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New Items ~ May 2021

FICTION

Act your age, Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert.  The flightiest of the Brown sisters crashes into the life of an uptight B & B owner and has him falling hard – literally!

The Affair by Danielle Steel.  A French author’s extramarital affair affects various member of his wife’s family.

All the cowboys ain’t gone by John Jacobson.  The main character is an old fashioned hero worth rooting for with much Indiana Jones-style derring-do as he travels from Texas at the turn of the century to join the French Foreign Legion.

Cloudmaker by Malcolm Brooks.  A soaring novel set during the summer of Amelia Earhart’s final flight, a tale of American ingenuity and optimism set against the backdrop of a deepening Great Depression.

The consequences of fear by Jacqueline Winspear.  Maisie Dobbs uncovers a conspiracy with devastating implications for Britain’s war effort during the Nazi occupation of Europe.

Danger in numbers by Heather Graham.  Deep in the Everglades, an eerie crime scene sets off an investigation that sends two agents deep into a world of corrupted faith, greed, and deadly secrets.

The drowning kind by Jennifer McMahon.  A chilling novel about a woman who returns to the old family home after her sister mysteriously drowns in its swimming pool…but she’s not the pool’s only victim.

Eternal by Lisa Scottoline.  Three people involved in a love triangle find everything they hold dear is tested as Mussolini’s power grows and laws change in Rome.

Infinite Country by Patricia Engel.  A story of a family occupying two different countries, Columbia and the United States.

The Kaiser’s web by Steve Berry.  A newly discovered dossier from World War II might change the course of Germany’s upcoming elections.

Klara and the sun by Kazuo Ishiguro.  An “Artificial Friend” named Klara is purchased to serve as a companion to an ailing 14 year old girl.

The ladies of the secret circus by Constance Sayers.  A magical story spanning from the jazz age in Paris to modern-day America of family secrets, sacrifice, and lost love set against the backdrop of a mysterious circus.

The lamplighters by Emma Stonex.  A gorgeous and atmospheric novel about the mysterious disappearance of three lighthouse keepers from a remote tower miles from the Cornish coast – and about the wives who were left behind.

The last bookshop in London by Madeline Martin.  Through blackouts and air raids as the Blitz intensifies, a woman discovers the power of storytelling to unite her community in ways she never dreamed – a force that triumphs over even the darkest night of the war.

The lost apothecary by Sarah Penner.  An aspiring historian in London finds a clue that might put to rest unsolved apothecary murders from 200 years ago.

The lost village by Camilla Sten.  In 1959, 900 villagers disappeared without a trace.  How can an entire village full of people just…vanish?  This delivers maximum dread with remarkable restraint.   As the situation goes from bad to worse to terrifying, readers will revel in the chills.

Meet me in Paradise by Libby Hubscher.  Marin Cole has never:  seen the ocean, climbed mountains, taken a risk in her life.  But if her sister’s plan works, she just might do all three.

Never far away by Michael Koryta.  Placed in witness protection in remote northern Maine, Leah risks exposing herself to the dangerous forces of her past when her homesick children run away.

The nine lives of Rose Napolitano by Donna Freitas.  This explores 9 possible outcomes when a woman who has never wanted children marries a man who gradually decides he does.

Of women and salt by Gabriela Garcia.  The daughter of a Cuban immigrant take sin the daughter of a neighbor detained by ICE and seeks to learn about her own family history.

The other Emily by Dean Koontz.  Haunted by the unsolved disappearance of the love of his life a decade earlier, a writer visits her suspected killer in prison before meeting a woman who uncannily resembles the person he lost.

Other people’s children by R.J. Hoffmann.  A riveting novel about a couple whose dream of adopting a baby is shattered when the teenage mother reclaims her child.

The phone booth at the edge of the world by Laura Messina.  Two bereft people find themselves seeking a garden at the top of a hill in Japan, where a disconnected phone allows the grief-stricken to send their voice into the wind as they talk to those they have lost.

The red book by James Patterson.  This puts the characters through hell in a story that’s top-drawer crime fiction.

Serpentine by Jonathan Kellerman.  Alex Delaware is traversing the forbidding place known as L.A. and exhuming the past in order to bring a vicious killer to justice.

What’s mine and yours by Naima Coster.  The integration of a North Carolina school ties together a pair of seemingly unconnected families for two decades.

NEW DVDs

Wonder Woman 1984  (2020) starring Gail Gadot and Chris Pine

News of the world (2020) starring Tom Hanks and Helena Zengel

The Peanut Butter Falcon (2019) starring Shia LaBeouf and Dakota Johnson

The snake pit (1948) starring Olivia de Havilland

The enchanted cottage (1945) starring Dorothy McGuire and Robert Young

NONFICTION

Birds of Maine by Peter Vickery.  This offers a detailed look at the state’s birds – from the Wild Turkey to the Arctic Tern – with info on migration patterns and how Maine’s geography and shifting climate mold its birdlife.

Fears of a setting sun by Dennis Rasmussen.  The surprising story of how the Founding Fathers came to despair for the future of the nation they had created.

Fourteen (talks) by (age) fourteen by Michelle Icard.  The 14 essential conversations to have with your tween and early teenager to prepare them for the emotional, physical, and social challenges ahead.

The hill we climb by Amanda Gorman.  The poem read on President Biden’s Inauguration Day by the youngest poet to write and perform an inaugural poem.

Lady Bird Johnson by Julia Sweig.  A look at the policy initiatives and the leadership style of the first lady during her time in the East Wing.

Restoring your historic house by Scott Hanson.  The complete comprehensive guide for homeowners on how to accommodate contemporary life in a historical house.

Sensitive is the new strong by Anita Moorjani.  The power of empaths in an increasingly harsh world.

Shooting Midnight Cowboy by Glenn Frankel.  The history of the controversial 1969 Oscar-winning film that signaled a dramatic shift in American popular culture.

Sidelined by Julie DiCaro.  This is a sweeping takedown of misogyny in America’s sports media and professional leagues.  It’s all about sports, culture, and being a woman in America.

Wait, I’m working with who?  by Peter Economy.  The essential guide to dealing with difficult coworkers, annoying managers, and other toxic personalities.

Where we find ourselves: the photographs of Hugh Mangum, 1897-1922.  These are interesting on so many levels and is Americana at its most compelling, real buried treasure brought to life.

Winter pasture by Li Juan.  A warm portrait of stark, strenuous lives in remote China as a woman journeys with a family of herders in winter.  It’s a rare look at a disappearing world.

The women of the Bible speak by Shannon Bream.  They lived timeless stories – by examining them, we can understand what it means to be a woman of faith.

Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

Birdsong by Julie Flett

Curious George goes swimming by Margret Rey

Granddaddy’s turn : a journey to the ballot box by Michael S. Bandy

I am perfectly designed by Karamo Brown

I promise by LeBron James

Love you forever by Robert Munsch

Northbound : a train ride out of segregation by Michael S. Bandy

Spring stinks by Ryan Higgins

V is for voting by Kate Farrell

Vote for our future! by Margaret McNamara

Welcome to the party by Gabrielle Union

Your house, my house by Marianne Dubuc

CHAPTER BOOKS

Alone in the woods by Rebecca Behrens

Ancestor approved : intertribal stories for kids edited by Cynthia Leitich Smith

Clean getaway by Nic Stone

Loretta Little looks back : three voices go tell it! by Andrea Davis Pinkney

Two roads by Joseph Bruchac

Wings of fire : the dangerous gift by Tui Sutherland

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The Great bunk bed battle by Tina Kugler

Hilo. Book 7, Gina the girl who broke the world by Judd Winick

History Comics. The Challenger disaster : tragedy in the skies by Pranas Naujokaitis

History Comics. The Great Chicago fire : rising from the ashes by Kate Hannigan

History Comics. The Roanoke Colony : America’s first mystery by Chris Schweizer

NON-FICTION

Beginner’s world atlas by National Geographic Kids

Buzzing with questions : the inquisitive mind of Charles Henry Turner by Janice N. Harrington

Dinosaur lady : the daring discoveries of Mary Anning, the first paleontologist by Linda Skeers

The great bear rescue : saving the Gobi bears by Sandra Markle

Heartbeat by Doe Boyle

Hello neighbor! : the kind and caring world of Mister Rogers by Matthew Cordell

Insects by the numbers : a book of infographics by Steve Jenkins

Kamala Harris : rooted in justice by Nikki Grimes

Marie’s Ocean : Marie Tharp maps the mountains under the sea by Josie James

Student World Atlas by National Geographic

National parks of the U.S.A. by Kate Siber

The national parks : discover all 62 parks of the United States by Stefanie Payne

Space : a visual encyclopedia by DK

Whoosh! : Lonnie Johnson’s super-soaking stream of inventions by Chris Barton

William Still and his freedom stories : the father of the underground railroad by Don Tate

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

New Items ~ April 2021

FICTION

Across the green grass fields by Seanan McGuire.  In this fantasy, a young girl discovers a portal to a land filled with centaurs and unicorns.

