At this time, access to the building is on Monday through Friday from 10am - 5pm. Our Pick-Up Window is open Monday through Friday from 10 - 5:25. Please call for details - 207-582-3312

New Items ~ July 2021

FICTION

The damage by Caitlin Wahrer.  When a small town family is pushed to the brink, how far will they go to protect one of their own?  An edgy, propulsive read about what we will do in the name of love and blood.

The devil my dance by Jake Tapper.  A couple is asked by the Attorney General to look into a threat, which brings them into contact with the Rat Pack and the Church of Scientology.

The Drummers by Tricia Fields.  Police Chief Josie Gray’s life is complicated when sparks and bullets begin to fly after her small town in Texas is overrun by a community wishing to live “off grid”.

Finding Ashley by Danielle Steel.  Two estranged sisters, one a former best-selling author, the other a nun, reconnect as one searches for the child the other gave up.

For the wolf by Hannah Whitten.  Here is a fantasy novel about a young woman who must be sacrificed to the legendary Wolf of the Wood to save her kingdom.  But not all legends are true, and the Wolf isn’t the only danger lurking in the Wilderwood.

Golden girl by Elin Hilderbrand.  A Nantucket novelist has one final summer to protect her secrets while her loved ones on earth learn to live without their golden girl.

A good mother by Lara Bazelon.  A thriller about two young mothers, one shocking murder, and a court case that puts them both on trial. 

The guncle by Steven Rowley.  A warm and funny novel about a once-famous gay sitcom star whose unexpected family tragedy leaves him with his niece and nephew for the summer.

Hang the moon by Alexandria Bellefleur.  A rom-com about a homeless romantic who vows to show his childhood crush that romance isn’t dead by recreating iconic dates from his favorite films.

Katharine Parr by Alison Weir.  A novel of Henry VIII’s sixth wife who manages to survive him and remarry, only to be thrown into a romantic intrigue that threatens the very throne of England.

The Kingdoms by Natasha Pulley.  A genre-bending, time twisting alternative history that asks whether it’s worth changing the past to save the future, even if it costs you everyone you’ve ever loved.

The lady has a past by Amanda Quick.  An unlikely duo falls down a rabbit hole of twisted rumors and missing socialites, discovering that a health spa is a facade for something far darker than they imagined.

Legacy by Nora Roberts.  A novel of a mother and a daughter, of ambition and romance, and of a traumatic past reawakened by a terrifying threat.

The maidens by Alex Michaelides.  A tale of psychological suspense, this weaves together Greek mythology, murder, and obsession.

Mary Jane by Jessica Blau.  A tender story about a 14 year old girl’s coming of age in 1970s Baltimore, caught between her straight-laced family and the progressive family she nannies for – who happen to be secretly hiding a famous rock star and his movie star wife for the summer.

The other Black girl by Zakiya Harris.  All about the tension that unfurls when two young Black women meet against the starkly white backdrop of New York City publishing.

The plot by Jean Korelitz.  A propulsive read about a story too good NOT to steal, and the writer who steals it.

Revival season by Monica West.  The daughter of one of the South’s most famous Baptist preachers discovers a shocking secret about her father that puts her at odds with both her faith and her family.

The seed keeper by Diane Wilson.  Spanning several generations, this follows a Dakota family’s struggle to preserve their way of life, and their sacrifices to protect what matters most.

The siren by Katherine St. John.  When a Hollywood heartthrob hires his ex-wife to act in his son’s film, he sparks a firestorm on an isolated island that will unearth long-buried secrets and unravel years of lies.

Something unbelievable by Maria Kuznetsova.  An overwhelmed new mom discovers unexpected parallels between life in 21st century America and her grandmother’s account of their family’s escape from the Nazis.

The sweetness of water by Nathan Harris.  Two brothers freed by the Emancipation Proclamation hope to reunite with their mother while the forbidden romance between 2 Confederate soldiers causes chaos.

That summer by Jennifer Weiner.  Daisy receives emails intended for a woman leading a more glamorous life and finds there was more to this accident.

Wendy, darling by A.C. Wise.  Neverland is more nightmare than dream.  This rich tale of memory and magic is sure to resonate with fans of re imagined children’s stories.

While justice sleeps by Stacey Abrams.  A gripping thriller set within the halls of the U.S. Supreme Court.

NEW DVDs

The father (2020) starring Anthony Hopkins and Olivia Colman

Another round (2020) starring Mads Mikkelsen

Minari (2020) starring Steven Yeun

Judas and the Black Messiah (2020) starring Daniel Kaluuya and Lakeith Stanfield

The Rose Tattoo (1955) starring Anna Magnani and Burt Lancaster

NONFICTION

The Appalachian Trail by Philip D’Anieri.  The history and fascinating backstory of the dreamers and builders who helped bring the Appalachian Trail to life over the past century.

Beyond by Catherine Wolff.  How humankind thinks about heaven.

The bomber mafia by Malcolm Gladwell.  A look at the key players and outcomes of precision bombing during World War II.

The divine language of coincidence by Sophia Demas.  Sophia examines the events in her life that at first seemed to be a series of coincidences, but upon further consideration were building blocks of the miraculous.

Downeast by Gigi Georges.  This follows 5 Maine girls as they come of age in one of the most challenging and geographically isolated regions on the Eastern seaboard – Washington County.

Facing the mountain by Daniel Brown.  This highlights the contributions and sacrifices that Japanese immigrants and their American-born children made for the sake of the nation during World War II:  the Japanese-American army unit that overcame brutal odds in Europe; their families incarcerated back home; and a young man who refused to surrender his constitutional rights, even if it meant imprisonment.

Finding the mother tree by Suzanne Simard.  An ecologist describes ways trees communicate, cooperate, and compete.

How the word is passed by Clint Smith.  A powerful and diligent exploration of the realities and ongoing consequences of slavery in America.

Killing the mob by Bill O’Reilly.  The author turns legendary criminals and their true-life escapades into a read that rivals the most riveting crime novel.

111 Places in Boston that you must not miss by Kim Windyka.  A fun tour guide to some unexpected sites.

Persist by Elizabeth Warren.  The senior senator from Massachusetts shares six influential perspectives that shaped her life and advocacy.

Total Olympics by Jeremy Fuchs.  Every obscure, hilarious, dramatic and inspiring tale worth knowing.

What happened to you? by Bruce Perry.  An approach to dealing with trauma that shifts an essential question used to investigate it.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Cow boy is not a cowboy by Gregory Barrington

The most beautiful thing by Kao Kalia Yang

Every color of light by Hiroshi Osada

Ritu weds Chandni by Ameya Narvankar

A stopwatch from Grampa by Loretta Garbutt

We are the gardeners by Joanna Gaines

Be who you are by Todd Parr

Out of nowhere by Chris Naylor-Ballesteros

Peace by Margaret McNamara

This way, Charlie by Caron Levis

Balloons for Papa by Elizabeth Gilbert Bedia

Trying by Kobi Yamada

Big feelings by Alexandra Penfold

The world made a rainbow by Michelle Robinson

My day with the panye by Tami Charles

NON-FICTION

Most wanted : the revolutionary partnership of John Hancock & Samuel Adams by Sarah Jane Marsh

Gone to the woods : surviving a lost childhood by Gary Paulsen

Becoming a good creature by Sy Montgomery

Race through the skies : the week the world learned to fly by Martin W Sandler

World of glass : the art of Dale Chihuly by Jan Greenberg

A small history of a disagreement by Claudio Fuentes

Explore Native American cultures! with 25 great projects by Anita Yasuda

Exquisite : the poetry and life of Gwendolyn Brooks by Suzanne Slade

The everything kids’ basketball book : the all-time greats, legendary teams, today’s superstars — and tips on playing like a pro by Bob Schaller

This book is anti-racist : 20 lessons on how to wake up, take action, and do the work by Tiffany Jewell

Jim Trelease’s read-aloud handbook Edited and Revised by Cyndi Giorgis

Making a difference : using your talents and passions to change the world by Melissa Seymour

Wow in the world : the how and wow of the human body : from your tongue to your toes and all the guts in between by Mindy Thomas

Rainbow revolutionaries : 50 LGBTQ + people who made history by Sarah Prager

Who Is RuPaul? by Nico Medina

Hello, Earth! : poems to our planet by Joyce Sidman

Little people, big dreams : RuPaul by Maria Vegara

Little people, big dreams : Zaha Hadid by Maria Vegara

When Cloud became a cloud by Rob Hodgson

Osnat and her dove : the true story of the world’s first female rabbi by Sigal Samuel

Little libraries, big heroes by Miranda Paul

DVD’s

Elmo’s world : things Elmo loves by Sesame Street

The magic school bus rides again. All about Earth! a Netflix Series

The magic school bus rides again. Blast off! Featuring Kate McKinnon

Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood : Mister Rogers meets new friends collection 30 classic episodes from 1979-2000

Paw patrol. Dino rescue : roar to the rescue by Nickelodeon

Soul by Disney Pixar

Tom & Jerry : the movie by Warner Brothers

Raya and the last dragons by Disney

The Croods : a new age by Dreamworks

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ June 2021

FICTION

Basil’s war by Stephen Hunter.  A swashbuckling British agent goes behind enemy lines to search for a religious text that might hold the key to ending the Second World War

Breakout by Paul Herron.  A corrections officer and an ex-cop are fleeing a hurricane, but their only hope of survival is a maximum-security prison where they face new untold dangers.

The devil’s hand by Jack Carr.  James Reece is given a top-secret CIA mission.

Dial A for Aunties by Jesse Sutanto.  This story is filled with mistaken identity, a gaggle of intoxicated groomsmen, five lovably hilarious sisters, and slapstick humor that is full of absurd hi-jinks.

Fast ice by Clive Cussler.  Kurt Austin races to Antarctica to stop a chilling plot that imperils the entire planet.

Good company by Cynthia Sweeney.  The foundation of a marriage between actors is shaken when they reunite with an old friend who is now a TV star.

The good sister by Sally Hepworth.  Past secrets come up when Fern decides to pay back her twin sister, Rose, by having a baby for her.

