January Weather

      January rides the wind

      Annie and Snowball and the magical house

N       Name of the wind

U       Uncommon appeal of clouds

A       After the snow

R        Rising storm

       Young snowboarder

 

W      Winter storms

       Energy from wind

      And the wind blows free

      Tracks in the snow

      Hello snow!

       Eye of the storm

R        Really good snowman

New Items ~ January 2020

FICTION

Africaville by Jeffrey Colvin.  Set in a small Nova Scotia Town settled by former slaves, this depicts several generations of one family bound together and torn apart by blood, faith, time, and fate.

After Kilimanjaro by Gayle Woodson.  Medical fiction of this kind is rare – it’s not a thriller or tearjerker, but a thoughtful novel about doctors, the work they do, and the impact that has on their patients.

The Andromeda evolution by Michael Crichton.  In this sequel to the techno-thriller that started it all, the threat returns in a gripping sequel that is terrifyingly realistic and resonant.  The Evolution is coming.

Arapaho summer by Kinley Roby.  In 1867 two Union veterans and two Arapaho women they rescue from a Lakota war party set off on the Oregon Trail in search of a new beginning.

Bloody genius by John Sandford.  Virgil Flowers will have to watch his back – and his mouth – as he investigates a college culture war turned deadly.

The confession club by Elizabeth Berg.  An uplifting novel about friendship, surprising revelations, and a second chance at love.

Crossroad by Bill Cameron.  On a desolate road in the Oregon high desert, an apprentice mortician stumbles upon a horrific crash – and into a vortex of treachery, long-buried secrets, and growing menace.

Dread journey by Dorothy Hughes.  On a transcontinental train, a starlet fears her director may be trying to kill her.

The family upstairs by Lisa Jewell.  Libby Learns the identity of her parents and inherits a London mansion, but this comes with a mystery of multiple murders.

Genesis by Robin Cook.  This takes on the ripped-from-the-headlines topic of harnessing DNA from ancestry websites to catch a killer.

Guilty, not guilty by Felix Francis.  The husband and brother of an unstable woman who’s been strangled get into a battle royal over which of them will get the other convicted of her murder.

The innocents by Michel Crummey.  Orphaned and alone in 1800s Newfoundland, a young brother and sister contend with the dire hazards of their coastal surroundings.

The kill club by Wendy Heard.  A desperate woman at the end of her rope is drawn into an intriguing, but deadly, scheme.  Just try to put this one down.

A minute to midnight by David Baldacci.  When Atlee Pine returns to her hometown to investigate her sister’s kidnapping from 30 years ago, she winds up tracking a potential serial killer.

Nothing more dangerous by Allen Eskens.  In a small Southern town where loyalty to family and to “your people” carries the weight of a sacred oath, defying those unspoken rules can be a deadly proposition.

The off-islander by Peter Colt.  A Boston-born Vietnam vet and P.I. is hired to find a missing father – but my find far more than he bargained for…

The rise of Magicks by Nora Roberts.  This closes out the trilogy “Chronicles of the One”.

Swede Hollow by Ola Larsmo.  A riveting family saga immersed in the gritty, dark side of Swedish immigrant life in America in the early 20th century.

Stuck in Manistique by Dennis Cuesta.  Two troubled lives intersect in a novel combining cozy mystery, comedy, and reflections on fractured relationships.  A hypnotic tale of family secrets that also features delightfully silly humor.

NEW DVDs

The Crown: the complete second season (2019) starring Claire Foy, Matt Smith, Victoria Hamilton, Vanessa Kirby, and John Lithgow

It: Chapter two (2019) starring Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy

Never too late (1965) starring Paul Ford and Connie Stevens

NONFICTION

A Bookshop in Berlin by Francoise Frenkel.  A rediscovered, prize-winning memoir of a fearless Jewish bookseller on a harrowing fight for survival across Nazi-occupied Europe.

Dynamic dames by Sloan De Forest.  Celebrate 50 of the most empowering and unforgettable female characters ever to grace the silver screen, as well as the artists who brought them to vibrant life!

Eightysomethings by Katharine Esty.  A practical guide to letting go, aging well, and finding unexpected happiness over the age of 80.

Finding Chika by Mitch Albom.  A moving memoir of love and loss.  You can’t help but fall for Chika.  A page-turner that will not doubt become a classic.

Here all along by Sarah Hurwitz.  Finding meaning, spirituality, and a deeper connection to life – in Judaism (after finally choosing to look there).

Hymns of the Republic by S.C. Gwynne.  An engrossing history of the final gasps of the Civil War, a year in which Americans mourned their fathers and brothers and sons but also the way their lives used to be, the people they used to be, the innocence they had lost.

If you tell by Gregg Oslen.  A shocking and empowering true-crime story of three sisters determined to survive their mother’s house of horrors.  A story of murder, family secrets, and the unbreakable bond of sisterhood.

Letters from an astrophysicist by Neil DeGrasse Tyson.  This is like a scientific Dear Abby advice column that talks about black holes, extraterrestrial sightings, and human predicaments.

The lie by William Dameron.  A candid memoir of denial, stolen identities, betrayal, faking it, and coming out.

On flowers by Amy Merrick.  Lessons from an accidental florist.  Merrick is a rare and special kind of artist who uses flowers to help us see the familiar in a completely new way.

On the plain of snakes by Paul Theroux.  Legendary travel writer Theroux drives the entire length of the U.S.-Mexico border, then goes deep into the hinterland on the back roads to uncover the rich, layered world behind today’s brutal headlines.

Unexplained by Richard Smith.  Real-life supernatural stories for uncertain times and not for the easily frightened.

A warning by Anonymous.  A senior official in the Trump administration offers an assessment of the president and makes a moral appeal.

What we will become by Mimi Lemay.  A mother’s memoir of her transgender child’s odyssey, and HER journey outside the boundaries of the faith and culture that shaped her.

The witches are coming by Lindy West.  In this wickedly funny cultural critique, the author exposes misogyny in the #MeToo era.

You are awesome by Neil Pasricha.  How to navigate change, wrestle with failure, and live an intentional life.

 NEW CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Aalfred and Aalbert by Morag Hood

Around the table that grandad built  by Melanie Heuiser Hill

Astro girl by Ken Wilson-Max

A big bed for Little Snow by Grace Lin

The Christmas tree who loved trains by Anne Silvestro

A day for skating by Sarah Sullivan

Freedom soup by Tami Charles

Good morning, snowplow! by Deborah Bruss

How to hide a lion at Christmas by Helen Stephens

Just in case you want to fly by Julie Fogliano

Little fox in the snow by Jonathan London

Making a friend by Tammi Sauer

The serious goose by Jimmy Kimmel

Small Walt and Mo the Tow by Elizabeth Verdick

The snowflake mistake by Lou Treleaven

Sofia Valdez, future prez by Andrea Beaty

Telling time by David Adler

This is not that kind of book by Christopher Healy

CHAPTER BOOKS

Beverly, right here by Kate DiCamillo

The forgotten girl by India Hill Brown

Night of the new magicians by Mary Pope Osborne

The Princess in Black and the bathtime battle by Shannon Hale

Two dogs in a trench coat go on a class trip by Julie Falatko

Wings of Fire: the poison jungle by Tui Sutherland

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Dog Man. Fetch 22 by Dav Pilkey

Sunny rolls the dice by Jennifer Holm

Welcome to Wanderland by Jackie Ball

NON-FICTION

Can I eat a mammoth? by Madeline King

Do penguins have emotions? by World Book

Greek myths and mazes by Jan Bajtlik

Why are monkeys so flexible? by World Book

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

New Items ~ December 2019

FICTION

Agent running in the field by John Le Carre.  A seasoned solitary figure, in a desperate attempt to resist the new political turbulence swirling around him, makes connections that will take him down a very dangerous path.

All this could be yours by Jami Attenberg.  A timely exploration of what it means to be caught in the web of a toxic man who abused his power.  It shows how those webs can tangle a family for generations and what it takes to – maybe, hopefully – break free.

Blue moon by Lee Child.  Jack Reacher comes to the aid of an elderly couple and confronts his most dangerous opponents yet.

The bromance book club by Lyssa Adams.  A baseball player attempts to heal his marriage with the help of his team’s romance-novel book club.

The deserter by Nelson DeMille.  This features a brilliant and unorthodox Army investigator, his troubling new partner, and their hunt for the Army’s most notorious – and dangerous – deserter.

Find me by Andre Aciman.  In this exploration of the varieties of love, the author of Call Me By Your Name revisits its complex and beguiling characters decades after their first meeting.

Ghoster by Jason Arnopp.  A razor-sharp thriller for a social-media obsessed world.  Prepare to never look at your phone the same way again….