A bright ray of darkness by Ethan Hawke.  The blistering story of a young man making his Broadway debut in Henry IV, just as his marriage implodes – an utterly transfixing book about art and love, fame and heartbreak.

The burning girls by C.J. Tudor.  An unconventional vicar must exorcise the dark past of a remote village haunted by death and disappearances in this unsettling thriller.

Dark sky by C.J. Box.  Wyoming game warden Joe Pickett must accompany a Silicon Valley CEO on a hunting trip – but soon learns that he himself may be the hunted.

Death by chocolate snickerdoodle by Sarah Graves.  When a cunning killer and a devastating fire threaten to ravage Eastport, Jacobia Tiptree must go into action before all she loves goes up in smoke.

The Duke and I by Julia Quinn.  In the first book of the Bridgerton series, Daphne Bridgerton’s reputation soars when she colludes with the Duke of Hastings.

Enjoy the view by Sarah Morgenthaler.  A grouchy mountaineer, a Hollywood starlet, and miles of untamed wilderness.  What could possibly go wrong in this rom-com?

Faithless in death by J.D. Robb.  Eve Dallas investigates the murder of a young sculptor in the West Village.

The kitchen front by Jennifer Ryan.  A BBC-sponsored wartime cooking competition gives the four women who enter a chance to better their lives.

Landslide by Susan Conley.  The author is at her best capturing Maine’s coastal terrain as well as her character’s emotional turmoil.  Through her disarming family portrait, she speaks volumes about changing ways of life.

Later by Stephen King.  With echoes of his classic novel, It, this is a powerful, haunting, unforgettable exploration of what it takes to stand up to evil in all the faces it wears.

The lowering days by Gregory Brown.  Set in 1980s Maine, this explores family love, the power of myths and storytelling, survival and environmental exploitation, and the ties between cultural identity and the land we live on.

The midnight library by Matt Haig.  Nora Seed finds a library beyond the edge of the universe that contains books with multiple possibilities of the lives on could have lived.

Minus me by Mameve Medwed.  Her life turned upside down by a grim diagnosis, a small-town Maine woman sets about writing a “How To” life manual for her handsome yet hapless husband.

Missing and endangered by J.A. Jance.  The Cochise Country Sheriff’s daughter becomes involved in a missing persons case.

The northern reach by W.S. Winslow.  Set in Maine, this is a novel about the power of place and family ties, the weight of the stories we choose to tell, and the burden of those stories we hide.

Our Italian summer by Jennifer Probst.  Three generations of women must heal the broken pieces of their lives on a trip of a lifetime through picturesque Italy.

The Paris Library by Janet Charles.  A teenager in Montana discovers that her elderly neighbor worked decades earlier at the American Library in Paris and was part of the Resistance.

The Plague Court murders by John Dickson Carr.  When a spiritual medium is murdered in a locked hut on a haunted estate, Sir Henry Merrivale seeks a logical solution to a ghostly crime.

The rebel nun by Marj Charlier.  Based on the true story of Clotild, the daughter of a 6th century king who leads a rebellion of nuns against the rising misogyny and patriarchy of the medieval church.

The sanatorium by Sarah Pearse.  Elin Warner must find her estranged brother’s fiancée, who goes missing as a storm approaches a hotel that was once a sanatorium in the Swiss Alps.

Who is Maud Dixon?  by Alexandra Andrews.  Identity theft takes on a new meaning in this arresting thriller.

Winter’s orbit by Everina Maxwell.  A famously disappointing minor royal and the Emperor’s least favorite grandchild, Prince Kiem commanded by the Emperor to renew the empire’s bonds with its newest vassal planet.  The prince must marry Count Jainan, the recent widower of another royal prince of the empire.

NEW DVDs

Jojo Rabbit (2019) starring Scarlett Johansson, Rebel Wilson, Taika Waititi, and Sam Rockwell

The old maid (1939) starring Bette Davis and Miriam Hopkins

Foreign Correspondent (1940) starring Joel McCrea

The Sunshine Boys (1975) starring Walter Matthau and George Burns

NEW MUSIC CDs

Fetch the bolt cutters by Fiona Apple

Women in Music, Pt. III by HAIM

Black Pumas by Black Pumas

The new Abnormal by The Strokes

Fine line by Harry Styles

NONFICTION

Can’t slow down by Michaelangelo Matos.  How 1984 became pop’s blockbuster year – the definitive account of pop music in the mid-80s from Prince and Madonna to the underground hip-hop, indie rock, and club scenes.

The crown in crisis by Alexander Larman.  A juicy account of the events leading up to and following British monarch King Edward VIII’s abdication…even royal watcher will learn something new from this comprehensive account of one of the biggest scandals in the history of the British monarchy.

Dress codes by Richard Ford.  A revelatory exploration of fashion through the ages that asks what our clothing reveals about ourselves and our society.

Every conversation counts by Riaz Meghji.  Readers looking to have more meaningful interactions would do well to pick this up due to significant consideration as to how the pandemic era has changed relationships.

Girlhood by Masuma Ahuja.  Full of pictures and the unique voices of teenage girls in a variety of situations and cultures, this provides a snapshot of teens’ lives around the world.

The soul of a woman by Isabel Allende.  A passionate and inspiriting meditation on what it means to be a woman.

To raise a boy by Emma Brown.  A journalist’s searing investigation into how we teach boys to be men – and how we can do better.  Insightful and sometimes disturbing.

Walk in my combat boots by James Patterson.  A collection of interviews with troops who fought overseas.  The most moving and powerful war stories ever told, by the men and women who lived them.

Walking with ghosts by Gabriel Byrne.  Bryne channels his fellow countrymen and Ireland’s literary masters as he reveals his struggle with alcoholism, aching passion for the Ireland of his youth, and is piercingly frank about his acting life.

We need to hang out by Billy Baker.  In this comic adventure through the loneliness epidemic, a middle-aged everyman looks around one day and realizes that he seems to have misplaced his friends, inspiring him to set out on a hilarious and moving quest to revive old tribes and build new ones, in his own ridiculous way.

What they don’t teach teens by Jonathan Cristall.  Life safety skills for teens and the adults who care for them.

The witch of eye by Kathryn Nuernberger.  Essays concerning the history of women who saw things differently and dared not to be silent and silenced by power structures.  Women such as Titiba, Marie Laveau, and Hildegard of Bingen.

World of wonders by Aimee Nezhukumatathil.  A collection of essays about the natural world and the way its inhabitants can teach, support, and inspire us.

You’re leaving when? by Annabelle Gurwitch.  Erma Bombeck meets Dorothy Parker in this topical and often laugh-out-loud take on our modern malaise.