Great circle by Maggie Shipstead.  The story of a daredevil female aviator determined to chart her own course in life – at any cost.

The happiest girl in the world by Alena Dillon.  A gripping novel about a young woman’s dreams of Olympic gymnastics gold – and what it takes to reach the top.

Hour of the witch by Chris Bohjalian.  A young Puritan woman – faithful, resourceful, but afraid of the demons that dog her soul – plots her escape from a violent marriage.

The man who lived underground by Richard Wright.  This resonates deeply as a story about race and the struggle to envision a different, better world.

Margreete’s Harbor by Eleanor Morse.  This is a novel set on the coast of Maine during the 1960s, tracing the life of a family and its matriarch as they negotiate sharing a home.

Northern spy by Flynn Berry.  The sister of a BBC producer may have joined the Irish Republican Army.

Ocean Prey by John Sandford.  Fan favorite heroes Lucas Davenport and Virgil Flowers join forces on a deadly maritime case.

Oslo, Maine by Marcia Butler.  A moose walks into a rural Maine town.  At the same time, Pierre, a brilliant 12 year old, loses his memory in an accident. 

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir.  A lone astronaut is on a desperate, last-chance mission to save the earth from disaster.

Raft of stars by Andre Graff.  Two young boys think they’ve committed a crime, so they flee into the woods of Wisconsin.  Will the adults trying to find and protect them reach them before it’s too late?

The Russian by James Patterson.  Investigating a trio of murders in 3 major US cities against a backdrop of his impending nuptials, Michael Bennett risks getting caught in a deadly trap set by a particularly elusive killer.

Secrets of happiness by Joan Silber.  When a man discovers his father in NY has long had another secret family, the interlocking fates of both families lead to surprise loyalties, love triangles, and a reservoir of inner strength.

Sergeant Salinger by Jerome Charyn.  Grounded in biographical fact, this is a portrait of a young man devastated by World War II on his way to becoming the mythic figure behind a novel that has marked generations.

Sooley by John Grisham.  Samuel Sooleymon receives a basketball scholarship to North Carolina Central and determines to bring his family over from a civil war-ravaged South Sudan.

Sunflower sisters by Martha Kelly.  During the Civil War, two sisters join the war effort together while two other sisters are enslaved on separate plantations.

2034 by Elliot Ackerman.  A chilling thriller that imagines a naval clash between the US and China in the South China Sea in 2034 – and the path from there to a nightmarish global conflagration.

Win by Harlan Coben.  Windsor Horne Lockwood III might rectify cold cases connected to his family that have eluded the FBI for decades.

NONFICTION

At any cost by Rebecca Rosenberg.  Here is unraveled the twisted story of Rod Covlin, whose unrepentant greed drove him to an unspeakable act of murder and betrayal that rocked New York City.

Broken horses by Brandy Carlile.  The Grammy Award winning singer and songwriter recounts difficulties during her formative years and her hard-won success.

Come fly the world by Julia Cooke.  The jet-age story of the women of Pan Am; women who wanted out and wanted up.

Don’t call it a cult by Sarah Berman.  This is the definitive look at the NXIVM cult, which victimized dozens of women for more than a decade.

Finding Freedom by Erin French.  From the owner of the critically acclaimed The Lost Kitchen, this is a life-affirming memoir about survival, renewal, and finding a community to lift her up.

Get good with money by Tiffany Aliche.  Ten simple steps to becoming financially whole.

The gospels: a new translation by Sarah Ruden.  A remarkable and accessible new translation of the Gospels.

The haunting of Alma Fielding by Kate Summerscale.  A true ghost story that happened in England.

I’m in Seattle, where are you?  by Mortada Gzar.  An exquisite story of life and love lost.  This conveys the author’s deep desire to reunite with his lover.  It’s hard to put down and difficult to forget.

Learning to pray by James Martin.  With his guidance, interested readers may see prayer as both the most natural yet transcendent thing in the world.

Little and often by Trent Preszler.  The founder of Preszler Woodshop discusses his long-time estrangement from his father and how he overcame the grief and loss of his father’s death through a carpentry project completed with inherited tools.

Nuclear folly by Serhii Plokhy.  A harrowing account of the Cuban missile crisis and how the US and USSR came to the brink of nuclear apocalypse.

Rock me on the water by Ronald Brownstein.  1974 – the year Los Angeles transformed movies, music, television, and politics.

This is the fire by Don Lemon.  In this vital book for these times, a reporter for CNN brings his experience to today’s most urgent questions:  How can we end racism in America in our lifetime?

Three ordinary girls by Tim Brady.  The true story of 3 fearless female resisters during WW II whose youth and innocence belied their extraordinary daring in the Nazi-occupied Netherlands.  It also made them the underground’s most invaluable commodity.

The triumph of Nancy Reagan by Karen Tumulty.  The definitive bio of the fiercely vigilant and politically astute First Lady who shaped one of the most consequential presidencies of the 20th century.

Wild + free nature by Ainsley Arment.  25 outdoor adventures for kids to explore, discover, and awaken their curiosity.

World travel by Anthony Bourdain.  A guide to some of the world’s most fascinating places, as seen and experienced by the writer, TV host, and relentlessly curious traveler.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ May 2021

FICTION

Act your age, Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert.  The flightiest of the Brown sisters crashes into the life of an uptight B & B owner and has him falling hard – literally!

The Affair by Danielle Steel.  A French author’s extramarital affair affects various member of his wife’s family.

All the cowboys ain’t gone by John Jacobson.  The main character is an old fashioned hero worth rooting for with much Indiana Jones-style derring-do as he travels from Texas at the turn of the century to join the French Foreign Legion.

Cloudmaker by Malcolm Brooks.  A soaring novel set during the summer of Amelia Earhart’s final flight, a tale of American ingenuity and optimism set against the backdrop of a deepening Great Depression.

The consequences of fear by Jacqueline Winspear.  Maisie Dobbs uncovers a conspiracy with devastating implications for Britain’s war effort during the Nazi occupation of Europe.

Danger in numbers by Heather Graham.  Deep in the Everglades, an eerie crime scene sets off an investigation that sends two agents deep into a world of corrupted faith, greed, and deadly secrets.

The drowning kind by Jennifer McMahon.  A chilling novel about a woman who returns to the old family home after her sister mysteriously drowns in its swimming pool…but she’s not the pool’s only victim.

Eternal by Lisa Scottoline.  Three people involved in a love triangle find everything they hold dear is tested as Mussolini’s power grows and laws change in Rome.

Infinite Country by Patricia Engel.  A story of a family occupying two different countries, Columbia and the United States.

The Kaiser’s web by Steve Berry.  A newly discovered dossier from World War II might change the course of Germany’s upcoming elections.

Klara and the sun by Kazuo Ishiguro.  An “Artificial Friend” named Klara is purchased to serve as a companion to an ailing 14 year old girl.

The ladies of the secret circus by Constance Sayers.  A magical story spanning from the jazz age in Paris to modern-day America of family secrets, sacrifice, and lost love set against the backdrop of a mysterious circus.

The lamplighters by Emma Stonex.  A gorgeous and atmospheric novel about the mysterious disappearance of three lighthouse keepers from a remote tower miles from the Cornish coast – and about the wives who were left behind.

The last bookshop in London by Madeline Martin.  Through blackouts and air raids as the Blitz intensifies, a woman discovers the power of storytelling to unite her community in ways she never dreamed – a force that triumphs over even the darkest night of the war.

The lost apothecary by Sarah Penner.  An aspiring historian in London finds a clue that might put to rest unsolved apothecary murders from 200 years ago.

The lost village by Camilla Sten.  In 1959, 900 villagers disappeared without a trace.  How can an entire village full of people just…vanish?  This delivers maximum dread with remarkable restraint.   As the situation goes from bad to worse to terrifying, readers will revel in the chills.

Meet me in Paradise by Libby Hubscher.  Marin Cole has never:  seen the ocean, climbed mountains, taken a risk in her life.  But if her sister’s plan works, she just might do all three.

Never far away by Michael Koryta.  Placed in witness protection in remote northern Maine, Leah risks exposing herself to the dangerous forces of her past when her homesick children run away.

The nine lives of Rose Napolitano by Donna Freitas.  This explores 9 possible outcomes when a woman who has never wanted children marries a man who gradually decides he does.

Of women and salt by Gabriela Garcia.  The daughter of a Cuban immigrant take sin the daughter of a neighbor detained by ICE and seeks to learn about her own family history.

The other Emily by Dean Koontz.  Haunted by the unsolved disappearance of the love of his life a decade earlier, a writer visits her suspected killer in prison before meeting a woman who uncannily resembles the person he lost.

Other people’s children by R.J. Hoffmann.  A riveting novel about a couple whose dream of adopting a baby is shattered when the teenage mother reclaims her child.

The phone booth at the edge of the world by Laura Messina.  Two bereft people find themselves seeking a garden at the top of a hill in Japan, where a disconnected phone allows the grief-stricken to send their voice into the wind as they talk to those they have lost.

The red book by James Patterson.  This puts the characters through hell in a story that’s top-drawer crime fiction.

Serpentine by Jonathan Kellerman.  Alex Delaware is traversing the forbidding place known as L.A. and exhuming the past in order to bring a vicious killer to justice.

What’s mine and yours by Naima Coster.  The integration of a North Carolina school ties together a pair of seemingly unconnected families for two decades.

NEW DVDs

Wonder Woman 1984  (2020) starring Gail Gadot and Chris Pine

News of the world (2020) starring Tom Hanks and Helena Zengel

The Peanut Butter Falcon (2019) starring Shia LaBeouf and Dakota Johnson

The snake pit (1948) starring Olivia de Havilland

The enchanted cottage (1945) starring Dorothy McGuire and Robert Young

NONFICTION

Birds of Maine by Peter Vickery.  This offers a detailed look at the state’s birds – from the Wild Turkey to the Arctic Tern – with info on migration patterns and how Maine’s geography and shifting climate mold its birdlife.

