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New Items ~ December 2020

FICTION

After all I’ve done by Mina Hardy.  An expert nightmare, one of those rare thrillers whose answers are even more scarifying than its mysteries.

The cold millions by Jess Walter.  Two brothers are swept up in the turbulent class warfare of the early 20th century.

Dead man dancing by John Galligan.  Sheriff Heidi Kick is investigating an illicit cage fighting ring with ties to white nationalism when her husband suddenly goes missing.

Death comes as the end by Agatha Christie.  Egypt in 2000 B.C.  A priest’s daughter, investigating a suspicious death, uncovers an asp’s nest of jealousy, betrayal, and serial murder.

The dirty south by John Connolly.  A chilling blend of police procedural and gothic horror tale…perfect for fireside reading on cold, rainy nights.

Fortune favors the dead by Stephen Spotswood.  A sprightly period debut in the noir vein – a provocative gender-flipping of Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin.

Hidden Salem by Kay Hooper.  A town shrouded in the occult.  An evil that lurks in the dark.  The S.C.U. returns because what actually hides in the shadows and secrets of Salem is unlike anything the agents have ever encountered.

I saw him die by Andrew Wilson.  In a classic who-dun-it filled with red herrings and double-crosses, Agatha Christie investigates a mysterious death in the Scottish highlands.

Inheritors by Asako Serizawa.  A beautiful and brutal exploration of lives fragmented by the Pacific side of World War II.

Jane in love by Rachel Givney.  Jane Austen, heralded author, ends up time-traveling almost 200 years into the future.  There she finds the love she’s written about and the destiny she’s dreamed of…but is it worth her legacy?

Jingle all the way by Debbie Macomber.  Love can transform even the best-laid plans in this heartfelt Christmas novel.

The last great road bum by Hector Tobar.  A would-be writer leaves a comfortable existence in Urbana, Illinois, in order to travel the world in search of material for a great American novel.  Instead, he finds romance, danger, and the dark heart of the mid-20th century.

Memorial by Bryan Washington.  Benson and Mike, a mixed-race couple in Houston, search for the truth about themselves, each other, and their families.  It’s a subtle and moving exploration of love, family, race, and the long, frustrating search for home.

The missing sister by Elle Marr.  This follows a medical student to, around, and ultimately beneath Paris in search of the twin sister she’d been drifting away from.  Notable for its exploration of the uncanny bonds twins share and the killer’s memorable macabre motive.

Not my Romeo by Ilsa Madden-Mills.  A smart and sexy contemporary romance about a smoking-hot professional football player and the small-town girl he can’t resist.

On borrowed crime by Kate Young.  The Jane Doe book club enjoys guessing whodunit, but when murder happens in their midst, they discover solving crimes isn’t fun and games.

One more for Christmas by Sarah Morgan.  As the snowflakes fall on their first family celebration in years, the Mitchell women must learn that sometimes facing up to the past is all you need to heal your heart.

Plain bad heroines by Emily Danforth.  A horror-comedy centered around a New England boarding school for girls.

Ring shout by P. Djeli Clark.  A dark fantasy historical novel that gives a supernatural twist to the Ku Klux Klan’s reign of terror.

The secret lives of church ladies by Deesha Philyaw.  These 9 stories feature four generations of Black women grappling with who they want to be in the world, caught as they are between the church’s double standards and their own needs and passions.

The sentinel by Lee Child.  Jack Reacher is in Nashville and a voice in his head is telling him to walk away.  Of course, he doesn’t.

Sweet sorrow by David Nicholls.  A bittersweet yet funny coming-of-age tale about the heart-stopping thrill of first love – and how just one summer can forever change a life.

The switch by Beth O’Leary.  A grieving British woman and her grandmother switch homes and lives in an attempt to shake things up.  The result is a cozy hopeful escapade that will make readers laugh, cry, and feel inspired.

The wonder boy of Whistle Stop by Fannie Flagg.  A heartwarming novel about secrets of youth rediscovered, hometown memories, and the magical moment in ordinary lives.

 NEW DVDs

The Crown: the complete third season (2020) starring Olivia Colman

Gallipoli (1981) starring Mel Gibson and Mark Lee

The informer (1935) starring Victor McLaglen

Quantum of Solace (2009) starring Daniel Craig

NONFICTION

The Bible with and without Jesus by Amy-Jill Levine.  The author shows how and why Jews and Christians read many of the same biblical texts differently.  Exploring and explaining these diverse perspectives, she reveals more clearly Scripture’s beauty and power.

Blue Sky Kingdom by Bruce Kirkby.  As it explores an ancient – and dying – Tibetan Buddhist culture, this delightful book also tells a timely, heartwarming story of a family’s search for peace away from the din of modern culture.

The bottom line for baby by Tina Bryson.  From sleep training to screens, thumb sucking to tummy time – what science says about it all.

Catching the wind by Neil Gabler.  The epic, definitive bio of Ted Kennedy – an immersive journey through the life of a complicated man and a sweeping history of the fall of liberalism and the collapse of political morality.

Celeste Holm Syndrome by David Lazar.  Fans of Hollywood’s Golden Age will delight in this affecting look at what makes actors truly memorable, even if they’re not in the spotlight.

The dead are arising by Les Payne.  An epic biography of Malcolm X.

Inside game by Keith Law.  Bad calls, strange moves, and what baseball behavior teaches us about ourselves.

Making work human by Eric Mosley.  How human centered companies are changing the future of work and the world.  How do you keep your employees engaged, creative, innovative, and productive?  Simple:  Work human!

Philip and Alexander by Adrian Goldsworthy.  This definitive bio of one of history’s most influential father/son duos tells the story of two rulers who gripped the world – and their rise and fall from power in ancient Greece.

Right place, right time by Bob Gruen.  An action-packed memoir that takes readers on the road with rock’s hardest-working photographer.  And the stories he tells….

Singular sensation by Michael Riedel.  The story of a transformative decade on Broadway, featuring gripping behind-the-scenes accounts of shows such as Rent, Angels in America, Chicago, The Lion King and The Producers – shows that changed the history of the American theater.

West Side Story by Richard Barrios.  While remaining always respectful to the movie and the people who made it, the author lays bare the behind-the-scenes tumult, elevating the book from a typical making-of story to something really special: a no-hold-bared chronicle of what it really takes to get a great movie made.

World wild vet by Evan Antin.  From the star of Animal Planet’s Evan Goes Wild comes a wild look at our natural world that is perfect for fans of Steve Irwin, James Herriot, and Bear Grylls.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ November 2020

FICTION

Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse.  A powerful priest, an outcast seafarer, and a man born to be the vessel of a god come together.  This novel is inspired by the civilizations of the Pre-Columbian Americas and woven into a tale of celestial prophecies, political intrigue, and forbidden magic.

The book of two ways by Jodi Picoult.  A novel about the choice that alter the course of our lives.  Do we make choices – or do our choices make us?  And who would you be if you hadn’t turned out to be the person you are right now?

The brilliant life of Eudora Honeysett by Annie Lyons.  A moving and joyous novel about an elderly woman who is ready to embrace death and of the little girl who reminds her what it means to live.

Chaos by Iris Johansen.  CIA agent Alisa Flynn is willing to go rogue if it means catching the most heartless band of criminals she’s ever encountered.

The devil and the dark water by Stuart Turton.  A murder on the high seas.  A remarkable detective duo.  A demon who may or may not exist.  A thriller of supernatural horror, occult suspicion, and paranormal mystery on the high seas.

The evening and the morning by Ken Follett.  In a prequel to “Pillars of the Earth”, a boat builder, a Norman noblewoman, and a monk live in England under attack by the Welsh and the Vikings.

Fifty words for rain by Asha Lemmie.  In 1940s Japan, an 8-year-old child of a married Japanese aristocrat and her African-American lover searches for her place in the world.

The invisible life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab.  France, 1714.  In a moment of desperation, a young woman makes a Faustian bargain to live forever – and is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets.  But everything changes when, after nearly 300 years, she meets a young man in a hidden bookstore and he remembers her name.

Jack by Marilynne Robinson.  This is the story of the prodigal son of a Presbyterian minister and his romance with a high school teacher who is also the son of a preacher.  Their deeply felt, tormented, star-crossed interracial romance resonates with all the paradoxes of American life then and now.

Just like you by Nick Hornby.  A divorced 41 year old woman meets a 22 year old at a butcher’s counter.  This is about what happens when the person who makes you happiest is someone you never expected.

Leave the world behind by Rumaan Alam.  A magnetic novel about two families, strangers to each other, who are forced together on a long weekend gone terribly wrong.

The lending library by Aliza Fogelson.  This pairs a passionate bibliophile with a handsome construction worker and achieves maximum charm.  A daydreamer gives her town, and herself, an amazing gift:  a lending library in her sunroom.

The lost shtetl by Max Gross.  What if there was a town that history missed?  A small Jewish village in the Polish forest is so secluded no one knows it exists…until now.

Love and other crimes by Sara Paretsky.  A collection of crime and detective stories, many featuring legendary detective V.I. Warshawski.