Holding on to nothing by Elizabeth Shelburne.  Brings us a present-day Appalachian story cast without sentiment or cliché, but with a genuine and profound understanding of the place and its people.

I lost my girlish laughter by Jane Allen.  This delicious satire of old Hollywood, originally published in 1938 and largely unknown even by cinephiles, gets a welcome reissue.

Kiss the girls and make them cry by Mary Higgins Clark.  A journalist sets out to share a #METoo story from her past and discovers that her abuser has become a powerful businessman who will do anything to keep her quiet.

The night fire by Michael Connelly.  Harry Bosch and Renee Ballard return to take up a case that held the attention of Bosch’s mentor.

Ninth house by Leigh Bardugo.  After mysteriously surviving a multiple homicide, Galaxy Stern comes face to face with dark magic, murder, and more at Yale University.

Nothing to see here by Kevin Wilson.  A moving and uproarious novel about a woman who finds meaning in her life when she begins caring for two children with remarkable and disturbing abilities.

Olive, again by Elizabeth Strout.  The author continues the life of her beloved Olive Kitteridge, a character who has captured the imaginations of millions of readers.

The revisioners by Margaret Sexton.  Here is a bracing window into Southern life and tensions, alternating between two women’s stories set nearly 100 years ago.

Secret Service by Tom Bradby.  What if the next British Prime Minister was really a Russian agent?

When she returned by Lucinda Berry.  Kate vanished from a parking lot 11 years ago, leaving behind her husband and young daughter.  When she shows up at a Montana gas station, clutching an infant and screaming for help, investigators believe she may have been abducted by a cult.

NEW DVDs

The haunting of Hill House (2019) starring Carla Gugino and Elizabeth Reaser

Nevada Smith (1966) starring Steve McQueen and Karl Malden

Discovery of witches (2019) starring Matthew Goode and Teresa Palmer

Ellen – the complete season one (1994) starring Ellen DeGeneres

NEW CDs

Country Music – a film by Ken Burns: the soundtrack

Lover by Taylor Swift

Cuz I love you by Lizzo

Best of en Vogue

NONFICTION

All blood runs red by Phil Keith.  The incredible story of the first African American military pilot, who went on to become a Paris nightclub impresario, a spy in the French Resistance, and an American civil rights pioneer.

Blood by Allison Moorer.  The singer/songwriter’s memoir may serve as solace for those who’ve faced abuse, a signal for those in it to get out, and an eye-opener for others.

Catch and kill by Ronan Farrow.  In a dramatic account of violence and espionage, investigative reporter Farrow exposes serial abuse and a cabal of powerful interests hell-bent on covering up the truth, at any cost.

Good husbandry by Kristin Kimball.  Kimball describes the delicious highs and sometimes excruciating lows of life on Essex Farm – a 500 acre farm that produces a full diet for a community of 250 people.

Home now by Cynthia Anderson.  In this detailed, sensitive portrait of Lewiston’s revitalization by African immigrants, Anderson expertly captures the multi-layered dynamics between Lewiston natives and African immigrants.  The result is a vivid and finely tuned portrait of immigration in America.

If you lived here you’d be home by now by Christopher Ingraham.  The hilarious, charming, and candid story of a writer’s decision to uproot his life and move his family to Red Lake Falls, Minnesota, population 1400 – the community he made famous as “the worst place to live in America” in a story he wrote.

In the dream house by Carmen Machado.  A revolutionary memoir about domestic abuse.  Tracing the full arc of a harrowing relationship with a charismatic but volatile partner, Machado struggles to make sense of how what happened to her shaped the person she was becoming.    A revolutionary memoir about domestic abuse. 

Janis: her life and music by Holly George-Warren.  This blazingly intimate bio establishes the Queen of Rock & Roll as the rule-breaking musical trailblazer and complicated, gender-bending rebel she was.

The less people know about us by Axton Betz-Hamilton.  In this true crime memoir, an identity theft expert tells the story of the duplicity and betrayal that inspired her career and nearly destroyed her family after their identities were stolen.

Lonely Planet’s best in travel 2020.  It really is a big deal.  International Travel publisher, Lonely Planet, has featured Maine as one of this years “Best in Travel” places.  Bring on the international tourists !

The movie musical ! by Jeanine Basinger.  An in-depth look at the singing, dancing, happy-making world of Hollywood musicals, beautifully illustrated – an essential text for anyone who’s ever laughed, cried, or sung along at the movies.

Running to glory by Sam McManis.  A moving account of a champion cross-country team made up primarily of teenager from migrant-worker families.

Scream by Margee Kerr.  Kerr takes readers on a journey on which they will experience the world’s most frightening and terrifying places firsthand.  As she explores places that make people tremble, she shares her personal dread on each of these destinations, which makes the book ever more captivating.

Sitcommentary by Mark Robinson.  From I Love Lucy to Black-ish, sitcoms have often paved the way for social change.  It has challenged the public to revisit social mores and reshape how we think about the world we live in.

Touched by the sun by Carly Simon.  A chance encounter at a summer party on Martha’s Vineyard blossomed into an improbable but enduring friendship between Simon and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

The vagina bible by Jen Gunter.  OB/GYN, writer for the New York Times and Self magazine, Dr. Jen now delivers the definitive book of vagina health, answering questions you couldn’t find the right answers to.

Vanity Fair’s women on women. These essays about women by women pack a feminist wallop, underscoring the combative resilience of notable women who never gave in to what was expected of them.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

New Items ~ November 2019

FICTION

Before the devil fell by Neil Olson.  Equal parts engaging and creepy, this twisty tale examines how secrets and regret can continue to reverberate through generations.  Possibly too creepy for late-night reading.

The bone fire by S.D. Sykes.  Oswald de Lacy brings his family to a secluded island castle to escape the Black Death, but soon a murder within the household proves that even the strongest fortress isn’t free from terror in 14th century England.

A book of bones by John Connolly.  Charlie Parker’s pursuit of his nemesis peaks in this seamless, expansive, and chilling blend of police procedural and gothic horror tale.

Cantoras by Carolina De Robertis.  In the shadow of a violent dictatorship, five queer women find the courage and strength to live their truth.

Chilling effect by Valerie Valdes.  A hilarious, offbeat space opera that skewers everything from pop culture to video games and features an irresistible foul-mouthed captain and her motley crew.

Cilka’s journey by Heather Morris.  A 16 year old, who sleeps with a concentration camp commandant in order to survive, is sentenced to a Siberian prison camp where she cares for the ill.

The Dutch house by Ann Patchett.  The story of the indelible bond between two siblings, the house of their childhood, and a past that will not let them go.

Full throttle by Joe Hill.  In a collection of short fiction, Hill dissects timeless human struggles in 13 tales of supernatural suspense, including “In the Tall Grass”, one of the 2 co-written with Stephen King.

The girl who lived twice by David Lagercrantz.  Mikael Blomkvist helps Lisabeth Salander put her past behind her.

The giver of stars by Jojo Moyes.  An extraordinary story of five women’s journey to deliver books to people who never had any, expanding horizons and changing their lives.

The guardians by John Grisham.  Cullen Post, a lawyer and Episcopal minister, antagonizes some ruthless killers when he takes on a wrongful conviction case.

Imaginary friend by Stephen Chbosky.  A pleasing book for those who like to scare themselves silly, one to read with the lights on and the door bolted.

The lying room by Nicci French.  A married woman’s affair with her boss spirals into a dangerous game of chess with the police when she discovers he’s been murdered and she clears the crime scene of all evidence.

The man who saw everything by Deborah Levy.  Multiple versions of history collide – literally – in a story that defies gravity in a daring, time-bending novel.

The nugget by P.T. Deutermann.  A novice naval aviator grows into a hero in this authentic World War II adventure.

The pursuit by Joyce Carol Oates.  A young woman is haunted by a past she doesn’t understand in this powerful story of domestic violence.

Random act by Gerry Boyle.  When Maine’s favorite reporter, Jack McMorrow, heads out to the hardware store on a routine errand, little does he know that he’s about to witness a murder that will have vicious repercussions.

Robert B. Parker’s The Bitterest Pill by Reed Coleman.  The opioid epidemic has reached Paradise, and Police Chief Jesse Stone must rush to stop the devastation.

Salvaged by Madeleine Roux.  A woman on the run.  A captain adrift in space.  One of them is infected with an alien parasite.  In this dark sci-fi thriller, a young woman must confront her past so the human race will have a future.

The shape of night by Tess Gerritsen.  A woman tries to outrun her past and is drawn to a coastal village in Maine – and to a string of unsolved murders.

The secrets we kept by Lara Prescott. During the Cold War, members of the CIA’s typing pool aid its mission to smuggle the banned book Doctor Zhivago behind the Iron Curtain.