Children’s Books

PICTURE BOOKS

The camping trip by Jennifer K Mann

Champ and Major: first dogs by Joy McCullough

Cow boy is not a cowboy by Gregory Barrington

Eyes that kiss in the corners by Joanna Ho

Idea jar by Adam Lehrhaupt

Look! I wrote a book! (and you can too!) by Sally Lloyd-Jones

Time for Kenny by J. Brian Pinkney

Welcome to the party by Gabrielle Union

Your name is a song by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow

CHAPTER BOOKS

Clean getaway By Nic Stone

Sofia Valdez and the vanishing vote by Andrea Beaty

Two roads by Joseph Bruchac

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The baby-sitter’s club: Claudia and the new girl by Ann Martin

Baby-sitters little sister: Karen’s worst day by Ann Martin

The Challenger disaster by Pranas Naujokaitis

The great Chicago fire by Kate Hannigan

The Roanoke Colony by Christ Schweizer

NON-FICTION

Free press and censorship by Susan Brophy Down

Frogs by Gail Gibbons

Hello neighbor! : the kind and caring world of Mister Rogers by Matthew Cordell

Kamala Harris : rooted in justice by Nikki Grimes

Marie’s Ocean: Marie Tharp maps the mountains under the sea  by Josie James

Memorial Day by Emma Carlson Berne

Memory superpowers: an adventurous guide to remembering what you don’t want to forget by Nelson Dellis

Monarch butterfly by Gail Gibbons

The truth about butterflies by Maxwell Eaton III

Visual guide to grammar and punctuation by Sheila Digmen

DVDS

Bill Nye the science guy: Patterns

Bill Nye the science guy: Reptiles

Bill Nye the science guy: Wetlands

Jetsons, the movie

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

New Items ~ March 2021

FICTION

Beneficence by Meredith Hall.  In the years after World War II, the Senter family built a wonderful life on their isolated dairy farm in rural Maine.  After tragedy strikes, each must fight the isolation of their own grief and guilt to reclaim their old life – if they can.

Blood grove by Walter Mosley.  A continuation of the Easy Rawlins saga, in which the iconic detective’s loyalties are tested on the sun-soaked streets of Southern California.

The bride wore black by Cornell Woolrich.  A police detective seeks the rationale between seemingly-unrelated murders, connected only by the appearance of a beautiful woman each time.

The children’s blizzard by Melanie Benjamin.  A story of courage on the prairie, inspired by the devastating storm that struck the Great Plains in 1888, threatening the lives of hundreds of immigrant homesteaders, especially school children.

A deadly fortune by Stacie Murphy.  A historical mystery in the vein of “The Alienist”, in which a young woman in Gilded Age New York must use a special talent to unravel a deadly conspiracy.

The ex talk by Rachel Solomon.  To save their jobs, rival public radio co-workers pretend to be exes for a new show and end up getting much more than they bargained for.

Faithless in death by J.D. Robb.  Gwen is wealthy, elegant, and comforted by her fiancé as she sheds tears over the trauma of finding a body.  But why did it take an hour to report it?  And why is she lying about little things?

The four winds by Kristin Hannah.  An epic novel of love and heroism and hopes, set against the backdrop of one of America’s most defining eras – The Great Depression.

The frozen crown by Greta Kelly.  A princess with a powerful and dangerous secret must find a way to save her country from ruthless invaders in this exciting fantasy.

Girl A by Abigail Dean.  An absorbing and psychologically immersive novel about a young girl who escapes captivity – but not the secrets that shadow the rest of her life.

A heart of blood and ashes by Milla Vane.  The fun thing about romance is that it encompasses all other genres too.  If you are a fantasy fan, looking for a happy-ever-after, this could be the ticket.

If I disappear by Eliza Brazier.  When a true-crime podcaster disappears, her biggest fan sets out to find her.

A lie someone told you about yourself by Peter Davies.  A truthful examination of fatherhood that explores the fallout from an abortion and the difficulties that follow a second pregnancy.  This will strike a resonant chord with parents everywhere.

Lone stars by Justin Deabler.  This follows the arc of four generations of a Texan family in a changing America and in doing so shows the hope that by uncloseting ourselves – as immigrants, smart women, gay people –we find power in empathy.

Meet me in Bombay by Jenny Ashcroft.  United by love.  Separated by war.  Will they find their way back to each other?

Milk fed by Melissa Broder.  This explores the difficulties of loving oneself in a world that prizes thinness above all else.  This poignant exploration of desire, religion, and daughterhood is hard to resist.

Murder by numbers by Eric Brown.  A British detective battles to unmask a killer before his wife becomes victim No. 6.  A classic English mystery with plenty of unexpected plot twists.

Nick by Michael Smith.  This is a look into the life of Nick Carraway before Gatsby entered his life.

People like her by Ellery Lloyd.  A razor-sharp, wickedly smart suspense novel about an ambitious influencer mom whose soaring success threatens her marriage, her morals, and her family’s safety.

The perfect guests by Emma Rous.  A grand estate with many secrets; an orphan caught in a web of lies; and a young woman playing a sinister game.

Perfect little children by Sophie Hannah.  Beth had a falling out with her best friend, Flora, and hasn’t been in contact since.  She drives by Flora’s house many years later and sees Flora, who looks the same, only older, by 12 years.  Flora calls to her children to get out of the car.  They emerge…exactly as Beth last saw them 12 years ago, aged 5 and 3.  How can that be?

The push by Ashley Audrain.  A devastating event forces a mother who questions her child’s behavior – and her own sanity – to confront the truth.

The scorpion’s tail by Douglas Preston.  An FBI agent and an archaeologist identity a mummified corpse and its gruesome cause of death.

Trio by William Boyd.  A rollicking novel with a dark undertow, set around three unforgettable individuals and a doomed movie set.

Tsarina by Ellen Alpsten.  Before Catherine the Great, there was Catherine Alexeyevna: the first woman to rule Russia in her own right.  This is the story of her rise to power from serf to murderess, to empress.

The wife upstairs by Rachel Hawkins.  A recently arrived dog walker in a Southern gated community falls for a mysterious widower.

The yellow wife by Sadeqa Johnson.  This harrowing story follows an enslaved woman forced to barter love and freedom while living in the most infamous slave jail in Virginia.

NEW DVDS

The King of Staten Island (2020) starring Pete Davidson and Marisa Tomei

The Godfather, Coda: the death of Michael Corleone (2020) starring Al Pacino

Slap shot (1977) starring Paul Newman and Michael Ontkean

Mulan (2020) starring Yifei Liu and Donnie Yen

Only when I laugh (1981) starring Marsha Mason, Joan Hackett, and Kristy McNichol

 NEW MUSIC CDs

Folklore by Taylor Swift

Disco by Kylie Minogue

Punisher by Phoebe Bridgers

Wildflowers and all the rest by Tom Petty

NONFICTION

Coming back by Fawn Germer.  How to win the job you want when you’ve lost the job you need.

Fright favorites by David Skal.  31 movies to haunt your Halloween and beyond from Turner Classic movies.

Frontier Follies by Ree Drummond.  A down-to-earth, hilarious collection of stories and musings on marriage, motherhood, and country life from the star of the TV show The Pioneer Woman.

How to start and run a successful home daycare business by Christina Kamp.

Just as I am by Cicely Tyson.  An icon in film, TV, and fashion, Tyson here tells the story of her remarkable life.

The secret life of Dorothy Soames by Justine Cowan.  A memoir about the unearthing of her deceased mother’s secret past and a generations-long cycle of family trauma.  This frank account of a real-life Dickensian dystopia captivates at every turn.

We came, we saw, we left by Charles Wheelan.  In a pre-CoVid 19 world, the Wheelans decided to leave behind work, school, and even the family dogs to travel the world on a modest budget.  Equal parts “how-to” and “how-not-to”, this is an insightful and often hilarious account of one family’s gap-year experiment. 

Where I come from by Rick Bragg.  Bragg brings us an ode to the stories and history of the Deep South, filled with eclectic nuggets about places and people he knows well.