Magic lessons by Alice Hoffman.  In a prequel to “Practical Magic”, Maria Owens invokes a curse that will haunt her family in Salem, MA.

Only truth by Julie Cameron.  A London painter, whose husband insists on moving to the country realizes that “there’s something not right with this place”.  Talk about an understatement.

The return by Nicholas Sparks.  The story of an injured Navy doctor – and two women whose secrets will change the course of his life.

The searcher by Tana French.  After a divorce, a former Chicago police officer resettles in an Irish village where a boy goes missing.

 The silence by Don DeLillo.  Set in the near future, five people are gathered together in a Manhattan apartment in the midst of a catastrophic event.

A time for mercy by John Grisham.  Court-appointed lawyer Jake Brigance puts his career, his financial security, and the safety of his family on the line to defend a 16 year old suspect who is accused of killing a local deputy and is facing the death penalty.

To sleep in a sea of stars by Christopher Paolini.  Kira Navarez might be the only one who can save the Earth and its colonies from being destroyed.

Until summer comes around by Glenn Rolfe.  A family of vampires terrorizes the seaside town of Old Orchard Beach in this tale of adolescent romance and murder.

Vince Flynn: total power by Kyle Mills.  When America’s power grid is shut down, Mitch Rapp goes after a cyber terrorist.

NEW MUSIC CDs

Bigger love by John Legend

The genius of Ray Charles by Ray Charles

The best of Kansas

NEW DVDs

Fosse/Verdon (2020)  starring Sam Rockwell and Michelle Williams

Marriage story (2019) starring Scarlett Johansson, Adam Driver, and Laura Dern

Casino Royale (2006) starring Daniel Craig

Colewell (2019) starring Karen Allen

NONFICTION:

The boy, the mole, the fox, and the horse by Charlie MacKesy.  A journey for all ages that explores life’s universal lessons, featuring 100 color and black-and-white drawings.

Children of ash and elm by Neil Price.  With clarity and verve, this examines various aspects of Viking society.  An exemplary history that gives a nuanced view of a society long reduced to a few clichés.

Eleanor by David Michaelis.  A break-through portrait of Eleanor Roosevelt, America’s longest-serving First Lady, an avatar of democracy whose ever-expanding agency as diplomat, activist, and humanitarian made her one of the world’s most widely admired and influential women.

The home edit life by Clea Shearer.  This is both for those who love to organize in their free time and those who want to get organized but feel they just can’t make the time.

How to astronaut by Terry Virts.  A former astronaut offers a mixture of science and adventure in this guide to space travel.  Divided into sections on training, launch, orbit, space-walking, deep space, and re-entry.

I will run wild by Thomas Cleaver.  This is a vivid narrative history of the early stages of the Pacific War, as U.S. and Allied forces desperately tried to slow the Japanese onslaught that began with the sudden attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941.

A knock at midnight by Brittany Barnett.  An urgent call to free those buried alive by America’s legal system, and an inspiring true story about unwavering belief in humanity from a young lawyer and important new voice in the movement to transform the system.

Librarian tales by William Ottens.  An insider’s look at one of the most prevalent, yet commonly misunderstood institutions.  Here is the good, the bad, and the ugly of librarian Ottens’ experience working behind the service desks and in the stacks of public libraries.

Loving sports when they don’t love you back by Jessica Luther.  Revealing some of the ugliest truths about professional sports.  An incisive, damning indictment of the world’s most popular past-times.

Modern comfort foods by Ina Garten.  The cook updates some of the comfort foods we grew up with.

The secret lives of planets by Paul Murdin.  A smooth survey of the planets and satellites.  Satisfying popular science, just right for the budding astronomer in the household.

That cheese plate will change your life by Marissa Mullen.  Creative gatherings and self-care with the cheese by numbers method.

Weird Earth by Donald Prothero.  Debunking strange ideas about our planet such as a moon landing hoax, flat earth, hollow earth, Atlantis, dowsing, and more.

New Children’s Books 

PICTURE BOOKS

Bedtime bonnet by Nancy Redd

Bo the brave by Bethan Woollvin

Cozy by Jan Brett

Federico and the wolf by Rebecca Gomez

Hurry up! by Kate Dopirak

A last goodbye by Elin Kelsey

Letters from Bear by Gauthier David

Lift by Minh Le

Madeline Finn and the therapy dog by Lisa Papp

My big family by Yanitzia Canetti

Nasla’s dream by Cecile Roumiguiere

Peter and the tree children by Peter Wohlleben

A quiet girl by Peter Carnavas

Rain Boy by Dylan Glynn

The run by Barroux

Short & sweet by Josh Funk

Sid Hoff’s Danny and the dinosaur ride a bike by Bruce Hale

Southwest sunrise by Nikki Grimes

Ty’s travels : All aboard! by Kelly Lyons

Where happiness begins by Eva Eland

While you’re away by Thodoris Papaioannou

 CHAPTER BOOKS

Percy Jackson’s Greek gods by Rick Riordan

Percy Jackson’s Greek heroes by Rick Riordan

Raising Lumie by Joan Bauer

Revenge of the enginerds by Jarrett Lerner

A wish in the dark by Christina Soontornvat

NON-FICTION

It’s a numbers game! Basketball by James Buckley, Jr.

Lost cities by Giles Laroche

The ocean in your bathtub by Seth Fishman

On your mark, get set, gold! by Scott Allen

Play in the wild by Lita Judge

A rainbow of rocks by Kate DePalma

A thousand glass flowers: Marietta Barovier and the invention of the Rosetta bead by Evan Turk

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The battle of the labyrinth by Rick Riordan

The last Olympian by Rick Riordan

The lightning thief by Rick Riordan

The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan

The Titan’s curse by Rick Riordan

JUVENILE DVDs

Daniel Tiger’s neighborhood: Explore the outdoors (2020) The Fred Rogers Company.

Red shoes and the seven dwarfs (2020) starring Chloe Grace Moretz and Sam Claflin.

The secret garden (2020) starring Colin Firth and Julie Walters.

Trolls world tour (2020) voices of Anna Kendrick and Justin Timberlake.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ October 2020

FICTION

All the devils are here by Louise Penny.  Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Surete du Quebec investigates a sinister plot in the City of Light.

Bear necessity by James Gould-Bourne.  A feel-good story about coping with grief that focuses on the love between a dad and his son and how it can lead to friendship.

Before she was Helen by Caroline Cooney.  Clemmie is a 70something, semi-retired Latin teacher, a spinster living in a somnolent Florida retirement community.  But there must be more to her.  Why else is she rattled when she learns that a cold case is coming back to life?

Cactus Jack by Brad Smith.  A 30something single woman, the untried colt she inherits, a horse crazy little girl, and their band of misfits and has-beens stick it to the establishment in the cut-throat world of horse racing.

Celine by Peter Heller.  She is nearly 70, has emphysema from years as a smoker, and she’s never too far from her oxygen tank.  She’s a blue blood and a sculptor.  She’s also a private eye in this smart, comic mystery.

Dear Ann by Bobbie Ann Mason.  A meditation on one woman’s life choices and the road she didn’t take.

Death at high tide by Hannah Dennison.  Two sisters inherit an old hotel in the remote Isles of Scilly off the coast of Cornwall and find it full of intrigue, danger, and romance.

The exiles by Christina Baker Kline.  Three young women are sent to the fledgling British penal colony of Australia in the 1840s.

Fast girls by Elise Hooper.  This celebrates three unheralded female athletes in a tale spanning three Olympiads.

The haunted lady by Mary Roberts Rinehart.  Someone’s trying to kill the head of the Fairbanks estate, and only her nurse can protect her.  A superior example of the plucky-heroine-in-an-old-dark-house school.

His and hers by Alice Feeney.  A brilliant cat-and-mouse game.  There are two sides to every story:  yours and mine, ours and theirs, his and hers.  Which means someone is always lying.

The killings at Kingfisher Hill by Sophie Hannah.  Lovers of classic whodunits will hope that the author will continue to offer her take on the great Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot.

The lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis.  When rarities disappear, a curator at the New York Public Library, who grapples with her grandmother’s legacy, uncovers new truths about her family heritage.

The lying life of adults by Elena Ferrante.  In this coming-of-age story, Giovanna seeks her true reflection in tow kindred cities.

The new American by Micheline Marcom.  The epic journey of a young Guatemalan American student, a “dreamer”, who gets deported and decides to make his way back home to California.

The new wilderness by Diane Cook.  This explores a moving mother-daughter relationship in a world ravaged by climate change and overpopulation.

One by one by Ruth Ware.  Ware does what she does best – gives us a familiar locked-door mystery setup and lets the tension and suspicion marinate until they reach fever pitch.

Payback by Mary Gordon.  A novel of lifelong reckoning between two women.  It contrasts the 1970s world of upper-class women’s education with the #MeToo era.

Royal by Danielle Steel.  In 1943, the 17 year old Princess Charlotte assumes a new identity in the country and falls in love.

Shadows in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas is about to walk into the shadows of her husband’s dangerous past….

