January Weather

      January rides the wind

      Annie and Snowball and the magical house

N       Name of the wind

U       Uncommon appeal of clouds

A       After the snow

R        Rising storm

       Young snowboarder

 

W      Winter storms

       Energy from wind

      And the wind blows free

      Tracks in the snow

      Hello snow!

       Eye of the storm

R        Really good snowman

New Items ~ January 2020

FICTION

Africaville by Jeffrey Colvin.  Set in a small Nova Scotia Town settled by former slaves, this depicts several generations of one family bound together and torn apart by blood, faith, time, and fate.

After Kilimanjaro by Gayle Woodson.  Medical fiction of this kind is rare – it’s not a thriller or tearjerker, but a thoughtful novel about doctors, the work they do, and the impact that has on their patients.

The Andromeda evolution by Michael Crichton.  In this sequel to the techno-thriller that started it all, the threat returns in a gripping sequel that is terrifyingly realistic and resonant.  The Evolution is coming.

Arapaho summer by Kinley Roby.  In 1867 two Union veterans and two Arapaho women they rescue from a Lakota war party set off on the Oregon Trail in search of a new beginning.

Bloody genius by John Sandford.  Virgil Flowers will have to watch his back – and his mouth – as he investigates a college culture war turned deadly.

The confession club by Elizabeth Berg.  An uplifting novel about friendship, surprising revelations, and a second chance at love.

Crossroad by Bill Cameron.  On a desolate road in the Oregon high desert, an apprentice mortician stumbles upon a horrific crash – and into a vortex of treachery, long-buried secrets, and growing menace.

Dread journey by Dorothy Hughes.  On a transcontinental train, a starlet fears her director may be trying to kill her.

The family upstairs by Lisa Jewell.  Libby Learns the identity of her parents and inherits a London mansion, but this comes with a mystery of multiple murders.

Genesis by Robin Cook.  This takes on the ripped-from-the-headlines topic of harnessing DNA from ancestry websites to catch a killer.

Guilty, not guilty by Felix Francis.  The husband and brother of an unstable woman who’s been strangled get into a battle royal over which of them will get the other convicted of her murder.

The innocents by Michel Crummey.  Orphaned and alone in 1800s Newfoundland, a young brother and sister contend with the dire hazards of their coastal surroundings.

The kill club by Wendy Heard.  A desperate woman at the end of her rope is drawn into an intriguing, but deadly, scheme.  Just try to put this one down.

A minute to midnight by David Baldacci.  When Atlee Pine returns to her hometown to investigate her sister’s kidnapping from 30 years ago, she winds up tracking a potential serial killer.

Nothing more dangerous by Allen Eskens.  In a small Southern town where loyalty to family and to “your people” carries the weight of a sacred oath, defying those unspoken rules can be a deadly proposition.

The off-islander by Peter Colt.  A Boston-born Vietnam vet and P.I. is hired to find a missing father – but my find far more than he bargained for…

The rise of Magicks by Nora Roberts.  This closes out the trilogy “Chronicles of the One”.

Swede Hollow by Ola Larsmo.  A riveting family saga immersed in the gritty, dark side of Swedish immigrant life in America in the early 20th century.

Stuck in Manistique by Dennis Cuesta.  Two troubled lives intersect in a novel combining cozy mystery, comedy, and reflections on fractured relationships.  A hypnotic tale of family secrets that also features delightfully silly humor.

NEW DVDs

The Crown: the complete second season (2019) starring Claire Foy, Matt Smith, Victoria Hamilton, Vanessa Kirby, and John Lithgow

It: Chapter two (2019) starring Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy

Never too late (1965) starring Paul Ford and Connie Stevens

NONFICTION

A Bookshop in Berlin by Francoise Frenkel.  A rediscovered, prize-winning memoir of a fearless Jewish bookseller on a harrowing fight for survival across Nazi-occupied Europe.

Dynamic dames by Sloan De Forest.  Celebrate 50 of the most empowering and unforgettable female characters ever to grace the silver screen, as well as the artists who brought them to vibrant life!

Eightysomethings by Katharine Esty.  A practical guide to letting go, aging well, and finding unexpected happiness over the age of 80.

Finding Chika by Mitch Albom.  A moving memoir of love and loss.  You can’t help but fall for Chika.  A page-turner that will not doubt become a classic.

Here all along by Sarah Hurwitz.  Finding meaning, spirituality, and a deeper connection to life – in Judaism (after finally choosing to look there).

Hymns of the Republic by S.C. Gwynne.  An engrossing history of the final gasps of the Civil War, a year in which Americans mourned their fathers and brothers and sons but also the way their lives used to be, the people they used to be, the innocence they had lost.

If you tell by Gregg Oslen.  A shocking and empowering true-crime story of three sisters determined to survive their mother’s house of horrors.  A story of murder, family secrets, and the unbreakable bond of sisterhood.

Letters from an astrophysicist by Neil DeGrasse Tyson.  This is like a scientific Dear Abby advice column that talks about black holes, extraterrestrial sightings, and human predicaments.

The lie by William Dameron.  A candid memoir of denial, stolen identities, betrayal, faking it, and coming out.

On flowers by Amy Merrick.  Lessons from an accidental florist.  Merrick is a rare and special kind of artist who uses flowers to help us see the familiar in a completely new way.

On the plain of snakes by Paul Theroux.  Legendary travel writer Theroux drives the entire length of the U.S.-Mexico border, then goes deep into the hinterland on the back roads to uncover the rich, layered world behind today’s brutal headlines.

Unexplained by Richard Smith.  Real-life supernatural stories for uncertain times and not for the easily frightened.

A warning by Anonymous.  A senior official in the Trump administration offers an assessment of the president and makes a moral appeal.

What we will become by Mimi Lemay.  A mother’s memoir of her transgender child’s odyssey, and HER journey outside the boundaries of the faith and culture that shaped her.

The witches are coming by Lindy West.  In this wickedly funny cultural critique, the author exposes misogyny in the #MeToo era.

You are awesome by Neil Pasricha.  How to navigate change, wrestle with failure, and live an intentional life.