What becomes a legend most by Philip Gefter.  Biography of Richard Avedon, a monumental photographer of the 20th century, who captured the iconic figures of his era in his starkly bold, intimately minimal, and forensic visual style.

What cats want by Yuki Hattori.  An illustrated guide for truly understanding your cat.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

New Items ~ February 2021

FICTION

American traitor by Brad Taylor.  Pike Logan is on the desperate hunt for a man who is about to betray his country – and ignite a horrific new world war.

Better luck next time by Julia Johnson.  A charming story of endings, new beginnings, along with the complexities and complications of friendship and love, set in late 1930s Reno.

Bloodline by Jess Lourey.  Perfect town.  Perfect homes.  Perfect families.  It’s enough to drive some women mad…After moving to her fiancé’s hometown, Joan thinks something is off with the town.  Her fiancé tells her she’s being paranoid.  He might be right.  Then again, she might have moved to the deadliest small town on earth.

Cobble Hill by Cecily von Ziegesar.  This chronicles a year in the life of 4 families in an upscale Brooklyn neighborhood as they seek purpose, community, and meaningful relationships – until one night a raucous Neighborhood party knocks them to their senses.

From these broken streets by Roland Merullo.  A galvanizing historical novel of Nazi-occupied Naples and the rage and resistance of a people under siege.

He started it by Samantha Downing.  A road trip to scatter their grandfather’s ashes – and claim their inheritance – takes a strange turn for three adult siblings.

The heiress by Molly GreeleyPride and Prejudice side-trip:  the story of Anne de Bourgh, the heiress Darcy was expected to marry.

If I had two wings by Randall Kenan.  Mingling the earthy with the otherworldly, these ten stories chronicle ineffable events in ordinary lives.

The moment of tenderness by Madeleine L’Engle.  A genre-bending story collection that transcends generational divides and reminds readers that hope, above all, can transform suffering into the promise of joy.

Neighbors by Danielle Steel.  A woman opens her home to her neighbors in the wake of a devastating earthquake, setting off events that reveal secrets, break relationships, and bring strangers together to forge powerful new bonds.

Nora by Nuala O’Connor.  A bold re-imagining of the life of James Joyce’s wife, muse, and the model for Molly Bloom in Ulysses.

The once and future witches by Alix Harrow.  In the late 1800s, three sisters use witchcraft to change the course of history in this novel of magic and the suffragette movement.

Outlawed by Anna North.  The Crucible meets True Grit in this adventure story of a fugitive girl, a mysterious gang of robbers, and their dangerous mission to transform the Wild West.

Pretty little wife by Darby Kane.  A twisty domestic suspense novel that asks one central question: shouldn’t a dead husband stay dead?

The prophets by Robert Jones.  A stunning debut novel about the forbidden union between two enslaved young men on a Deep South plantation, the refuge they find in each other, and a betrayal that threatens their existence.

Ready player two by Ernest Cline.  In a sequel to Ready Play One, Wade Watts discovers a technological advancement and goes on a new quest.

The Resolutions by Brady Hammes.  Three fractious main characters are brought to life and their reunion is turned into a life-changing journey.

Secret Santa by Andrew Shaffer.  The Office meets Stephen King dressed up in holiday tinsel in this fun, festive, and frightening horror-comedy set during the horror publishing boom of the ‘80s.

Some go home by Odie Lindsey.  A searing novel that follows 3 generations – fractured by murder, seeking redemption – in fictional Pitchlynn, Mississippi.

Sorry I missed you by Suzy Krause.  Quirky, humorous, and utterly original – this is a heartwarming story about friendship, ghosting, and searching for answers to life’s mysteries.

The Sweeney sisters by Lian Dolan.  The sisters gather in Southport, CT for the funeral of their father, a brilliant writer.  An unexpected guest at his wake, however, will shift the foundations of their lives.  A warmhearted portrait of love embracing true hearts.

Sweet water by Cara Reinard.  What did her son do in the woods last night?  Does a mother really want to know?  This is an unsparing account of “rich people problems” that goes on forever – like all the best nightmares.

Ties that tether by Jane Igharo.  At 12 years old, Azere promised her dying father she would marry a Nigerian man and preserve her culture, even after immigrating to Canada.  Her mother has been vigilant about helping.  But when she meets a man who is…white…and seems so right for her, things get complicated.

Under the tulip tree by Michele Shocklee.  During the Great Depression, a young woman reporter takes a job interviewing former slaves for the Federal Writer’s Project.  There she meets a 101 year old woman whose honest yet tragic past as a slave horrifies her.

Violent peace by David Poyer.  World War III is over…or is it?  Superpowers race to fill the postwar power vacuum in this thriller.

NONFICTION

Anxiety first aid kit by Rich Hanson.  A quick-relief guide for calming anxiety and stress right now.

The Black Civil War soldier by Deborah Willis.  A stunning collection of stoic portraits and intimate ephemera from the lives of Black Civil War soldiers.

Calm the h*ck down by Melanie Dale.  A laugh-out-loud hilarious parenting book that teaches you how to dial back the stress of raising children with the simple premise that we all must need to lighten up a little bit.

College admission essentials by Ethan Sawyer.  A step by step guide to showing colleges who you are and what matters to you.

The good assassin by Stephen Talty.  The untold story of an Israeli spy’s epic journey to bring the notorious Butcher of Latvia to justice – case that altered the fates of all ex-Nazis.

His Holiness the fourteenth Dalai Lama by Tenzin Tethong.  This beautifully illustrated chronicle presents an in-depth, firsthand narrative of the Dalai Lama’s life story and the Tibetan saga.

How can it be gluten free cookbook collection by America’s Test Kitchen.

In case you get hit by a bus by Abby Schneiderman.  How to organize your life now for when you’re not around later.

This was Hollywood by Carla Valderrama.  From screen legends who have faded into obscurity to new revelations about movies’ biggest stars, this unearths the most fascinating little known tales from the birth of Hollywood through its Golden Age.

 NEW CHILDREN’S ITEMS

PICTURE BOOKS

All because you matter by Tami Charles

Bedtime for sweet creatures by Nikki Grimes

Bunheads by Misty Copeland

Construction site mission : demolition by Sherri Duskey Rinker

Daddy’s Little Princess by G. Todd Taylor

Elevator Bird by Sarah Williamson

Evelyn Del Rey is moving away by Meg Medina

A feel better book for little poopers by Holly Brochmann

Finding Francois : a story about the healing power of friendship by Gus Gordon

Henry’s important date by Robert Quackenbush

I am every good thing by Derrick Barnes

I talk like a river by Jordan Scott

If you come to Earth by Sophie Blackall

Lulu the one and only by Lynnette Mawhinney

Ocean calls: a haenyeo mermaid story by Tina Cho

Outside in by Deborah Underwood

Sometimes people march by Tessa Allen

Speak up by Miranda Paul

Tiger wild by Gwen Millward

Turtle walk by Matt Phelan

Two White Rabbits by Jairo Buitrago

Uncle Bobby’s wedding by Sarah Brannen

Weekend dad by Naseem Hrab

CHAPTER BOOKS

The canyon’s edge by Dusti Bowling

Diary of a wimpy kid : the deep end by Jeff Kinney

I want to sleep under the stars! By Mo Willems

Maya and the rising dark by Rena Barron

Nancy Clancy : secret of the silver key by Jane O’Connor

Nancy Clancy : star of stage and screen by Jane O’Connor

The princess in black and the giant problem by Shannon Hale

GRAPHIC NOVELS

5 worlds : the amber anthem by Mark Siegel

The Baby-Sitters Club : Logan likes Mary Anne! by Ann Martin

The bad guys in The One?! by Aaron Blabey

Cat Kid Comic Club by Dav Pilkey

Sparks!: Double dog dare by Ian Boothby

NON-FICTION

All thirteen : the incredible cave rescue of the Thai boys’ soccer team by Christina Soontornvat

Bill Nye’s great big world of science by Bill Nye

Feathered serpent and the five suns: a Mesoamerican creation myth by Duncan Tonatiuh

The International Day of the Girl : celebrating girls around the world  by Jessica Dee Humphreys

The little mermaid by Jerry Pinkney

National Geographic Kids Almanac 2021 by National Geographic

Rainbow revolutionaries : 50 LGBTQ+ people who made history by Sarah Prager

Resist! : peaceful acts that changed our world by Diane Stanley

She leads : the elephant matriarch by June Smalls

 DVDS

Bill Nye the science guy : climates

Let’s learn : S.T.E.M.