Someone to romance by Mary Balogh.  Pitch-perfect – a riveting, fast-paced narrative.  Regency fans will be delighted.

Squeeze me by Carl Hiaasen.  A dead dowager, hungry pythons, and occupants of the winter White House shake up the Palm Beach charity ball season.

Thick as thieves by Sandra Brown.  Arden Maxwell returns home to uncover the truth about her father’s involvement in a heist that went wrong 20 years ago.

Troubled blood by Robert Galbraith.  Private detective Cormoran Strike is visiting his family in Cornwell when he is approached by a woman asking for help finding her mother, who went missing in mysterious circumstances in 1974.

NEW DVDs

A simple favor (2018) starring Anna Kendrick and Blake Lively

Q: the winged serpent (1982) starring Michael Moriarty and Candy Clark

Dead of night (1945) starring Michael Redgrave

Hester Street (1975) starring Carol Kane and Steven Keats

The private life of Henry VIII (1933) starring Charles Laughton

NEW MUSIC CDs

Rough and rowdy ways by Bob Dylan

Gaslighter by Dixie Chicks

100 hits: the best 70s album

Ultimate Grammy Collection: Classic Country

NONFICTION

The beauty of living by J. Alison Rosenblitt.  Focusing on a brief period in the life of poet E.E. Cummings, notably his WW I experiences as a POW and ambulance driver, this sheds new light.  The horrors of gas warfare, mass slaughter, and illness bring new life to the American poet’s work.

A better man by Michael Black.  A radical plea for rethinking masculinity and teaching young men to give and receive love.

Caste by Isabel Wilkerson.  The Pulitzer Prize winning journalist examines aspects of caste systems across civilizations and reveals a rigid hierarchy in America today.

The detective in the dooryard by Timothy Cotton.  Stories about the people, places and things of Maine.  There are sad stories, big events, and even the very mundane, all told from the perspective of a seasoned police officer and in the wry voice of a lifelong Mainer.

Disloyal by Michael Cohen.  An account of being on the inside of Donald Trump’s world from his former personal attorney.

The dynasty by Jeff Benedict.  The history of the New England Patriots from NFL laughingstock to making 10 trips to the Super Bowl.

Faith instinct by Nicholas Wade.  How religion evolved and why it endures.

How we live now by Bill Hayes.  A poignant and profound tribute in stories and images to a city (NYC) amidst a pandemic.  The photos serve as potent documentation of an unprecedented time.

Kent State: four dead in Ohio by Derf Backderf.  A graphic novel telling of the day America turned guns on its own children: a shocking event burned into our national memory.

A Libertarian walks into a bear by Matthew Hongoltz-Hetling.  Once upon a time, a group of libertarians got together and hatched a plan to take over an American town and completely eliminate its government in 2004.  They set their sights on Grafton, NH, a barely populated settlement with one paved road.  They overlooked one hairy detail: no one told the bears.

Looking for Miss America by Margot Mifflin.  A lively account of memorable Miss America contestants, protests, and scandals – and how the pageant, near its one hundredth anniversary, serves as an unintended indicator of feminist progress.

Mill Town by Kerri Arsenault.  The author writes of her hometown – Mexico, Maine.  This is an American story, a human predicament, and a moral wake-up call that asks:  what are we willing to tolerate and whose lives are we willing to sacrifice for our own survival?

Rage by Bob Woodward.  Interviews with firsthand sources provide details about Trump’s moves as he faced a global pandemic, economic disaster, and racial unrest.

The ultimate retirement guide for 50+ by Suze Orman.  Winning strategies to make your money last a lifetime.

What it’s like to be a bird by David Sibley.  From flying to nesting, eating to singing – what birds are doing and why.

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Items ~ September 2020

 FICTION

The book of lost names by Kristin Harmel.  A young woman with a talent for forgery helps hundreds of Jewish children flee the Nazis in this historical novel.

The daughters of Erietown by Connie Schultz.  The evolving role of women in middle America in the second half of the 20th century is illuminated by the story of one Ohio family, its secrets and failures, its hopes and dreams.

Deadlock by Catherine Coulter.  A young wife, a psychopath, and three red boxes puzzle FBI agents Savich and Sherlock.

The end of her by Shari Lapena.  The parents of colicky twin girls have other troubles delivered in the form of suspicions surrounding the husband’s first wife’s death.

Girls of summer by Nancy Thayer.  One life-changing summer on Nantucket brings out exhilarating revelations for a single mother and her two grown children.

A good neighborhood by Therese Fowler.  A property line and a teenage romance strain relations between two North Carolina families.

Hieroglyphics by Jill McCorkle.  The story spools around two actual, horrific 1940 events:  The Coconut Grove nightclub fire in Boston and a train derailment in North Carolina.

Home before dark by Riley Sager.  A woman returns to the house made famous by her father’s bestselling horror memoir.  Is the place really haunted by evil forces, as her father claimed?  Or are there more earthbound – and dangerous – secrets hidden within its walls?

The house on Fripp Island by Rebecca Kauffman.  When two families – one rich, one not – vacation together off the coast, little do they know that someone won’t be returning home.

Indigo by Loren Estleman.  This effortlessly melds film history with a whodunit, clever and surprising.  Film noir buffs will be in heaven.

It’s not all downhill from here by Terry McMillan.  After a sudden change of plans, a remarkable woman and her loyal group of friends try to figure out what she’s going to do with the rest of her life.

The living dead by George Romero.  He invented the modern zombie with Night of the Living Dead.  This novel is set in the present day and is an entirely new tale.

Mexican gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia.  In 1950s Mexico, a debutante travels to a distant mansion where family secrets of a faded mining empire have been kept hidden.

Near dark by Brad Thor.  With a bounty on his head, Scot Harvath makes an alliance with a Norwegian intelligence operative.

The order by Daniel Silva.  An art restorer and spy cuts his family’s vacation short to investigate whether Pope Paul VII was murdered.

The pull of the stars by Emma Donoghue.  In an Ireland of 1918 doubly ravaged by war and disease, Nurse Julia works at an under-staffed hospital in the city center, where expectant mothers who have come down with the terrible new flu and are quarantined together.

The return by Rachel Harrison.  A group of friends reunite after one of them has returned from a mysterious two-year disappearance.  Going away to an isolated hotel to reconnect, it soon becomes impossible to deny that the Julie who vanished two years ago is not the same Julie who came back.  But then who – or what – is she?

Sex and vanity by Kevin Kwan.  Here’s a nod to A Room with a View in which Lucie Tang Churchill is torn between her WASPY billionaire fiancé and a privileged hunk born in Hong Kong.

Silas Crockett by Mary Ellen Chase.  This traces life on the Maine coast through 4 generations of a seafaring family.

To wake the giant by Jeff Shaara.  The run-up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor is depicted in a thrilling you-are-there re-creation.  Fans of military fiction will find much to enjoy.

Tomb of Gods by Brian Moreland.  The Egyptian tombs in 1935.  The atmosphere of a dark, claustrophobic tomb creates a scary story in which the character’s fear invites the reader into the world to experience the fright themselves.

28 summers by Elin Hilderbrand.  A relationship that started in 1993 between two people comes to light while she is on her deathbed and his wife runs for president.

A walk along the beach by Debbie Macomber.  After dealing with loss and setbacks, two sisters take risks on dreams and love.

Wonderland by Zoje Stage.  Shirley Jackson meet The Shining in his tense novel.  One mother’s love may be all that stands between her family, an enigmatic presence…and madness.

NONFICTION

The answer is… by Alex Trebek.  Who is the Canadian-American game show host whose pronunciation of the word “genre” has been shared widely on social media?

Begin again by Eddie Glaude.  An appraisal of the life and work of James Baldwin and their meaning in relationship to the Black Lives Matter movement and the Trump presidency.

Decoding your cat by Meghan Herron.  Experts explain common cat behaviors and reveal how to prevent or change unwanted ones.

18 tiny deaths by Bruce Goldfarb.  The story of a woman whose ambition and accomplishments far exceeded the expectations of her time.  This follows the transformation of a young, wealthy socialite into the mother of modern forensics.

The gift of forgiveness by Katherine Pratt.  An inspiring book on learning how to forgive – with firsthand stories from those who have learned to let go of resentment and find peace.

Grandpa magic by Allan Kronzek.  116 easy tricks, amazing brainteasers, and simple stunts to wow the grandkids.

The life of William Faulkner by Carl Rollyson.  This follows Faulkner from his formative years through his introduction to Hollywood.  It sheds light on his unpromising youth and provides the fullest portrait yet of his family life and marriage, showing that his career as a screenwriter influenced his novels.

Like crazy by Dan Mathews.  A hilarious and heartbreaking memoir about an outlandish mother and son on an odyssey of self-discovery, and the rag-tag community that rallied to help them as the mother entered the final phase of her life.

The Lost Kitchen by Erin French.  Here’s the history, complete with recipes, of the famous small restaurant in Freedom, Maine.

Me and White Supremacy by Layla Saad.  Ways to understand and possibly counteract white privilege.