 NEW CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Aalfred and Aalbert by Morag Hood

Around the table that grandad built  by Melanie Heuiser Hill

Astro girl by Ken Wilson-Max

A big bed for Little Snow by Grace Lin

The Christmas tree who loved trains by Anne Silvestro

A day for skating by Sarah Sullivan

Freedom soup by Tami Charles

Good morning, snowplow! by Deborah Bruss

How to hide a lion at Christmas by Helen Stephens

Just in case you want to fly by Julie Fogliano

Little fox in the snow by Jonathan London

Making a friend by Tammi Sauer

The serious goose by Jimmy Kimmel

Small Walt and Mo the Tow by Elizabeth Verdick

The snowflake mistake by Lou Treleaven

Sofia Valdez, future prez by Andrea Beaty

Telling time by David Adler

This is not that kind of book by Christopher Healy

CHAPTER BOOKS

Beverly, right here by Kate DiCamillo

The forgotten girl by India Hill Brown

Night of the new magicians by Mary Pope Osborne

The Princess in Black and the bathtime battle by Shannon Hale

Two dogs in a trench coat go on a class trip by Julie Falatko

Wings of Fire: the poison jungle by Tui Sutherland

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Dog Man. Fetch 22 by Dav Pilkey

Sunny rolls the dice by Jennifer Holm

Welcome to Wanderland by Jackie Ball

NON-FICTION

Can I eat a mammoth? by Madeline King

Do penguins have emotions? by World Book

Greek myths and mazes by Jan Bajtlik

Why are monkeys so flexible? by World Book

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

Holidays – Any And All You May Celebrate!

Believe it or not, we are in the midst of the “Holiday” season.

As humans, particularly American humans, we love to celebrate!  There are holidays every – yes, EVERY – day of the year.  From National Short Girl Appreciation Day (December 21, the shortest day of the year), and Cyber Monday and Cider Monday (both the Monday after Thanksgiving) to National Crossword Puzzle Day and National Bacon Day.  Each of these “holidays” are generally celebrated in December, so are part of the “Holiday Season”.

Traditionally, we think of “The Holidays” as one of the big three – Christmas, Chanukah and Kwanzaa.  Again, as Americans, whichever holiday we celebrate, we often give gifts to our loved ones.

Okay, here’s the plug for the library – –

If you didn’t know, we have several items currently available that would make great gifts for those folks you share with.

Well, what do you have, you might ask . . .

Currently, we have both note cards and prints available.  Local artist Kay Morris has given us a beautiful winter view of the front of the library.  The print is ten dollars, and the note cards are ten for fifteen dollars.

Lovely book bags are also available.  These bags have the library logo on the front and are very well made.  The bags are fifteen dollars each.

And . . . Books, we have books!

Four titles are available written by local authors ; Destination Unknown by former State Representative Gay Grant.  The Eastern. Book one, The early years : a novel and  The Eastern. Book two, Later on : a novel by Deborah Gould ;  Maine ingenuity : from waterwheels to M.I.T. by Michael McCaslin.  Each of these titles are seventeen dollars and ninety-five cents.  There are also a nice assortment of used books available, ranging in price from one to five dollars.

Is there anyone on your list that does not live in our service area?  We would love to sell you a Gardiner Public Library non-resident subscription to use as a gift.  Just think, a gift that truly will last an entire year! And for the whole family as well!

We even have pre-wrapped some of the above items, just to remove more of your stress.

So, to each of you, Happy Holidays – Each And Every One You May Celebrate!

New Items ~ December 2019

FICTION

Agent running in the field by John Le Carre.  A seasoned solitary figure, in a desperate attempt to resist the new political turbulence swirling around him, makes connections that will take him down a very dangerous path.

All this could be yours by Jami Attenberg.  A timely exploration of what it means to be caught in the web of a toxic man who abused his power.  It shows how those webs can tangle a family for generations and what it takes to – maybe, hopefully – break free.

Blue moon by Lee Child.  Jack Reacher comes to the aid of an elderly couple and confronts his most dangerous opponents yet.

The bromance book club by Lyssa Adams.  A baseball player attempts to heal his marriage with the help of his team’s romance-novel book club.

The deserter by Nelson DeMille.  This features a brilliant and unorthodox Army investigator, his troubling new partner, and their hunt for the Army’s most notorious – and dangerous – deserter.

Find me by Andre Aciman.  In this exploration of the varieties of love, the author of Call Me By Your Name revisits its complex and beguiling characters decades after their first meeting.

Ghoster by Jason Arnopp.  A razor-sharp thriller for a social-media obsessed world.  Prepare to never look at your phone the same way again….

Holding on to nothing by Elizabeth Shelburne.  Brings us a present-day Appalachian story cast without sentiment or cliché, but with a genuine and profound understanding of the place and its people.

I lost my girlish laughter by Jane Allen.  This delicious satire of old Hollywood, originally published in 1938 and largely unknown even by cinephiles, gets a welcome reissue.

Kiss the girls and make them cry by Mary Higgins Clark.  A journalist sets out to share a #METoo story from her past and discovers that her abuser has become a powerful businessman who will do anything to keep her quiet.

The night fire by Michael Connelly.  Harry Bosch and Renee Ballard return to take up a case that held the attention of Bosch’s mentor.

Ninth house by Leigh Bardugo.  After mysteriously surviving a multiple homicide, Galaxy Stern comes face to face with dark magic, murder, and more at Yale University.

Nothing to see here by Kevin Wilson.  A moving and uproarious novel about a woman who finds meaning in her life when she begins caring for two children with remarkable and disturbing abilities.

Olive, again by Elizabeth Strout.  The author continues the life of her beloved Olive Kitteridge, a character who has captured the imaginations of millions of readers.

The revisioners by Margaret Sexton.  Here is a bracing window into Southern life and tensions, alternating between two women’s stories set nearly 100 years ago.

Secret Service by Tom Bradby.  What if the next British Prime Minister was really a Russian agent?