Fears of a setting sun by Dennis Rasmussen.  The surprising story of how the Founding Fathers came to despair for the future of the nation they had created.

Fourteen (talks) by (age) fourteen by Michelle Icard.  The 14 essential conversations to have with your tween and early teenager to prepare them for the emotional, physical, and social challenges ahead.

The hill we climb by Amanda Gorman.  The poem read on President Biden’s Inauguration Day by the youngest poet to write and perform an inaugural poem.

Lady Bird Johnson by Julia Sweig.  A look at the policy initiatives and the leadership style of the first lady during her time in the East Wing.

Restoring your historic house by Scott Hanson.  The complete comprehensive guide for homeowners on how to accommodate contemporary life in a historical house.

Sensitive is the new strong by Anita Moorjani.  The power of empaths in an increasingly harsh world.

Shooting Midnight Cowboy by Glenn Frankel.  The history of the controversial 1969 Oscar-winning film that signaled a dramatic shift in American popular culture.

Sidelined by Julie DiCaro.  This is a sweeping takedown of misogyny in America’s sports media and professional leagues.  It’s all about sports, culture, and being a woman in America.

Wait, I’m working with who?  by Peter Economy.  The essential guide to dealing with difficult coworkers, annoying managers, and other toxic personalities.

Where we find ourselves: the photographs of Hugh Mangum, 1897-1922.  These are interesting on so many levels and is Americana at its most compelling, real buried treasure brought to life.

Winter pasture by Li Juan.  A warm portrait of stark, strenuous lives in remote China as a woman journeys with a family of herders in winter.  It’s a rare look at a disappearing world.

The women of the Bible speak by Shannon Bream.  They lived timeless stories – by examining them, we can understand what it means to be a woman of faith.

Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

Birdsong by Julie Flett

Curious George goes swimming by Margret Rey

Granddaddy’s turn : a journey to the ballot box by Michael S. Bandy

I am perfectly designed by Karamo Brown

I promise by LeBron James

Love you forever by Robert Munsch

Northbound : a train ride out of segregation by Michael S. Bandy

Spring stinks by Ryan Higgins

V is for voting by Kate Farrell

Vote for our future! by Margaret McNamara

Welcome to the party by Gabrielle Union

Your house, my house by Marianne Dubuc

CHAPTER BOOKS

Alone in the woods by Rebecca Behrens

Ancestor approved : intertribal stories for kids edited by Cynthia Leitich Smith

Clean getaway by Nic Stone

Loretta Little looks back : three voices go tell it! by Andrea Davis Pinkney

Two roads by Joseph Bruchac

Wings of fire : the dangerous gift by Tui Sutherland

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The Great bunk bed battle by Tina Kugler

Hilo. Book 7, Gina the girl who broke the world by Judd Winick

History Comics. The Challenger disaster : tragedy in the skies by Pranas Naujokaitis

History Comics. The Great Chicago fire : rising from the ashes by Kate Hannigan

History Comics. The Roanoke Colony : America’s first mystery by Chris Schweizer

NON-FICTION

Beginner’s world atlas by National Geographic Kids

Buzzing with questions : the inquisitive mind of Charles Henry Turner by Janice N. Harrington

Dinosaur lady : the daring discoveries of Mary Anning, the first paleontologist by Linda Skeers

The great bear rescue : saving the Gobi bears by Sandra Markle

Heartbeat by Doe Boyle

Hello neighbor! : the kind and caring world of Mister Rogers by Matthew Cordell

Insects by the numbers : a book of infographics by Steve Jenkins

Kamala Harris : rooted in justice by Nikki Grimes

Marie’s Ocean : Marie Tharp maps the mountains under the sea by Josie James

Student World Atlas by National Geographic

National parks of the U.S.A. by Kate Siber

The national parks : discover all 62 parks of the United States by Stefanie Payne

Space : a visual encyclopedia by DK

Whoosh! : Lonnie Johnson’s super-soaking stream of inventions by Chris Barton

William Still and his freedom stories : the father of the underground railroad by Don Tate

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

New Items ~ April 2021

FICTION

Across the green grass fields by Seanan McGuire.  In this fantasy, a young girl discovers a portal to a land filled with centaurs and unicorns.

A bright ray of darkness by Ethan Hawke.  The blistering story of a young man making his Broadway debut in Henry IV, just as his marriage implodes – an utterly transfixing book about art and love, fame and heartbreak.

The burning girls by C.J. Tudor.  An unconventional vicar must exorcise the dark past of a remote village haunted by death and disappearances in this unsettling thriller.

Dark sky by C.J. Box.  Wyoming game warden Joe Pickett must accompany a Silicon Valley CEO on a hunting trip – but soon learns that he himself may be the hunted.

Death by chocolate snickerdoodle by Sarah Graves.  When a cunning killer and a devastating fire threaten to ravage Eastport, Jacobia Tiptree must go into action before all she loves goes up in smoke.

The Duke and I by Julia Quinn.  In the first book of the Bridgerton series, Daphne Bridgerton’s reputation soars when she colludes with the Duke of Hastings.

Enjoy the view by Sarah Morgenthaler.  A grouchy mountaineer, a Hollywood starlet, and miles of untamed wilderness.  What could possibly go wrong in this rom-com?

Faithless in death by J.D. Robb.  Eve Dallas investigates the murder of a young sculptor in the West Village.

The kitchen front by Jennifer Ryan.  A BBC-sponsored wartime cooking competition gives the four women who enter a chance to better their lives.

Landslide by Susan Conley.  The author is at her best capturing Maine’s coastal terrain as well as her character’s emotional turmoil.  Through her disarming family portrait, she speaks volumes about changing ways of life.

Later by Stephen King.  With echoes of his classic novel, It, this is a powerful, haunting, unforgettable exploration of what it takes to stand up to evil in all the faces it wears.

The lowering days by Gregory Brown.  Set in 1980s Maine, this explores family love, the power of myths and storytelling, survival and environmental exploitation, and the ties between cultural identity and the land we live on.

The midnight library by Matt Haig.  Nora Seed finds a library beyond the edge of the universe that contains books with multiple possibilities of the lives on could have lived.

Minus me by Mameve Medwed.  Her life turned upside down by a grim diagnosis, a small-town Maine woman sets about writing a “How To” life manual for her handsome yet hapless husband.

Missing and endangered by J.A. Jance.  The Cochise Country Sheriff’s daughter becomes involved in a missing persons case.

The northern reach by W.S. Winslow.  Set in Maine, this is a novel about the power of place and family ties, the weight of the stories we choose to tell, and the burden of those stories we hide.

Our Italian summer by Jennifer Probst.  Three generations of women must heal the broken pieces of their lives on a trip of a lifetime through picturesque Italy.

The Paris Library by Janet Charles.  A teenager in Montana discovers that her elderly neighbor worked decades earlier at the American Library in Paris and was part of the Resistance.

The Plague Court murders by John Dickson Carr.  When a spiritual medium is murdered in a locked hut on a haunted estate, Sir Henry Merrivale seeks a logical solution to a ghostly crime.

The rebel nun by Marj Charlier.  Based on the true story of Clotild, the daughter of a 6th century king who leads a rebellion of nuns against the rising misogyny and patriarchy of the medieval church.

The sanatorium by Sarah Pearse.  Elin Warner must find her estranged brother’s fiancée, who goes missing as a storm approaches a hotel that was once a sanatorium in the Swiss Alps.

Who is Maud Dixon?  by Alexandra Andrews.  Identity theft takes on a new meaning in this arresting thriller.

Winter’s orbit by Everina Maxwell.  A famously disappointing minor royal and the Emperor’s least favorite grandchild, Prince Kiem commanded by the Emperor to renew the empire’s bonds with its newest vassal planet.  The prince must marry Count Jainan, the recent widower of another royal prince of the empire.

NEW DVDs

Jojo Rabbit (2019) starring Scarlett Johansson, Rebel Wilson, Taika Waititi, and Sam Rockwell

The old maid (1939) starring Bette Davis and Miriam Hopkins

Foreign Correspondent (1940) starring Joel McCrea

The Sunshine Boys (1975) starring Walter Matthau and George Burns

NEW MUSIC CDs

Fetch the bolt cutters by Fiona Apple

Women in Music, Pt. III by HAIM

Black Pumas by Black Pumas

The new Abnormal by The Strokes

Fine line by Harry Styles

NONFICTION

Can’t slow down by Michaelangelo Matos.  How 1984 became pop’s blockbuster year – the definitive account of pop music in the mid-80s from Prince and Madonna to the underground hip-hop, indie rock, and club scenes.

The crown in crisis by Alexander Larman.  A juicy account of the events leading up to and following British monarch King Edward VIII’s abdication…even royal watcher will learn something new from this comprehensive account of one of the biggest scandals in the history of the British monarchy.

Dress codes by Richard Ford.  A revelatory exploration of fashion through the ages that asks what our clothing reveals about ourselves and our society.

Every conversation counts by Riaz Meghji.  Readers looking to have more meaningful interactions would do well to pick this up due to significant consideration as to how the pandemic era has changed relationships.

Girlhood by Masuma Ahuja.  Full of pictures and the unique voices of teenage girls in a variety of situations and cultures, this provides a snapshot of teens’ lives around the world.

The soul of a woman by Isabel Allende.  A passionate and inspiriting meditation on what it means to be a woman.

To raise a boy by Emma Brown.  A journalist’s searing investigation into how we teach boys to be men – and how we can do better.  Insightful and sometimes disturbing.

Walk in my combat boots by James Patterson.  A collection of interviews with troops who fought overseas.  The most moving and powerful war stories ever told, by the men and women who lived them.

Walking with ghosts by Gabriel Byrne.  Bryne channels his fellow countrymen and Ireland’s literary masters as he reveals his struggle with alcoholism, aching passion for the Ireland of his youth, and is piercingly frank about his acting life.

We need to hang out by Billy Baker.  In this comic adventure through the loneliness epidemic, a middle-aged everyman looks around one day and realizes that he seems to have misplaced his friends, inspiring him to set out on a hilarious and moving quest to revive old tribes and build new ones, in his own ridiculous way.