Stamped from the beginning by Ibram Kendi.  The National Book Award winning history of how racist ideas were created, spread, and deeply rooted in American society.

This is Chance! by Jon Mooallem.  The thrilling cinematic story of a community shattered by disaster – the 1964 earthquake in Anchorage, Alaska – and the extraordinary woman who helped pull it back together.

To start a war by Robert Draper.  How the Bush Administration took American to war in Iraq.

Troop 6000 by Nikita Stewart.  The inspiring true story of the first Girl Scout troop founded for and by girls living in a shelter in Queens, New York, and the amazing, nationwide response that it sparked.

The unidentified by Colin Dickey. A tour of the country’s most persistent “unexplained” phenomena – mythical monsters, alien encounters, and our obsession with the unexplained.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

New Items ~ July 2020

FICTION

All adults here by Emma Straub.  A funny and keenly perceptive novel about the life cycle of one family – as the kids become parents, grandchildren become teenagers, and a matriarch confronts the legacy of her mistakes.

The ancestor by Danielle Trussoni.  A bewitching gothic novel of suspense that plunges readers into a world of dark family secrets, the mysteries of human genetics, and the burden of family inheritance.

The astonishing life of August March by Aaron Jackson.  An irrepressibly optimistic oddball orphan is thrust into the wilds of postwar New York City after an extraordinary childhood in a theater.  (Think Candide by way of John Irving, with a hint of Charles Dickens.)

Beach read by Emily Henry.  A romance writer who no longer believes in love and a literary writer stuck in a rut engage in a summer-long challenge that may just upend everything they believe about happily ever after.

Big summer by Jennifer Weiner.  A poignant and unputdownable novel about the power of friendship, the lure of frenemies, and the importance of making peace with yourself through life’s ups and downs.

Blindside by James Patterson.  The mayor of New York has a daughter who’s missing and in danger.  Detective Michael Bennett has a son who’s in prison.  The two strike a deal.

The book of V by Anna Solomon.  A kaleidoscopic novel intertwining the lives of three women across 3 centuries as their stories of sex, power, and desire finally converge in the present day.

The business of lovers by Eric Jerome Dickey.  In this road trip across L.A. there are deep conversations, adult situations, and a sweet love story at every turn.

Close up by Amanda Quick.  Welcome to Burning Cove, California where 1930s Hollywood glamour conceals a ruthless killer….

Dance away with me by Susan Phillips.  Two people determined to withdraw from society instead discover the power of human connection in this deeply felt romance.

The goodbye man by Jeffery Deaver.  Reward-seeker Colter Shaw infiltrates a sinister cult after learning that the only way to get somebody out…is to go in.

Guests of August by Gloria Goldreich.  Five families come together for a summer vacation that will change their lives forever in this tale of love, loss, and hope.

The henna artist by Alka Joshi.  In 1950s Jaipur, a young woman who escaped an abusive marriage and started a new life is confronted by her husband.

Hideaway by Nora Roberts.  A family ranch in Big Sur country and a legacy of Hollywood royalty set the stage for this suspense novel.

The house on Fripp Island by Rebecca Kauffman.  When two families – one rich, one not – vacation together off the coast of South Carolina, little do they know that someone won’t be returning home.

How much of these hills is gold by C Pam Zhang.  Set against the twilight of the American gold rush, two siblings are on the run in an unforgiving landscape – trying not to just survive but to find a home.

How to pronounce knife by Souvankham Thammavongsa.  Spare, unsentimental, and distilled to riveting essentials, these stories honor the surreal, funny, often wrenching realities of trying to build a life far from home.

The jetsetters by Amanda Ward.  When Charlotte wins a Mediterranean cruise, she sees it as the perfect opportunity to reconnect with her adult children.  Each character’s dysfunctions run deep, and each plot twist threatens to sink their sanity, resulting in a funny, moving tale of the complications of familial love.

The last trial by Scott Turow.  A brilliant courtroom chess match about a celebrated criminal defense lawyer and the prosecution of his lifelong friend – a doctor accused of murder.

The love story of Missy Carmichael by Beth Morrey.  Here is a love story of the most important kind: that of coming to love oneself through accepting and returning the love of others – be it people or dogs.

Murder at the Mena House by Erica Neubauer.  Well-heeled travelers from around the world flock to the Mena House Hotel – an exotic gem in Cairo where cocktails flow, adventure dispels the aftershocks of World War I, and deadly dangers wait in the shadows.

The murder of twelve by Jessica Fletcher.  Jessica takes on an Agatha Christie-style mystery when she finds herself stranded in a hotel during a blizzard with 12 strangers and a killer in their midst.

Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld.  A compelling what-might-have-been:  what if Hilary Rodham HADN’T married Bill Clinton?

The second home by Christina Clancy.  Told through the eyes of 3 siblings, this title captures the ache of nostalgia for summers past and the powerful draw of the places we return to again and again.  It is about second homes, second families, and second chances.

The shooting at Château Rock by Martin Walker.  When a local’s troubling death is linked to a Russian oligarch and his multinational conglomerate, Chief Bruno faces one of his toughest cases yet, one that brings together a French notary and a rock star – and of course, Bergerac red and white.

The sight of you by Holly Miller. A romantic and page-turning novel that poses a heartbreaking question:  Would you choose love, if you knew how it would end?

A tender thing by Emily Neuberger.  Set under the dazzling lights of late 1950s Broadway where a controversial new musical pushes the boundaries of love, legacy, and art.

Three things I know are true by Betty Culley.  Life changes forever for Liv when her older brother, Jonah, accidentally shoots himself with the gun of his best friend’s father.

A week at the shore by Barbara Delinsky.  This explores how lives and relationships are forever changed when 3 sisters reunite at their family Rhode Island beach house.

NEW DVDs

The lighthouse (2019) starring Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe

Little women (2019) starring Saoirse Ronan and Emma Watson

Doctor Sleep (2019) starring Ewan McGregor and Rebecca Ferguson

Roma (2018) starring Marina de Tavira

Star Wars: the rise of Skywalker (2019) starring Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill

1917 (2019) starring George MacKay and Dean-Charles Chapman

NEW NONFICTION

The age of Phillis by Honoree Jeffers.  A collection of original poems speaking to the life and times of Phillis Weatley, a Colonial America-era poet brought to Boston as a slave.

Dark mirror by Barton Gellman.  A well-documented account on the far-reaching impact of US domestic surveillance and the resulting intrusions of privacy.

A delayed life by Dita Kraus.  A story of survival that is rare in its coverage of life before and after the Holocaust, addressing the difficult question of what comes after such a tragedy.

Dirt by Bill Buford.  A hilariously self-deprecating, highly obsessive account of the author’s adventures in the world of French haute cuisine, for anyone who has ever found joy in cooking and eating food with their family.

Dress your best life by Dawnn Karen.  How to use fashion psychology to take your look – and your life – to the next level.

Home is a stranger by Parnaz Foroutan.  Unmoored by the death of her father and disenchanted by the American Dream, Foroutan leaves Los Angeles for Iran, 19 years after her family fled the religious police state brought in by the Islamic Theocracy.

In the name of God by Selina O’Grady.  A groundbreaking book on the history of religious tolerance and intolerance that offers an essential narrative to understanding Islam and the West today.

Kooks and degenerates on ice by Thomas Whalen.  Here to celebrate the 50th anniversary – it’s Bobby Orr, the big bad Boston Bruins, and the Stanley Cup championship that transformed hockey.

Rental style by Chelsey Brown.  This doubles as a décor piece and handy design guide and shows readers how to decorate and organize small, rented spaces on a budget.

Sigh, gone by Phuc Tran.  For anyone who has ever felt like they don’t belong, this shares an irreverent, funny, and moving tale of displacement and assimilation woven together with poignant themes from beloved works of classic literature.  The author now lives in Portland, Maine.

24 by Willie Mays.  A memoir by the Baseball Hall of Famer told in 24 chapters to correspond with his well-known uniform number.

Warhol by Blake Gopnik.  The definitive bio of a fascinating and paradoxical figure, one of the most influential artists of his – or any – age.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ March 2020

FICTION

The authenticity project by Clare Pooley.  The story of a solitary green notebook that brings together six strangers and leads to unexpected friendship…and even love.

A beautiful crime by Christopher Bollen.  A twisty story of deception, set in contemporary Venice and featuring a young American couple who have set their sights on a high-stakes con.

Cesare by Jerome Charyn.  Beginning in 1937 Germany, this is a literary thriller and love story born of the horrors of a country whose culture has died, whose history has been warped, and whose soul has disappeared.

The chill by Scott Carson.  A century after an early 20th century New York community is intentionally flooded to redistribute water downstate, an inspector overseeing a dangerously neglected damn uncovers a prophecy that warns of additional sacrifices.

Dead to her by Sarah Pinborough.  A twisty psychological thriller about a savvy second wife who will do almost anything to come out on top.

Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano.  A 12 year old boy tries to start over after becoming the sole survivor of a plane crash in which he lost his immediate family.

Golden in death by J.D. Robb.  Homicide detective Eve Dallas investigates a murder with a mysterious motive – and a terrifying weapon.