When she returned by Lucinda Berry.  Kate vanished from a parking lot 11 years ago, leaving behind her husband and young daughter.  When she shows up at a Montana gas station, clutching an infant and screaming for help, investigators believe she may have been abducted by a cult.

NEW DVDs

The haunting of Hill House (2019) starring Carla Gugino and Elizabeth Reaser

Nevada Smith (1966) starring Steve McQueen and Karl Malden

Discovery of witches (2019) starring Matthew Goode and Teresa Palmer

Ellen – the complete season one (1994) starring Ellen DeGeneres

NEW CDs

Country Music – a film by Ken Burns: the soundtrack

Lover by Taylor Swift

Cuz I love you by Lizzo

Best of en Vogue

NONFICTION

All blood runs red by Phil Keith.  The incredible story of the first African American military pilot, who went on to become a Paris nightclub impresario, a spy in the French Resistance, and an American civil rights pioneer.

Blood by Allison Moorer.  The singer/songwriter’s memoir may serve as solace for those who’ve faced abuse, a signal for those in it to get out, and an eye-opener for others.

Catch and kill by Ronan Farrow.  In a dramatic account of violence and espionage, investigative reporter Farrow exposes serial abuse and a cabal of powerful interests hell-bent on covering up the truth, at any cost.

Good husbandry by Kristin Kimball.  Kimball describes the delicious highs and sometimes excruciating lows of life on Essex Farm – a 500 acre farm that produces a full diet for a community of 250 people.

Home now by Cynthia Anderson.  In this detailed, sensitive portrait of Lewiston’s revitalization by African immigrants, Anderson expertly captures the multi-layered dynamics between Lewiston natives and African immigrants.  The result is a vivid and finely tuned portrait of immigration in America.

If you lived here you’d be home by now by Christopher Ingraham.  The hilarious, charming, and candid story of a writer’s decision to uproot his life and move his family to Red Lake Falls, Minnesota, population 1400 – the community he made famous as “the worst place to live in America” in a story he wrote.

In the dream house by Carmen Machado.  A revolutionary memoir about domestic abuse.  Tracing the full arc of a harrowing relationship with a charismatic but volatile partner, Machado struggles to make sense of how what happened to her shaped the person she was becoming.    A revolutionary memoir about domestic abuse. 

Janis: her life and music by Holly George-Warren.  This blazingly intimate bio establishes the Queen of Rock & Roll as the rule-breaking musical trailblazer and complicated, gender-bending rebel she was.

The less people know about us by Axton Betz-Hamilton.  In this true crime memoir, an identity theft expert tells the story of the duplicity and betrayal that inspired her career and nearly destroyed her family after their identities were stolen.

Lonely Planet’s best in travel 2020.  It really is a big deal.  International Travel publisher, Lonely Planet, has featured Maine as one of this years “Best in Travel” places.  Bring on the international tourists !

The movie musical ! by Jeanine Basinger.  An in-depth look at the singing, dancing, happy-making world of Hollywood musicals, beautifully illustrated – an essential text for anyone who’s ever laughed, cried, or sung along at the movies.

Running to glory by Sam McManis.  A moving account of a champion cross-country team made up primarily of teenager from migrant-worker families.

Scream by Margee Kerr.  Kerr takes readers on a journey on which they will experience the world’s most frightening and terrifying places firsthand.  As she explores places that make people tremble, she shares her personal dread on each of these destinations, which makes the book ever more captivating.

Sitcommentary by Mark Robinson.  From I Love Lucy to Black-ish, sitcoms have often paved the way for social change.  It has challenged the public to revisit social mores and reshape how we think about the world we live in.

Touched by the sun by Carly Simon.  A chance encounter at a summer party on Martha’s Vineyard blossomed into an improbable but enduring friendship between Simon and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

The vagina bible by Jen Gunter.  OB/GYN, writer for the New York Times and Self magazine, Dr. Jen now delivers the definitive book of vagina health, answering questions you couldn’t find the right answers to.

Vanity Fair’s women on women. These essays about women by women pack a feminist wallop, underscoring the combative resilience of notable women who never gave in to what was expected of them.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

 

 

 

What Are We Reading?

Marlene

Being an aficionado of all things Victorian and also of murder mysteries, I am currently devouring Anne Perry’s book Callander Square which fits the bill perfectly! Having just recently discovered her, I decided to start at the beginning of her writings and go from there. Having read The Cater Street Hangman, I am now onto her next novel which is my current read. Her style of writing is engaging and her characters follow from book to book, so one gets to really become a part of their story.

Audrey

Just read Shoutin’ Into The Fog by Thomas Hanna

Now reading The Ship of Brides by Jojo Moyes

Dawn

I have a few going, naturally.  I am re-listening to Lethal White by Robert Galbraith (aka J.K. Rowling) in the Cormoran Strike series.  Also listening, for the first time to Theft by Finding : Diaries 1977-2002 by David Sedaris. 

Recently finished The Civil Wars of Julia Ward Howe by Elaine Showalter and In Cold Blood by Truman Capote.

Up next is The Dutch House by Ann Patchett and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. 

Waiting in the wings are The Witch Elm by Tana French, Manderley Forever : A Biography of Daphne du Maurier by Tatiana de Rosnay, and A Better Man by Louise Penny.

Scott

I just finished Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury.  I picked it up decades ago but just couldn’t get into it at the time.  Throughout the years it has been referred to many times in things I have come across, so I finally picked it up again.  After all, it IS a classic so it must have something going for it.  It got me this time.  Its blend of nostalgia for more innocent times, childhood memories, and just a touch of darkness worked it’s magic on me at last.  Funny how you can reject a story at some point in your life and then totally embrace it at another time in your life.

And in reference to a section of that book, who doesn’t remember how fast you can run or how high you can jump with a new pair of sneakers?  Wonderful. 

Ginni

I read Where The Light Enters : Building A Family, Discovering Myself by Jill Biden. I wanted to learn more about this family and see how they handle life with its joys and struggles. This was electrifying biography of Jill Biden that did not disappoint me.  I could definitely reread the book to get more out of it and I would highly recommend it. 