What they don’t teach teens by Jonathan Cristall.  Life safety skills for teens and the adults who care for them.

The witch of eye by Kathryn Nuernberger.  Essays concerning the history of women who saw things differently and dared not to be silent and silenced by power structures.  Women such as Titiba, Marie Laveau, and Hildegard of Bingen.

World of wonders by Aimee Nezhukumatathil.  A collection of essays about the natural world and the way its inhabitants can teach, support, and inspire us.

You’re leaving when? by Annabelle Gurwitch.  Erma Bombeck meets Dorothy Parker in this topical and often laugh-out-loud take on our modern malaise.

Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

The camping trip by Jennifer K Mann

Champ and Major: first dogs by Joy McCullough

Cow boy is not a cowboy by Gregory Barrington

Eyes that kiss in the corners by Joanna Ho

Idea jar by Adam Lehrhaupt

Look! I wrote a book! (and you can too!) by Sally Lloyd-Jones

Time for Kenny by J. Brian Pinkney

Welcome to the party by Gabrielle Union

Your name is a song by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow

CHAPTER BOOKS

Clean getaway By Nic Stone

Sofia Valdez and the vanishing vote by Andrea Beaty

Two roads by Joseph Bruchac

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The baby-sitter’s club: Claudia and the new girl by Ann Martin

Baby-sitters little sister: Karen’s worst day by Ann Martin

The Challenger disaster by Pranas Naujokaitis

The great Chicago fire by Kate Hannigan

The Roanoke Colony by Christ Schweizer

NON-FICTION

Free press and censorship by Susan Brophy Down

Frogs by Gail Gibbons

Hello neighbor! : the kind and caring world of Mister Rogers by Matthew Cordell

Kamala Harris : rooted in justice by Nikki Grimes

Marie’s Ocean: Marie Tharp maps the mountains under the sea  by Josie James

Memorial Day by Emma Carlson Berne

Memory superpowers: an adventurous guide to remembering what you don’t want to forget by Nelson Dellis

Monarch butterfly by Gail Gibbons

The truth about butterflies by Maxwell Eaton III

Visual guide to grammar and punctuation by Sheila Digmen

DVDS

Bill Nye the science guy: Patterns

Bill Nye the science guy: Reptiles

Bill Nye the science guy: Wetlands

Jetsons, the movie

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

New Items ~ March 2021

FICTION

Beneficence by Meredith Hall.  In the years after World War II, the Senter family built a wonderful life on their isolated dairy farm in rural Maine.  After tragedy strikes, each must fight the isolation of their own grief and guilt to reclaim their old life – if they can.

Blood grove by Walter Mosley.  A continuation of the Easy Rawlins saga, in which the iconic detective’s loyalties are tested on the sun-soaked streets of Southern California.

The bride wore black by Cornell Woolrich.  A police detective seeks the rationale between seemingly-unrelated murders, connected only by the appearance of a beautiful woman each time.

The children’s blizzard by Melanie Benjamin.  A story of courage on the prairie, inspired by the devastating storm that struck the Great Plains in 1888, threatening the lives of hundreds of immigrant homesteaders, especially school children.

A deadly fortune by Stacie Murphy.  A historical mystery in the vein of “The Alienist”, in which a young woman in Gilded Age New York must use a special talent to unravel a deadly conspiracy.

The ex talk by Rachel Solomon.  To save their jobs, rival public radio co-workers pretend to be exes for a new show and end up getting much more than they bargained for.

Faithless in death by J.D. Robb.  Gwen is wealthy, elegant, and comforted by her fiancé as she sheds tears over the trauma of finding a body.  But why did it take an hour to report it?  And why is she lying about little things?

The four winds by Kristin Hannah.  An epic novel of love and heroism and hopes, set against the backdrop of one of America’s most defining eras – The Great Depression.

The frozen crown by Greta Kelly.  A princess with a powerful and dangerous secret must find a way to save her country from ruthless invaders in this exciting fantasy.

Girl A by Abigail Dean.  An absorbing and psychologically immersive novel about a young girl who escapes captivity – but not the secrets that shadow the rest of her life.

A heart of blood and ashes by Milla Vane.  The fun thing about romance is that it encompasses all other genres too.  If you are a fantasy fan, looking for a happy-ever-after, this could be the ticket.

If I disappear by Eliza Brazier.  When a true-crime podcaster disappears, her biggest fan sets out to find her.

A lie someone told you about yourself by Peter Davies.  A truthful examination of fatherhood that explores the fallout from an abortion and the difficulties that follow a second pregnancy.  This will strike a resonant chord with parents everywhere.

Lone stars by Justin Deabler.  This follows the arc of four generations of a Texan family in a changing America and in doing so shows the hope that by uncloseting ourselves – as immigrants, smart women, gay people –we find power in empathy.

Meet me in Bombay by Jenny Ashcroft.  United by love.  Separated by war.  Will they find their way back to each other?

Milk fed by Melissa Broder.  This explores the difficulties of loving oneself in a world that prizes thinness above all else.  This poignant exploration of desire, religion, and daughterhood is hard to resist.

Murder by numbers by Eric Brown.  A British detective battles to unmask a killer before his wife becomes victim No. 6.  A classic English mystery with plenty of unexpected plot twists.

Nick by Michael Smith.  This is a look into the life of Nick Carraway before Gatsby entered his life.

People like her by Ellery Lloyd.  A razor-sharp, wickedly smart suspense novel about an ambitious influencer mom whose soaring success threatens her marriage, her morals, and her family’s safety.

The perfect guests by Emma Rous.  A grand estate with many secrets; an orphan caught in a web of lies; and a young woman playing a sinister game.

Perfect little children by Sophie Hannah.  Beth had a falling out with her best friend, Flora, and hasn’t been in contact since.  She drives by Flora’s house many years later and sees Flora, who looks the same, only older, by 12 years.  Flora calls to her children to get out of the car.  They emerge…exactly as Beth last saw them 12 years ago, aged 5 and 3.  How can that be?

The push by Ashley Audrain.  A devastating event forces a mother who questions her child’s behavior – and her own sanity – to confront the truth.

The scorpion’s tail by Douglas Preston.  An FBI agent and an archaeologist identity a mummified corpse and its gruesome cause of death.

Trio by William Boyd.  A rollicking novel with a dark undertow, set around three unforgettable individuals and a doomed movie set.

Tsarina by Ellen Alpsten.  Before Catherine the Great, there was Catherine Alexeyevna: the first woman to rule Russia in her own right.  This is the story of her rise to power from serf to murderess, to empress.

The wife upstairs by Rachel Hawkins.  A recently arrived dog walker in a Southern gated community falls for a mysterious widower.

The yellow wife by Sadeqa Johnson.  This harrowing story follows an enslaved woman forced to barter love and freedom while living in the most infamous slave jail in Virginia.

NEW DVDS

The King of Staten Island (2020) starring Pete Davidson and Marisa Tomei

The Godfather, Coda: the death of Michael Corleone (2020) starring Al Pacino

Slap shot (1977) starring Paul Newman and Michael Ontkean

Mulan (2020) starring Yifei Liu and Donnie Yen

Only when I laugh (1981) starring Marsha Mason, Joan Hackett, and Kristy McNichol

 NEW MUSIC CDs

Folklore by Taylor Swift

Disco by Kylie Minogue

Punisher by Phoebe Bridgers

Wildflowers and all the rest by Tom Petty

NONFICTION

Coming back by Fawn Germer.  How to win the job you want when you’ve lost the job you need.

Fright favorites by David Skal.  31 movies to haunt your Halloween and beyond from Turner Classic movies.

Frontier Follies by Ree Drummond.  A down-to-earth, hilarious collection of stories and musings on marriage, motherhood, and country life from the star of the TV show The Pioneer Woman.

How to start and run a successful home daycare business by Christina Kamp.

Just as I am by Cicely Tyson.  An icon in film, TV, and fashion, Tyson here tells the story of her remarkable life.

The secret life of Dorothy Soames by Justine Cowan.  A memoir about the unearthing of her deceased mother’s secret past and a generations-long cycle of family trauma.  This frank account of a real-life Dickensian dystopia captivates at every turn.

We came, we saw, we left by Charles Wheelan.  In a pre-CoVid 19 world, the Wheelans decided to leave behind work, school, and even the family dogs to travel the world on a modest budget.  Equal parts “how-to” and “how-not-to”, this is an insightful and often hilarious account of one family’s gap-year experiment. 

Where I come from by Rick Bragg.  Bragg brings us an ode to the stories and history of the Deep South, filled with eclectic nuggets about places and people he knows well.

What becomes a legend most by Philip Gefter.  Biography of Richard Avedon, a monumental photographer of the 20th century, who captured the iconic figures of his era in his starkly bold, intimately minimal, and forensic visual style.

What cats want by Yuki Hattori.  An illustrated guide for truly understanding your cat.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

New Items ~ August 2019

FICTION

Almost midnight by Paul Doiron.  A deadly attack on one of Maine’s last wild wolves leads Game Warden Mike Bowditch to an even bigger criminal conspiracy.

Ask again, yes by Mary Beth Keane.  A family saga about 2 Irish American families in a New York suburb, the love between 2 of their children, and the tragedies to tear them apart and destroy the future.

Backlash by Brad Thor.  Cut off from any support, Scot Harvath fights to get his revenge.

Big Sky by Kate Atkinson.  Detective Jackson Brodie uncovers a sinister network in a sleepy seaside town.

The chain by Adrian McKinty.  At once a commentary on social media, greed, revenge, love, and true evil, this will have readers searching for more titles by this author.

The eagle flies at night by Jan Anderson.  What does an ordinary community do when the state settles refugees in their city?  How does the arrival of refugees challenge the hearts and minds of residents?  These are the questions Rev. Giles asks himself and his congregation as they wrestle with an influx to the city of Portland, Maine.

Into the jungle by Erica Ferencik.  A young woman leaves behind everything she knows to take on the Bolivian jungle, but her excursion abroad quickly turns into a fight for her life.