Rock ‘n learn : human body

Rock ‘n learn : life science

Rock ‘n learn : money & making change

Rock ‘n learn : writing strategies

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review

 

 

New Items ~ January 2021

FICTION

The awakening by Nora Roberts.  This launches a fantasy trilogy with a heartwarming story of a woman finding her true self across parallel worlds.

Bone harvest by James Brogden.  A dark and haunting tale of an ancient cult wreaking havoc on the modern world.

The children of Red Peak by Craig DiLouie.  With this chilling story of cult abuse, the author proves his mastery of the slow slide from psychological drama into supernatural horror.

Daylight by David Baldacci.  FBI agent Atlee Pine’s search for her twin sister overlaps with a military investigator’s hunt for someone involved in a global conspiracy.

Fortune and glory by Janet Evanovich.  Stephanie Plum deals with a soldier of fortune from Little Havana.

A good marriage by Kimberly McCreight.  A woman’s murder reveals the perilous compromises some couples make – and the secrets they keep – in order to stay together.

Hidden in plain sight by Jeffrey Archer.  William Warwick has been promoted to Detective Sergeant, but his promotion means that he, along with the rest of his team, have been reassigned to the Drugs Squad and tasked to catch a notorious drug dealer.

The housekeeper by Natalie Barelli.  When Hannah Wilson hires Claire as her new housekeeper, she has no idea they share a past.  But I’s not just Claire who has secrets.  Everyone in that house seems to have something to hide.

How to fail at flirting by Denise Williams.  One daring to-do list and a crash course in flirtation turn a Type A overachiever’s world upside down.

The law of innocence by Michael Connelly.  Lincoln lawyer Mickey Haller must defend himself against murder charges.

Lord the one you love is sick by Kasey Thornton.  A compulsively readable book about how easily tight-knit communities can unravel.  It may make you think again about what lies beneath the surface of your own community.

Love your life by Sophie Kinsella.  A delightful novel about a woman who ditches her dating app for a writer’s retreat in Italy – to find that real love comes with its own filters.

Miss Benson’s beetle by Rachel Joyce.   Two women are on a life-changing adventure where they must risk everything, break all the rules, and discover their best selves – together.

Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley.  Brilliantly imaginative story of three extraordinary animals – and a young boy – whose lives intersect in Paris.

Reviving the Hawthorn sisters by Emily Carpenter.  The plot of this novel deals with uncovering a faith healer’s elusive and haunted past.

Shadow sands  by Robert Bryndza.  The moors are a perfect place to hide for a serial killer.  And a chilling return to the past for nascent private investigator Kate Marshall.

The star-crossed sisters of Tuscany by Lori Spielman.  A trio of second-born daughters sets out on a whirlwind journey through the lush Italian countryside to break the family curse that says they’ll never find love.

Surviving the fatherland by Annette Oppenlander.  A raw, history-based tale that pays homage to the war children who bore witness while struggling to survive.

Tiny nightmares edited by Lincoln Michel.  Very short stories of horror.

Tomorrow will be better by Betty Smith.  This is the story of Margy Shannon – shy, eager, fully optimistic – and her search for something better than the hard misery of poverty in which she lives.

The vanishing sky by L. Annette Binder.  This follows Etta and Josef Huber and their sons in rural Germany during World War II and provides a fresh take on the madness of war.

We hear voices by Evie Green.  An eerie debut about a little boy who recovers from a mysterious pandemic and inherits an imaginary friend who makes him do violent things.

NEW DVDs

The Irishman (2020) Starring Robert De Niro and Al Pacino

North and South (1985) starring Patrick Swayze and David Carradine

Diary of a mad housewife (1970) starring Carrie Snodgress and Richard Benjamin

A view to a kill (1985) starring Roger Moore

The farmer’s daughter (1947) starring Loretta Young and Joseph Cotton

Tarantula (1955) starring John Agar

NONFICTION

The American crisis by The Atlantic.  Some of America’s best reporters and thinkers offer an urgent look at a country in chaos in this collection of timely, often prophetic articles.

The best of me by David Sedaris.  A collection of the humorist’s essays.

The bird way by Jennifer Ackerman.  A new look at how birds talk, work, play, parent, and think.

Braiding sweetgrass by Robin Kimmerer.  Indigenous wisdom, scientific knowledge, and the teachings of plants. The woven essays that construct this book bring people back into conversation with all that is green and growing; a universe that never stopped speaking to us, even when we forgot how to listen

Chicago’s great fire by Carl Smith.  The full and authoritative story of one of the most iconic disasters in American history, told through the vivid memories of those who experienced it.

Clanlands by Sam Heughan.  The stars of “Outlander” use various means of travel to explore Scotland.

Conditional citizens by Laila Lalami.  This profound inquiry into the American immigrant experience deserves to be widely read as the author argues that becoming a U.S. citizen does not necessarily mean becoming an equal member of the American family.

Foolproof fish by America’s Test Kitchen.  Recipes that accommodate multiple kinds of fish and plenty of fish facts will inspire you to dive into seafood cookery with confidence.

Golem girl by Riva Lehrer.  The vividly told, gloriously illustrated memoir of an artist born with disabilities who searches for freedom and connection in a society afraid of strange bodies.

Help yourself by Lindsay Hunt.  A guide to gut health for people who love delicious food.

How to hunt ghosts by Joshua Warren.   A paranormal researcher teaches the novice hunter the basics, which above all include treating the paranormal as any other scientific field: one requiring well-documented research and hard evidence.

Nobody ever asked me about the girls by Lisa Robinson.  An intimate look at the lives of our most celebrated female musicians – and their challenges with fame.

A promised land by Barack Obama.  Obama tells the story of his improbable odyssey from young man searching for his identity to leader of the free world.

7 ways by Jamie Oliver.  Easy ideas for cooking every day of the week.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

 

Gifts with a Gardiner Maine Connection!

It’s that time of year again – gift giving time!

Are you looking for gift items with a local connection?  If so, we just might have what you are looking for!

Currently, we have ~~

2021 Gardiner calendars – $10.00

Library in Winter – print of a Kay Morris original – $10.00

Library in Winter – note cards of Kay Morris original – $15.00

 

Books ~~

The Eastern, Book One : The Early Years by Deborah Gould – $10.00

The Eastern, Book Two : Later On by Deborah Gould – $10.00

Maine Ingenuity, From Waterwheels to M.I.T. by Michael McCaslin – $10.00

Destination Unknown, An Evacuee’s Story by Gay M. Grant – $10.00

Gardiner Public Library Book Bags – $15.00

 

With all that is going on in the world, many of our usual places to donate non-perishable items have shortened their hours, closed, or for whatever reason, are not able to accept items this year.  We have resurrected our Christmas Tree, and will graciously accept non-perishable items to be donated to those in need.

 

The tree is located on the main floor of the library for those who are interested.  We will also accept items at our Pick-Up Window, located at the rear of the library (parking lot side).

 

Current library hours are ~~

 

Monday thru Friday 10:00am – 5:00pm – limited access to the building.

 

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 10:00am – 5:25pm – Pick-Up Window and book returns.

Wednesday 10:00am – 6:00pm – Pick-Up Window and book returns.

New Items ~ December 2020

FICTION

After all I’ve done by Mina Hardy.  An expert nightmare, one of those rare thrillers whose answers are even more scarifying than its mysteries.