Jess

1.) The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern (2019) – I am only a few chapters into this one at the moment, but so far I am thoroughly enjoying it! – It’s about a place where are the stories of the world are kept, the sundry of ways the stories are stored (written on paper, etched into stone, threaded with spider webs, traced into the veins of leaves), and the people who protect them.

Blurb: “Zachary Ezra Rawlins is a graduate student in Vermont when he discovers a mysterious book hidden in the stacks. As he turns the pages, entranced by tales of lovelorn prisoners, key collectors, and nameless acolytes, he reads something strange: a story from his own childhood.

Bewildered by this inexplicable book and desperate to make sense of how his own life came to be recorded, Zachary uncovers a series of clues – a bee, a key, and a sword – that lead him to a masquerade party in New York, to a secret club, and through a doorway to an ancient library hidden far below the surface of the earth.

What Zachary finds in this curious place is more than just a buried home for books and their guardians – it is a place of lost cities and seas, lovers who pass notes under doors and across time, and of stories whispered by the dead. Zachary learns of those who have sacrificed much to protect this realm, relinquishing their sight and their tongues to preserve this archive, and also of those who are intent on its destruction.”

2.) The Outlaws of Sherwood by Robin McKinley (1988) – Recommended to be by the lovely Miss Ann! I am about halfway through this book, and it’s been an extremely fun/interesting read so far. As the title might suggest, it is a retelling of the story of Robin Hood, Marian, and the gang of Merrie Men; for me, it truly is a completely different look at these characters of legend. The biggest plus for me, is that McKinley doesn’t start off the story with Robin and his men already being folk-hero legends, she allows the reader to join in on their journey to their more familiar roles of protectors of the poor.

Blurb: “There have been many tales and ballads about the man we know as Robin Hood, and the lady Marian, Little John, Will Scarlet and the rest. But Newbery medalist Robin McKinley brings her unique gifts of storytelling to the familiar legends, and creates an original and compelling novel. – In the days of King Richard the Lionheart, a young forester named Robin set out one morning for the Nottingham Fair. But he never arrived. By the end of the day a man lay dead in the King’s Forest, and Robin was an outlaw with a price on his head.”

Ann

I recently finished The Death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware for our book discussion group.  The book was very discuss-able for the group, with more likes than dislikes.  The main character is a Tarot reader in the story, and as someone who read cards myself, that piece interested me.  I felt that the cards could have been better used throughout the story.  Hal, (the protagonist) reads cards, and refers to herself as a “cold reader”.  This is basically a person who has memorized the cards, but is using the body language, verbal and non-verbal responses, as well as social media as a way to read her clients.  I found, in reading the interview questions in the back of the book, that the author had never had a Tarot reading, nor studied the cards.  All of her information came from books that she had used.  I have to say that piece left a bit of a bad taste in my mouth.

Another book I have going is Animal Farm : The Graphic Novel by George Orwell ; adapted and illustrated by Odyr.  It’s been many years since I originally read the book, so this is sort of a fun way to remember a title.  Recently, I have found several of the more “classic” novels in this form and have enjoyed them in a different way.

I just checked out an audio book – The Rosie Result by Graeme Simsion.  This is the third book in this series, and I am looking forward to it!

Bob

Earlier today I finished The Black Lung Captain, a steam-punk style fantasy adventure written by Chris Wooding.  This is the second title in the series Tales from the Ketty Jay, (which refers to the name of the airship on which much of the story takes place).  The plot revolves around the crew of the Ketty Jay joining the captain of another craft, (who suffers from the “Black Lung” disease), on an expedition to retrieve a mysterious artifact from a crashed airship in the savage wilds.  The downed airship turns out to be from the supernatural civilization that lives at the North Pole, cut off from the rest of the world by a band of violent electrical storms.  Plenty of air battles, gun fights, and other steam-punk style action ensues.

Chris Wooding does an excellent job keeping the story moving, while allowing every member of the eight person crew to grow and develop over the course of the book.  The story is engaging and action-packed, with stakes that are both serious and easy to understand.  Readers will discover a fine mix of drama, comedy, tragedy, and romance, without any of those themes overwhelming the entire plot.  Fans of the science fiction TV shows Firefly and Independence would probably find this an enjoyable read.  The series starts with the previous title, Retribution Falls.  I would recommend reading that title first if you want to get the most out of this book, although it is not strictly necessary.

New Items ~ November 2019

FICTION

Before the devil fell by Neil Olson.  Equal parts engaging and creepy, this twisty tale examines how secrets and regret can continue to reverberate through generations.  Possibly too creepy for late-night reading.

The bone fire by S.D. Sykes.  Oswald de Lacy brings his family to a secluded island castle to escape the Black Death, but soon a murder within the household proves that even the strongest fortress isn’t free from terror in 14th century England.

A book of bones by John Connolly.  Charlie Parker’s pursuit of his nemesis peaks in this seamless, expansive, and chilling blend of police procedural and gothic horror tale.

Cantoras by Carolina De Robertis.  In the shadow of a violent dictatorship, five queer women find the courage and strength to live their truth.

Chilling effect by Valerie Valdes.  A hilarious, offbeat space opera that skewers everything from pop culture to video games and features an irresistible foul-mouthed captain and her motley crew.

Cilka’s journey by Heather Morris.  A 16 year old, who sleeps with a concentration camp commandant in order to survive, is sentenced to a Siberian prison camp where she cares for the ill.

The Dutch house by Ann Patchett.  The story of the indelible bond between two siblings, the house of their childhood, and a past that will not let them go.

Full throttle by Joe Hill.  In a collection of short fiction, Hill dissects timeless human struggles in 13 tales of supernatural suspense, including “In the Tall Grass”, one of the 2 co-written with Stephen King.

The girl who lived twice by David Lagercrantz.  Mikael Blomkvist helps Lisabeth Salander put her past behind her.

The giver of stars by Jojo Moyes.  An extraordinary story of five women’s journey to deliver books to people who never had any, expanding horizons and changing their lives.

The guardians by John Grisham.  Cullen Post, a lawyer and Episcopal minister, antagonizes some ruthless killers when he takes on a wrongful conviction case.