The last house guest by Megan Miranda.  A suspenseful novel about an idyllic town in Maine dealing with the suspicious death of one of their own.

Lock every door by Riley Sager.  A woman whose new job apartment sitting in one of NY’s oldest and most glamorous buildings may cost more than it pays

The long flight home by Alan Hlad.  A fresh angle (which begins in Maine) on the blitz of World War II and focuses on the homing pigeons used by the British, and the people who trained and cared for them.

Lost and found by Danielle Steel.  A photographer embarks on a road trip to reconnect with three men she might have married.

More news tomorrow by Susan Shreve.  Family drama about a daughter’s quest to understand her mother’s mysterious death.

Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner.  A timely exploration of 2 sisters’ lives from the 1950s to the present as they struggle to find their places – and be true to themselves – in a rapidly evolving world.

The new girl by Daniel Silva.  Gabriel Allon, the chief of Israeli intelligence, partners with the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, whose daughter has been kidnapped.

On earth we’re briefly gorgeous by Ocean Vuong.  Little Dog writes a letter to a mother who cannot read, revealing a family history.

The paper wasp by Lauren Acampora.  A woman with big but unfocused ambitions moves to LA to become the personal assistant to her childhood best friend, a rising Hollywood starlet.

Paris, 7 a.m. by Liza Wieland.  A novel of what happened to the poet Elizabeth Bishop during 3 life-changing weeks she spent in Paris amidst the imminent threat of World War II.

The perfect child by Lucinda Berry.  A novel of suspense about a young couple desperate to have a child of their own – and the unsettling consequences of getting what they always wanted.

Queen Bee by Dorothea Benton Frank.  A beekeeper’s quiet life is unsettled by her demanding mother, outgoing sister, and neighboring widower.

Roughhouse Friday by Jaed Coffin.  A meditation on violence and abandonment, masculinity, and our inescapable longing for love.  The author lives in Brunswick, Maine.

Salvation Day by Kali Wallace.  A lethal virus is awoken on an abandoned spaceship in this incredibly fast-paced, claustrophobic thriller.

The Saturday Night Ghost Club by Craig Davidson.  A bittersweet coming of age story in the vein of Stand By Me about a group of misfit kids who spend an unforgettable summer investigating local ghost stories and urban legends.

Summer of ‘69 by Elin Hilderbrand.  Four siblings experience the drama, intrigue, and upheaval of a summer when everything changed – 1969.

Surfside sisters by Nancy Thayer.  A Nantucket woman returns home to find that reunions aren’t always simple.

Under currents by Nora Roberts.  A novel about the power of family to harm – and to heal.

We went to the woods by Caite Dolan-Leach.  They went off the grid.  Their secrets didn’t.  A novel about the allure – and dangers – of disconnecting.

Window on the bay by Debbie Macomber.  When a single mom becomes an empty nester, she spreads her wings to rediscover herself – and her passions.

NEW DVDs

Captain Marvel (2019) starring Brie Larson and Samuel L. Jackson

The public (2019) starring Alec Baldwin, Emilio Estevez, and Gabrielle Union

Mountains of the moon (1989) starring Patrick Bergin and Iain Glen

What they had (2018) starring Hilary Swank, Michael Shannon, and Blythe Danner

A room with a view (1986) starring Helena Bonham Carter, Maggie Smith, and Daniel Day-Lewis

Dancing on the edge (2013) starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Matthew Goode, Jacqueline Bisset

It follows (2014)  starring Maika Monroe and Keir Gilchrist

NONFICTION

Burn the place by Iliana Regan.  A singular expressive debut memoir that traces one chef’s struggle find her place and what happens when she does.

Dutch girl by Robert Matzen.  Near the end of 1939, 10 year old Audrey Hepburn flew from boarding school in England into the Netherlands, which would soon become a war zone.  What she experienced in 5 years of Nazi occupation has never been explored until now.

The honey bus by Meredith May.  An extraordinary story of a girl, her grandfather, and one of nature’s most mysterious and beguiling creatures: the honeybee.

I know what I saw by Linda Godfrey.  Modern-day encounters with monsters of new urban legend and ancient lore.

Invisible heroes of World War II by Jerry Borrowman.  Extraordinary wartime stories of ordinary people.

Love thy neighbor by Ayaz Virji.  A true story about a Muslim doctor’s service to small-town America and the hope of overcoming our country’s climate of hostility and fear.

Mary’s household tips and tricks by Mary Berry.  The Queen of Baking now shares her expertise in home maintenance and care.

Slime by Ruth Kassinger.  How algae created us, plague us, and just might save us.

Songs of America by Jon Meacham.  The author joins Tim McGraw to explore how American was shaped by music.

The Stonewall Reader.  A generous and eclectic assortment of writings about the historical Stonewall Riots.  It is divided into 3 sections:  Before, During, and After Stonewall.

Supernavigators by David Barrie.  A globetrotting voyage of discovery celebrating the navigational gifts of animals; from whales and lobsters to birds and beetles – and many more.

This is really war by Emilie Lucchesi.  The incredible true story of a navy nurse POW in the occupied Philippines.

Wild and crazy guys by Nick Semlyen.  How the comedy mavericks of the ‘80s changed Hollywood forever.

New Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

Another by Christian Robinson

Bear came along by Richard T. Morris

Field trip to the moon by John Hare

How do you care for a very sick bear? by Vanessa Bayer

Hum and swish by Matt Myers

Kindness makes the world go round by Craig Manning

My little chick, from egg to chick– by Geraldine Elschner

A normal pig by K-Fai Steele

Paw Patrol 5-minute stories collection  

Rainbow : a first book of pride by Michael Genhart

Rocket says look up! by Nathan Bryon

This beach is loud! by Samantha Cotterill

Vamos! Let’s go to the market by Raul Gonzalez

CHAPTER BOOKS

Owl diaries # 5 : Warm hearts day by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries # 6 : Baxter is missing by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries # 7 : The Wildwood Bakery by Rebecca Elliott

NON-FICTION

Crossing on time : steam engines, fast ships, and a journey to the new world by David Macaulay

DK findout! Birds by Ben Hoare

DK findout! Castles by Philip Steele

The girl who named Pluto : the story of Venetia Burney by Alice B McGinty

Just right : searching for the Goldilocks planet  by Curtis Manley

Military dogs on the job by Roxanne Troup

Night sky : explore nature with fun facts and activities by Carole Scott

Planetarium by Raman Prinja

Super summer : all kinds of summer facts and fun by Bruce Goldstone

They, she, he, me : free to be! by Maya and Matthew Smith-Gonzalez

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Camp by Kayla Miller

Dinosaur explorers #1 Prehistoric pioneers by Redcode & Albbie

The Giver by P. Craig Russell

Olympians #11 Hephaistos: god of fire by George O’Connor

Putuguq & Kublu and the qalupalik by Roselynn Akulukjuk

The underfoot : the mighty deep by Ben Fisher

Wolfie Monster and the big bad pizza battle by Joey Ellis

MOVIES

Open season with Martin Lawrence

Race to Witch Mountain by Walt Disney with Dwayne Johnson

Ruby’s studio. The friendship show with Dr. Robyn Silverman

The three musketeers by Walt Disney

Wonder Park with Jennifer Garner

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ July 2019

FICTION

America was hard to find by Kathleen Alcott.  Three indelible characters embody the truths about this country in transition during America’s most iconic moments in the later part of the last century: the race to space, the race against the Vietnam War, and the ravages of the AIDS epidemic.

The body in the wake by Katherine Hall Page.  Amateur detective and caterer Faith Fairchild is at her Penobscot Bay, Maine cottage preparing for a summer wedding, when she stumbles across….a body.

Bunny by Mona Awad.  A darkly funny, strange novel about a lonely graduate student drawn into a clique of rich girls who seem to move and speak as one.

Cape May by Chip Cheek.  This explores the social and sexual mores of 1950s America through the eyes of a newly married couple from the genteel south corrupted by sophisticated New England urbanites.

City of girls by Elizabeth Gilbert.  Someone told Vivian Morris in her youth that she would never be an interesting person.  Good thing they didn’t put money on it.

The confessions of Frannie Langton by Sara Collins.  A servant and former slave is accused of murdering her employer and his wife in this thriller that moves from a Jamaican sugar plantation to the fetid streets of Georgian London.

Dark site by Patrick Lee.  Sam Dryden comes under attack from unknown forces as an unremembered episode from his past threatens more than just his life.

Deception Cove by Owen Laukkanen.  An ex-convict, an ex-Marine, and a rescue dog are caught in the cross-hairs of a ruthless gang in remote Washington State.

Disappearing earth by Julia Phillips.  A year in the lives of women and girls on an isolated peninsula in northeastern Russia opens with a chilling crime.

The flight portfolio by Julie Orringer.  Based on the true story of Varian Fry’s extraordinary attempt to save the work, and the lives, of Jewish artists fleeing the Holocaust.

The guest book by Sarah Blake.  This sets out to be more than a juicy family saga – it aims to depict the moral evolution of a part of American society.  Its convincing characters and muscular narrative succeed on both accounts.

Have you seen Luis Velez?  by Catherine Hyde.  A novel about two strangers who find that kindness is a powerful antidote to fear.

The heads of Cerberus by Francis Stevens.  A rediscovered sci-fi classic written in 1919 set in a dystopian 22nd century society where the winner takes all, a precursor to “The Hunger Games”….and to Hitler’s Germany.

How we disappeared by Jing-Jing Lee.  A novel set in World War II Singapore about a woman who survived the Japanese occupation and a man who thought he had lost everything.

The invited by Jennifer McMahon.  A chilling ghost story with a twist – in the woods of Vermont a husband and wife don’t simply move into a haunted house, they build one.

Little darlings by Melanie Golding.   “Mother knows best” takes on a sinister new meaning in this unsettling thriller.

Mistress of the Ritz by Melanie Benjamin.  Novel based on the story of the extraordinary real-life American woman who secretly worked for the French Resistance during World War II – while playing hostess to the invading Germans at the iconic Hotel Ritz in Paris.