The cold millions by Jess Walter.  Two brothers are swept up in the turbulent class warfare of the early 20th century.

Dead man dancing by John Galligan.  Sheriff Heidi Kick is investigating an illicit cage fighting ring with ties to white nationalism when her husband suddenly goes missing.

Death comes as the end by Agatha Christie.  Egypt in 2000 B.C.  A priest’s daughter, investigating a suspicious death, uncovers an asp’s nest of jealousy, betrayal, and serial murder.

The dirty south by John Connolly.  A chilling blend of police procedural and gothic horror tale…perfect for fireside reading on cold, rainy nights.

Fortune favors the dead by Stephen Spotswood.  A sprightly period debut in the noir vein – a provocative gender-flipping of Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin.

Hidden Salem by Kay Hooper.  A town shrouded in the occult.  An evil that lurks in the dark.  The S.C.U. returns because what actually hides in the shadows and secrets of Salem is unlike anything the agents have ever encountered.

I saw him die by Andrew Wilson.  In a classic who-dun-it filled with red herrings and double-crosses, Agatha Christie investigates a mysterious death in the Scottish highlands.

Inheritors by Asako Serizawa.  A beautiful and brutal exploration of lives fragmented by the Pacific side of World War II.

Jane in love by Rachel Givney.  Jane Austen, heralded author, ends up time-traveling almost 200 years into the future.  There she finds the love she’s written about and the destiny she’s dreamed of…but is it worth her legacy?

Jingle all the way by Debbie Macomber.  Love can transform even the best-laid plans in this heartfelt Christmas novel.

The last great road bum by Hector Tobar.  A would-be writer leaves a comfortable existence in Urbana, Illinois, in order to travel the world in search of material for a great American novel.  Instead, he finds romance, danger, and the dark heart of the mid-20th century.

Memorial by Bryan Washington.  Benson and Mike, a mixed-race couple in Houston, search for the truth about themselves, each other, and their families.  It’s a subtle and moving exploration of love, family, race, and the long, frustrating search for home.

The missing sister by Elle Marr.  This follows a medical student to, around, and ultimately beneath Paris in search of the twin sister she’d been drifting away from.  Notable for its exploration of the uncanny bonds twins share and the killer’s memorable macabre motive.

Not my Romeo by Ilsa Madden-Mills.  A smart and sexy contemporary romance about a smoking-hot professional football player and the small-town girl he can’t resist.

On borrowed crime by Kate Young.  The Jane Doe book club enjoys guessing whodunit, but when murder happens in their midst, they discover solving crimes isn’t fun and games.

One more for Christmas by Sarah Morgan.  As the snowflakes fall on their first family celebration in years, the Mitchell women must learn that sometimes facing up to the past is all you need to heal your heart.

Plain bad heroines by Emily Danforth.  A horror-comedy centered around a New England boarding school for girls.

Ring shout by P. Djeli Clark.  A dark fantasy historical novel that gives a supernatural twist to the Ku Klux Klan’s reign of terror.

The secret lives of church ladies by Deesha Philyaw.  These 9 stories feature four generations of Black women grappling with who they want to be in the world, caught as they are between the church’s double standards and their own needs and passions.

The sentinel by Lee Child.  Jack Reacher is in Nashville and a voice in his head is telling him to walk away.  Of course, he doesn’t.

Sweet sorrow by David Nicholls.  A bittersweet yet funny coming-of-age tale about the heart-stopping thrill of first love – and how just one summer can forever change a life.

The switch by Beth O’Leary.  A grieving British woman and her grandmother switch homes and lives in an attempt to shake things up.  The result is a cozy hopeful escapade that will make readers laugh, cry, and feel inspired.

The wonder boy of Whistle Stop by Fannie Flagg.  A heartwarming novel about secrets of youth rediscovered, hometown memories, and the magical moment in ordinary lives.

 NEW DVDs

The Crown: the complete third season (2020) starring Olivia Colman

Gallipoli (1981) starring Mel Gibson and Mark Lee

The informer (1935) starring Victor McLaglen

Quantum of Solace (2009) starring Daniel Craig

NONFICTION

The Bible with and without Jesus by Amy-Jill Levine.  The author shows how and why Jews and Christians read many of the same biblical texts differently.  Exploring and explaining these diverse perspectives, she reveals more clearly Scripture’s beauty and power.

Blue Sky Kingdom by Bruce Kirkby.  As it explores an ancient – and dying – Tibetan Buddhist culture, this delightful book also tells a timely, heartwarming story of a family’s search for peace away from the din of modern culture.

The bottom line for baby by Tina Bryson.  From sleep training to screens, thumb sucking to tummy time – what science says about it all.

Catching the wind by Neil Gabler.  The epic, definitive bio of Ted Kennedy – an immersive journey through the life of a complicated man and a sweeping history of the fall of liberalism and the collapse of political morality.

Celeste Holm Syndrome by David Lazar.  Fans of Hollywood’s Golden Age will delight in this affecting look at what makes actors truly memorable, even if they’re not in the spotlight.

The dead are arising by Les Payne.  An epic biography of Malcolm X.

Inside game by Keith Law.  Bad calls, strange moves, and what baseball behavior teaches us about ourselves.

Making work human by Eric Mosley.  How human centered companies are changing the future of work and the world.  How do you keep your employees engaged, creative, innovative, and productive?  Simple:  Work human!

Philip and Alexander by Adrian Goldsworthy.  This definitive bio of one of history’s most influential father/son duos tells the story of two rulers who gripped the world – and their rise and fall from power in ancient Greece.

Right place, right time by Bob Gruen.  An action-packed memoir that takes readers on the road with rock’s hardest-working photographer.  And the stories he tells….

Singular sensation by Michael Riedel.  The story of a transformative decade on Broadway, featuring gripping behind-the-scenes accounts of shows such as Rent, Angels in America, Chicago, The Lion King and The Producers – shows that changed the history of the American theater.

West Side Story by Richard Barrios.  While remaining always respectful to the movie and the people who made it, the author lays bare the behind-the-scenes tumult, elevating the book from a typical making-of story to something really special: a no-hold-bared chronicle of what it really takes to get a great movie made.

World wild vet by Evan Antin.  From the star of Animal Planet’s Evan Goes Wild comes a wild look at our natural world that is perfect for fans of Steve Irwin, James Herriot, and Bear Grylls.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

New Items ~ November 2020

FICTION

Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse.  A powerful priest, an outcast seafarer, and a man born to be the vessel of a god come together.  This novel is inspired by the civilizations of the Pre-Columbian Americas and woven into a tale of celestial prophecies, political intrigue, and forbidden magic.

The book of two ways by Jodi Picoult.  A novel about the choice that alter the course of our lives.  Do we make choices – or do our choices make us?  And who would you be if you hadn’t turned out to be the person you are right now?

The brilliant life of Eudora Honeysett by Annie Lyons.  A moving and joyous novel about an elderly woman who is ready to embrace death and of the little girl who reminds her what it means to live.

Chaos by Iris Johansen.  CIA agent Alisa Flynn is willing to go rogue if it means catching the most heartless band of criminals she’s ever encountered.

The devil and the dark water by Stuart Turton.  A murder on the high seas.  A remarkable detective duo.  A demon who may or may not exist.  A thriller of supernatural horror, occult suspicion, and paranormal mystery on the high seas.

The evening and the morning by Ken Follett.  In a prequel to “Pillars of the Earth”, a boat builder, a Norman noblewoman, and a monk live in England under attack by the Welsh and the Vikings.

Fifty words for rain by Asha Lemmie.  In 1940s Japan, an 8-year-old child of a married Japanese aristocrat and her African-American lover searches for her place in the world.

The invisible life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab.  France, 1714.  In a moment of desperation, a young woman makes a Faustian bargain to live forever – and is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets.  But everything changes when, after nearly 300 years, she meets a young man in a hidden bookstore and he remembers her name.