Imaginary friend by Stephen Chbosky.  A pleasing book for those who like to scare themselves silly, one to read with the lights on and the door bolted.

The lying room by Nicci French.  A married woman’s affair with her boss spirals into a dangerous game of chess with the police when she discovers he’s been murdered and she clears the crime scene of all evidence.

The man who saw everything by Deborah Levy.  Multiple versions of history collide – literally – in a story that defies gravity in a daring, time-bending novel.

The nugget by P.T. Deutermann.  A novice naval aviator grows into a hero in this authentic World War II adventure.

The pursuit by Joyce Carol Oates.  A young woman is haunted by a past she doesn’t understand in this powerful story of domestic violence.

Random act by Gerry Boyle.  When Maine’s favorite reporter, Jack McMorrow, heads out to the hardware store on a routine errand, little does he know that he’s about to witness a murder that will have vicious repercussions.

Robert B. Parker’s The Bitterest Pill by Reed Coleman.  The opioid epidemic has reached Paradise, and Police Chief Jesse Stone must rush to stop the devastation.

Salvaged by Madeleine Roux.  A woman on the run.  A captain adrift in space.  One of them is infected with an alien parasite.  In this dark sci-fi thriller, a young woman must confront her past so the human race will have a future.

The shape of night by Tess Gerritsen.  A woman tries to outrun her past and is drawn to a coastal village in Maine – and to a string of unsolved murders.

The secrets we kept by Lara Prescott. During the Cold War, members of the CIA’s typing pool aid its mission to smuggle the banned book Doctor Zhivago behind the Iron Curtain.

Tuesday Mooney talks to ghosts by Kate Racculia.  A dying billionaire sends one woman and a cast of dreamers on a citywide treasure hunt in this irresistible novel.

The twisted ones by T. Kingfisher.  When a woman clears out her deceased grandmother’s home in rural North Carolina, she finds long-hidden secrets about a strange colony of beings in the woods.  It’s The Blair Witch Project meets The Andy Griffith Show.

The water dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates.  This captures the brutality of slavery and explores the underlying truth that slaveholders could not dehumanize the enslaved without also dehumanizing themselves.

Who are you, Calvin Bledsoe? by Brock Clarke.  An exuberant comic novel involving explosions, secret agents, religious fanatics, and a hapless narrator dragged around Europe by his long-lost aunt.

What happens in Paradise by Elin Hilderbrand.  Irene Steele visits the island of St. John to get to the bottom of the mysterious life and death of her husband.

The world that we knew by Alice Hoffman.  A rabbi’s daughter creates a mystical Jewish creature that is sworn to protect a 12 year old girl in World War II Europe.

NONFICTION

Beautiful on the outside by Adam Rippon.  The former Olympic figure skater shares his underdog journey from beautiful mess to outrageous success in this big-hearted memoir.

The body by Bill Bryson.  A head-to-toe tour of the marvel that is the human body.

The book of gutsy women by Hillary Clinton.  Profiles of women from around the world who have blazed trails and challenged the status quo.

Dog is love by Clive Wynne.  Why and how your dog loves you.

Face it by Debbie Harry.  As the lead singer of the group Blondie, Harry tells her story of a woman who made her own path and set the standard for a generation of those to follow.

From the periphery by Pia Justesen.  This consists of narratives of everyday people who describe what it’s like to be treated differently by society because of their disabilities.

The girls by Abigail Pesta.  The inside story of how serial predator Larry Nassar got away with abusing hundreds of gymnasts for decades – and how a team of brave women banded together to bring him down.

Home work by Julie Andrews.  Continuing her life story that she began in her first book, Home, Andrews here gives a memoir of her Hollywood years.

If these walls could talk by Jerry Remy.  Stories from the Boston Red Sox dugout, Locker room, and press box.

Inside out by Demi Moore.  The star chronicles the rocky relationships, body image issues, and public perception that affected her attempts to balance family and fame.

The last pass by Gary Pomerantz.  Looking back on his life, Boston Celtics Bob Cousy regrets his failure to understand the struggles that his teammate Bill Russell, the NBA’s first Black superstar, was going through during the years they played together in racist Boston.

Me by Elton John.  In his first and only official autobiography, the music icon reveals the truth about his life, from his rollercoaster lifestyle to becoming a living legend.

Plagued by fire by Paul Hendrickson.  Frank Lloyd Wright was America’s most famous architect.  He was a genius, an egotist, and a man tormented by conscience and regret.

River of fire by Helen Prejean.  This describes her life as a nun, starting with her entrance into a convent in 1957 at the age of 18 and ending in 1982 when she began her work with abolishing the death penalty.

You throw like a girl by Don McPherson.  This is a call to action that has the potential to provoke conversation and change and is a unique crossover of sports memoir and astute social commentary about the blind spot of masculinity.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Big boys cry by Jonty Howley

Bruce’s big storm by Ryan Higgins

Dasher by Matt Tavares

The end of something wonderful by Stephanie Lucianovic

The favorite book by Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Grandpa’s top threes by Wendy Meddour

Have you seen my blankie? by Lucy Rowland

Hop up! Wriggle over! by Elizabeth Honey

I’m a gnome by Jessica Peill-Meininghaus

If I could give you Christmas by Lynn Plourde

A letter to my teacher by Deborah Hopkinson

The proudest blue : a story of Hijab and family by Ibtihaj Muhammad

The scarecrow by Beth Ferry

The shortest day by Susan Cooper

A stone sat still by Brendan Wenzel

 CHAPTER BOOKS

All the impossible things by Lindsay Lackey

Big break : Julie 1974 by Megan McDonald

Look both ways : a tale told in ten blocks by Jason Reynolds

No ordinary sound: Melody 1964 by Denise Patrick

Other words for home by Jasmine Warga

The spirit of aloha: Nanea 1941 by Kirby Larson

The tyrant’s tomb by Rick Riordan

GRAPHIC NOVELS

The Bad Guys in superbad by Aaron Blabey

The Bad Guys in the Big Bad Wolf by Aaron Blabey

Best friends by Shannon Hale

Chick & Brain : Smell my foot! by Cece Bell

Dog Man. For whom the ball rolls by Dav Pilkey

Guts by Raina Telgemeier

Mighty Jack and Zita the spacegirl by Ben Hatke

The okay witch by Emma Steinkellner

Stargazing by Jen Wang

 NON-FICTION

Are robots aware they’re robots? World Book answers your questions about technology

