nelson DeMille.  This features a brilliant and unorthodox Army investigator, his troubling new partner, and their hunt for the Army’s most notorious – and dangerous – deserter.

Find me by Andre Aciman.  In this exploration of the varieties of love, the author of Call Me By Your Name revisits its complex and beguiling characters decades after their first meeting.

Ghoster by Jason Arnopp.  A razor-sharp thriller for a social-media obsessed world.  Prepare to never look at your phone the same way again….

Holding on to nothing by Elizabeth Shelburne.  Brings us a present-day Appalachian story cast without sentiment or cliché, but with a genuine and profound understanding of the place and its people.

I lost my girlish laughter by Jane Allen.  This delicious satire of old Hollywood, originally published in 1938 and largely unknown even by cinephiles, gets a welcome reissue.

Kiss the girls and make them cry by Mary Higgins Clark.  A journalist sets out to share a #METoo story from her past and discovers that her abuser has become a powerful businessman who will do anything to keep her quiet.

The night fire by Michael Connelly.  Harry Bosch and Renee Ballard return to take up a case that held the attention of Bosch’s mentor.

Ninth house by Leigh Bardugo.  After mysteriously surviving a multiple homicide, Galaxy Stern comes face to face with dark magic, murder, and more at Yale University.

Nothing to see here by Kevin Wilson.  A moving and uproarious novel about a woman who finds meaning in her life when she begins caring for two children with remarkable and disturbing abilities.

Olive, again by Elizabeth Strout.  The author continues the life of her beloved Olive Kitteridge, a character who has captured the imaginations of millions of readers.

The revisioners by Margaret Sexton.  Here is a bracing window into Southern life and tensions, alternating between two women’s stories set nearly 100 years ago.

Secret Service by Tom Bradby.  What if the next British Prime Minister was really a Russian agent?

When she returned by Lucinda Berry.  Kate vanished from a parking lot 11 years ago, leaving behind her husband and young daughter.  When she shows up at a Montana gas station, clutching an infant and screaming for help, investigators believe she may have been abducted by a cult.

NEW DVDs

The haunting of Hill House (2019) starring Carla Gugino and Elizabeth Reaser

Nevada Smith (1966) starring Steve McQueen and Karl Malden

Discovery of witches (2019) starring Matthew Goode and Teresa Palmer

Ellen – the complete season one (1994) starring Ellen DeGeneres

NEW CDs

Country Music – a film by Ken Burns: the soundtrack

Lover by Taylor Swift

Cuz I love you by Lizzo

Best of en Vogue

NONFICTION

All blood runs red by Phil Keith.  The incredible story of the first African American military pilot, who went on to become a Paris nightclub impresario, a spy in the French Resistance, and an American civil rights pioneer.

Blood by Allison Moorer.  The singer/songwriter’s memoir may serve as solace for those who’ve faced abuse, a signal for those in it to get out, and an eye-opener for others.

Catch and kill by Ronan Farrow.  In a dramatic account of violence and espionage, investigative reporter Farrow exposes serial abuse and a cabal of powerful interests hell-bent on covering up the truth, at any cost.

Good husbandry by Kristin Kimball.  Kimball describes the delicious highs and sometimes excruciating lows of life on Essex Farm – a 500 acre farm that produces a full diet for a community of 250 people.

Home now by Cynthia Anderson.  In this detailed, sensitive portrait of Lewiston’s revitalization by African immigrants, Anderson expertly captures the multi-layered dynamics between Lewiston natives and African immigrants.  The result is a vivid and finely tuned portrait of immigration in America.

If you lived here you’d be home by now by Christopher Ingraham.  The hilarious, charming, and candid story of a writer’s decision to uproot his life and move his family to Red Lake Falls, Minnesota, population 1400 – the community he made famous as “the worst place to live in America” in a story he wrote.

In the dream house by Carmen Machado.  A revolutionary memoir about domestic abuse.  Tracing the full arc of a harrowing relationship with a charismatic but volatile partner, Machado struggles to make sense of how what happened to her shaped the person she was becoming.    A revolutionary memoir about domestic abuse. 