Long bright river by Liz Moore.  Mickey risks her job with the Philadelphia police force by going after a murderer and searching for her missing sister.

The mercies by Kiran Hargrave.  On an icy, dark island, men hunt witches…and women fight back.  This chilling tale of religious persecution is served up with a feminist bite.

Mercy House by Alena Dillon.  Inside a century-old row house in Brooklyn, Sister Evelyn and her fellow nuns preside over a safe haven for the abused and abandoned.

The recipe for revolution by Carolyn Chute.  A blistering book about the Settlement, a radical, politically incorrect collective of the disorderly and disaffected in rural Maine.

The regrets by Amy Bonnaffons.  Reality and dream collide in this darkly playful novel about a love affair between the living and the dead.

Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart.  The unforgettable story of a sweet and lonely boy who spends his 1980 childhood in run-down public housing in Glasgow, Scotland, where Thatcher’s policies have put people out of work and where the city’s drug epidemic is around the corner.

A view to a kilt by Kaitlyn Dunnett.  A series of blizzards have kept tourists away from Moosetookalook, Maine, and shoppers out of Liss MacCrimmmon’s Scottish Emporium.  But as warmer weather brings promises of tartan sales and new faces, melting snow reveals cold-blooded murder.

NEW DVDs

A beautiful day in the neighborhood (2019)  starring Matthew Rhys and Tom Hanks

The farewell (2019)  starring Awkwafina

Harriet (2019) starring Cynthia Erivo and Leslie Odom Jr.

Parasite (2019) starring Kang Ho Song and Sun Kyun Lee

Taboo: Season 1 (2017) starring Tom Hardy

Once upon a Time in Hollywood (2019) starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt

NONFICTION

Aftershock: the human toll of war by Richard Cahan.  Haunting World War II images by America’s soldier photographers.

The book you wish your parents had read by Philippa Perry.  Definitive guide for any parent looking to navigate their past, avoid repeating their own parents’ mistakes, and ensure they don’t land their own kids in therapy.

By chance alone by Max Eisen. More than 70 years after the Nazi camps where liberated by the Allies, this details the author’s story of survival:  the back-breaking slave labor in Auschwitz, the infamous “death march”, the painful aftermath of liberation, and his journey of physical and psychological healing.

Decoding boys by Cara Natterson.  Comforting … a common-sensical and gently humorous exploration of male puberty’s many trials.

Esquire dress code.  A man’s guide to personal style as seen by Esquire magazine.

Gay like me: a father writes to his son by Richie Jackson.  This is a celebration of gay identity and parenting, and a powerful warning to the author’s son, other gay men, and the world.  He looks back on his own journey as a gay man coming of age through decades of political and cultural turmoil.

How to do nothing by Jenny Odell.  An argument for unplugging from technology in order to potentially focus attention of important matters.

Last stop Auschwitz by Eddy de Wind.  Written in Auschwitz itself, this one-of-a-kind, minute-by-minute true account is a crucial historical testament to a survivor’s fight for his life.

Something that may shock and discredit you by Daniel Ortberg.  A witty and clever collection of essays and cultural observations spanning pop culture – from the endearingly popular to the staggeringly obscure.

Very stable genius by Philip Rucker.  The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists use firsthand accounts to chart patterns of behavior within the Trump administration.

When my time comes by Diane Rehm.  Conversations about whether those who are dying should have the right to determine when life should end.

When time stopped by Ariana Neumann.  In this remarkable memoir, the author dives into the secrets of her father’s past years spent hiding in plain sight in war-torn Berlin, the annihilation of dozens of family members in the Holocaust, and the courageous choice to build anew.

Why we can’t sleep by Ada Calhoun.  The cultural and political contexts of the crises that Generation X face.

 New Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

The Cottingley fairies by Ana Sender

Growing season by Maryann Cocca-Leffler

How to catch a unicorn by Adam Wallace

Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast by Josh Funk

Lana Lynn howls at the moon by Rebecca van Slyke

Listen by Holly McGhee

Look, it’s raining by Mathieu Pierloot

No more naps! by Chris Grabenstein

Not quite narwhal by Jessie Sima

One fox : a counting book thriller by Kate Read

CHAPTER BOOKS

Homerooms & hall passes by Tom O’Donnell

Peg + Cat : Peg up a tree by Jennifer Oxley

Weird little robots by Carolyn Crimi

NON-FICTION

Antibiotics by Tamra Orr

Art Sparks: Draw, Paint, Make, and get Creative by Marlon Abrams

Egg to chicken by Rachel Tonkin

Egg to frog by Rachel Tonkin

Good night stories for rebel girls by Elena Favilli

It started with a big bang by Floor Bal

Life by the river by Holly Duhig

Life in the forest by Holly Duhig

Save the crash-test dummies by Jennifer Swanson

The speed of starlight by Colin Stuart

Stitch camp: 18 crafty projects for kids & tweens by Nicole Blum

Yes, I can listen! by Steve Metzger

DVDS

Abominable with Chloe Bennet

The angry birds movie 2 with Josh Gad

Great Yellowstone thaw by BBC Earth with Kirk Johnson

How to train your dragon. Homecoming with Jay Baruchel

Thomas & friends : Tale of the brave with Olivia Colman

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ February 2020

FICTION

American dirt by Jeanine Cummins.  Intensely suspenseful and deeply humane, this novel makes migrants seeking to cross the southern US border indelibly individual.

The bells of hell by Michael Kurland.  A counter-intelligence agent recruits a number of civilians to help foil a suspected terrorist attack by German spies in New York in 1938.

The better liar by Tanen Jones.  When a woman conceals her sister’s death to claim their joint inheritance, her deception exposes a web of dangerous secrets.

The blaze by Chad Dundas.  One man knows the connection between two extraordinary acts of arson, fifteen years apart, in his Montana hometown – if only he could remember it.

Hindsight by Iris Johansen.  Investigator Kendra Michaels whose former blindness has left her with uniquely insightful observation skills – must put her life on the line to catch a murderer setting his sights on some of society’s most vulnerable.

House on fire by Joseph Finder.  Private investigator Nick Heller infiltrates a powerful and wealthy pharmaceutical family hiding something sinister.

The long petal of the sea by Isabel Allende.  This epic spans decades and crosses continents following two young people as they flee the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War in search of a place to call home.

The poison garden by Alex Marwood.  Insidious secrets and chilling revelations surround a mysterious cult.

Recipe for a perfect wife by Karma Brown.  A modern-day woman finds inspiration in hidden notes left by her home’s previous owner, a quintessential 1950s housewife.

Such a fun age by Kiley Reid.  A story of race and privilege, this is set around a young black babysitter, her well-intentioned employer, and a surprising connection that threatens to undo them both.

To the edge of sorrow by Aharon Appelfeld.  A haunting novel about an unforgettable group of Jewish partisans fighting the Nazis during World War II.

 Trouble in mind by Michael Wiley.  As a result of being shot in the head while working undercover, Sam Kelson suffers from two unusual brain conditions:  disinhibition, causing him to speak only the truth, and autopagnosia which makes him unable to recognize himself in a mirror.

The vanishing by Jayne Ann Krentz.  Decades ago in the small town of Fogg Lake, The Incident occurred: an explosion in the cave system that released unknown gasses.  The residents slept for 2 days.  When they woke up they discovered that things had changed – they had changed.

Westering women by Sandra Dallas.  This focuses on a motley group of women who form a bond traveling to California on the Overland Trail.  Readers will enjoy this modern take on the journey West that’s rife with girl power.

The wife and the widow by Christian White.  Set against the backdrop of an eerie island town in the dead of winter, this takes you to a cliff edge and asks the question: how well do we really know the people we love?

MUSIC CDs

2020 Grammy Nominees

100 Hits: the best 60s.

The Real ‘70s.

100 hits: the best 80s.

Goodbye Yellow Brick Road by Elton John

DVDs

Downton Abbey (2019) starring Hugh Bonneville, Maggie Smith, and Jim Carter

Judy (2019) starring Renee Zellweger

The Rainmaker (1956) starring Burt Lancaster and Katharine Hepburn

The Ring (2002) starring Naomi Watts

The talk of the town (1942) starring Cary Grant, Jean Arthur, and Ronald Coleman

Tales from the Crypt / Vault of Horror (1972) starring Ralph Richardson and Joan Collins

NONFICTION

The baby decision by Merle Bombardieri.  This is a clear, compassionate guide to making a parenting or childfree decision with confidence.

Boys and sex by Peggy Orenstein.  The author interviews young men on hookups, love, porn, consent, and navigating the new masculinity, offering both an examination of sexual culture and a guide on how to improve it.

Falling into joy by Conni Ponturo.  This is a book about joy and how to get it and keep it in our lives.  It is all simpler than we are making it out to be.  We just need to take the small steps towards it.

The in-betweens by Mira Ptacin.  A young writer travels to Etna, Maine to tell the unusual story of America’s longest running camp devoted to mysticism and the world beyond.