Big book of monsters : the creepiest creatures from classic literature by Hal Johnson

Can cats swim even if they don’t like water? World Book answers your questions about pests and other animals

Cat encyclopedia for kids by Joanne Mattern

Dr. Seuss’s Horse Museum by Dr. Seuss

From seed to sunflower by Camilla de la Bedoyere

Is the milky way made out of milk? World Book answers your questions about outer space

Lionel Messi by Anthony Hewson

Sidney Crosby by Kevin Frederickson

Steph Curry by Kevin Frederickson

Todd Gurley by Anthony Hewson

The truth about crocodiles : Seriously funny facts about your favorite animals by Maxwell Eaton

 DVDS

Aladdin with Will Smith

The best Christmas gift (Veggie Tales)

Daniel Tiger’s neighborhood.  It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood

Missing link with Hugh Jackman

Sesame Street. 50 years and counting

Toy story 4 with Ivan Shavrin

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Wear A Crown Day

Several of the staff here at the Gardiner Public Library would like the world to know ~~~

The Saturday before Halloween shall be considered “Wear A Crown Day”!

For anyone interested, some of us WILL be wearing our crowns this Saturday, October 26th.  We would love you to join us in solidarity!

What type of crown? You might ask, well, that is completely up to you!

Burger King Crowns would be fine, though I don’t know if BK still gives out crowns.  (I’m probably dating myself in even mentioning them).

A jeweled crown would be lovely, but only if you are True Royalty, (as of course, we ALL are!).

Tiaras are a sparkling sensation!

A crown of flowers would smell heavenly, though perhaps a bit hard to find or create this time of year.  But, a crown of autumn leaves could be absolutely stunning!

I am not advocating for a Crown of Thorns, nor a dental crown unless absolutely necessary, but yes, those are crowns for sure.

If you are wondering where and why?  Recently, a young lady, of perhaps 5 came to the circulation desk wearing beautiful gold shoes, an incredibly sparkling dress, and the most beautifulest crown – thus, “Wear A Crown Day” was born!

Pictures from Google Images

New Items ~ October 2019

FICTION

A better man by Louise Penny.   Catastrophic spring flooding, blistering attacks in the media, and a mysterious disappearance greet Chief Inspector Gamache as he returns to the Sûreté du Québec.

Bloomland by John Engelhard.  This explores how the origin and aftermath of a shooting impacts the lives of 3 characters.  As a community wrestles with the fallout, the story interrogates social and cultural dysfunction in a nation where mass violence has become all too familiar.

Cold storage by David Koepp.  A wild and terrifying adventure about 3 strangers who must work together to contain a highly contagious, deadly organism.

The cold way home by Julia Keller.  The sleuths are easy to like and the murder story is moving, but the object of fascination here is Wellwood, a state-run mental institution with a dark history as a repository for “rebellious, unruly women.”

The dearly beloved by Cara Wall.  Two married couples’ intricate bonds of faith & friendship, jealousy and understanding, are tested by the birth of an autistic child.

Gamechanger by L.X. Beckett.  Necromancer meets Star Trek Sci-Fi.

Going Dutch by James Gregor.  A directionless grad student finds himself at the center of a bisexual love triangle in this charming Brooklyn rom-com.  Of course his double life must come crashing down, which it does spectacularly.

The grammarians by Cathleen Schine.  At the heart of this comic novel about super-smart, language-obsessed sisters are profound questions about how close two human beings can be.

Haunted house murder by Leslie Meier.  Tricks and treats keep the Halloween spirit alive in coastal Maine, but this year the haunted house theme is getting carried away a little too far.

The institute by Stephen King.  A group of kids with special talents must play along with the rules at the evil institution where they’re being detained or face an even scarier fate.

The last good guy by T. Jefferson Parker.  P.I. Roland Ford hunts for a missing teenager and uncovers a dark conspiracy in his most personal case yet.

The nanny by Gilly Macmillan.  Suspense novel with delicious British suspense tropes on display – rural resentment of the local rich people, closets full of skeletons, shady business dealings, false memories, and fake identities.  Who could ask for more?

Old bones by Douglas Preston.  The story of the ill-fated Donner party has new life in this thrilling blend of archaeology, history, murder, and suspense.

The Oracle by Jonathan Cahn.  A traveler discovers mysteries hidden behind seven locked doors.

The passengers by John Marrs.  In the near future, government-mandated self-driving cars become the norm in Britain – until they prove susceptible to a sophisticated terrorist hack.

Quichotte by Salman Rushdie.  A dazzling Don Quixote for the modern age.

The retreat by Sherri Smith.  This shows the dark side of the self-care and wellness industry with twisting suspense that asks: how well do you really know your friends?

A single thread by Tracy Chevalier.  An immersive, moving story of a woman coming into her own at the dawn of the second World War.

The testaments by Margaret Atwood.  This sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale picks up the story 15 years after Offred stepped into the unknown, with the explosive testaments of 3 female narrators from Gilead.

Thirteen by Steve Cavanagh.  What if the serial killer isn’t on trial but is a member of the jury?

This tender land by William Krueger.  A magnificent novel about 4 orphans on a life-changing odyssey during the Great Depression.

Vendetta in death by J.D. Robb.  Eve Dallas looks into the misdeeds of a wealthy businessman while a vigilante named Lady Justice uses disguises to avenge women who were wronged.

What Rose forgot by Nevada Barr.  A grandmother in her 60s emerges from a mental fog to find she’s trapped in her worst nightmare.