Tuesday Mooney talks to ghosts by Kate Racculia.  A dying billionaire sends one woman and a cast of dreamers on a citywide treasure hunt in this irresistible novel.

The twisted ones by T. Kingfisher.  When a woman clears out her deceased grandmother’s home in rural North Carolina, she finds long-hidden secrets about a strange colony of beings in the woods.  It’s The Blair Witch Project meets The Andy Griffith Show.

The water dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates.  This captures the brutality of slavery and explores the underlying truth that slaveholders could not dehumanize the enslaved without also dehumanizing themselves.

Who are you, Calvin Bledsoe? by Brock Clarke.  An exuberant comic novel involving explosions, secret agents, religious fanatics, and a hapless narrator dragged around Europe by his long-lost aunt.

What happens in Paradise by Elin Hilderbrand.  Irene Steele visits the island of St. John to get to the bottom of the mysterious life and death of her husband.

The world that we knew by Alice Hoffman.  A rabbi’s daughter creates a mystical Jewish creature that is sworn to protect a 12 year old girl in World War II Europe.

NONFICTION

Beautiful on the outside by Adam Rippon.  The former Olympic figure skater shares his underdog journey from beautiful mess to outrageous success in this big-hearted memoir.

The body by Bill Bryson.  A head-to-toe tour of the marvel that is the human body.

The book of gutsy women by Hillary Clinton.  Profiles of women from around the world who have blazed trails and challenged the status quo.

Dog is love by Clive Wynne.  Why and how your dog loves you.

Face it by Debbie Harry.  As the lead singer of the group Blondie, Harry tells her story of a woman who made her own path and set the standard for a generation of those to follow.

From the periphery by Pia Justesen.  This consists of narratives of everyday people who describe what it’s like to be treated differently by society because of their disabilities.

The girls by Abigail Pesta.  The inside story of how serial predator Larry Nassar got away with abusing hundreds of gymnasts for decades – and how a team of brave women banded together to bring him down.

Home work by Julie Andrews.  Continuing her life story that she began in her first book, Home, Andrews here gives a memoir of her Hollywood years.

If these walls could talk by Jerry Remy.  Stories from the Boston Red Sox dugout, Locker room, and press box.

Inside out by Demi Moore.  The star chronicles the rocky relationships, body image issues, and public perception that affected her attempts to balance family and fame.

The last pass by Gary Pomerantz.  Looking back on his life, Boston Celtics Bob Cousy regrets his failure to understand the struggles that his teammate Bill Russell, the NBA’s first Black superstar, was going through during the years they played together in racist Boston.

Me by Elton John.  In his first and only official autobiography, the music icon reveals the truth about his life, from his rollercoaster lifestyle to becoming a living legend.

Plagued by fire by Paul Hendrickson.  Frank Lloyd Wright was America’s most famous architect.  He was a genius, an egotist, and a man tormented by conscience and regret.

River of fire by Helen Prejean.  This describes her life as a nun, starting with her entrance into a convent in 1957 at the age of 18 and ending in 1982 when she began her work with abolishing the death penalty.

You throw like a girl by Don McPherson.  This is a call to action that has the potential to provoke conversation and change and is a unique crossover of sports memoir and astute social commentary about the blind spot of masculinity.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Big boys cry by Jonty Howley

Bruce’s big storm by Ryan Higgins

Dasher by Matt Tavares

The end of something wonderful by Stephanie Lucianovic

The favorite book by Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Grandpa’s top threes by Wendy Meddour

Have you seen my blankie? by Lucy Rowland

Hop up! Wriggle over! by Elizabeth Honey

I’m a gnome by Jessica Peill-Meininghaus

If I could give you Christmas by Lynn Plourde

A letter to my teacher by Deborah Hopkinson

The proudest blue : a story of Hijab and family by Ibtihaj Muhammad

The scarecrow by Beth Ferry

The shortest day by Susan Cooper

A stone sat still by Brendan Wenzel

 CHAPTER BOOKS

All the impossible things by Lindsay Lackey

Big break : Julie 1974 by Megan McDonald

Look both ways : a tale told in ten blocks by Jason Reynolds

No ordinary sound: Melody 1964 by Denise Patrick

Other words for home by Jasmine Warga

The spirit of aloha: Nanea 1941 by Kirby Larson

The tyrant’s tomb by Rick Riordan

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The Bad Guys in superbad by Aaron Blabey

The Bad Guys in the Big Bad Wolf by Aaron Blabey

Best friends by Shannon Hale

Chick & Brain : Smell my foot! by Cece Bell

Dog Man. For whom the ball rolls by Dav Pilkey

Guts by Raina Telgemeier

Mighty Jack and Zita the spacegirl by Ben Hatke

The okay witch by Emma Steinkellner

Stargazing by Jen Wang

 NON-FICTION

Are robots aware they’re robots? World Book answers your questions about technology

Big book of monsters : the creepiest creatures from classic literature by Hal Johnson

Can cats swim even if they don’t like water? World Book answers your questions about pests and other animals

Cat encyclopedia for kids by Joanne Mattern

Dr. Seuss’s Horse Museum by Dr. Seuss

From seed to sunflower by Camilla de la Bedoyere

Is the milky way made out of milk? World Book answers your questions about outer space

Lionel Messi by Anthony Hewson

Sidney Crosby by Kevin Frederickson

Steph Curry by Kevin Frederickson

Todd Gurley by Anthony Hewson

The truth about crocodiles : Seriously funny facts about your favorite animals by Maxwell Eaton

 DVDS

Aladdin with Will Smith

The best Christmas gift (Veggie Tales)

Daniel Tiger’s neighborhood.  It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood

Missing link with Hugh Jackman

Sesame Street. 50 years and counting

Toy story 4 with Ivan Shavrin

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ October 2019

FICTION

A better man by Louise Penny.   Catastrophic spring flooding, blistering attacks in the media, and a mysterious disappearance greet Chief Inspector Gamache as he returns to the Sûreté du Québec.

Bloomland by John Engelhard.  This explores how the origin and aftermath of a shooting impacts the lives of 3 characters.  As a community wrestles with the fallout, the story interrogates social and cultural dysfunction in a nation where mass violence has become all too familiar.

Cold storage by David Koepp.  A wild and terrifying adventure about 3 strangers who must work together to contain a highly contagious, deadly organism.

The cold way home by Julia Keller.  The sleuths are easy to like and the murder story is moving, but the object of fascination here is Wellwood, a state-run mental institution with a dark history as a repository for “rebellious, unruly women.”

The dearly beloved by Cara Wall.  Two married couples’ intricate bonds of faith & friendship, jealousy and understanding, are tested by the birth of an autistic child.

Gamechanger by L.X. Beckett.  Necromancer meets Star Trek Sci-Fi.

Going Dutch by James Gregor.  A directionless grad student finds himself at the center of a bisexual love triangle in this charming Brooklyn rom-com.  Of course his double life must come crashing down, which it does spectacularly.

The grammarians by Cathleen Schine.  At the heart of this comic novel about super-smart, language-obsessed sisters are profound questions about how close two human beings can be.

Haunted house murder by Leslie Meier.  Tricks and treats keep the Halloween spirit alive in coastal Maine, but this year the haunted house theme is getting carried away a little too far.

The institute by Stephen King.  A group of kids with special talents must play along with the rules at the evil institution where they’re being detained or face an even scarier fate.

The last good guy by T. Jefferson Parker.  P.I. Roland Ford hunts for a missing teenager and uncovers a dark conspiracy in his most personal case yet.

The nanny by Gilly Macmillan.  Suspense novel with delicious British suspense tropes on display – rural resentment of the local rich people, closets full of skeletons, shady business dealings, false memories, and fake identities.  Who could ask for more?

Old bones by Douglas Preston.  The story of the ill-fated Donner party has new life in this thrilling blend of archaeology, history, murder, and suspense.

The Oracle by Jonathan Cahn.  A traveler discovers mysteries hidden behind seven locked doors.

The passengers by John Marrs.  In the near future, government-mandated self-driving cars become the norm in Britain – until they prove susceptible to a sophisticated terrorist hack.

Quichotte by Salman Rushdie.  A dazzling Don Quixote for the modern age.

The retreat by Sherri Smith.  This shows the dark side of the self-care and wellness industry with twisting suspense that asks: how well do you really know your friends?

A single thread by Tracy Chevalier.  An immersive, moving story of a woman coming into her own at the dawn of the second World War.

The testaments by Margaret Atwood.  This sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale picks up the story 15 years after Offred stepped into the unknown, with the explosive testaments of 3 female narrators from Gilead.