Jack by Marilynne Robinson.  This is the story of the prodigal son of a Presbyterian minister and his romance with a high school teacher who is also the son of a preacher.  Their deeply felt, tormented, star-crossed interracial romance resonates with all the paradoxes of American life then and now.

Just like you by Nick Hornby.  A divorced 41 year old woman meets a 22 year old at a butcher’s counter.  This is about what happens when the person who makes you happiest is someone you never expected.

Leave the world behind by Rumaan Alam.  A magnetic novel about two families, strangers to each other, who are forced together on a long weekend gone terribly wrong.

The lending library by Aliza Fogelson.  This pairs a passionate bibliophile with a handsome construction worker and achieves maximum charm.  A daydreamer gives her town, and herself, an amazing gift:  a lending library in her sunroom.

The lost shtetl by Max Gross.  What if there was a town that history missed?  A small Jewish village in the Polish forest is so secluded no one knows it exists…until now.

Love and other crimes by Sara Paretsky.  A collection of crime and detective stories, many featuring legendary detective V.I. Warshawski.

Magic lessons by Alice Hoffman.  In a prequel to “Practical Magic”, Maria Owens invokes a curse that will haunt her family in Salem, MA.

Only truth by Julie Cameron.  A London painter, whose husband insists on moving to the country realizes that “there’s something not right with this place”.  Talk about an understatement.

The return by Nicholas Sparks.  The story of an injured Navy doctor – and two women whose secrets will change the course of his life.

The searcher by Tana French.  After a divorce, a former Chicago police officer resettles in an Irish village where a boy goes missing.

 The silence by Don DeLillo.  Set in the near future, five people are gathered together in a Manhattan apartment in the midst of a catastrophic event.

A time for mercy by John Grisham.  Court-appointed lawyer Jake Brigance puts his career, his financial security, and the safety of his family on the line to defend a 16 year old suspect who is accused of killing a local deputy and is facing the death penalty.

To sleep in a sea of stars by Christopher Paolini.  Kira Navarez might be the only one who can save the Earth and its colonies from being destroyed.

Until summer comes around by Glenn Rolfe.  A family of vampires terrorizes the seaside town of Old Orchard Beach in this tale of adolescent romance and murder.

Vince Flynn: total power by Kyle Mills.  When America’s power grid is shut down, Mitch Rapp goes after a cyber terrorist.

NEW MUSIC CDs

Bigger love by John Legend

The genius of Ray Charles by Ray Charles

The best of Kansas

NEW DVDs

Fosse/Verdon (2020)  starring Sam Rockwell and Michelle Williams

Marriage story (2019) starring Scarlett Johansson, Adam Driver, and Laura Dern

Casino Royale (2006) starring Daniel Craig

Colewell (2019) starring Karen Allen

NONFICTION:

The boy, the mole, the fox, and the horse by Charlie MacKesy.  A journey for all ages that explores life’s universal lessons, featuring 100 color and black-and-white drawings.

Children of ash and elm by Neil Price.  With clarity and verve, this examines various aspects of Viking society.  An exemplary history that gives a nuanced view of a society long reduced to a few clichés.

Eleanor by David Michaelis.  A break-through portrait of Eleanor Roosevelt, America’s longest-serving First Lady, an avatar of democracy whose ever-expanding agency as diplomat, activist, and humanitarian made her one of the world’s most widely admired and influential women.

The home edit life by Clea Shearer.  This is both for those who love to organize in their free time and those who want to get organized but feel they just can’t make the time.

How to astronaut by Terry Virts.  A former astronaut offers a mixture of science and adventure in this guide to space travel.  Divided into sections on training, launch, orbit, space-walking, deep space, and re-entry.

I will run wild by Thomas Cleaver.  This is a vivid narrative history of the early stages of the Pacific War, as U.S. and Allied forces desperately tried to slow the Japanese onslaught that began with the sudden attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941.

A knock at midnight by Brittany Barnett.  An urgent call to free those buried alive by America’s legal system, and an inspiring true story about unwavering belief in humanity from a young lawyer and important new voice in the movement to transform the system.

Librarian tales by William Ottens.  An insider’s look at one of the most prevalent, yet commonly misunderstood institutions.  Here is the good, the bad, and the ugly of librarian Ottens’ experience working behind the service desks and in the stacks of public libraries.

Loving sports when they don’t love you back by Jessica Luther.  Revealing some of the ugliest truths about professional sports.  An incisive, damning indictment of the world’s most popular past-times.

Modern comfort foods by Ina Garten.  The cook updates some of the comfort foods we grew up with.

The secret lives of planets by Paul Murdin.  A smooth survey of the planets and satellites.  Satisfying popular science, just right for the budding astronomer in the household.

That cheese plate will change your life by Marissa Mullen.  Creative gatherings and self-care with the cheese by numbers method.

Weird Earth by Donald Prothero.  Debunking strange ideas about our planet such as a moon landing hoax, flat earth, hollow earth, Atlantis, dowsing, and more.

New Children’s Books 

PICTURE BOOKS

Bedtime bonnet by Nancy Redd

Bo the brave by Bethan Woollvin

Cozy by Jan Brett

Federico and the wolf by Rebecca Gomez

Hurry up! by Kate Dopirak

A last goodbye by Elin Kelsey

Letters from Bear by Gauthier David

Lift by Minh Le

Madeline Finn and the therapy dog by Lisa Papp

My big family by Yanitzia Canetti

Nasla’s dream by Cecile Roumiguiere

Peter and the tree children by Peter Wohlleben

A quiet girl by Peter Carnavas

Rain Boy by Dylan Glynn

The run by Barroux

Short & sweet by Josh Funk

Sid Hoff’s Danny and the dinosaur ride a bike by Bruce Hale

Southwest sunrise by Nikki Grimes

Ty’s travels : All aboard! by Kelly Lyons

Where happiness begins by Eva Eland

While you’re away by Thodoris Papaioannou

 CHAPTER BOOKS

Percy Jackson’s Greek gods by Rick Riordan

Percy Jackson’s Greek heroes by Rick Riordan

Raising Lumie by Joan Bauer

Revenge of the enginerds by Jarrett Lerner

A wish in the dark by Christina Soontornvat

NON-FICTION

It’s a numbers game! Basketball by James Buckley, Jr.

Lost cities by Giles Laroche

The ocean in your bathtub by Seth Fishman

On your mark, get set, gold! by Scott Allen

Play in the wild by Lita Judge

A rainbow of rocks by Kate DePalma

A thousand glass flowers: Marietta Barovier and the invention of the Rosetta bead by Evan Turk

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The battle of the labyrinth by Rick Riordan

The last Olympian by Rick Riordan

The lightning thief by Rick Riordan

The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan

The Titan’s curse by Rick Riordan

JUVENILE DVDs

Daniel Tiger’s neighborhood: Explore the outdoors (2020) The Fred Rogers Company.

Red shoes and the seven dwarfs (2020) starring Chloe Grace Moretz and Sam Claflin.

The secret garden (2020) starring Colin Firth and Julie Walters.

Trolls world tour (2020) voices of Anna Kendrick and Justin Timberlake.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

CLASSIC HORROR MOVIES FOR THE SPOOKY SEASON

It always starts with the big three: Dracula, Frankenstein, and The Wolfman and all made in the 1930s.  No gore, no jump shots, no slashers.  Just a feeling of dread that overwhelms you as the movie weaves its spell.

Some of my favorite quotes from them:

Dracula – “ I don’t drink…..wine.”

Frankenstein – “It’s alive ! “

The Wolfman – “Whoever is bitten by a werewolf and lives, becomes a werewolf himself.”

Of course these classics begat more of the same, from the serious such as The Bride of Frankenstein to the comedic Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein.