NEW DVDs

Rocketman  (2019) starring Taron Egerton and Jamie Bell

Life in Pieces : the complete first season starring Diane Weist and James Brolin

Summer of ’42 (1971) starring Gary Grimes and Jennifer O’Neill

Zorba the Greek (1964) starring Anthony Quinn and Alan Bates

NONFICTION

All the powers of earth by Sidney Blumenthal.  Lincoln’s incredible ascent to power in a world of chaos is newly revealed through a great biographer’s extraordinary research and literary style.

Audience of one by James Poniewozik.  Donald Trump, television, and the fracturing of America – this is both a fascinating look at the ways TV has changed and shaped the U.S., and a compelling lens through which to look at how we got to 11/8/16.

But where do I put the couch? by Melissa Michaels. 100 REAL decorating FAQs answered.

Country music: an illustrated history by Dayton Duncan.  Lucid, jam-packed, richly illustrated companion to the Ken Burns documentary series. Country music is America’s music – which is to say, music from every culture and ethnicity.

Healing with CBD by Eileen Konieczny.  Learn how cannabidiol can transform your health without the high.

Homegrown by Alex Speier.  The captivating story of the historic 2018 Boston Red Sox, as told through the assembly and ascendancy of their talented young core.

Inconspicuous consumption by Tatiana Schlossberg.  This urgent call to action will empower you to stand up to climate change and environmental pollution by making simple but impactful everyday choices.

My life on the line by Ryan O’Callaghan.  The New England Patriot gives a riveting account of life as a closeted professional athlete against the backdrop of depression and opioid addiction.

100 things to do in Portland, Maine before you die by Robert Witkowski.  Start your engines….  Ready.   Set.   Go!

Talking to strangers by Malcolm Gladwell.  The author offers a powerful examination of our interactions with strangers – and why they often go wrong.

When you find my body by D. Dauphinee.  The disappearance of Geraldine Large on the Appalachian Trail in Maine and the search for her body.

Will my cat eat my eyeballs? by Caitlin Doughty.  A mortician answers real questions from kids about death, dead bodies, and decomposition.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Hannah’s tall order : an A to Z sandwich by Linda Vander Heyden

Lionel and the lion’s share by Lou Peacock

Looking for yesterday by Alison Jay

Miss Jaster’s garden by N M Bodecker

One shoe two shoes by Caryl Hart

The right one for Roderic by Violeta Noy

Where do speedboats sleep at night by Brianna Caplan Sayres

NON-FICTION

Day and night by Crystal Sikkens

Dolphins! : strange and wonderful by Laurence Pringle

The four seasons by Crystal Sikkens

Helen Oxenbury : a life in illustration by Leonard Marcus

The life cycle of a rabbit by Crystal Sikkens

Look, I’m a mathematician

Map and track oceans by Lauren Ishak

Mike Trout by Anthony Hewson

Mookie Betts by Derek Moon

Patrick Mahomes by Kevin Frederickson

Tom Brady by Kevin Frederickson

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Banned Books Week 2019

 

Each year, ALA (American Library Association) celebrates “Banned Books Week”.  This year Banned Books Week is September 22 – 28, though, here in Gardiner, our display is up for the entire month of September.

What is Banned Books Week, you ask?

“Banned Books Week (September 22-28, 2019) is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it spotlights current and historical attempts to censor books in libraries and schools. It brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted for removal or restriction in libraries and schools. By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. “

Above is taken directly from the ALA website.  For those interested in the history of when Banned Books week began, the following link will take you directly to the website. http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/banned

The ALA website has several lists of Banned & Challenged books.  Looking at the list of “Classics”, I see several, many, perhaps even the majority of titles I was required to read in school, as well as books I have read since then.

Of Mice And Men by John Steinbeck and The Catcher In The Rye by J D Salinger have each been banned or challenged over twenty times.  For what reason(s)? is a great question.

Language – vulgar, offensive, profane, racist, foul, and objectionable are the terms used most often.

Other reasons listed are “the violent ending” (Of Mice And Men), “sexual scenes, things concerning moral issues, violence, and anything dealing with the occult” (The Catcher In The Rye), and then, of course the very general “book’s contents”.

As I click my way around the ALA website, there is a page available to see the Top Ten challenges per year.  Over the past ten years, it appears that the majority of challenges are to items geared toward children and teens, though there are several adult titles as well.  The reasons for challenge are similar to those previously mentioned, with the addition of “LGBTQIA+ content”, “stereotypes”, “sexual violence”, “gender identity”, as well as the all-encompassing “unsuited for age group”.

Hmmm . . . .

As a human being, as well as a library employee, I don’t feel that it is my place to tell you or anyone else what they may read, so these lists all just make me shake my head in wonder.

I will say, however, the more someone says “NO” the more I want to do, so let’s all take a chance and read a book that has been Banned or Challenged, just to be different, or difficult!

New Items ~ September 2019

FICTION

The bitterroots by C.J. Box.  The black sheep of an influential family is accused of assault.

Blood of an exile by Brian Naslund.  A page-turning, edge-of-your-seat read that breathes new life into dragon mythology.

Chances are…. by Richard Russo.  A reunion on Martha’s Vineyard reopens old mysteries and wounds for three Vietnam-era college friends.

Contraband by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington is caught in the web of a national smuggling operation.

Costalegre by Courtney Maum.  A wildly imaginative and curiously touching story of a privileged teenager who has everything a girl could want except for a mother who loves her back.

Delayed rays of a star by Amanda Lee Koe.  A dazzling novel following the lives of 3 groundbreaking women – Marlene Dietrich, Anna May Wong, and Leni Riefenstahl – cinema legends who lit up the 20th century.

The escape room by Megan Goldin.  Four young Wall Street rising stars discover the price of ambition when an escape room challenge turns into a lethal game of revenge.

Evvie Drake starts over by Linda Holmes.  In a sleepy seaside town in Maine, an unlikely relationship develops between a young woman who’s lost her husband and a major league pitcher who’s lost his game.

Fleishman is in trouble by Taffy Brodesser-Akner.  Toby Fleishman is forced to confront his own perception of his actions when his ex-wife drops off their kids at his place and disappears.