Necessary people by Anna Pitoniak.  Set against the fast-paced backdrop of TV news, this is a propulsive work of psychological suspense about ambition and privilege, about the thin line between friendship and rivalry, about the people we need in our lives, and the people we don’t.

On a summer tide by Suzanne Fisher.  When her father buys an island off the coast of Maine with the hope of breathing new life into it, his daughter thinks he’s lost his mind.  She soon discovers the island has its own way of living…and loving.

The oracle by Clive Cussler.  A husband and wife treasure hunting team search for an ancient scroll which carries a deadly curse.

The policewomen’s bureau by Edward Conlon.  The NYPD’s “No Girls Allowed” sign fades in this fictional account of a real woman’s struggle for respect and success in a profession that men wanted all to themselves.

Redemption by David Baldacci.  Amos Decker learns that he may have made a mistake on a case he worked as a rookie detective – one with heartbreaking consequences, and he may be the only person who can put it right.

Resistance women by Jennifer Chiaverini.  Historical saga that recreates the danger, romance, and sacrifices of an era and brings to life one courageous American and her circle of women friends who waged a clandestine battle against Hitler in Nazi Berlin.

This storm by James Ellroy.  A massive novel of World War II Los Angeles.

Vessel by Lisa Nichols.  An astronaut returns to Earth after losing her entire crew to an inexplicable disaster, but is her version of what happened in space the truth?  Or is there more to the story?

Waisted by Randy Susan Meyers.  Seven women enrolled in an extreme weight loss documentary discover self-love and sisterhood as they enact a daring revenge against the exploitative filmmakers.

A woman is no man by Etaf Rum.  A Palestinian-American teenager, much like her mother before her, faces the prospect of an arranged marriage.

NONFICTION

The art of inventing hope by Howard Reich.  This offers an unprecedented in-depth conversation between the world’s most revered Holocaust survivor, Elie Wiesel, and the son of survivors, Howard Reich.

The book of pride by Mason Funk.  This captures the true story of the gay rights movement from the 1960s to the present, through richly detailed, studding interviews with the leaders, activists, and ordinary people who witnessed the movement and made it happen.

The cost of these dreams by Wright Thompson.  A collection of true stories about the dream of greatness and its cost in the world of sports.

A fiery gospel by Richard Gamble.  The Battle Hymn of the Republic and the road to righteous war.  Readers with an interest in 19th century American religious and political popular culture will enjoy this bio of the hymn by Gardiner’s own Julia Ward Howe.

Furious hours by Casey Cep.  Harper Lee worked on the true-crime story about a rural preacher accused of murdering five of his family members in the 1970s.  Cep unravels the mystery surrounding Harper Lee’s first and only work of nonfiction, and the shocking true crimes at the center of it.

How to forget by Kate Mulgrew.  In this very honest and examined memoir about returning to Iowa to care for her ailing parents, Mulgrew takes us on an unexpected journey of loss, betrayal, and the transcendent nature of a daughter’s love for her parents.

Questions I am asked about the Holocaust by Hedi Fried.  Now 94, Fried has spent her life educating about the Holocaust as a survivor and answering questions about one of the darkest periods in human history.

Save me the plums by Ruth Reichl.  Gourmet magazine readers will relish the behind-the-scenes peek at the workings of the magazine.  Reichl’s revealing memoir is a deeply personal look at a food world on the brink of change.

A season on the wind by Kenn Kaufman.  A close look at one season in one key site that reveals the amazing science and magic of spring bird migration and the perils of human encroachment.

They were all her property by Stephanie Jones-Rogers.  Bridging women’s history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery.

Woodstock by Dale Bell.  In celebration of the 50th anniversary, this new photo book goes behind the scenes of the hit documentary film, Woodstock.

New Children’s Books for July 2019

PICTURE BOOKS

Bruno, the standing cat by Nadine Robert

Cece loves science and adventure by Kimberly Derting

Count on me by Miguel Tanco

Dear boy, a celebration of cool, clever, compassionate you! by Paris Rosenthal

Ghost cat by Kevan Atteberry

How to read a book by Kwame Alexander

Sea glass summer by Michelle Houts

Tilly & Tank by Jay Fleck

BEGINNER READERS

Fancy Nancy Toodle-oo Miss Moo by Victoria Saxon

First little readers book level B by Liza Charlesworth

Leaf it to Dot by Andrea Cascardi

Rocket out of the park by Andrea Cascardi

CHAPTER BOOKS

The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge by M.T. Anderson

The haunted house by R. A. Montgomery

Princess Island by Shannon Gilligan

Space pup by R. A. Montgomery

Your grandparents are spies by Anson Montomery

Your grandparents are zombies by Anson Montomery

NON-FICTION

Encyclopedia of Strangely Named Animals by Fredrik Colting

How to be a scientist by Steve Mould

The science of flight by Ian Graham

The science of spacecraft by Alex Woolf

The science of vehicles by Roger Canavan

What a waste: trash, recycling, and protecting our planet by Jess French

MOVIES

Bernie the dolphin with Lola Sultan

The cheetah children by PBS with Robyn Keene-Young

Daniel Tiger’s neighborhood: won’t you be our neighbor? Animated

How to train your dragon: the hidden world with Jay Baruchel

Telling time by Rock ‘n learn with Richard Caudie

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

 

New Items ~ June 2019

FICTION

The A list by J.A. Jance.  An imprisoned fertility doctor seeks revenge.

Anna of Kleve, the princess in the portrait by Alison Weir.  The surprising life of the least known of King Henry VIII’s wives is illuminated in this volume of the Six Tudor Queens series.

At Briarwood School for Girls by Michael Knight.  It’s 1994 and Leonore is a junior at Briarwood.  She plays basketball.  She hates her roommate.  History is her favorite subject.  She has told no one that she’s pregnant.  Everything, in other words, is under control.  Right.  Sure it is.

The better sister by Alafair Burke.  When a Manhattan lawyer is murdered, two estranged sisters – one the dead man’s widow and the other his ex – must set aside mistrust and old resentments.  But can they escape the past?

The book woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Richardson.  Basically about the power of reading and libraries, this also explores the extreme rural poverty of 1930s Appalachia and labor unrest among coal miners.

The bookshop of the broken hearted by Robert Hillman.  A tender novel about love and forgiveness in 1960s Australia, in which a lonely farmer finds his life turned upside down by the arrival of a vibrant librarian who is many years his senior.

A boy and his dog at the end of the world by C.A. Fletcher.  When a beloved family dog is stolen, her owner sets out on a life-changing journey through the ruins of our world to bring her back in this tale of survival, courage, and hope.

The bride test by Helen Hoang.  A superior romance in which a young Vietnamese woman seizes an opportunity to travel to America in hopes of finding a husband and a better life.

The Cornwalls are gone by James Patterson.  An Army intelligence officer must commit a crime or lose her kidnapped husband and daughter.

The Dark Game by Jonathan Janz.  10 writers are selected for a summer-long writing retreat with the most celebrated and reclusive author in the world.  But they are really entering the twisted imagination of a deranged genius, a lethal contest pitting them against one another.

A dream of death by Connie Berry.  On a remote Scottish island, an American antiques dealer wrestles with her own past while sleuthing a killing, staged to recreate a 200 year old unsolved murder.

The farm by Joanne Ramos.  At a luxurious secret facility in upstate New York, women who need money bear children for wealthy would-be mothers.  Excellent – both as a reproductive dystopian narrative and as a social novel about women and class.

If she wakes by Michael Koryta. Slowly emerging from the coma she’s been in since a black cargo van rammed the car she was using to transport a visiting professor who was thus killed, Maine college senior Tara is targeted by a ruthless young hit man.

Lost roses by Martha Kelly.  In 1914, the New York socialite Eliza Ferriday works to help White Russian families escape from the revolution.

Mr. Gandy’s grand tour by Alan Titchmarsh.  Free with no responsibilities, Mr. Gandy sets off for a grand tour of the type popular in the 18th century.  Paris certainly, and Italy.  After that, who knows?  It’s sure to be either an ugly midlife disaster or an opportunity for growth.

Naamah by Sarah Blake.  A retelling of Noah’s ark centered around his wife, Naamah – the woman who helped reshape the world with her hands.

Normal people by Sally Rooney.  The connection between a high school star athlete and a loner ebbs and flows when they go to Trinity College in Dublin.

Rabbits for food by Binnie Kirshenbaum.  A laugh-out-loud funny story of a writer’s slide into depression and institutionalization.

Someone knows by Lisa Scottoline.  A novel about how a single decision can undo a family, how our past can derail our present, and how not guilty doesn’t always mean innocent.

They all fall down by Rachel Hall.  Seven sinners arrive on a private island for a reckoning that will leave you breathless.

Triple jeopardy by Anne Perry.  Young lawyer Daniel Pitt must defend a British diplomat accused of a theft that may cover up a deadly crime.

Two weeks by Karen Kingsbury.  A pregnant 18 year old has limited time to change her mind about giving her baby up for adoption.

A wonderful stroke of luck by Ann Beattie.  Set in a boarding school in New Hampshire, this is about the complicated relationship between a charismatic teacher and his students, and the secrets we keep from those we love.

Wunderland by Jennifer Epstein.  This is a vividly written and stark chronicle of Nazism and its legacies.  An absorbing exploration of friendship, betrayal, and coming to terms with the past.

DVDs

Fantastic beasts: the crimes of Grindelwald (2018) starring Eddie Redmayne, Jude Law, and Johnny Depp

RBG (2018) starring Ruth Bader Ginsburg

NONFICTION

The accidental veterinarian by Philipp Schott.  For all animal lovers, tales that are always amusing, amazing, and – once in a while – sad.

The art of happy moving by Ali Wenzke.  An upbeat guide to help you survive the moving process from start to finish, filled with strategies and checklists for timing and supplies.

Auschwitz: not long ago, not far away by Robert Jan van Pelt.  This tells a story to shake the conscience of the world. It is the catalogue of the first-ever traveling exhibition about the Auschwitz concentration camp, where 1.1 million people lost their lives.