Janis: her life and music by Holly George-Warren.  This blazingly intimate bio establishes the Queen of Rock & Roll as the rule-breaking musical trailblazer and complicated, gender-bending rebel she was.

The less people know about us by Axton Betz-Hamilton.  In this true crime memoir, an identity theft expert tells the story of the duplicity and betrayal that inspired her career and nearly destroyed her family after their identities were stolen.

Lonely Planet’s best in travel 2020.  It really is a big deal.  International Travel publisher, Lonely Planet, has featured Maine as one of this years “Best in Travel” places.  Bring on the international tourists !

The movie musical ! by Jeanine Basinger.  An in-depth look at the singing, dancing, happy-making world of Hollywood musicals, beautifully illustrated – an essential text for anyone who’s ever laughed, cried, or sung along at the movies.

Running to glory by Sam McManis.  A moving account of a champion cross-country team made up primarily of teenager from migrant-worker families.

Scream by Margee Kerr.  Kerr takes readers on a journey on which they will experience the world’s most frightening and terrifying places firsthand.  As she explores places that make people tremble, she shares her personal dread on each of these destinations, which makes the book ever more captivating.

Sitcommentary by Mark Robinson.  From I Love Lucy to Black-ish, sitcoms have often paved the way for social change.  It has challenged the public to revisit social mores and reshape how we think about the world we live in.

Touched by the sun by Carly Simon.  A chance encounter at a summer party on Martha’s Vineyard blossomed into an improbable but enduring friendship between Simon and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

The vagina bible by Jen Gunter.  OB/GYN, writer for the New York Times and Self magazine, Dr. Jen now delivers the definitive book of vagina health, answering questions you couldn’t find the right answers to.

Vanity Fair’s women on women. These essays about women by women pack a feminist wallop, underscoring the combative resilience of notable women who never gave in to what was expected of them.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

New Items ~ November 2019

FICTION

Before the devil fell by Neil Olson.  Equal parts engaging and creepy, this twisty tale examines how secrets and regret can continue to reverberate through generations.  Possibly too creepy for late-night reading.

The bone fire by S.D. Sykes.  Oswald de Lacy brings his family to a secluded island castle to escape the Black Death, but soon a murder within the household proves that even the strongest fortress isn’t free from terror in 14th century England.

A book of bones by John Connolly.  Charlie Parker’s pursuit of his nemesis peaks in this seamless, expansive, and chilling blend of police procedural and gothic horror tale.

Cantoras by Carolina De Robertis.  In the shadow of a violent dictatorship, five queer women find the courage and strength to live their truth.

Chilling effect by Valerie Valdes.  A hilarious, offbeat space opera that skewers everything from pop culture to video games and features an irresistible foul-mouthed captain and her motley crew.

Cilka’s journey by Heather Morris.  A 16 year old, who sleeps with a concentration camp commandant in order to survive, is sentenced to a Siberian prison camp where she cares for the ill.

The Dutch house by Ann Patchett.  The story of the indelible bond between two siblings, the house of their childhood, and a past that will not let them go.

Full throttle by Joe Hill.  In a collection of short fiction, Hill dissects timeless human struggles in 13 tales of supernatural suspense, including “In the Tall Grass”, one of the 2 co-written with Stephen King.

The girl who lived twice by David Lagercrantz.  Mikael Blomkvist helps Lisabeth Salander put her past behind her.

The giver of stars by Jojo Moyes.  An extraordinary story of five women’s journey to deliver books to people who never had any, expanding horizons and changing their lives.

The guardians by John Grisham.  Cullen Post, a lawyer and Episcopal minister, antagonizes some ruthless killers when he takes on a wrongful conviction case.

Imaginary friend by Stephen Chbosky.  A pleasing book for those who like to scare themselves silly, one to read with the lights on and the door bolted.

The lying room by Nicci French.  A married woman’s affair with her boss spirals into a dangerous game of chess with the police when she discovers he’s been murdered and she clears the crime scene of all evidence.