Lands of lost borders by Kate Harris.  She and a friend covered 10 countries during a 10 month bike journey from Istanbul to India.  While retracing the path of the ancient Silk Road trade route, they contend with Himalayan-sized hill climbs, unforgiving landscapes, and surly officials.

Life in medieval Europe by Daniele Cybulskie.  Fact and fiction:  what did people actually eat?  Were they really filthy?  And did they ever get to marry for love?  All this and more.

Llewellyn’s complete book of lucid dreaming by Clare Johnson.  A comprehensive guide to promote creativity, overcome sleep disturbances & enhance health and wellness.

Modern flexitarian.  Plant-inspired recipes you can flex to add fish, meat, or dairy.

Never get angry again by David Lieberman.  A comprehensive and holistic look at the underlying emotional, physical, and spiritual causes of anger, and what the reader can do to gain perspective, allowing them to never get angry again.

Nothing fancy by Alison Roman.  This helps you nail dinner with unfussy food, unstuffy vibes, and the permission to be imperfect.

Quit like a woman by Holly Whitaker.  The radical choice to not drink in a culture obsessed with alcohol.

The third rainbow girl by Emma Eisenberg.  An investigation of the murder of two young women – showing how a violent crime casts a shadow over an entire community.  It follows this crime through the complex history of Appalachia, forming a searing portrait of America – its divisions of gender and class, and of its violence.

Tightrope: Americans reaching for hope by Nicholas Kristof.  This issues a plea – deeply personal and told through the lives of real Americans – to address the crisis in working class America, while focusing on solutions to mend a half century of governmental failure.

Tiny habits by B.J. Fogg.  The expert on habit formations show how you can have a happier, healthier life – by starting small.

Travels with myself and another by Martha Gellhorn.  Dry wit and plenty of whiskey buoyed Gellhorn during terrifying flights, insect-infested hotel rooms, and tropical disease as she chased stories across the globe.

The unique states of America.  This takes us on a journey across the states to discover the country’s most iconic – and unique – destinations and experiences.

The valleys of the assassins by Freya Stark.  She blazed across the Middle East in the 1920s and 1930s searching for the legendary mountain home of the Assassins, a warrior sect that defied both crusaders and caliphs.

Welcome to the goddamn ice cube by Blair Braverman.  Chasing adventure, the author left her California hometown at 19 for dogsledding school in the Norwegian Arctic.  Her vivid account offers plenty of thrills and high-flying danger from Norwegian snowdrifts to Alaskan glaciers.

The yellow house by Sarah Broom.  An unforgettable memoir about the inexorable pull of home and family, set in a shotgun house in New Orleans East.

 New Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

Between us and Abuela: a family story from the border by Mitali Perkins

Frida Kahlo and her animalitos by Monica Brown

I’m not Millie! by Mark Pett

Ida and the whale by Rebecca Gugger

The Invisible Leash by Patrice Karst

Moth by Isabel Thomas

Skulls! by Blair Thornburgh

The way I act  by Steve Metzger

CHAPTER BOOKS

Spies: James Armistead Lafayette by Kyandreia Jones

Spies: Mata Hari by Katherine Factor

Talking leaves by Joseph Bruchac

Terror on the Titanic by Jim Wallace

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The brain: the ultimate thinking machine by Tory Woollcott

Cats: nature and nurture by Andy Hirsch

Flying machines: how the Wright brothers soared by Alison Wilgus

Polar bears: survival on the ice by Jason Viola

Rockets: defying gravity by Anne Drozd

Skyscrapers: the heights of engineering by John Kerschbaum

Wild weather: storms, meteorology, and climate by M.K. Reed

Wings of fire: the hidden kingdom by Tui Sutherland

NONFICTION

2020 Maine summer camps: real kids – real camps – real Maine! by Maine Youth Camping Foundation

Animal by Smithsonian

Animals up close by DK

Are you what you eat? by DK

The Bermuda Triangle by Elizabeth Noll

Bigfoot by Elizabeth Noll

Cells : an owner’s handbook by Carolyn Fisher

Cooking class global feast!: 44 recipes that celebrate the world’s cultures by Deanna Cook

Do all Indians live in tipis? by Smithsonian Books

ESP by Elizabeth Noll

Ghosts by Elizabeth Noll

Haunted places by Elizabeth Noll

How did I get here? by Philip Bunting

Human body by Smithsonian

Human body: [a book with guts!] by Dan Green

Science by Smithsonian

The science of poop and farts by Alex Woolf

The science of scabs and pus by Ian Graham

The science of snot and phlegm by Fiona Macdonald

UFOs by Elizabeth Noll

Wait, rest, pause: dormancy in nature by Marcie Atkins

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ November 2019

FICTION

Before the devil fell by Neil Olson.  Equal parts engaging and creepy, this twisty tale examines how secrets and regret can continue to reverberate through generations.  Possibly too creepy for late-night reading.

The bone fire by S.D. Sykes.  Oswald de Lacy brings his family to a secluded island castle to escape the Black Death, but soon a murder within the household proves that even the strongest fortress isn’t free from terror in 14th century England.

A book of bones by John Connolly.  Charlie Parker’s pursuit of his nemesis peaks in this seamless, expansive, and chilling blend of police procedural and gothic horror tale.

Cantoras by Carolina De Robertis.  In the shadow of a violent dictatorship, five queer women find the courage and strength to live their truth.

Chilling effect by Valerie Valdes.  A hilarious, offbeat space opera that skewers everything from pop culture to video games and features an irresistible foul-mouthed captain and her motley crew.

Cilka’s journey by Heather Morris.  A 16 year old, who sleeps with a concentration camp commandant in order to survive, is sentenced to a Siberian prison camp where she cares for the ill.

The Dutch house by Ann Patchett.  The story of the indelible bond between two siblings, the house of their childhood, and a past that will not let them go.

Full throttle by Joe Hill.  In a collection of short fiction, Hill dissects timeless human struggles in 13 tales of supernatural suspense, including “In the Tall Grass”, one of the 2 co-written with Stephen King.

The girl who lived twice by David Lagercrantz.  Mikael Blomkvist helps Lisabeth Salander put her past behind her.

The giver of stars by Jojo Moyes.  An extraordinary story of five women’s journey to deliver books to people who never had any, expanding horizons and changing their lives.

The guardians by John Grisham.  Cullen Post, a lawyer and Episcopal minister, antagonizes some ruthless killers when he takes on a wrongful conviction case.

Imaginary friend by Stephen Chbosky.  A pleasing book for those who like to scare themselves silly, one to read with the lights on and the door bolted.

The lying room by Nicci French.  A married woman’s affair with her boss spirals into a dangerous game of chess with the police when she discovers he’s been murdered and she clears the crime scene of all evidence.

The man who saw everything by Deborah Levy.  Multiple versions of history collide – literally – in a story that defies gravity in a daring, time-bending novel.

The nugget by P.T. Deutermann.  A novice naval aviator grows into a hero in this authentic World War II adventure.

The pursuit by Joyce Carol Oates.  A young woman is haunted by a past she doesn’t understand in this powerful story of domestic violence.

Random act by Gerry Boyle.  When Maine’s favorite reporter, Jack McMorrow, heads out to the hardware store on a routine errand, little does he know that he’s about to witness a murder that will have vicious repercussions.

Robert B. Parker’s The Bitterest Pill by Reed Coleman.  The opioid epidemic has reached Paradise, and Police Chief Jesse Stone must rush to stop the devastation.

Salvaged by Madeleine Roux.  A woman on the run.  A captain adrift in space.  One of them is infected with an alien parasite.  In this dark sci-fi thriller, a young woman must confront her past so the human race will have a future.

The shape of night by Tess Gerritsen.  A woman tries to outrun her past and is drawn to a coastal village in Maine – and to a string of unsolved murders.

The secrets we kept by Lara Prescott. During the Cold War, members of the CIA’s typing pool aid its mission to smuggle the banned book Doctor Zhivago behind the Iron Curtain.

Tuesday Mooney talks to ghosts by Kate Racculia.  A dying billionaire sends one woman and a cast of dreamers on a citywide treasure hunt in this irresistible novel.

The twisted ones by T. Kingfisher.  When a woman clears out her deceased grandmother’s home in rural North Carolina, she finds long-hidden secrets about a strange colony of beings in the woods.  It’s The Blair Witch Project meets The Andy Griffith Show.

The water dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates.  This captures the brutality of slavery and explores the underlying truth that slaveholders could not dehumanize the enslaved without also dehumanizing themselves.

Who are you, Calvin Bledsoe? by Brock Clarke.  An exuberant comic novel involving explosions, secret agents, religious fanatics, and a hapless narrator dragged around Europe by his long-lost aunt.

What happens in Paradise by Elin Hilderbrand.  Irene Steele visits the island of St. John to get to the bottom of the mysterious life and death of her husband.

The world that we knew by Alice Hoffman.  A rabbi’s daughter creates a mystical Jewish creature that is sworn to protect a 12 year old girl in World War II Europe.

NONFICTION

Beautiful on the outside by Adam Rippon.  The former Olympic figure skater shares his underdog journey from beautiful mess to outrageous success in this big-hearted memoir.