Thirteen by Steve Cavanagh.  What if the serial killer isn’t on trial but is a member of the jury?

This tender land by William Krueger.  A magnificent novel about 4 orphans on a life-changing odyssey during the Great Depression.

Vendetta in death by J.D. Robb.  Eve Dallas looks into the misdeeds of a wealthy businessman while a vigilante named Lady Justice uses disguises to avenge women who were wronged.

What Rose forgot by Nevada Barr.  A grandmother in her 60s emerges from a mental fog to find she’s trapped in her worst nightmare.

NEW DVDs

Rocketman  (2019) starring Taron Egerton and Jamie Bell

Life in Pieces : the complete first season starring Diane Weist and James Brolin

Summer of ’42 (1971) starring Gary Grimes and Jennifer O’Neill

Zorba the Greek (1964) starring Anthony Quinn and Alan Bates

NONFICTION

All the powers of earth by Sidney Blumenthal.  Lincoln’s incredible ascent to power in a world of chaos is newly revealed through a great biographer’s extraordinary research and literary style.

Audience of one by James Poniewozik.  Donald Trump, television, and the fracturing of America – this is both a fascinating look at the ways TV has changed and shaped the U.S., and a compelling lens through which to look at how we got to 11/8/16.

But where do I put the couch? by Melissa Michaels. 100 REAL decorating FAQs answered.

Country music: an illustrated history by Dayton Duncan.  Lucid, jam-packed, richly illustrated companion to the Ken Burns documentary series. Country music is America’s music – which is to say, music from every culture and ethnicity.

Healing with CBD by Eileen Konieczny.  Learn how cannabidiol can transform your health without the high.

Homegrown by Alex Speier.  The captivating story of the historic 2018 Boston Red Sox, as told through the assembly and ascendancy of their talented young core.

Inconspicuous consumption by Tatiana Schlossberg.  This urgent call to action will empower you to stand up to climate change and environmental pollution by making simple but impactful everyday choices.

My life on the line by Ryan O’Callaghan.  The New England Patriot gives a riveting account of life as a closeted professional athlete against the backdrop of depression and opioid addiction.

100 things to do in Portland, Maine before you die by Robert Witkowski.  Start your engines….  Ready.   Set.   Go!

Talking to strangers by Malcolm Gladwell.  The author offers a powerful examination of our interactions with strangers – and why they often go wrong.

When you find my body by D. Dauphinee.  The disappearance of Geraldine Large on the Appalachian Trail in Maine and the search for her body.

Will my cat eat my eyeballs? by Caitlin Doughty.  A mortician answers real questions from kids about death, dead bodies, and decomposition.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Hannah’s tall order : an A to Z sandwich by Linda Vander Heyden

Lionel and the lion’s share by Lou Peacock

Looking for yesterday by Alison Jay

Miss Jaster’s garden by N M Bodecker

One shoe two shoes by Caryl Hart

The right one for Roderic by Violeta Noy

Where do speedboats sleep at night by Brianna Caplan Sayres

NON-FICTION

Day and night by Crystal Sikkens

Dolphins! : strange and wonderful by Laurence Pringle

The four seasons by Crystal Sikkens

Helen Oxenbury : a life in illustration by Leonard Marcus

The life cycle of a rabbit by Crystal Sikkens

Look, I’m a mathematician

Map and track oceans by Lauren Ishak

Mike Trout by Anthony Hewson

Mookie Betts by Derek Moon

Patrick Mahomes by Kevin Frederickson

Tom Brady by Kevin Frederickson

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ September 2019

FICTION

The bitterroots by C.J. Box.  The black sheep of an influential family is accused of assault.

Blood of an exile by Brian Naslund.  A page-turning, edge-of-your-seat read that breathes new life into dragon mythology.

Chances are…. by Richard Russo.  A reunion on Martha’s Vineyard reopens old mysteries and wounds for three Vietnam-era college friends.

Contraband by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington is caught in the web of a national smuggling operation.

Costalegre by Courtney Maum.  A wildly imaginative and curiously touching story of a privileged teenager who has everything a girl could want except for a mother who loves her back.

Delayed rays of a star by Amanda Lee Koe.  A dazzling novel following the lives of 3 groundbreaking women – Marlene Dietrich, Anna May Wong, and Leni Riefenstahl – cinema legends who lit up the 20th century.

The escape room by Megan Goldin.  Four young Wall Street rising stars discover the price of ambition when an escape room challenge turns into a lethal game of revenge.

Evvie Drake starts over by Linda Holmes.  In a sleepy seaside town in Maine, an unlikely relationship develops between a young woman who’s lost her husband and a major league pitcher who’s lost his game.

Fleishman is in trouble by Taffy Brodesser-Akner.  Toby Fleishman is forced to confront his own perception of his actions when his ex-wife drops off their kids at his place and disappears.

The favorite daughter by Kaira Rouda.  The perfect home.  The perfect family.  The perfect lie. You never know how far someone will go to keep a family together.

The Gifted School by Bruce Holsinger.  A previously happy group of friends and parents is nearly destroyed by their own competitiveness when an exclusive school for gifted children opens in the community.

The golden hour by Beatriz Williams.  This creates a dazzling epic of WW II-era Nassau – a hotbed of spies, traitors, and the most infamous couple of the age – the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.

The great unexpected by Dan Mooney.  A curmudgeon and his eccentric new roommate join together to plan an epic escape from a nursing home in this charming, poignant tale.

In West Mills by De’Shawn Winslow.  Follows the residents of a black neighborhood in a tiny North Carolina town over the course of several decades.

Labyrinth by Catherine Coulter.  Agents Savich and Sherlock wend their way through a maze of lies to get to the bottom of a secret.

Lady in the lake by Laura Lippman.  In 1966, a housewife becomes a reporter and investigates the killing of a black woman in Baltimore.

The last astronaut by David Wellington.  Sally Jansen is Earth’s last astronaut – and last hope – in this thriller where a mission to make first contact becomes a struggle for survival in the depths of space.

Lost you by Haylen Beck.  Novel of psychological suspense about two women locked in a desperate fight over a child each believes is rightfully hers.

The marriage clock by Zara Raheem.  Starting on the night of her 26th birthday, an Indian woman has just 3 months to find her true love or else she has to allow her parents to arrange her marriage.

The Nickel boys by Colson Whitehead.  Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

One good deed by David Baldacci.  Archer is a straight-talking former WW II soldier fresh out of prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs.  A great mix of contemporary women’s fiction, an old-fashioned friends-to-lovers story, and a big dose of #metoo reading in one fantastic package.

Shamed by Linda Castillo.  A devastating murder exposes an Amish family’s tortured past.

Simply dead by Eleanor Kuhns.   A teenage midwife in Maine goes missing in 1790.

Tell me everything by Cambria Brockman.  A tight group of college friends at a Maine college fight to keep their relationships from splintering under the pressure of secrets.

The turn of the key by Ruth Ware.  A creepy mystery in which a nanny takes a post at a haunted country house.

The unlikely escape of Uriah Heep by H.G. Parry.  The ultimate book-lover’s fantasy, featuring a young scholar with the power to bring literary characters into the world.

Whisper network by Chandler Baker.  A thriller, a murder mystery, and an anthem for any woman who has ever hit a glass ceiling, been the brunt of sexual innuendo, or felt harassed in the workplace.

 NEW MUSIC CDs

The platinum collection: Greatest hits I, II, III    by Queen

Western stars by Bruce Springsteen

No. 6 collaborations project by Ed Sheeran

Rock of ages by Billy Strings

Oklahoma!  (2019 Broadway cast recording)

NONFICTION

Crisis in the red zone by Richard Preston.  More from the author of “The Hot Zone” – the story of the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history and of the outbreaks to come.

Don’t read poetry by Stephanie Burt.  A book about how to read poems.

Last witnesses by Svetlana Alexievich.  From the Nobel Prize-winning writer, here is an oral history of children’s experiences in WW II across Russia.

Leaving the Witness by Amber Scorah.  The author describes her strict upbringing as a third-generation Jehovah’s Witness and her efforts to find her true place in the world apart from the edicts of her family and faith.

On the clock by Emily Guendelsberger.  A bitingly funny, eye-opening story of a college-educated young professional who finds work in the automated and time-starved world of hourly labor.

100 times: a memoir of sexism by Chavisa Woods.  100 personal stories of sexism, harassment, discrimination, and assault – parts of a constant battle ALL women face every day.

Outpost by Dan Richards.  The author visits the far-away places in our world and witnesses the landscapes asking – Why are we drawn to wilderness?  And how do wild places become a space for inspiration and creativity?