The man who saw everything by Deborah Levy.  Multiple versions of history collide – literally – in a story that defies gravity in a daring, time-bending novel.

The nugget by P.T. Deutermann.  A novice naval aviator grows into a hero in this authentic World War II adventure.

The pursuit by Joyce Carol Oates.  A young woman is haunted by a past she doesn’t understand in this powerful story of domestic violence.

Random act by Gerry Boyle.  When Maine’s favorite reporter, Jack McMorrow, heads out to the hardware store on a routine errand, little does he know that he’s about to witness a murder that will have vicious repercussions.

Robert B. Parker’s The Bitterest Pill by Reed Coleman.  The opioid epidemic has reached Paradise, and Police Chief Jesse Stone must rush to stop the devastation.

Salvaged by Madeleine Roux.  A woman on the run.  A captain adrift in space.  One of them is infected with an alien parasite.  In this dark sci-fi thriller, a young woman must confront her past so the human race will have a future.

The shape of night by Tess Gerritsen.  A woman tries to outrun her past and is drawn to a coastal village in Maine – and to a string of unsolved murders.

The secrets we kept by Lara Prescott. During the Cold War, members of the CIA’s typing pool aid its mission to smuggle the banned book Doctor Zhivago behind the Iron Curtain.

Tuesday Mooney talks to ghosts by Kate Racculia.  A dying billionaire sends one woman and a cast of dreamers on a citywide treasure hunt in this irresistible novel.

The twisted ones by T. Kingfisher.  When a woman clears out her deceased grandmother’s home in rural North Carolina, she finds long-hidden secrets about a strange colony of beings in the woods.  It’s The Blair Witch Project meets The Andy Griffith Show.

The water dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates.  This captures the brutality of slavery and explores the underlying truth that slaveholders could not dehumanize the enslaved without also dehumanizing themselves.

Who are you, Calvin Bledsoe? by Brock Clarke.  An exuberant comic novel involving explosions, secret agents, religious fanatics, and a hapless narrator dragged around Europe by his long-lost aunt.

What happens in Paradise by Elin Hilderbrand.  Irene Steele visits the island of St. John to get to the bottom of the mysterious life and death of her husband.

The world that we knew by Alice Hoffman.  A rabbi’s daughter creates a mystical Jewish creature that is sworn to protect a 12 year old girl in World War II Europe.

NONFICTION

Beautiful on the outside by Adam Rippon.  The former Olympic figure skater shares his underdog journey from beautiful mess to outrageous success in this big-hearted memoir.

The body by Bill Bryson.  A head-to-toe tour of the marvel that is the human body.

The book of gutsy women by Hillary Clinton.  Profiles of women from around the world who have blazed trails and challenged the status quo.

Dog is love by Clive Wynne.  Why and how your dog loves you.

Face it by Debbie Harry.  As the lead singer of the group Blondie, Harry tells her story of a woman who made her own path and set the standard for a generation of those to follow.

From the periphery by Pia Justesen.  This consists of narratives of everyday people who describe what it’s like to be treated differently by society because of their disabilities.

The girls by Abigail Pesta.  The inside story of how serial predator Larry Nassar got away with abusing hundreds of gymnasts for decades – and how a team of brave women banded together to bring him down.

Home work by Julie Andrews.  Continuing her life story that she began in her first book, Home, Andrews here gives a memoir of her Hollywood years.

If these walls could talk by Jerry Remy.  Stories from the Boston Red Sox dugout, Locker room, and press box.

Inside out by Demi Moore.  The star chronicles the rocky relationships, body image issues, and public perception that affected her attempts to balance family and fame.

The last pass by Gary Pomerantz.  Looking back on his life, Boston Celtics Bob Cousy regrets his failure to understand the struggles that his teammate Bill Russell, the NBA’s first Black superstar, was going through during the years they played together in racist Boston.

Me by Elton John.  In his first and only official autobiography, the music icon reveals the truth about his life, from his rollercoaster lifestyle to becoming a living legend.

Plagued by fire by Paul Hendrickson.  Frank Lloyd Wright was America’s most famous architect.  He was a genius, an egotist, and a man tormented by conscience and regret.