Down from the mountain by Bryce Andrews.  The story of a grizzly bear named Millie: her life, death, and cubs, and what they reveal about the changing character of the American West today.

A Florida state of mind by James Wright.  An unnatural history of our weirdest state that’s always in the news for everything from alligator attacks to zany crimes.

Life will be the death of me…and you too! by Chelsea Handler.  The comedian chronicles going into therapy and becoming an advocate for change.

Losing Earth by Nathaniel Rich.  By 1979, we knew nearly everything we understand today about climate change – including how to stop it.  Over the next decade, a handful risked their careers in a desperate campaign to convince the world to act before it was too late.  This is their story and ours.

The man they wanted me to be by Jared Sexton.  Deeply personal, this examines how we teach boys what’s expected of men in America and the long-term effects of that socialization – which include depression, shorter lives, misogyny, and suicide.

The matriarch:  Barbara Bush and the making of an American dynasty by Susan Page.  A vivid bio of the former First Lady, one of the most influential and under-appreciated women in American political history.

The Mueller report.  The special counsel’s investigation looms as a turning point in American history.

Playing back the 80s by Jim Beviglia. For those who didn’t grow up in the 80s, this endlessly funny book will show them what the fuss was all about with the music and maybe reveal a few surprises along the way.

Out East by John Glynn.  A gripping portrait of life in a Montauk summer house – a debut memoir of first love, identity and the self-discovery among a group of friends who became family.

The pioneers by David McCullough.  The settling of the Northwest Territory by dauntless pioneers who overcame incredible hardships to build a community based on ideals that would come to define our country.

A woman of no importance by Sonia Purnell.  The true story of a Baltimore socialite who joined a spy organization during World War II and became essential to the French Resistance.

New Children’s Books for June 2019

 PICTURE BOOKS

Babymoon by Hayley Barrett

Diggersaurs by Michael Whaite

Ernestine’s milky way by Kerry Madden-Lunsford

Grumpy monkey by Suzanne Lang

Hello, I’m here by Helen Frost

I love you all year through by Stephanie Stansbie

Karate Kakapo by Loredana Cunti

The night flower by Lara Hawthorne

Raj and the best day ever by Sebastien Braun

The unbudgeable curmudgeon by Matthew Burgess

Wake up, color pup by Taia Morley

Wordy birdy by Tammi Sauer

CHAPTER BOOKS

The adventures of a girl called Bicycle by Christina Uss

Arlo Finch in the valley of fire by John August

The benefits of being an octopus by Ann Braden

Class action by Steven B. Frank

Forgotten city by Michael Ford

Game changer by Tommy Greenwald

The House in Poplar Wood by K.E. Ormsbee

Journey of the pale bear by Susan Fletcher

Lifeboat 12 by Susan Hood

The night diary by Veera Hiranandani                   

Nightbooks by J.A. White

Ra the mighty: cat cetective by A.B. Greenfield

Skylark and Wallcreeper by Anne O’Brien Carelli

Wicked Nix by Lena Coakley

NON-FICTION

Beware of the crocodile by Martin Jenkins

Caterpillar and Bean by Martin Jenkins

Dog days of history: the incredible story of our best friends by Sarah Albee

Inside outside by Anne-Margot Ramstein

Like a lizard by April Pulley Sayre

Map and track rain forests by Heather C. Hudak

Pass go and collect $200: the real story of how monopoly was invented by Tanya Lee Stone

The proper way to meet a hedgehog and other how-to poems by Paul B. Janeczko

Shawn Mendes by Robin Johnson

MOVIES

Frozen by Disney

Hardy Boys Nancy Drew Mysteries Season One with Shaun Cassidy

The kid who would be king with Patrick Stewart

The LEGO movie 2 with Chris Pratt

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ May 2019

FICTION

The Ash family by Molly Dektar.  When a young woman leaves her family – and the civilized world – to join an off-the-grid community headed by an enigmatic leader, she discovers that belonging comes with a deadly cost.

Beyond the Point by Claire Gibson.  An inspiring tribute to female friendship and female courage.  Three women are brought together in an enthralling story of friendship, heartbreak, resilience in a novel set at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Boy swallows universe by Trent Dalton.  A story of brotherhood, true love, family, and the most unlikely of friendships, this is the tale of an adolescent boy on the cusp of discovering the man he will be.

Death in Provence by Serena Kent.  This is a clever, light-hearted mystery set in modern Provence featuring the irrepressible Penelope Kite, a young-at-heart divorcee with a knack for stumbling across dead bodies.

Fame adjacent by Sarah Skilton.  The child star that was left behind is about to get her moment to shine in this swoony romantic comedy inspired by a unique, beloved facet of pop culture history:  The Mickey Mouse Club.

The hunting party by Lucy Foley.  Psychological suspense in the tradition of Agatha Christie in which a group of old college friends are snowed in at a hunting lodge…and murder and mayhem ensue.

Infinite detail by Tim Maughan.  A timely and uncanny portrait of a world in the wake of fake news, diminished privacy, and a total shutdown of the internet.

An Irish immigrant story by Jack Cashman.  This historical novel brings the reader through the story of a family that overcomes adversity to thrive in America.

The island of sea women by Lisa See.  The friendship over many decades of two female divers from the Korean island of Jeju is pushed to a breaking point.

Kaddish.com by Nathan Englander.  An excellent comic dissection of Jewish-American life.  This novel reads like Chaim Potok filtered through the sensibility of Mel Brooks.

The last act by Brad Parks.  An out of work actor takes a job for the FBI – using a false name and backstory, he enters a low-security prison and begins to befriend a fellow prisoner who knows the location of documents that can bring down a ruthless drug cartel.  But the cartel is also looking….

The last year of the war by Susan Meissner.  A German American teenager’s life changes forever when her immigrant family is sent to an internment camp during WW II and she becomes friends with another girl at the camp – a Japanese American teenager.

Little faith by Nickolas Butler.  A Wisconsin family grapples with the power and limitations of faith when one of their own falls under the influence of a radical church.

Lost and wanted by Nell Freudenberger.  A physicist at MIT receives a text from her dead best friend.

A puzzle for fools by Patrick Quentin.  A wave of murders rocks a sanitarium – and it’s up to the patients to stop them.

Silent night by Danielle Steel.  After tragedy strikes, a child TV star loses her memory and ability to speak.

Tomorrow there will be sun by Dana Reinhardt.  A private Mexican villa in a tropical paradise is the backdrop of this story of a milestone vacation gone wrong, wrong, wrong as a family falls apart.

When all is said by Anne Griffin.  If you had to pick 5 people to sum up your life, who would they be?  If you were to raise a glass to each of them, what would you say?  And what would you learn about yourself, when all is said?

Wild card by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington clashes with a determined adversary.

Wolf pack by C.J. Box.  Wyoming game warden Joe Pickett encounters bad behavior on his own turf – only to have the FBI and the DOJ ask him to stand down.

NEW DVDs

Aquaman (2018) starring Jason Momoa

If Beale Street could talk (2018) starring Stephen James and Regina King

The bookshop (2018) starring Emily Mortimer, Bill Nighy, and Patricia Clarkson

Vice (2018) starring Christian Bale and Amy Adams

NONFICTION

Biased by Jennifer Eberhardt.  From one of the world’s leading experts on unconscious racial bias, a personal examination of one of the central controversies and culturally powerful issues of our time, and its influence on contemporary race relations and criminal justice.

The end of absence by Michael Harris.  Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the internet.  This is about reclaiming what we’ve lost in a world of constant connections.

Girl, stop apologizing by Rachel Hollis.  A shame-free plan for embracing and achieving your goals.

Holy envy by Barbara Taylor.  The author recounts her moving discoveries of finding the sacred in unexpected places while teaching the world’s religions to undergrads in rural Georgia, revealing how God delights in confounding our expectations.

It ended badly by Jennifer Wright.  13 of the worst breakups in history – replete with beheadings, uprisings, creepy sex dolls, and celebrity gossip – and its disastrously bad consequences throughout time.

K by Tyler Kepner.  A history of baseball in 10 pitches.

The league of wives by Heath Lee.  The story of a group of women who mobilized and organized in an attempt to bring their POW husbands home from Vietnam.

Mama’s last hug by Frans de Waal.  A captivating survey of animal and human emotions.

The Seventies: a photographic journey by Ira Resnick.  The Seventies in America were a time of social and cultural ferment, and Resnick was there with his camera to capture it all.

The threat by Andrew McCabe.  How the FBI protects America in the age of terror and Trump.

Under red skies by Karoline Kan.  A deeply personal and shocking look at how China is coming to terms with its conflicted past as it emerges into a modern, cutting-edge superpower, seen though the stories of three generations of women.

Women warriors by Pamela Toler.  Who says women don’t go to war?  From Vikings and African queens to cross-dressing military doctors and WW II Russian fighter pilots, these are the stories of women for whom battle was not a metaphor.