The Plaza by Julie Satow.  An unforgettable history of how one illustrious hotel has defined our understanding of money and glamour, from the Gilded Age to the Gog-Go Eighties to today’s Billionaire Row.

Reading behind bars by Jill Grunenwald.  A true story of literature, law, and life as a person librarian.

They called us enemy by George Takei.  A stunning graphic novel recounting the actor/author/activist’s childhood imprisoned within American concentration camps during WW II.  Experience forces that shaped an American icon – and America itself – in this tale of courage, country, loyalty, and love.

Three women by Lisa Taddeo.  The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student, and a restaurant owner.

The volunteer by Jack Fairweather.  True story of a Polish agent who infiltrated Auschwitz, organized a rebellion, and then snuck back out.

We’re still here by Jennifer Silva.  Anyone interested in the lives and motivations of blue-collar workers and their participation in the electoral process should read this.

NEW CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Hide and seek by Kate May Green

When Aidan became a brother by Kyle Lukoff

Bunny’s Book Club goes to school by Annie Silvestro

The new kitten by Joyce Carol Oates

My big bad monster by A. N. Kang

No more monsters under your bed! by Jordan Chouteau

Mighty Reader and the Big Freeze by Will Hillenbrand

Clothesline clues to the first day of school by Kathryn Heling

The pigeon has to go to school by Mo Willems

First day of Groot! by Brendan Deneen

The king of kindergarten by Derrick Barnes

Goodbye, friend! Hello, friend by Cori Doerrfeld

Take your pet to school day by Linda Ashman

The teacup café by Patty Farrin

My teacher is a robot by Jeffrey Brown

The school book by Todd Parr

Fancy Nancy: Shoe-la-la! by Victoria Saxon

The best seat in kindergarten by Katharine Kenah

CHAPTER BOOKS

Babymouse : Tales from the locker by Jennifer L. Holm

Curiosity House : The shrunken head by Lauren Oliver

The forgetting spell by Lauren Myracle

MOVIES

The secret life of pets 2 with Harrison Ford

Pokemon : Detective Pikachu by Rob Letterman

A dog’s journey with Marg Helgenberger

Cinderella by Walt Disney

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Items ~ August 2019

FICTION

Almost midnight by Paul Doiron.  A deadly attack on one of Maine’s last wild wolves leads Game Warden Mike Bowditch to an even bigger criminal conspiracy.

Ask again, yes by Mary Beth Keane.  A family saga about 2 Irish American families in a New York suburb, the love between 2 of their children, and the tragedies to tear them apart and destroy the future.

Backlash by Brad Thor.  Cut off from any support, Scot Harvath fights to get his revenge.

Big Sky by Kate Atkinson.  Detective Jackson Brodie uncovers a sinister network in a sleepy seaside town.

The chain by Adrian McKinty.  At once a commentary on social media, greed, revenge, love, and true evil, this will have readers searching for more titles by this author.

The eagle flies at night by Jan Anderson.  What does an ordinary community do when the state settles refugees in their city?  How does the arrival of refugees challenge the hearts and minds of residents?  These are the questions Rev. Giles asks himself and his congregation as they wrestle with an influx to the city of Portland, Maine.

Into the jungle by Erica Ferencik.  A young woman leaves behind everything she knows to take on the Bolivian jungle, but her excursion abroad quickly turns into a fight for her life.

The last house guest by Megan Miranda.  A suspenseful novel about an idyllic town in Maine dealing with the suspicious death of one of their own.

Lock every door by Riley Sager.  A woman whose new job apartment sitting in one of NY’s oldest and most glamorous buildings may cost more than it pays

The long flight home by Alan Hlad.  A fresh angle (which begins in Maine) on the blitz of World War II and focuses on the homing pigeons used by the British, and the people who trained and cared for them.

Lost and found by Danielle Steel.  A photographer embarks on a road trip to reconnect with three men she might have married.

More news tomorrow by Susan Shreve.  Family drama about a daughter’s quest to understand her mother’s mysterious death.

Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner.  A timely exploration of 2 sisters’ lives from the 1950s to the present as they struggle to find their places – and be true to themselves – in a rapidly evolving world.

The new girl by Daniel Silva.  Gabriel Allon, the chief of Israeli intelligence, partners with the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, whose daughter has been kidnapped.

On earth we’re briefly gorgeous by Ocean Vuong.  Little Dog writes a letter to a mother who cannot read, revealing a family history.

The paper wasp by Lauren Acampora.  A woman with big but unfocused ambitions moves to LA to become the personal assistant to her childhood best friend, a rising Hollywood starlet.

Paris, 7 a.m. by Liza Wieland.  A novel of what happened to the poet Elizabeth Bishop during 3 life-changing weeks she spent in Paris amidst the imminent threat of World War II.

The perfect child by Lucinda Berry.  A novel of suspense about a young couple desperate to have a child of their own – and the unsettling consequences of getting what they always wanted.

Queen Bee by Dorothea Benton Frank.  A beekeeper’s quiet life is unsettled by her demanding mother, outgoing sister, and neighboring widower.

Roughhouse Friday by Jaed Coffin.  A meditation on violence and abandonment, masculinity, and our inescapable longing for love.  The author lives in Brunswick, Maine.

Salvation Day by Kali Wallace.  A lethal virus is awoken on an abandoned spaceship in this incredibly fast-paced, claustrophobic thriller.

The Saturday Night Ghost Club by Craig Davidson.  A bittersweet coming of age story in the vein of Stand By Me about a group of misfit kids who spend an unforgettable summer investigating local ghost stories and urban legends.

Summer of ‘69 by Elin Hilderbrand.  Four siblings experience the drama, intrigue, and upheaval of a summer when everything changed – 1969.

Surfside sisters by Nancy Thayer.  A Nantucket woman returns home to find that reunions aren’t always simple.

Under currents by Nora Roberts.  A novel about the power of family to harm – and to heal.

We went to the woods by Caite Dolan-Leach.  They went off the grid.  Their secrets didn’t.  A novel about the allure – and dangers – of disconnecting.

Window on the bay by Debbie Macomber.  When a single mom becomes an empty nester, she spreads her wings to rediscover herself – and her passions.

NEW DVDs

Captain Marvel (2019) starring Brie Larson and Samuel L. Jackson

The public (2019) starring Alec Baldwin, Emilio Estevez, and Gabrielle Union

Mountains of the moon (1989) starring Patrick Bergin and Iain Glen

What they had (2018) starring Hilary Swank, Michael Shannon, and Blythe Danner

A room with a view (1986) starring Helena Bonham Carter, Maggie Smith, and Daniel Day-Lewis

Dancing on the edge (2013) starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Matthew Goode, Jacqueline Bisset

It follows (2014)  starring Maika Monroe and Keir Gilchrist

NONFICTION

Burn the place by Iliana Regan.  A singular expressive debut memoir that traces one chef’s struggle find her place and what happens when she does.

Dutch girl by Robert Matzen.  Near the end of 1939, 10 year old Audrey Hepburn flew from boarding school in England into the Netherlands, which would soon become a war zone.  What she experienced in 5 years of Nazi occupation has never been explored until now.

The honey bus by Meredith May.  An extraordinary story of a girl, her grandfather, and one of nature’s most mysterious and beguiling creatures: the honeybee.

I know what I saw by Linda Godfrey.  Modern-day encounters with monsters of new urban legend and ancient lore.

Invisible heroes of World War II by Jerry Borrowman.  Extraordinary wartime stories of ordinary people.

Love thy neighbor by Ayaz Virji.  A true story about a Muslim doctor’s service to small-town America and the hope of overcoming our country’s climate of hostility and fear.

Mary’s household tips and tricks by Mary Berry.  The Queen of Baking now shares her expertise in home maintenance and care.

Slime by Ruth Kassinger.  How algae created us, plague us, and just might save us.

Songs of America by Jon Meacham.  The author joins Tim McGraw to explore how American was shaped by music.

The Stonewall Reader.  A generous and eclectic assortment of writings about the historical Stonewall Riots.  It is divided into 3 sections:  Before, During, and After Stonewall.

Supernavigators by David Barrie.  A globetrotting voyage of discovery celebrating the navigational gifts of animals; from whales and lobsters to birds and beetles – and many more.

This is really war by Emilie Lucchesi.  The incredible true story of a navy nurse POW in the occupied Philippines.

Wild and crazy guys by Nick Semlyen.  How the comedy mavericks of the ‘80s changed Hollywood forever.

New Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

Another by Christian Robinson

Bear came along by Richard T. Morris

Field trip to the moon by John Hare

How do you care for a very sick bear? by Vanessa Bayer

Hum and swish by Matt Myers

Kindness makes the world go round by Craig Manning

My little chick, from egg to chick– by Geraldine Elschner

A normal pig by K-Fai Steele

Paw Patrol 5-minute stories collection  

Rainbow : a first book of pride by Michael Genhart

Rocket says look up! by Nathan Bryon

This beach is loud! by Samantha Cotterill

Vamos! Let’s go to the market by Raul Gonzalez

CHAPTER BOOKS

Owl diaries # 5 : Warm hearts day by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries # 6 : Baxter is missing by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries # 7 : The Wildwood Bakery by Rebecca Elliott

NON-FICTION

Crossing on time : steam engines, fast ships, and a journey to the new world by David Macaulay

DK findout! Birds by Ben Hoare

DK findout! Castles by Philip Steele

The girl who named Pluto : the story of Venetia Burney by Alice B McGinty

Just right : searching for the Goldilocks planet  by Curtis Manley

Military dogs on the job by Roxanne Troup

Night sky : explore nature with fun facts and activities by Carole Scott

Planetarium by Raman Prinja

Super summer : all kinds of summer facts and fun by Bruce Goldstone

They, she, he, me : free to be! by Maya and Matthew Smith-Gonzalez

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Camp by Kayla Miller

Dinosaur explorers #1 Prehistoric pioneers by Redcode & Albbie

The Giver by P. Craig Russell

Olympians #11 Hephaistos: god of fire by George O’Connor

Putuguq & Kublu and the qalupalik by Roselynn Akulukjuk

The underfoot : the mighty deep by Ben Fisher

Wolfie Monster and the big bad pizza battle by Joey Ellis

MOVIES

Open season with Martin Lawrence

Race to Witch Mountain by Walt Disney with Dwayne Johnson

Ruby’s studio. The friendship show with Dr. Robyn Silverman

The three musketeers by Walt Disney

Wonder Park with Jennifer Garner

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ July 2019

FICTION

America was hard to find by Kathleen Alcott.  Three indelible characters embody the truths about this country in transition during America’s most iconic moments in the later part of the last century: the race to space, the race against the Vietnam War, and the ravages of the AIDS epidemic.

The body in the wake by Katherine Hall Page.  Amateur detective and caterer Faith Fairchild is at her Penobscot Bay, Maine cottage preparing for a summer wedding, when she stumbles across….a body.

Bunny by Mona Awad.  A darkly funny, strange novel about a lonely graduate student drawn into a clique of rich girls who seem to move and speak as one.

Cape May by Chip Cheek.  This explores the social and sexual mores of 1950s America through the eyes of a newly married couple from the genteel south corrupted by sophisticated New England urbanites.

City of girls by Elizabeth Gilbert.  Someone told Vivian Morris in her youth that she would never be an interesting person.  Good thing they didn’t put money on it.

The confessions of Frannie Langton by Sara Collins.  A servant and former slave is accused of murdering her employer and his wife in this thriller that moves from a Jamaican sugar plantation to the fetid streets of Georgian London.

Dark site by Patrick Lee.  Sam Dryden comes under attack from unknown forces as an unremembered episode from his past threatens more than just his life.

Deception Cove by Owen Laukkanen.  An ex-convict, an ex-Marine, and a rescue dog are caught in the cross-hairs of a ruthless gang in remote Washington State.

Disappearing earth by Julia Phillips.  A year in the lives of women and girls on an isolated peninsula in northeastern Russia opens with a chilling crime.

The flight portfolio by Julie Orringer.  Based on the true story of Varian Fry’s extraordinary attempt to save the work, and the lives, of Jewish artists fleeing the Holocaust.

The guest book by Sarah Blake.  This sets out to be more than a juicy family saga – it aims to depict the moral evolution of a part of American society.  Its convincing characters and muscular narrative succeed on both accounts.

Have you seen Luis Velez?  by Catherine Hyde.  A novel about two strangers who find that kindness is a powerful antidote to fear.

The heads of Cerberus by Francis Stevens.  A rediscovered sci-fi classic written in 1919 set in a dystopian 22nd century society where the winner takes all, a precursor to “The Hunger Games”….and to Hitler’s Germany.

How we disappeared by Jing-Jing Lee.  A novel set in World War II Singapore about a woman who survived the Japanese occupation and a man who thought he had lost everything.

The invited by Jennifer McMahon.  A chilling ghost story with a twist – in the woods of Vermont a husband and wife don’t simply move into a haunted house, they build one.

Little darlings by Melanie Golding.   “Mother knows best” takes on a sinister new meaning in this unsettling thriller.

Mistress of the Ritz by Melanie Benjamin.  Novel based on the story of the extraordinary real-life American woman who secretly worked for the French Resistance during World War II – while playing hostess to the invading Germans at the iconic Hotel Ritz in Paris.

Necessary people by Anna Pitoniak.  Set against the fast-paced backdrop of TV news, this is a propulsive work of psychological suspense about ambition and privilege, about the thin line between friendship and rivalry, about the people we need in our lives, and the people we don’t.

On a summer tide by Suzanne Fisher.  When her father buys an island off the coast of Maine with the hope of breathing new life into it, his daughter thinks he’s lost his mind.  She soon discovers the island has its own way of living…and loving.

The oracle by Clive Cussler.  A husband and wife treasure hunting team search for an ancient scroll which carries a deadly curse.

The policewomen’s bureau by Edward Conlon.  The NYPD’s “No Girls Allowed” sign fades in this fictional account of a real woman’s struggle for respect and success in a profession that men wanted all to themselves.

Redemption by David Baldacci.  Amos Decker learns that he may have made a mistake on a case he worked as a rookie detective – one with heartbreaking consequences, and he may be the only person who can put it right.

Resistance women by Jennifer Chiaverini.  Historical saga that recreates the danger, romance, and sacrifices of an era and brings to life one courageous American and her circle of women friends who waged a clandestine battle against Hitler in Nazi Berlin.

This storm by James Ellroy.  A massive novel of World War II Los Angeles.

Vessel by Lisa Nichols.  An astronaut returns to Earth after losing her entire crew to an inexplicable disaster, but is her version of what happened in space the truth?  Or is there more to the story?

Waisted by Randy Susan Meyers.  Seven women enrolled in an extreme weight loss documentary discover self-love and sisterhood as they enact a daring revenge against the exploitative filmmakers.

A woman is no man by Etaf Rum.  A Palestinian-American teenager, much like her mother before her, faces the prospect of an arranged marriage.

NONFICTION

The art of inventing hope by Howard Reich.  This offers an unprecedented in-depth conversation between the world’s most revered Holocaust survivor, Elie Wiesel, and the son of survivors, Howard Reich.

The book of pride by Mason Funk.  This captures the true story of the gay rights movement from the 1960s to the present, through richly detailed, studding interviews with the leaders, activists, and ordinary people who witnessed the movement and made it happen.

The cost of these dreams by Wright Thompson.  A collection of true stories about the dream of greatness and its cost in the world of sports.

A fiery gospel by Richard Gamble.  The Battle Hymn of the Republic and the road to righteous war.  Readers with an interest in 19th century American religious and political popular culture will enjoy this bio of the hymn by Gardiner’s own Julia Ward Howe.

Furious hours by Casey Cep.  Harper Lee worked on the true-crime story about a rural preacher accused of murdering five of his family members in the 1970s.  Cep unravels the mystery surrounding Harper Lee’s first and only work of nonfiction, and the shocking true crimes at the center of it.

How to forget by Kate Mulgrew.  In this very honest and examined memoir about returning to Iowa to care for her ailing parents, Mulgrew takes us on an unexpected journey of loss, betrayal, and the transcendent nature of a daughter’s love for her parents.

Questions I am asked about the Holocaust by Hedi Fried.  Now 94, Fried has spent her life educating about the Holocaust as a survivor and answering questions about one of the darkest periods in human history.

Save me the plums by Ruth Reichl.  Gourmet magazine readers will relish the behind-the-scenes peek at the workings of the magazine.  Reichl’s revealing memoir is a deeply personal look at a food world on the brink of change.

A season on the wind by Kenn Kaufman.  A close look at one season in one key site that reveals the amazing science and magic of spring bird migration and the perils of human encroachment.

They were all her property by Stephanie Jones-Rogers.  Bridging women’s history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery.

Woodstock by Dale Bell.  In celebration of the 50th anniversary, this new photo book goes behind the scenes of the hit documentary film, Woodstock.