River of fire by Helen Prejean.  This describes her life as a nun, starting with her entrance into a convent in 1957 at the age of 18 and ending in 1982 when she began her work with abolishing the death penalty.

You throw like a girl by Don McPherson.  This is a call to action that has the potential to provoke conversation and change and is a unique crossover of sports memoir and astute social commentary about the blind spot of masculinity.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Big boys cry by Jonty Howley

Bruce’s big storm by Ryan Higgins

Dasher by Matt Tavares

The end of something wonderful by Stephanie Lucianovic

The favorite book by Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Grandpa’s top threes by Wendy Meddour

Have you seen my blankie? by Lucy Rowland

Hop up! Wriggle over! by Elizabeth Honey

I’m a gnome by Jessica Peill-Meininghaus

If I could give you Christmas by Lynn Plourde

A letter to my teacher by Deborah Hopkinson

The proudest blue : a story of Hijab and family by Ibtihaj Muhammad

The scarecrow by Beth Ferry

The shortest day by Susan Cooper

A stone sat still by Brendan Wenzel

 CHAPTER BOOKS

All the impossible things by Lindsay Lackey

Big break : Julie 1974 by Megan McDonald

Look both ways : a tale told in ten blocks by Jason Reynolds

No ordinary sound: Melody 1964 by Denise Patrick

Other words for home by Jasmine Warga

The spirit of aloha: Nanea 1941 by Kirby Larson

The tyrant’s tomb by Rick Riordan

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The Bad Guys in superbad by Aaron Blabey

The Bad Guys in the Big Bad Wolf by Aaron Blabey

Best friends by Shannon Hale

Chick & Brain : Smell my foot! by Cece Bell

Dog Man. For whom the ball rolls by Dav Pilkey

Guts by Raina Telgemeier

Mighty Jack and Zita the spacegirl by Ben Hatke

The okay witch by Emma Steinkellner

Stargazing by Jen Wang

 NON-FICTION

Are robots aware they’re robots? World Book answers your questions about technology

Big book of monsters : the creepiest creatures from classic literature by Hal Johnson

Can cats swim even if they don’t like water? World Book answers your questions about pests and other animals

Cat encyclopedia for kids by Joanne Mattern

Dr. Seuss’s Horse Museum by Dr. Seuss

From seed to sunflower by Camilla de la Bedoyere

Is the milky way made out of milk? World Book answers your questions about outer space

Lionel Messi by Anthony Hewson

Sidney Crosby by Kevin Frederickson

Steph Curry by Kevin Frederickson

Todd Gurley by Anthony Hewson

The truth about crocodiles : Seriously funny facts about your favorite animals by Maxwell Eaton

 DVDS

Aladdin with Will Smith

The best Christmas gift (Veggie Tales)

Daniel Tiger’s neighborhood.  It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood

Missing link with Hugh Jackman

Sesame Street. 50 years and counting

Toy story 4 with Ivan Shavrin

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Wear A Crown Day

Several of the staff here at the Gardiner Public Library would like the world to know ~~~

The Saturday before Halloween shall be considered “Wear A Crown Day”!

For anyone interested, some of us WILL be wearing our crowns this Saturday, October 26th.  We would love you to join us in solidarity!

What type of crown? You might ask, well, that is completely up to you!

Burger King Crowns would be fine, though I don’t know if BK still gives out crowns.  (I’m probably dating myself in even mentioning them).

A jeweled crown would be lovely, but only if you are True Royalty, (as of course, we ALL are!).

Tiaras are a sparkling sensation!

A crown of flowers would smell heavenly, though perhaps a bit hard to find or create this time of year.  But, a crown of autumn leaves could be absolutely stunning!

I am not advocating for a Crown of Thorns, nor a dental crown unless absolutely necessary, but yes, those are crowns for sure.

If you are wondering where and why?  Recently, a young lady, of perhaps 5 came to the circulation desk wearing beautiful gold shoes, an incredibly sparkling dress, and the most beautifulest crown – thus, “Wear A Crown Day” was born!

Pictures from Google Images