Horror movies continued in the same vein until the 1950s when the world began to worry about nuclear fallout, pollution, and problems with the environment.   Suddenly we had disturbed The Creature from the Black Lagoon, insects were becoming enormous and deadly – Them! and Tarantula, and despite what was happening to the planet, aliens wanted to take over our bodies (Invasion of the Body Snatchers).

Personally, I am a fan of the sub-genre classic haunted house movies.  Check out the original versions of The Uninvited, House on Haunted Hill, and The Haunting.

Some of my favorites from the 1960s are Carnival of Souls, Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds, Psycho, and Rosemary’s Baby.  The 1970s began to be more graphic in the depiction of horror but without being too graphic, my pants were still scared off by the last episode in Trilogy of Terror with the Zuni fetish doll, the original John Carpenter’s version of The Fog, and Alien (“In space, no one can hear your scream.”)

The 1960s was a transitioning decade for horror films.  Not until the late 70s and the arrival of the movies Halloween and Scream, did horror films turn into “slasher films”.  The horror was now all blood and gore, jump shots, and screaming teenagers.  Too bad.  Classic horror movies took time to build the thrills and chills.  It’s what you DON’T or CAN’T see that is far more terrifying in your head.

Since 1980 the only horror film that comes to my mind to recommend would be Tremors from 1989 because it blends humor with the scares so successfully.

What classic horror film of yours have I missed?

 

New Items ~ October 2020

FICTION

All the devils are here by Louise Penny.  Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Surete du Quebec investigates a sinister plot in the City of Light.

Bear necessity by James Gould-Bourne.  A feel-good story about coping with grief that focuses on the love between a dad and his son and how it can lead to friendship.

Before she was Helen by Caroline Cooney.  Clemmie is a 70something, semi-retired Latin teacher, a spinster living in a somnolent Florida retirement community.  But there must be more to her.  Why else is she rattled when she learns that a cold case is coming back to life?

Cactus Jack by Brad Smith.  A 30something single woman, the untried colt she inherits, a horse crazy little girl, and their band of misfits and has-beens stick it to the establishment in the cut-throat world of horse racing.

Celine by Peter Heller.  She is nearly 70, has emphysema from years as a smoker, and she’s never too far from her oxygen tank.  She’s a blue blood and a sculptor.  She’s also a private eye in this smart, comic mystery.

Dear Ann by Bobbie Ann Mason.  A meditation on one woman’s life choices and the road she didn’t take.

Death at high tide by Hannah Dennison.  Two sisters inherit an old hotel in the remote Isles of Scilly off the coast of Cornwall and find it full of intrigue, danger, and romance.

The exiles by Christina Baker Kline.  Three young women are sent to the fledgling British penal colony of Australia in the 1840s.

Fast girls by Elise Hooper.  This celebrates three unheralded female athletes in a tale spanning three Olympiads.

The haunted lady by Mary Roberts Rinehart.  Someone’s trying to kill the head of the Fairbanks estate, and only her nurse can protect her.  A superior example of the plucky-heroine-in-an-old-dark-house school.

His and hers by Alice Feeney.  A brilliant cat-and-mouse game.  There are two sides to every story:  yours and mine, ours and theirs, his and hers.  Which means someone is always lying.

The killings at Kingfisher Hill by Sophie Hannah.  Lovers of classic whodunits will hope that the author will continue to offer her take on the great Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot.

The lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis.  When rarities disappear, a curator at the New York Public Library, who grapples with her grandmother’s legacy, uncovers new truths about her family heritage.

The lying life of adults by Elena Ferrante.  In this coming-of-age story, Giovanna seeks her true reflection in tow kindred cities.

The new American by Micheline Marcom.  The epic journey of a young Guatemalan American student, a “dreamer”, who gets deported and decides to make his way back home to California.

The new wilderness by Diane Cook.  This explores a moving mother-daughter relationship in a world ravaged by climate change and overpopulation.

One by one by Ruth Ware.  Ware does what she does best – gives us a familiar locked-door mystery setup and lets the tension and suspicion marinate until they reach fever pitch.

Payback by Mary Gordon.  A novel of lifelong reckoning between two women.  It contrasts the 1970s world of upper-class women’s education with the #MeToo era.

Royal by Danielle Steel.  In 1943, the 17 year old Princess Charlotte assumes a new identity in the country and falls in love.

Shadows in death by J.D. Robb.  Lt. Eve Dallas is about to walk into the shadows of her husband’s dangerous past….

Someone to romance by Mary Balogh.  Pitch-perfect – a riveting, fast-paced narrative.  Regency fans will be delighted.

Squeeze me by Carl Hiaasen.  A dead dowager, hungry pythons, and occupants of the winter White House shake up the Palm Beach charity ball season.

Thick as thieves by Sandra Brown.  Arden Maxwell returns home to uncover the truth about her father’s involvement in a heist that went wrong 20 years ago.

Troubled blood by Robert Galbraith.  Private detective Cormoran Strike is visiting his family in Cornwell when he is approached by a woman asking for help finding her mother, who went missing in mysterious circumstances in 1974.

NEW DVDs

A simple favor (2018) starring Anna Kendrick and Blake Lively

Q: the winged serpent (1982) starring Michael Moriarty and Candy Clark

Dead of night (1945) starring Michael Redgrave

Hester Street (1975) starring Carol Kane and Steven Keats

The private life of Henry VIII (1933) starring Charles Laughton

NEW MUSIC CDs

Rough and rowdy ways by Bob Dylan

Gaslighter by Dixie Chicks

100 hits: the best 70s album

Ultimate Grammy Collection: Classic Country

NONFICTION

The beauty of living by J. Alison Rosenblitt.  Focusing on a brief period in the life of poet E.E. Cummings, notably his WW I experiences as a POW and ambulance driver, this sheds new light.  The horrors of gas warfare, mass slaughter, and illness bring new life to the American poet’s work.

A better man by Michael Black.  A radical plea for rethinking masculinity and teaching young men to give and receive love.

Caste by Isabel Wilkerson.  The Pulitzer Prize winning journalist examines aspects of caste systems across civilizations and reveals a rigid hierarchy in America today.

The detective in the dooryard by Timothy Cotton.  Stories about the people, places and things of Maine.  There are sad stories, big events, and even the very mundane, all told from the perspective of a seasoned police officer and in the wry voice of a lifelong Mainer.

Disloyal by Michael Cohen.  An account of being on the inside of Donald Trump’s world from his former personal attorney.

The dynasty by Jeff Benedict.  The history of the New England Patriots from NFL laughingstock to making 10 trips to the Super Bowl.

Faith instinct by Nicholas Wade.  How religion evolved and why it endures.

How we live now by Bill Hayes.  A poignant and profound tribute in stories and images to a city (NYC) amidst a pandemic.  The photos serve as potent documentation of an unprecedented time.

Kent State: four dead in Ohio by Derf Backderf.  A graphic novel telling of the day America turned guns on its own children: a shocking event burned into our national memory.

A Libertarian walks into a bear by Matthew Hongoltz-Hetling.  Once upon a time, a group of libertarians got together and hatched a plan to take over an American town and completely eliminate its government in 2004.  They set their sights on Grafton, NH, a barely populated settlement with one paved road.  They overlooked one hairy detail: no one told the bears.

Looking for Miss America by Margot Mifflin.  A lively account of memorable Miss America contestants, protests, and scandals – and how the pageant, near its one hundredth anniversary, serves as an unintended indicator of feminist progress.

Mill Town by Kerri Arsenault.  The author writes of her hometown – Mexico, Maine.  This is an American story, a human predicament, and a moral wake-up call that asks:  what are we willing to tolerate and whose lives are we willing to sacrifice for our own survival?

Rage by Bob Woodward.  Interviews with firsthand sources provide details about Trump’s moves as he faced a global pandemic, economic disaster, and racial unrest.

The ultimate retirement guide for 50+ by Suze Orman.  Winning strategies to make your money last a lifetime.

What it’s like to be a bird by David Sibley.  From flying to nesting, eating to singing – what birds are doing and why.

 

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.