New Children’s Books for May 2019

 PICTURE BOOKS

Africville by Shauntay Grant

Baby day by Jane Godwin

A day in the life of Marlon Bundo by Marlon Bundo

Kite for the moon by Jane Yolen

Little Fox and the missing moon by Ekaterina Trukhan

Music for Mister Moon by Philip C. Stead

Peg + Cat: math in the bath by Jennifer Oxley

A piglet named Mercy by Kate DiCamillo

The sun shines everywhere by Mary Ann Hoberman

Sweet dreamers by Isabelle Simler

There’s a dinosaur on the 13th floor by Wade Bradford

GRAPHIC NOVELS

5 worlds: the Cobalt Prince by Mark Siegel

Baby-Sitters Club: Mary Anne saves the day by Raina Telgemeier

Baby-Sitters Club: the truth about Stacey by Raina Telgemeier

Endgames  by Ru Xu

Science comics solar system: our place in space by Rosemary Mosco

Super Potato #1: the epic origin of Super Potato by Artur Laperla

CHAPTER BOOKS

Freya & Zoose by Emily Butler

Judy Moody and friends: searching for stinkodon by Megan McDonald

Max and the Midknights by Lincoln Peirce

Merci Suarez changes gears by Meg Medina

Owl diaries: Eva and Baby Mo by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries: Eva and the lost pony by Rebecca Elliott

Owl diaries: Eva’s big sleepover by Rebecca Elliott

Pay attention, Carter Jones by Gary D. Schmidt

The Princess in black and the hungry bunny horde by Shannon Hale

The Princess in black takes a vacation by Shannon Hale

The remarkable journey of Coyote Sunrise by Dan Gemeinhart

What the wind can tell you by Sarah Marie A. Jette

NON-FICTION

Astronaut, aquanaut by Jennifer Swanson

Knowledge genius by Peter Chrisp

LEGO Star Wars visual dictionary by Simon Beecroft

The magic & mystery of trees by Jen Green

Nature play at home by Nancy Striniste

Ocean emporium: a compilation of creatures by Susie Brooks

Rotten! : vultures, beetles, slime, and nature’s other decomposers by Anita Sanchez

Time to parent: organizing your life to bring out the best in your child and you by Julie Morgenstern

MOVIES

Arthur’s music jamboree a PBS Kids

Arthur’s travel adventures a PBS Kids

Dragons : race to the edge seasons 1 & 2 by Dreamworks

Kiki’s delivery service with Kirsten Dunst

Paddington 2 with Ben Wishaw

Tangled : before ever after with Mandy Moore

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

New Items ~ April 2019

FICTION

The American Agent by Jacqueline Winspear.  Mazie Dobbs investigates the mysterious murder of an American war correspondent in London during the Blitz.

Black Leopard, red wolf by Marlon James.  A swords-and-sorcery epic set in a mythical Africa that is also part detective story, part quest fable, and part inquiry into the nature of truth, belief, and destiny.

Bowlaway by Elizabeth McCracken.  This is about three generations of an unconventional New England family who own and operate a candlepin bowling alley.

Cemetery Road by Greg Iles.  An electrifying tale of friendship, betrayal, and shattering secrets that threaten to destroy a small Mississippi town.

Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Reid.  A gripping novel about the whirlwind rise of an iconic 1970s rock group and their beautiful lead singer, revealing the mystery behind their infamous breakup.

Early riser by Jasper Fforde.  A madcap adventure through the Welsh winter which has grown so deadly most humans literally sleep through it.  Whip-smart, tremendous fun, and an utter delight from start to finish.

Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts.  The story behind the Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the book that inspired the iconic film, through the eyes of author L. Frank Baum’s intrepid wife, Maud.

The huntress by Kate Quinn.  A battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America.

Leading men by Christopher Castellani.  An intriguing tale of Tennessee Williams and his lover of 15 years, Frank Merlo.  It’s a wonderful examination of artists and the people who love them and change their work in large and imperceptible ways.

The lost man by Jane Harper.  Nathan and Bub Bright find their other brother dead at the border of their cattle ranch in the Australian outback.

The Malta exchange by Steve Berry.  The author has the lock on making history zing with breathless suspense and galloping action.  Malta and the Vatican are superb settings for this ecclesiastical extravaganza.

Mission critical by Mark Greaney.  A high-states thriller featuring the world’s most dangerous assassin: the Gray Man.

The military wife by Laura Trentham.  A young widow embraces a second chance at life when she reconnects with those who understand the sacrifices made by American soldiers and their families.

 The object of your affections by Falguni Kothari.  Two best friends rewrite the rules of friendship, love and family…and change everything they thought they knew about motherhood.

The river by Peter Heller.  The story of 2 college students on a wilderness canoe trip – a gripping tale of a friendship tested by fire, white water, and violence.

Run away by Harlan Coben.  You’ve lost your daughter.  She’s addicted to drugs and to an abusive boyfriend.  And she’s made it clear that she doesn’t want to be found.  Then, by chance, you see her playing guitar in Central Park…

The secretary by Renee Knight.  She could be the most dangerous person in the room…    But it would be a mistake to underestimate such a steadfast secretary as Christine.  Because as everyone is about to discover, there’s a dangerous line between obedience and obsession.

Trump Sky Alpha by Mark Doten.  One year after the president has plunged the world into nuclear war, a journalist takes refuge in the Twin Cities Metro Containment Zone.  On assignment, she documents internet humor at the end of the world.  By turns a dystopian nightmare, a cyber thriller, a spot-on treatise on memes, and a tragic tale of love and loss.

The wall by John Lanchester.  Dystopian fiction done just right, with a scenario that’s all too real.  It blends the most compelling issues of our time – rising waters, rising fear, rising political division – into a suspenseful story of love, trust, and survival.

The wedding guest by Jonathan Kellerman.  Milo Sturgis and Alex Delaware investigate the death of a stranger at a wedding reception.

NEW DVDs

Bohemian Rhapsody (2018)  starring Rami Malek

A star is born (2018) starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

Green book (2018) starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali

Can you ever forgive me? (2018) starring Melissa McCarthy and Richard E. Grant

The favourite (2018) starring Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, Rachel Weisz

At eternity’s gate (2018) starring Willem Dafoe

NEW MUSIC CDs

By the way, I forgive you by Brandi Carlile

(the teal album) by Weezer

Look alive by Guster

H.E.R. by H.E.R.

Can’t say I ain’t country by Florida Georgia Line

The essential Dinah Washington by Dinah Washington

NONFICTION

An American summer by Alex Kotlowitz.  This captures the summer of 2013 in neglected Chicago neighborhoods, rendering intimate profiles of residents and the “very public” violence they face every day.  It is a fiercely uncompromising and unforgettable portrait.

The art of dying well by Katy Butler.  An inspiring, informative, and practical guide to navigating end of life issues.

Black is the body by Emily Bernard.  Memoir from a black woman that gives stories of her grandmother’s time, her mother’s time, and her own.

The darkest year by William Klingaman.  A psychological study of the American homefront in 1941 under pressure of total war.

Monhegan by Mark Warner.  A guide to Maine’s fabled island.

Mykonos: portrait of a vanished era by Robert McCabe.  Experience the unspoiled beauty and traditional culture of this legendary Greek island as it was in the late 1950s.

On the run in Nazi Berlin by Bert Lewyn.  160,000 Jews lived in Berlin before World War II.  By 1945, only 3,000 remained.  Lewyn was one of the few, and his memoir – from witnessing the famous 1933 book burning to the aftermath of the war in a displaced persons camp – offers an unparalleled depiction of the life of a runaway Jew caught in the heart of the Nazi empire.

The salt path by Raynor Winn.  A true story of a couple who lost everything and embarked on a transformative journey walking the South West Coast Path in England.

Shortest way home by Pete Buttigieg.  The young mayor of South Bend, Indiana, now in his second term, explains what mayors do and offers ideas for the country as a whole in his memoir.

Sleeping with strangers by David Thomson.  From a celebrated film critic, this is an original, seductive account of sexuality in the movies and of how actors and actresses on screen have fed our desires.

Soar, Adam, soar by Rick Prashaw.  After a tragic accident cut his life short, Adam left a legacy of changed lives and a trove of social media posts documenting his life, relationships, transition, and struggle with epilepsy – all with remarkable transparency and directness.

Tamed by Alice Roberts.  Uncovers the deep history of 10 familiar species with incredible wild pasts:  dogs, apples and wheat, cattle, potatoes and chickens, rice, maize and horses.  The author reveals how becoming part of our world changed these and how they became our allies.

This much country by Kristin Pace.  A memoir of heartbreak, thousand-mile races, the endless Alaskan wilderness and man, many dogs from one of only a handful of women to have completed both the Yukon Quest and the Iditarod.

We were rich and we didn’t know it by Tom Phelan.  A tender recollection of growing up on a farm in Ireland in the 1940s, a captivating portrait of a bygone time.

Which side are you on? by James Sullivan.  Presented here is 20th century American history as seen through 100 protest songs.

Children’s Books

 PICTURE BOOKS

 Are you scared, Darth Vader by Adam Rex

The bear, the piano, the dog, and the fiddle by David Litchfield

Because by Mo Willems

Blue by Laura Vaccaro Seeger

Builders & breakers by Steve Light

Carl and the meaning of life by Deborah Freedman

The dress and the girl by Camille Andros

Gittel’s journey: an Ellis Island story by Leslea Newman

The littlest things give the loveliest hugs by Mark Sperring

The pinata that the farm maiden hung by Samantha Vamos

Side by side by Chris Raschka

Thank you, Omu by Oge Mora

The very impatient caterpillar by Ross Burach

 GRAPHIC NOVELS

Aquicorn Cove by Katie O’Neill

Dog Man: Brawl of the wild by Dav Pilkey

The hidden witch by Molly Ostertag

Hilda and the bird parade by Luke Pearson

Rocket to the moon? by Don Brown

Then everything went wrong by Judd Winick

 CHAPTER BOOKS

The assassins curse by Kevin Sands

Because of the rabbit by Cynthia Lord

The bridge home by Padma Venkatraman

The friendship war by Andrew Clements

Grenade by Alan Gratz

The hive queen by Tui Sutherland

Lion down by Stuart Gibbs

Small spaces by Katherine Arden

Swallow’s dance by Wendy Orr

Sweeping up the heart by Kevin Henkes

The unteachables by Gordon Korman

 NON-FICTION

Bloom bloom! by April Sayre Pulley

Calm : mindfulness for kids by Wynne Kinder

The college football championship: the fight for the top spot by Matt Doeden

The earth gives more by Sue Fliess

Inside the Daytona 500 by Todd Kortemeier

Period power : a manifesto for the menstrual movement by Nadya Okamoto

Raindrops roll by April Sayre Pulley

The World Cup : soccer’s global championship by Matt Doeden

 MOVIES

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch with Benedict Cumberbatch

Mary Poppins returns with Emily Blunt

Nutcracker and the four realms with Keira Knightley

Ralph breaks the internet with Sarah Silverman

Spider-Man into the Spider-Verse with Bob Persichetti

  

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.