New Children’s Books for July 2019

PICTURE BOOKS

Bruno, the standing cat by Nadine Robert

Cece loves science and adventure by Kimberly Derting

Count on me by Miguel Tanco

Dear boy, a celebration of cool, clever, compassionate you! by Paris Rosenthal

Ghost cat by Kevan Atteberry

How to read a book by Kwame Alexander

Sea glass summer by Michelle Houts

Tilly & Tank by Jay Fleck

BEGINNER READERS

Fancy Nancy Toodle-oo Miss Moo by Victoria Saxon

First little readers book level B by Liza Charlesworth

Leaf it to Dot by Andrea Cascardi

Rocket out of the park by Andrea Cascardi

CHAPTER BOOKS

The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson

The haunted house by R. A. Montgomery

Princess Island by Shannon Gilligan

Space pup by R. A. Montgomery

Your grandparents are spies by Anson Montomery

Your grandparents are zombies by Anson Montomery

NON-FICTION

Encyclopedia of Strangely Named Animals by Fredrik Colting

How to be a scientist by Steve Mould

The science of flight by Ian Graham

The science of spacecraft by Alex Woolf

The science of vehicles by Roger Canavan

What a waste: trash, recycling, and protecting our planet by Jess French

MOVIES

Bernie the dolphin with Lola Sultan

The cheetah children by PBS with Robyn Keene-Young

Daniel Tiger’s neighborhood: won’t you be our neighbor? Animated

How to train your dragon: the hidden world with Jay Baruchel

Telling time by Rock ‘n learn with Richard Caudie

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ June 2019

FICTION

The A list by J.A. Jance.  An imprisoned fertility doctor seeks revenge.

Anna of Kleve, the princess in the portrait by Alison Weir.  The surprising life of the least known of King Henry VIII’s wives is illuminated in this volume of the Six Tudor Queens series.

At Briarwood School for Girls by Michael Knight.  It’s 1994 and Leonore is a junior at Briarwood.  She plays basketball.  She hates her roommate.  History is her favorite subject.  She has told no one that she’s pregnant.  Everything, in other words, is under control.  Right.  Sure it is.

The better sister by Alafair Burke.  When a Manhattan lawyer is murdered, two estranged sisters – one the dead man’s widow and the other his ex – must set aside mistrust and old resentments.  But can they escape the past?

The book woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Richardson.  Basically about the power of reading and libraries, this also explores the extreme rural poverty of 1930s Appalachia and labor unrest among coal miners.

The bookshop of the broken hearted by Robert Hillman.  A tender novel about love and forgiveness in 1960s Australia, in which a lonely farmer finds his life turned upside down by the arrival of a vibrant librarian who is many years his senior.

A boy and his dog at the end of the world by C.A. Fletcher.  When a beloved family dog is stolen, her owner sets out on a life-changing journey through the ruins of our world to bring her back in this tale of survival, courage, and hope.

The bride test by Helen Hoang.  A superior romance in which a young Vietnamese woman seizes an opportunity to travel to America in hopes of finding a husband and a better life.

The Cornwalls are gone by James Patterson.  An Army intelligence officer must commit a crime or lose her kidnapped husband and daughter.

The Dark Game by Jonathan Janz.  10 writers are selected for a summer-long writing retreat with the most celebrated and reclusive author in the world.  But they are really entering the twisted imagination of a deranged genius, a lethal contest pitting them against one another.

A dream of death by Connie Berry.  On a remote Scottish island, an American antiques dealer wrestles with her own past while sleuthing a killing, staged to recreate a 200 year old unsolved murder.

The farm by Joanne Ramos.  At a luxurious secret facility in upstate New York, women who need money bear children for wealthy would-be mothers.  Excellent – both as a reproductive dystopian narrative and as a social novel about women and class.

If she wakes by Michael Koryta. Slowly emerging from the coma she’s been in since a black cargo van rammed the car she was using to transport a visiting professor who was thus killed, Maine college senior Tara is targeted by a ruthless young hit man.

Lost roses by Martha Kelly.  In 1914, the New York socialite Eliza Ferriday works to help White Russian families escape from the revolution.

Mr. Gandy’s grand tour by Alan Titchmarsh.  Free with no responsibilities, Mr. Gandy sets off for a grand tour of the type popular in the 18th century.  Paris certainly, and Italy.  After that, who knows?  It’s sure to be either an ugly midlife disaster or an opportunity for growth.

Naamah by Sarah Blake.  A retelling of Noah’s ark centered around his wife, Naamah – the woman who helped reshape the world with her hands.

Normal people by Sally Rooney.  The connection between a high school star athlete and a loner ebbs and flows when they go to Trinity College in Dublin.

Rabbits for food by Binnie Kirshenbaum.  A laugh-out-loud funny story of a writer’s slide into depression and institutionalization.

Someone knows by Lisa Scottoline.  A novel about how a single decision can undo a family, how our past can derail our present, and how not guilty doesn’t always mean innocent.

They all fall down by Rachel Hall.  Seven sinners arrive on a private island for a reckoning that will leave you breathless.

Triple jeopardy by Anne Perry.  Young lawyer Daniel Pitt must defend a British diplomat accused of a theft that may cover up a deadly crime.

Two weeks by Karen Kingsbury.  A pregnant 18 year old has limited time to change her mind about giving her baby up for adoption.

A wonderful stroke of luck by Ann Beattie.  Set in a boarding school in New Hampshire, this is about the complicated relationship between a charismatic teacher and his students, and the secrets we keep from those we love.

Wunderland by Jennifer Epstein.  This is a vividly written and stark chronicle of Nazism and its legacies.  An absorbing exploration of friendship, betrayal, and coming to terms with the past.

DVDs

Fantastic beasts: the crimes of Grindelwald (2018) starring Eddie Redmayne, Jude Law, and Johnny Depp

RBG (2018) starring Ruth Bader Ginsburg

NONFICTION

The accidental veterinarian by Philipp Schott.  For all animal lovers, tales that are always amusing, amazing, and – once in a while – sad.

The art of happy moving by Ali Wenzke.  An upbeat guide to help you survive the moving process from start to finish, filled with strategies and checklists for timing and supplies.

Auschwitz: not long ago, not far away by Robert Jan van Pelt.  This tells a story to shake the conscience of the world. It is the catalogue of the first-ever traveling exhibition about the Auschwitz concentration camp, where 1.1 million people lost their lives.

Down from the mountain by Bryce Andrews.  The story of a grizzly bear named Millie: her life, death, and cubs, and what they reveal about the changing character of the American West today.

A Florida state of mind by James Wright.  An unnatural history of our weirdest state that’s always in the news for everything from alligator attacks to zany crimes.

Life will be the death of me…and you too! by Chelsea Handler.  The comedian chronicles going into therapy and becoming an advocate for change.

Losing Earth by Nathaniel Rich.  By 1979, we knew nearly everything we understand today about climate change – including how to stop it.  Over the next decade, a handful risked their careers in a desperate campaign to convince the world to act before it was too late.  This is their story and ours.

The man they wanted me to be by Jared Sexton.  Deeply personal, this examines how we teach boys what’s expected of men in America and the long-term effects of that socialization – which include depression, shorter lives, misogyny, and suicide.

The matriarch:  Barbara Bush and the making of an American dynasty by Susan Page.  A vivid bio of the former First Lady, one of the most influential and under-appreciated women in American political history.

The Mueller report.  The special counsel’s investigation looms as a turning point in American history.

Playing back the 80s by Jim Beviglia. For those who didn’t grow up in the 80s, this endlessly funny book will show them what the fuss was all about with the music and maybe reveal a few surprises along the way.

Out East by John Glynn.  A gripping portrait of life in a Montauk summer house – a debut memoir of first love, identity and the self-discovery among a group of friends who became family.

The pioneers by David McCullough.  The settling of the Northwest Territory by dauntless pioneers who overcame incredible hardships to build a community based on ideals that would come to define our country.

A woman of no importance by Sonia Purnell.  The true story of a Baltimore socialite who joined a spy organization during World War II and became essential to the French Resistance.