The favorite daughter by Kaira Rouda.  The perfect home.  The perfect family.  The perfect lie. You never know how far someone will go to keep a family together.

The Gifted School by Bruce Holsinger.  A previously happy group of friends and parents is nearly destroyed by their own competitiveness when an exclusive school for gifted children opens in the community.

The golden hour by Beatriz Williams.  This creates a dazzling epic of WW II-era Nassau – a hotbed of spies, traitors, and the most infamous couple of the age – the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.

The great unexpected by Dan Mooney.  A curmudgeon and his eccentric new roommate join together to plan an epic escape from a nursing home in this charming, poignant tale.

In West Mills by De’Shawn Winslow.  Follows the residents of a black neighborhood in a tiny North Carolina town over the course of several decades.

Labyrinth by Catherine Coulter.  Agents Savich and Sherlock wend their way through a maze of lies to get to the bottom of a secret.

Lady in the lake by Laura Lippman.  In 1966, a housewife becomes a reporter and investigates the killing of a black woman in Baltimore.

The last astronaut by David Wellington.  Sally Jansen is Earth’s last astronaut – and last hope – in this thriller where a mission to make first contact becomes a struggle for survival in the depths of space.

Lost you by Haylen Beck.  Novel of psychological suspense about two women locked in a desperate fight over a child each believes is rightfully hers.

The marriage clock by Zara Raheem.  Starting on the night of her 26th birthday, an Indian woman has just 3 months to find her true love or else she has to allow her parents to arrange her marriage.

The Nickel boys by Colson Whitehead.  Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

One good deed by David Baldacci.  Archer is a straight-talking former WW II soldier fresh out of prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs.  A great mix of contemporary women’s fiction, an old-fashioned friends-to-lovers story, and a big dose of #metoo reading in one fantastic package.

Shamed by Linda Castillo.  A devastating murder exposes an Amish family’s tortured past.

Simply dead by Eleanor Kuhns.   A teenage midwife in Maine goes missing in 1790.

Tell me everything by Cambria Brockman.  A tight group of college friends at a Maine college fight to keep their relationships from splintering under the pressure of secrets.

The turn of the key by Ruth Ware.  A creepy mystery in which a nanny takes a post at a haunted country house.

The unlikely escape of Uriah Heep by H.G. Parry.  The ultimate book-lover’s fantasy, featuring a young scholar with the power to bring literary characters into the world.

Whisper network by Chandler Baker.  A thriller, a murder mystery, and an anthem for any woman who has ever hit a glass ceiling, been the brunt of sexual innuendo, or felt harassed in the workplace.

 NEW MUSIC CDs

The platinum collection: Greatest hits I, II, III    by Queen

Western stars by Bruce Springsteen

No. 6 collaborations project by Ed Sheeran

Rock of ages by Billy Strings

Oklahoma!  (2019 Broadway cast recording)

NONFICTION

Crisis in the red zone by Richard Preston.  More from the author of “The Hot Zone” – the story of the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history and of the outbreaks to come.

Don’t read poetry by Stephanie Burt.  A book about how to read poems.

Last witnesses by Svetlana Alexievich.  From the Nobel Prize-winning writer, here is an oral history of children’s experiences in WW II across Russia.

Leaving the Witness by Amber Scorah.  The author describes her strict upbringing as a third-generation Jehovah’s Witness and her efforts to find her true place in the world apart from the edicts of her family and faith.

On the clock by Emily Guendelsberger.  A bitingly funny, eye-opening story of a college-educated young professional who finds work in the automated and time-starved world of hourly labor.

100 times: a memoir of sexism by Chavisa Woods.  100 personal stories of sexism, harassment, discrimination, and assault – parts of a constant battle ALL women face every day.

Outpost by Dan Richards.  The author visits the far-away places in our world and witnesses the landscapes asking – Why are we drawn to wilderness?  And how do wild places become a space for inspiration and creativity?

The Plaza by Julie Satow.  An unforgettable history of how one illustrious hotel has defined our understanding of money and glamour, from the Gilded Age to the Gog-Go Eighties to today’s Billionaire Row.

Reading behind bars by Jill Grunenwald.  A true story of literature, law, and life as a person librarian.

They called us enemy by George Takei.  A stunning graphic novel recounting the actor/author/activist’s childhood imprisoned within American concentration camps during WW II.  Experience forces that shaped an American icon – and America itself – in this tale of courage, country, loyalty, and love.

Three women by Lisa Taddeo.  The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student, and a restaurant owner.

The volunteer by Jack Fairweather.  True story of a Polish agent who infiltrated Auschwitz, organized a rebellion, and then snuck back out.

We’re still here by Jennifer Silva.  Anyone interested in the lives and motivations of blue-collar workers and their participation in the electoral process should read this.

NEW CHILDREN’S BOOKS

PICTURE BOOKS

Hide and seek by Kate May Green

When Aidan became a brother by Kyle Lukoff

Bunny’s Book Club goes to school by Annie Silvestro

The new kitten by Joyce Carol Oates

My big bad monster by A. N. Kang

No more monsters under your bed! by Jordan Chouteau

Mighty Reader and the Big Freeze by Will Hillenbrand

Clothesline clues to the first day of school by Kathryn Heling

The pigeon has to go to school by Mo Willems

First day of Groot! by Brendan Deneen

The king of kindergarten by Derrick Barnes

Goodbye, friend! Hello, friend by Cori Doerrfeld

Take your pet to school day by Linda Ashman

The teacup café by Patty Farrin

My teacher is a robot by Jeffrey Brown

The school book by Todd Parr

Fancy Nancy: Shoe-la-la! by Victoria Saxon

The best seat in kindergarten by Katharine Kenah

CHAPTER BOOKS

Babymouse : Tales from the locker by Jennifer L. Holm

Curiosity House : The shrunken head by Lauren Oliver

The forgetting spell by Lauren Myracle

MOVIES

The secret life of pets 2 with Harrison Ford

Pokemon : Detective Pikachu by Rob Letterman

A dog’s journey with Marg Helgenberger

Cinderella by Walt Disney

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.