The body by Bill Bryson.  A head-to-toe tour of the marvel that is the human body.

The book of gutsy women by Hillary Clinton.  Profiles of women from around the world who have blazed trails and challenged the status quo.

Dog is love by Clive Wynne.  Why and how your dog loves you.

Face it by Debbie Harry.  As the lead singer of the group Blondie, Harry tells her story of a woman who made her own path and set the standard for a generation of those to follow.

From the periphery by Pia Justesen.  This consists of narratives of everyday people who describe what it’s like to be treated differently by society because of their disabilities.

The girls by Abigail Pesta.  The inside story of how serial predator Larry Nassar got away with abusing hundreds of gymnasts for decades – and how a team of brave women banded together to bring him down.

Home work by Julie Andrews.  Continuing her life story that she began in her first book, Home, Andrews here gives a memoir of her Hollywood years.

If these walls could talk by Jerry Remy.  Stories from the Boston Red Sox dugout, Locker room, and press box.

Inside out by Demi Moore.  The star chronicles the rocky relationships, body image issues, and public perception that affected her attempts to balance family and fame.

The last pass by Gary Pomerantz.  Looking back on his life, Boston Celtics Bob Cousy regrets his failure to understand the struggles that his teammate Bill Russell, the NBA’s first Black superstar, was going through during the years they played together in racist Boston.

Me by Elton John.  In his first and only official autobiography, the music icon reveals the truth about his life, from his rollercoaster lifestyle to becoming a living legend.

Plagued by fire by Paul Hendrickson.  Frank Lloyd Wright was America’s most famous architect.  He was a genius, an egotist, and a man tormented by conscience and regret.

River of fire by Helen Prejean.  This describes her life as a nun, starting with her entrance into a convent in 1957 at the age of 18 and ending in 1982 when she began her work with abolishing the death penalty.

You throw like a girl by Don McPherson.  This is a call to action that has the potential to provoke conversation and change and is a unique crossover of sports memoir and astute social commentary about the blind spot of masculinity.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Big boys cry by Jonty Howley

Bruce’s big storm by Ryan Higgins

Dasher by Matt Tavares

The end of something wonderful by Stephanie Lucianovic

The favorite book by Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Grandpa’s top threes by Wendy Meddour

Have you seen my blankie? by Lucy Rowland

Hop up! Wriggle over! by Elizabeth Honey

I’m a gnome by Jessica Peill-Meininghaus

If I could give you Christmas by Lynn Plourde

A letter to my teacher by Deborah Hopkinson

The proudest blue : a story of Hijab and family by Ibtihaj Muhammad

The scarecrow by Beth Ferry

The shortest day by Susan Cooper

A stone sat still by Brendan Wenzel

 CHAPTER BOOKS

All the impossible things by Lindsay Lackey

Big break : Julie 1974 by Megan McDonald

Look both ways : a tale told in ten blocks by Jason Reynolds

No ordinary sound: Melody 1964 by Denise Patrick

Other words for home by Jasmine Warga

The spirit of aloha: Nanea 1941 by Kirby Larson

The tyrant’s tomb by Rick Riordan

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The Bad Guys in superbad by Aaron Blabey

The Bad Guys in the Big Bad Wolf by Aaron Blabey

Best friends by Shannon Hale

Chick & Brain : Smell my foot! by Cece Bell

Dog Man. For whom the ball rolls by Dav Pilkey

Guts by Raina Telgemeier

Mighty Jack and Zita the spacegirl by Ben Hatke

The okay witch by Emma Steinkellner

Stargazing by Jen Wang

 NON-FICTION

Are robots aware they’re robots? World Book answers your questions about technology

Big book of monsters : the creepiest creatures from classic literature by Hal Johnson

Can cats swim even if they don’t like water? World Book answers your questions about pests and other animals

Cat encyclopedia for kids by Joanne Mattern

Dr. Seuss’s Horse Museum by Dr. Seuss

From seed to sunflower by Camilla de la Bedoyere

Is the milky way made out of milk? World Book answers your questions about outer space

Lionel Messi by Anthony Hewson

Sidney Crosby by Kevin Frederickson

Steph Curry by Kevin Frederickson

Todd Gurley by Anthony Hewson

The truth about crocodiles : Seriously funny facts about your favorite animals by Maxwell Eaton

 DVDS

Aladdin with Will Smith

The best Christmas gift (Veggie Tales)

Daniel Tiger’s neighborhood.  It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood

Missing link with Hugh Jackman

Sesame Street. 50 years and counting

Toy story 4 with Ivan Shavrin

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ October 2019

FICTION

A better man by Louise Penny.   Catastrophic spring flooding, blistering attacks in the media, and a mysterious disappearance greet Chief Inspector Gamache as he returns to the Sûreté du Québec.

Bloomland by John Engelhard.  This explores how the origin and aftermath of a shooting impacts the lives of 3 characters.  As a community wrestles with the fallout, the story interrogates social and cultural dysfunction in a nation where mass violence has become all too familiar.

Cold storage by David Koepp.  A wild and terrifying adventure about 3 strangers who must work together to contain a highly contagious, deadly organism.

The cold way home by Julia Keller.  The sleuths are easy to like and the murder story is moving, but the object of fascination here is Wellwood, a state-run mental institution with a dark history as a repository for “rebellious, unruly women.”

The dearly beloved by Cara Wall.  Two married couples’ intricate bonds of faith & friendship, jealousy and understanding, are tested by the birth of an autistic child.

Gamechanger by L.X. Beckett.  Necromancer meets Star Trek Sci-Fi.

Going Dutch by James Gregor.  A directionless grad student finds himself at the center of a bisexual love triangle in this charming Brooklyn rom-com.  Of course his double life must come crashing down, which it does spectacularly.

The grammarians by Cathleen Schine.  At the heart of this comic novel about super-smart, language-obsessed sisters are profound questions about how close two human beings can be.

Haunted house murder by Leslie Meier.  Tricks and treats keep the Halloween spirit alive in coastal Maine, but this year the haunted house theme is getting carried away a little too far.

The institute by Stephen King.  A group of kids with special talents must play along with the rules at the evil institution where they’re being detained or face an even scarier fate.

The last good guy by T. Jefferson Parker.  P.I. Roland Ford hunts for a missing teenager and uncovers a dark conspiracy in his most personal case yet.

The nanny by Gilly Macmillan.  Suspense novel with delicious British suspense tropes on display – rural resentment of the local rich people, closets full of skeletons, shady business dealings, false memories, and fake identities.  Who could ask for more?

Old bones by Douglas Preston.  The story of the ill-fated Donner party has new life in this thrilling blend of archaeology, history, murder, and suspense.

The Oracle by Jonathan Cahn.  A traveler discovers mysteries hidden behind seven locked doors.

The passengers by John Marrs.  In the near future, government-mandated self-driving cars become the norm in Britain – until they prove susceptible to a sophisticated terrorist hack.

Quichotte by Salman Rushdie.  A dazzling Don Quixote for the modern age.

The retreat by Sherri Smith.  This shows the dark side of the self-care and wellness industry with twisting suspense that asks: how well do you really know your friends?

A single thread by Tracy Chevalier.  An immersive, moving story of a woman coming into her own at the dawn of the second World War.

The testaments by Margaret Atwood.  This sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale picks up the story 15 years after Offred stepped into the unknown, with the explosive testaments of 3 female narrators from Gilead.

Thirteen by Steve Cavanagh.  What if the serial killer isn’t on trial but is a member of the jury?

This tender land by William Krueger.  A magnificent novel about 4 orphans on a life-changing odyssey during the Great Depression.

Vendetta in death by J.D. Robb.  Eve Dallas looks into the misdeeds of a wealthy businessman while a vigilante named Lady Justice uses disguises to avenge women who were wronged.

What Rose forgot by Nevada Barr.  A grandmother in her 60s emerges from a mental fog to find she’s trapped in her worst nightmare.

NEW DVDs

Rocketman  (2019) starring Taron Egerton and Jamie Bell

Life in Pieces : the complete first season starring Diane Weist and James Brolin

Summer of ’42 (1971) starring Gary Grimes and Jennifer O’Neill

Zorba the Greek (1964) starring Anthony Quinn and Alan Bates

NONFICTION

All the powers of earth by Sidney Blumenthal.  Lincoln’s incredible ascent to power in a world of chaos is newly revealed through a great biographer’s extraordinary research and literary style.

Audience of one by James Poniewozik.  Donald Trump, television, and the fracturing of America – this is both a fascinating look at the ways TV has changed and shaped the U.S., and a compelling lens through which to look at how we got to 11/8/16.

But where do I put the couch? by Melissa Michaels. 100 REAL decorating FAQs answered.

Country music: an illustrated history by Dayton Duncan.  Lucid, jam-packed, richly illustrated companion to the Ken Burns documentary series. Country music is America’s music – which is to say, music from every culture and ethnicity.

Healing with CBD by Eileen Konieczny.  Learn how cannabidiol can transform your health without the high.