New Children’s Books for June 2019

 PICTURE BOOKS

Babymoon by Hayley Barrett

Diggersaurs by Michael Whaite

Ernestine’s milky way by Kerry Madden-Lunsford

Grumpy monkey by Suzanne Lang

Hello, I’m here by Helen Frost

I love you all year through by Stephanie Stansbie

Karate Kakapo by Loredana Cunti

The night flower by Lara Hawthorne

Raj and the best day ever by Sebastien Braun

The unbudgeable curmudgeon by Matthew Burgess

Wake up, color pup by Taia Morley

Wordy birdy by Tammi Sauer

CHAPTER BOOKS

The adventures of a girl called Bicycle by Christina Uss

Arlo Finch in the valley of fire by John August

The benefits of being an octopus by Ann Braden

Class action by Steven B. Frank

Forgotten city by Michael Ford

Game changer by Tommy Greenwald

The House in Poplar Wood by K.E. Ormsbee

Journey of the pale bear by Susan Fletcher

Lifeboat 12 by Susan Hood

The night diary by Veera Hiranandani                   

Nightbooks by J.A. White

Ra the mighty: cat cetective by A.B. Greenfield

Skylark and Wallcreeper by Anne O’Brien Carelli

Wicked Nix by Lena Coakley

NON-FICTION

Beware of the crocodile by Martin Jenkins

Caterpillar and Bean by Martin Jenkins

Dog days of history: the incredible story of our best friends by Sarah Albee

Inside outside by Anne-Margot Ramstein

Like a lizard by April Pulley Sayre

Map and track rain forests by Heather C. Hudak

Pass go and collect $200: the real story of how monopoly was invented by Tanya Lee Stone

The proper way to meet a hedgehog and other how-to poems by Paul B. Janeczko

Shawn Mendes by Robin Johnson

MOVIES

Frozen by Disney

Hardy Boys Nancy Drew Mysteries Season One with Shaun Cassidy

The kid who would be king with Patrick Stewart

The LEGO movie 2 with Chris Pratt

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ May 2019

FICTION

The Ash family by Molly Dektar.  When a young woman leaves her family – and the civilized world – to join an off-the-grid community headed by an enigmatic leader, she discovers that belonging comes with a deadly cost.

Beyond the Point by Claire Gibson.  An inspiring tribute to female friendship and female courage.  Three women are brought together in an enthralling story of friendship, heartbreak, resilience in a novel set at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Boy swallows universe by Trent Dalton.  A story of brotherhood, true love, family, and the most unlikely of friendships, this is the tale of an adolescent boy on the cusp of discovering the man he will be.

Death in Provence by Serena Kent.  This is a clever, light-hearted mystery set in modern Provence featuring the irrepressible Penelope Kite, a young-at-heart divorcee with a knack for stumbling across dead bodies.

Fame adjacent by Sarah Skilton.  The child star that was left behind is about to get her moment to shine in this swoony romantic comedy inspired by a unique, beloved facet of pop culture history:  The Mickey Mouse Club.

The hunting party by Lucy Foley.  Psychological suspense in the tradition of Agatha Christie in which a group of old college friends are snowed in at a hunting lodge…and murder and mayhem ensue.

Infinite detail by Tim Maughan.  A timely and uncanny portrait of a world in the wake of fake news, diminished privacy, and a total shutdown of the internet.

An Irish immigrant story by Jack Cashman.  This historical novel brings the reader through the story of a family that overcomes adversity to thrive in America.

The island of sea women by Lisa See.  The friendship over many decades of two female divers from the Korean island of Jeju is pushed to a breaking point.

Kaddish.com by Nathan Englander.  An excellent comic dissection of Jewish-American life.  This novel reads like Chaim Potok filtered through the sensibility of Mel Brooks.

The last act by Brad Parks.  An out of work actor takes a job for the FBI – using a false name and backstory, he enters a low-security prison and begins to befriend a fellow prisoner who knows the location of documents that can bring down a ruthless drug cartel.  But the cartel is also looking….

The last year of the war by Susan Meissner.  A German American teenager’s life changes forever when her immigrant family is sent to an internment camp during WW II and she becomes friends with another girl at the camp – a Japanese American teenager.

Little faith by Nickolas Butler.  A Wisconsin family grapples with the power and limitations of faith when one of their own falls under the influence of a radical church.

Lost and wanted by Nell Freudenberger.  A physicist at MIT receives a text from her dead best friend.

A puzzle for fools by Patrick Quentin.  A wave of murders rocks a sanitarium – and it’s up to the patients to stop them.

Silent night by Danielle Steel.  After tragedy strikes, a child TV star loses her memory and ability to speak.

Tomorrow there will be sun by Dana Reinhardt.  A private Mexican villa in a tropical paradise is the backdrop of this story of a milestone vacation gone wrong, wrong, wrong as a family falls apart.

When all is said by Anne Griffin.  If you had to pick 5 people to sum up your life, who would they be?  If you were to raise a glass to each of them, what would you say?  And what would you learn about yourself, when all is said?

Wild card by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington clashes with a determined adversary.

Wolf pack by C.J. Box.  Wyoming game warden Joe Pickett encounters bad behavior on his own turf – only to have the FBI and the DOJ ask him to stand down.

NEW DVDs

Aquaman (2018) starring Jason Momoa

If Beale Street could talk (2018) starring Stephen James and Regina King

The bookshop (2018) starring Emily Mortimer, Bill Nighy, and Patricia Clarkson

Vice (2018) starring Christian Bale and Amy Adams

NONFICTION

Biased by Jennifer Eberhardt.  From one of the world’s leading experts on unconscious racial bias, a personal examination of one of the central controversies and culturally powerful issues of our time, and its influence on contemporary race relations and criminal justice.

The end of absence by Michael Harris.  Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the internet.  This is about reclaiming what we’ve lost in a world of constant connections.

Girl, stop apologizing by Rachel Hollis.  A shame-free plan for embracing and achieving your goals.

Holy envy by Barbara Taylor.  The author recounts her moving discoveries of finding the sacred in unexpected places while teaching the world’s religions to undergrads in rural Georgia, revealing how God delights in confounding our expectations.

It ended badly by Jennifer Wright.  13 of the worst breakups in history – replete with beheadings, uprisings, creepy sex dolls, and celebrity gossip – and its disastrously bad consequences throughout time.

K by Tyler Kepner.  A history of baseball in 10 pitches.

The league of wives by Heath Lee.  The story of a group of women who mobilized and organized in an attempt to bring their POW husbands home from Vietnam.

Mama’s last hug by Frans de Waal.  A captivating survey of animal and human emotions.

The Seventies: a photographic journey by Ira Resnick.  The Seventies in America were a time of social and cultural ferment, and Resnick was there with his camera to capture it all.

The threat by Andrew McCabe.  How the FBI protects America in the age of terror and Trump.

Under red skies by Karoline Kan.  A deeply personal and shocking look at how China is coming to terms with its conflicted past as it emerges into a modern, cutting-edge superpower, seen though the stories of three generations of women.

Women warriors by Pamela Toler.  Who says women don’t go to war?  From Vikings and African queens to cross-dressing military doctors and WW II Russian fighter pilots, these are the stories of women for whom battle was not a metaphor.

New Children’s Books for May 2019

 PICTURE BOOKS

Africville by Shauntay Grant

Baby day by Jane Godwin

A day in the life of Marlon Bundo by Marlon Bundo

Kite for the moon by Jane Yolen

Little Fox and the missing moon by Ekaterina Trukhan

Music for Mister Moon by Philip C. Stead

Peg + Cat: math in the bath by Jennifer Oxley

A piglet named Mercy by Kate DiCamillo

The sun shines everywhere by Mary Ann Hoberman

Sweet dreamers by Isabelle Simler

There’s a dinosaur on the 13th floor by Wade Bradford

GRAPHIC NOVELS

5 worlds: the Cobalt Prince by Mark Siegel

Baby-Sitters Club: Mary Anne saves the day by Raina Telgemeier

Baby-Sitters Club: the truth about Stacey by Raina Telgemeier

Endgames  by Ru Xu

Science comics solar system: our place in space by Rosemary Mosco

Super Potato #1: the epic origin of Super Potato by Artur Laperla

CHAPTER BOOKS

Freya & Zoose by Emily Butler

Judy Moody and friends: searching for stinkodon by Megan McDonald

Max and the Midknights by Lincoln Peirce

Merci Suarez changes gears by Meg Medina

Owl diaries: Eva and Baby Mo by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries: Eva and the lost pony by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries: Eva’s big sleepover by Rebecca Elliott

Pay attention, Carter Jones by Gary D. Schmidt

The Princess in black and the hungry bunny horde by Shannon Hale

The Princess in black takes a vacation by Shannon Hale

The remarkable journey of Coyote Sunrise by Dan Gemeinhart

What the wind can tell you by Sarah Marie A. Jette

NON-FICTION

Astronaut, aquanaut by Jennifer Swanson

Knowledge genius by Peter Chrisp

LEGO Star Wars visual dictionary by Simon Beecroft

The magic & mystery of trees by Jen Green

Nature play at home by Nancy Striniste

Ocean emporium: a compilation of creatures by Susie Brooks

Rotten! : vultures, beetles, slime, and nature’s other decomposers by Anita Sanchez

Time to parent: organizing your life to bring out the best in your child and you by Julie Morgenstern

MOVIES

Arthur’s music jamboree a PBS Kids

Arthur’s travel adventures a PBS Kids

Dragons : race to the edge seasons 1 & 2 by Dreamworks

Kiki’s delivery service with Kirsten Dunst

Paddington 2 with Ben Wishaw

Tangled : before ever after with Mandy Moore

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.