Homegrown by Alex Speier.  The captivating story of the historic 2018 Boston Red Sox, as told through the assembly and ascendancy of their talented young core.

Inconspicuous consumption by Tatiana Schlossberg.  This urgent call to action will empower you to stand up to climate change and environmental pollution by making simple but impactful everyday choices.

My life on the line by Ryan O’Callaghan.  The New England Patriot gives a riveting account of life as a closeted professional athlete against the backdrop of depression and opioid addiction.

100 things to do in Portland, Maine before you die by Robert Witkowski.  Start your engines….  Ready.   Set.   Go!

Talking to strangers by Malcolm Gladwell.  The author offers a powerful examination of our interactions with strangers – and why they often go wrong.

When you find my body by D. Dauphinee.  The disappearance of Geraldine Large on the Appalachian Trail in Maine and the search for her body.

Will my cat eat my eyeballs? by Caitlin Doughty.  A mortician answers real questions from kids about death, dead bodies, and decomposition.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Hannah’s tall order : an A to Z sandwich by Linda Vander Heyden

Lionel and the lion’s share by Lou Peacock

Looking for yesterday by Alison Jay

Miss Jaster’s garden by N M Bodecker

One shoe two shoes by Caryl Hart

The right one for Roderic by Violeta Noy

Where do speedboats sleep at night by Brianna Caplan Sayres

NON-FICTION

Day and night by Crystal Sikkens

Dolphins! : strange and wonderful by Laurence Pringle

The four seasons by Crystal Sikkens

Helen Oxenbury : a life in illustration by Leonard Marcus

The life cycle of a rabbit by Crystal Sikkens

Look, I’m a mathematician

Map and track oceans by Lauren Ishak

Mike Trout by Anthony Hewson

Mookie Betts by Derek Moon

Patrick Mahomes by Kevin Frederickson

Tom Brady by Kevin Frederickson

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ September 2019

FICTION

The bitterroots by C.J. Box.  The black sheep of an influential family is accused of assault.

Blood of an exile by Brian Naslund.  A page-turning, edge-of-your-seat read that breathes new life into dragon mythology.

Chances are…. by Richard Russo.  A reunion on Martha’s Vineyard reopens old mysteries and wounds for three Vietnam-era college friends.

Contraband by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington is caught in the web of a national smuggling operation.

Costalegre by Courtney Maum.  A wildly imaginative and curiously touching story of a privileged teenager who has everything a girl could want except for a mother who loves her back.

Delayed rays of a star by Amanda Lee Koe.  A dazzling novel following the lives of 3 groundbreaking women – Marlene Dietrich, Anna May Wong, and Leni Riefenstahl – cinema legends who lit up the 20th century.

The escape room by Megan Goldin.  Four young Wall Street rising stars discover the price of ambition when an escape room challenge turns into a lethal game of revenge.

Evvie Drake starts over by Linda Holmes.  In a sleepy seaside town in Maine, an unlikely relationship develops between a young woman who’s lost her husband and a major league pitcher who’s lost his game.

Fleishman is in trouble by Taffy Brodesser-Akner.  Toby Fleishman is forced to confront his own perception of his actions when his ex-wife drops off their kids at his place and disappears.

The favorite daughter by Kaira Rouda.  The perfect home.  The perfect family.  The perfect lie. You never know how far someone will go to keep a family together.

The Gifted School by Bruce Holsinger.  A previously happy group of friends and parents is nearly destroyed by their own competitiveness when an exclusive school for gifted children opens in the community.

The golden hour by Beatriz Williams.  This creates a dazzling epic of WW II-era Nassau – a hotbed of spies, traitors, and the most infamous couple of the age – the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.

The great unexpected by Dan Mooney.  A curmudgeon and his eccentric new roommate join together to plan an epic escape from a nursing home in this charming, poignant tale.

In West Mills by De’Shawn Winslow.  Follows the residents of a black neighborhood in a tiny North Carolina town over the course of several decades.

Labyrinth by Catherine Coulter.  Agents Savich and Sherlock wend their way through a maze of lies to get to the bottom of a secret.

Lady in the lake by Laura Lippman.  In 1966, a housewife becomes a reporter and investigates the killing of a black woman in Baltimore.

The last astronaut by David Wellington.  Sally Jansen is Earth’s last astronaut – and last hope – in this thriller where a mission to make first contact becomes a struggle for survival in the depths of space.

Lost you by Haylen Beck.  Novel of psychological suspense about two women locked in a desperate fight over a child each believes is rightfully hers.

The marriage clock by Zara Raheem.  Starting on the night of her 26th birthday, an Indian woman has just 3 months to find her true love or else she has to allow her parents to arrange her marriage.

The Nickel boys by Colson Whitehead.  Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

One good deed by David Baldacci.  Archer is a straight-talking former WW II soldier fresh out of prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs.  A great mix of contemporary women’s fiction, an old-fashioned friends-to-lovers story, and a big dose of #metoo reading in one fantastic package.

Shamed by Linda Castillo.  A devastating murder exposes an Amish family’s tortured past.

Simply dead by Eleanor Kuhns.   A teenage midwife in Maine goes missing in 1790.

Tell me everything by Cambria Brockman.  A tight group of college friends at a Maine college fight to keep their relationships from splintering under the pressure of secrets.

The turn of the key by Ruth Ware.  A creepy mystery in which a nanny takes a post at a haunted country house.

The unlikely escape of Uriah Heep by H.G. Parry.  The ultimate book-lover’s fantasy, featuring a young scholar with the power to bring literary characters into the world.

Whisper network by Chandler Baker.  A thriller, a murder mystery, and an anthem for any woman who has ever hit a glass ceiling, been the brunt of sexual innuendo, or felt harassed in the workplace.

 NEW MUSIC CDs

The platinum collection: Greatest hits I, II, III    by Queen

Western stars by Bruce Springsteen

No. 6 collaborations project by Ed Sheeran

Rock of ages by Billy Strings

Oklahoma!  (2019 Broadway cast recording)

NONFICTION

Crisis in the red zone by Richard Preston.  More from the author of “The Hot Zone” – the story of the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history and of the outbreaks to come.

Don’t read poetry by Stephanie Burt.  A book about how to read poems.

Last witnesses by Svetlana Alexievich.  From the Nobel Prize-winning writer, here is an oral history of children’s experiences in WW II across Russia.

Leaving the Witness by Amber Scorah.  The author describes her strict upbringing as a third-generation Jehovah’s Witness and her efforts to find her true place in the world apart from the edicts of her family and faith.

On the clock by Emily Guendelsberger.  A bitingly funny, eye-opening story of a college-educated young professional who finds work in the automated and time-starved world of hourly labor.

100 times: a memoir of sexism by Chavisa Woods.  100 personal stories of sexism, harassment, discrimination, and assault – parts of a constant battle ALL women face every day.

Outpost by Dan Richards.  The author visits the far-away places in our world and witnesses the landscapes asking – Why are we drawn to wilderness?  And how do wild places become a space for inspiration and creativity?

The Plaza by Julie Satow.  An unforgettable history of how one illustrious hotel has defined our understanding of money and glamour, from the Gilded Age to the Gog-Go Eighties to today’s Billionaire Row.

Reading behind bars by Jill Grunenwald.  A true story of literature, law, and life as a person librarian.

They called us enemy by George Takei.  A stunning graphic novel recounting the actor/author/activist’s childhood imprisoned within American concentration camps during WW II.  Experience forces that shaped an American icon – and America itself – in this tale of courage, country, loyalty, and love.

Three women by Lisa Taddeo.  The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student, and a restaurant owner.

The volunteer by Jack Fairweather.  True story of a Polish agent who infiltrated Auschwitz, organized a rebellion, and then snuck back out.

We’re still here by Jennifer Silva.  Anyone interested in the lives and motivations of blue-collar workers and their participation in the electoral process should read this.

NEW CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Hide and seek by Kate May Green

When Aidan became a brother by Kyle Lukoff

Bunny’s Book Club goes to school by Annie Silvestro

The new kitten by Joyce Carol Oates

My big bad monster by A. N. Kang

No more monsters under your bed! by Jordan Chouteau

Mighty Reader and the Big Freeze by Will Hillenbrand

Clothesline clues to the first day of school by Kathryn Heling

The pigeon has to go to school by Mo Willems

First day of Groot! by Brendan Deneen

The king of kindergarten by Derrick Barnes

Goodbye, friend! Hello, friend by Cori Doerrfeld

Take your pet to school day by Linda Ashman

The teacup café by Patty Farrin

My teacher is a robot by Jeffrey Brown

The school book by Todd Parr

Fancy Nancy: Shoe-la-la! by Victoria Saxon

The best seat in kindergarten by Katharine Kenah

CHAPTER BOOKS

Babymouse : Tales from the locker by Jennifer L. Holm

Curiosity House : The shrunken head by Lauren Oliver

The forgetting spell by Lauren Myracle

MOVIES

The secret life of pets 2 with Harrison Ford

Pokemon : Detective Pikachu by Rob Letterman

A dog’s journey with Marg Helgenberger

Cinderella by Walt Disney

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.